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Greetings from Mammoth Lakes, California

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! We had probably the last hike of our trip this morning (strenuous, past beautiful alpine lakes), and then opted for vegging out by the pool for a change this afternoon. Almost home ...

Bill

0105-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 5 Jan 14, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan DerKazarian,
THEME: Clued In … today’s puzzle refers to the classic board game called Clue, in which we must find a murderer, the weapon used and where the crime was committed. The grid is divided into four quadrants, with circled letters that hint at a suspect, weapon and room where the murder occurred. The circled letters in the final quadrant spell out the who, where and how of the murder, our accusation:
1A. The "who" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : SUSPECT (all hint at “Miss Scarlet”)
40A. Pyrexia : FEVER (as in “scarlet fever”)
44A. Varsity award : LETTER (as in “The Scarlet Letter”)
70a. Colorful bird : TANAGER (as in “scarlet tanager”)

11A. The "where" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : ROOM (all hint at “the lounge”)
55A. Musical notation : REST (synonym of “lounge”)
64A. Lay off : IDLE (synonym of “lounge”)
18D. "Cool it!" : RELAX! (synonym of “lounge”)

73A. The "what" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : WEAPON (all hint at “the rope”)
94A. Opening for a dermatologist? : PORE (anagram of “rope”)
123A. Phone abbr. : OPER (anagram of “rope”)
141A. 2010 film "___ Men" : REPO (anagram of “rope”)

99A. Start of the accusation : MISS SCARLET
113A. Middle of the accusation : IN THE LOUNGE
135A. End of the accusation : WITH THE ROPE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. The "who" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : SUSPECT
Clue is another board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as "Cluedo". Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), a lead pipe (lead piping in the US) and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it's a fabulous game, a must during the holidays ...

22. Photo lab abbr. : ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

23. "M*A*S*H" star : ALDA
Alan Alda had a great television career, especially of course on "M*A*S*H". Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on "M*A*S*H". He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy "Same Time, Next Year" in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

The title of the movie and the TV series "M*A*S*H" has only three stars in it (three asterisks, that is!). These asterisks first appeared on the poster for the 1970 movie, but they were omitted in the opening titles. The TV series went on to use the asterisks from the poster.

24. Midwest capital : TOPEKA
Topeka is the capital of Kansas, and is located on the Kansas River in the northeast of the state. The name “Topeka” was chosen in 1855 and translates from the Kansa and the Ioway languages as “to dig good potatoes”. The reference isn’t to the common potato but rather to the herb known as the prairie potato (also “prairie turnip”), which was an important food for many Native Americans.

25. George's mother on "Seinfeld" : ESTELLE
In "Seinfeld", Jerry's friend George was the son of Frank and Estelle Costanza. George was of course played by Jason Alexander, and the character was loosely based on the show's co-creator Larry David. The name, however, came from Jerry Seinfeld's real-life friend Mike Costanza. George's parents were played by the great Jerry Stiller and Estelle Harris.

27. Part of Caesar's boast : VIDI
The oft-quoted statement "Veni, vidi, vici" ("I came, I saw, I conquered") is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BC and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

31. Textile tool : EVENER
An evener is tool used in the textile industry. The evener regulates the amount of yarn fed into a loom, so that an even amount of yarn is used for each yard of fabric produced.

33. "The Lion King" queen : NALA
In "The Lion King", Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba.

38. Southern terminus of I-35 : LAREDO, TEXAS
Laredo is a city in Texas, situated on the banks of the Rio Grande across the border from Nuevo Laredo in Mexico.

Interstate 35 runs from Laredo, Texas in the south to Duluth, Minnesota in the north.

40. Pyrexia : FEVER
The medical symptom of elevated body temperature is called fever, febrile response or pyrexia.

42. Old Tokyo : EDO
Edo is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today's Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

45. Early Coleco hand-held game : ALIEN ATTACK
The company that we now know as Coleco was founded in 1932 as the Connecticut Leather Company (which became abbreviated to “Coleco”). Coleco’s most famous products are probably video game consoles and Cabbage Patch Kids.

53. The Palins, e.g. : ALASKANS
When John McCain selected Sarah Palin as candidate for Vice President in the 2008 presidential election, she became the first Alaskan to go on the national ticket for a major party. She also became the first woman nominated for Vice President by the Republican Party.

56. ___ bleu : CORDON
Le Cordon Bleu is an education institution focused on hospitality management and the culinary arts. “Le cordon bleu” is French for “the blue ribbon”.

65. MGM symbol : LEO
There has been a lion in the logo of the MGM studio since 1924. The original was an Irishman (!), a lion named Slats who was born in Dublin Zoo in 1919. However, it wasn't until Jackie took over from Slats in 1928 that the roar was heard, as the era of silent movies was coming to an end. The current lion is called Leo, and he has been around since 1957.

66. Orbit competitor : TRIDENT
Trident chewing gum was introduced in 1960, and was marketed as a gum that aided in dental health. The original formula included three enzymes that were thought to soften dental tartar. This trio of enzymes gave rise to the name “Trident”.

67. Bloody Mary stirrer : CELERY
The Bloody Mary is one of my favorite cocktails, perhaps because it seems to taste so different depending on who makes it. It has numerous ingredients above and beyond the requisite vodka and tomato juice, and has been called “the world’s most complex cocktail”.

68. Others, to Ovid : ALIA
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil.

69. Make a boner : ERR
"Boner" is one of those terms that I just don't like because it can be used offensively. "Boner" can be used for a faux pas, an error.

70. Colorful bird : TANAGER
The Scarlet Tanager is a beautiful-looking bird, truly scarlet in color other than its wings and tail. It is in the cardinal family.

71. "Bam!" man : EMERIL
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander's Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous "Bam!" catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

79. Saturnalia : ORGY
Saturnalia was a festival held in Ancient Rome in honor of the god Saturn. It was a week-long celebration of eating, drinking and merriment. One remarkable custom for the festival was the role-reversal that took place in some events, with slaves being waited on by the slave owners.

83. Thing in doubt? : SILENT B
That letter B in the word “doubt” is silent.

93. Wrestling star Lou : ALBANO
Lou Albano was a professional wrestler from the New York area. That said, he was actually born in Italy as his father was studying there towards a medical degree. Lou was baptized in the Vatican.

96. Jungian complex : EGO
Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist. Jung was very much associated with the analysis of dreams.

97. Bordeaux wine : CLARET
“Clairet” is a dark rosé wine. Although it is uncommon today, clairet used to be the most common wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. For centuries now, English consumers have used the derivative term “claret” to describe all red wine from Bordeaux.

98. Some Ivy Leaguers : ELIS
Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

102. ___ girl : VALLEY
The original "valley girls" were the young, middle-class females living in San Fernando Valley in Southern California.

105. Tennis's Petrova : NADIA
Nadia Petrova is a tennis player from Moscow who has ranked third in the world in doubles. Petrova has a good complement of athletic genes as her father was a successful hammer thrower and her mother won an Olympic bronze in the 400m track relay.

109. ___-Cat : SNO
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All "snowcats" are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

112. Classic gaming inits. : NES
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)

122. Sainted archbishop of Canterbury who founded Scholasticism : ANSELM
Anselm was one of the Archbishops of Canterbury (in England) during Medieval times, from 1093 to 1109. As well as holding the important office within the Church, Anselm was an active and respected philosopher. He is often referred to as the founder of scholasticism, a method of learning that reigned in Medieval universities right across Europe for about 400 years.

127. What Lou Gehrig played : FIRST
Lou Gehrig was known as a powerhouse. He was a big hitter and just kept on playing. He broke the record for the most consecutive number of games played, and he stills holds the record for the most career grand slams. His durability earned him the nickname "The Iron Horse". Sadly, he died in 1941 at 37-years-old suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an illness we now call "Lou Gehrig's Disease".

132. 1939 Garland co-star : LAHR
Bert Lahr's most famous role was the cowardly lion in "The Wizard of Oz". Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Lahr also starred in the first US production of Samuel Beckett’s play “Waiting for Godot”, alongside Tom Ewell.

The actress Judy Garland’s real name was Frances Gumm. Garland was respected and loved both within and without the entertainment industry. She was the youngest recipient, at 39 years old, of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in the motion picture industry.

137. Author Kingsley or Martin : AMIS
Kingsley Amis (what a great name!) was a very successful English writer, famous for producing entertaining, comedic novels. His most famous novel probably is his first, "Lucky Jim" published in 1954, although he won a Booker Prize for a later novel, "The Old Devils" published in 1986. He passed on some of his talent through his genes, it seems, as his son Martin Amis is a very successful novelist too.

138. Actor Richard : CRENNA
Actor Richard Crenna's most recognized role was probably that of Colonel Trautman in the first three "Rambo" movies. Crenna wasn't the first person hired to play Trautman. Kirk Douglas accepted the role but walked off the set on the first day of shooting.

140. 1990s-2000s Volkswagen vehicle : EUROVAN
The Volkswagen Transporter T4 was made from 1990 to 2003, and was marketed in North America as the Volkswagen Eurovan.

141. 2010 film "___ Men" : REPO
“Repo Men” is a 2010 sci-fi film starring Jude Law and Forest Whitaker. The movie is based on an Eric Garcia novel called “the Repossession Mambo”, and wasn’t very well received by the critics.

143. Want : YEN
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

144. Director Mack of early slapstick : SENNETT
Mack Sennett was a director and actor noted for innovating slapstick comedies. Sennett used many wild car chases in his movies and went through a lot of custard pies.

Down
1. Chateau ___ Michelle : STE
Chateau Ste. Michelle is a winery in Woodinville, Washington in the Columbia Valley. Chateau Ste. Michelle produces so much Riesling wine that it is the number one Riesling producer in the world in terms of number of bottles.

4. Ballpark fare : PRETZELS
Pretzels originated in Europe and are especially popular in Southern Germany where a pretzel is known as “Brezel”. Pretzels were introduced into the US in the 1800s by immigrants from Germany and Switzerland who came to be known over here as the Pennsylvania Dutch.

12. Tony the Twin : OLIVA
Tony Oliva is a former Major League baseball player who played his whole career for the Minnesota Twins.

14. Its seal has an anchor and a moose : MAINE
Maine is the least densely populated state located east of the Mississippi, and almost 90% of its land is covered with forests. Perhaps that’s why the state’s nickname is “The Pine Tree State” ...

15. Prehistoric menace : PTERODACTYL
The prefixes pter- and ptero- mean "pertaining to a wing, or a feather", coming from the Greek word "pteron" (feather). Examples of use would be in the words "pterosaur" and "pterodactyl".

19. Cub Scouts leader : AKELA
Akela is the wolf in the "Jungle Book". He gave his name to the cubmaster in the scouting movement, now known as “Akela”.

30. It may contain aspartame : DIET SODA
The artificial sweetener called aspartame was discovered by a chemist working for Searle in 1965, but it took 15 years for the company to be granted approval for its sale. I wonder why ...???

32. Starting point? : EDEN
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

36. An ace is a good one : AVIATOR
A flying ace is an aviator who has shot down a number of enemy planes during combat. The qualifying number of kills seems to vary, but five is common. The first use of "ace" was during WWI when the French newspapers dubbed pilot Adolphe Pegoud "l'as" (French for "the ace") when he shot down his fifth German plane.

41. Major part of a tooth : DENTIN
The outer layer of our teeth is made from enamel. This covers the dentin layer, which supports the enamel.

44. Bush who wrote "Spoken From the Heart" : LAURA
Laura Bush, wife of President George W. Bush, had her memoir "Spoken from the Heart" published in 2010. Born Laura Lane Welch, the former First Lady has a Master's degree in Library Science (as does my wife, my own First Lady!). Given that background, it's not surprising that two causes that Laura Bush focused on while in the White House were education and literacy. She established the annual National Book Festival, first held in Washington, D.C. in 2001, after having co-founded the Texas Book Festival in her home state.

47. Basket fiber : ISTLE
Istle is a fiber that is obtained from various tropical plants, including the agave and yucca tree.

48. It's a knockout : ETHER
Ethers are a whole class of organic compounds, but in the vernacular “ether” is specifically diethyl ether. Diethyl ether was once very popular as a general anesthetic.

51. Farrell or Firth : COLIN
Colin Farrell is a film actor from Dublin, Ireland. Farrell made a name for himself playing in action movies such as “Phone Booth”, “S.W.A.T.” and “The Recruit”.

Colin Firth is an English actor who came to prominence playing Mr Darcy in the fabulous television adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” that came out in 1995 (I cannot recommend that six-episode drama enough). More recently, Firth won the Best Actor Oscar for playing King George VI in “The King’s Speech”.

54. Actor William : KATT
The actor William Katt is probably best known as the star of the TV show “The Greatest American Hero”, which ran from 1981 to 1983. William’s mother is the actress Barbara Hale who played Della Street on television’s “Perry Mason”. His father was actor Bill Williams who played the title role in the fifties TV series “The Adventures of Kit Carson”.

61. Bering ___: Abbr. : STR
The Bering Strait lies between Russian and Alaska, and is just below the Arctic Circle. The strait is just 53 miles wide, and only an average of 100-150 feet in depth. It has long been speculated that when sea levels were lower there was a land bridge where the strait is today. This would have allowed humans to walk between Asia and North America, with the assumption being that the original population of the Americas migrated here from Asia.

63. Mr. Onassis : ARI
Aristotle Onassis was born to a successful Greek shipping entrepreneur in Smyrna in modern-day Turkey. However, his family lost its fortune during WWI and so Aristotle worked with his father to build up a new business empire centered on the importation of tobacco. In 1957, Aristotle founded the Greek national airline, what is today called Olympic Air, and he also got into the business of shipping oil around the world. He married Athina Livanos in 1946, the daughter of a wealthy shipping magnate. They had two children, including the famous Christina Onassis. Livanos divorced Onassis on discovering him in bed with the opera singer Maria Callas. Onassis ended his affair with Callas in order to marry Jackie Kennedy in 1968.

73. W.W. II group : WACS
The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was formed in 1942, and the unit was converted to full status the following year to become the Women's Army Corps (WAC). Famously, General Douglas MacArthur referred to the WACs as his "best soldiers", saying they worked harder, complained less and were better disciplined than men. The WACs were disbanded in 1978 and the serving members were integrated into the rest of the army.

74. "___ Enchanted" : ELLA
"Ella Enchanted" is the title of a fantasy novel written by Gail Carson Levine, and published in 1997. It is a retelling of the story of Cinderella, with lots of mythical creatures added. A film adaptation was released in 2004, starring Anne Hathaway in the title role.

76. "Gay" city : PAREE
"Who Said Gay Paree?" is a song from the Cole Porter musical "Can-Can".

77. Pepsi brand : ONE
Pepsi ONE is so called as it has one calorie per eight-ounce serving. The artificial sweetener known as Ace-K was approved by the FDA for use in our food in 1998, and one hour after the approval was given, PepsiCo announced the introduction of Pepsi ONE ...

79. Some German cars : OPELS
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we'd say "estate car" in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

83. "Brave New World" drug : SOMA
In Aldous Huxley’s 1931 masterpiece, “Brave New World”, the members of his future society are encouraged to partake of the drug called soma. The soma provides hangover-free escapes referred to as “holidays”.

There is a speech by Miranda in “The Tempest” by William Shakespeare that is the source for the title of “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley:
O wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in't.

84. Part of U.S.: Abbr. : INIT
Initial (init.)

86. E-commerce site : ETSY
Etsy.com e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

87. Crime buster Eliot : NESS
Eliot Ness was the Treasury agent charged with the task of bringing down the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone. When Ness took on the job in 1930, Chicago law-enforcement agents were renowned for being corrupt, for being on the take. Ness handpicked 50 prohibition agents who he thought he could rely on, later reducing the group to a cadre of 15 and ultimately just 11 trusted men. That group of 11 earned the nickname "The Untouchables", the agents who couldn't be bought.

88. Tic ___ (candy) : TAC
Tic Tacs aren't American candy (as I always mistakenly believed). Tic Tacs are made by the Italian company Ferrero, and were introduced in 1969.

89. Antony's player in "Julius Caesar," 1953 : BRANDO
Marlon Brando won the Oscar for Best Actor for his portrayal of Vito Corleone in the 1972 blockbuster "The Godfather". He turned down the award and didn't attend the ceremony. Instead he sent a Native American rights activist called Sacheen Littlefeather who made a speech protesting the depiction of Native Americans in Hollywood movies. Brando wasn't the first person to refuse an Oscar. George C. Scott did the same thing when he won for playing the title role in 1970's "Patton". Scott just didn't like the whole idea of "competing" with other actors.

The 1953 film “Julius Caesar” is an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play. The movie has an amazing cast including Marlon Brando as Mark Antony, James Mason as Brutus, John Gielgud as Cassius, Edmond O’Brien as Casca, Greer Garson as Calpurnia and Deborah Kerr as Portia.

100. Sauce brand : RAGU
The Ragu brand of pasta sauce is owned by Unilever. The name " Ragù" is the Italian word for a sauce used to dress pasta, however the spelling is off a little. In Italian the word is "Ragù" with a grave accent over the "u", but if you look at a jar of the Unilever sauce, it is spelled "Ragú" on the label, with an acute accent. Sometimes I think we just don't try ...

103. Years abroad : ANNI
“Anni” is Italian for “years”.

107. Coke, for one : FUEL
Coke is coal that has been baked at very high temperatures to drive off volatile constituents such as water, coal-gas and coal tar. The resulting coke looks like coal, but is grey, porous and much lighter.

108. High rails : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

114. In ___ Patris (prayer words) : NOMINE
“In Nomine Patris” translates from Latin as “in the name of the father”.

115. King in "The Little Mermaid" : TRITON
Ariel is the mermaid daughter of the chief merman King Triton in the 1989 Disney feature called “The Little Mermaid”.

116. Grant for filmmaking? : HUGH
The English actor Hugh Grant’s full name is Hugh John Mungo Grant. Grant’s breakthrough came with his leading role in 1994’s “Four Weddings and a Funeral”. That was a fabulous performance. Sadly, I think Grant has basically been playing the same character ever since …

119. Recto's flip side : VERSO
The left and right pages of a book or magazine are known in publishing circles as verso and recto. Recto comes from the Latin for "right", and verso comes from the Latin word for "turned". The idea is that the left side of the page is "turned" and is the reverse of the recto/right side.

124. Coastal raptor : ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

"Raptor" is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

134. Dr.'s order : MRI
A CT (or "CAT") scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful causing damage that is cumulative over time. An MRI on the other hand (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn't like the term "nuclear" because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it's just called MRI.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. The "who" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : SUSPECT
8. "Most ___" ("For sure") : DEF
11. The "where" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : ROOM
15. Not skilled in : POOR AT
21. What you can bring up, in a phrase : THE REAR
22. Photo lab abbr. : ENL
23. "M*A*S*H" star : ALDA
24. Midwest capital : TOPEKA
25. George's mother on "Seinfeld" : ESTELLE
26. Luau dish : POI
27. Part of Caesar's boast : VIDI
28. Thrown out of the country : EXILED
29. Got logged off, in a way : TIMED OUT
31. Textile tool : EVENER
33. "The Lion King" queen : NALA
34. Blows one's mind : AMAZES
37. Ain't right? : ISN’T
38. Southern terminus of I-35 : LAREDO, TEXAS
40. Pyrexia : FEVER
41. Unfrost : DEICE
42. Old Tokyo : EDO
43. Go pfft : FAIL
44. Varsity award : LETTER
45. Early Coleco hand-held game : ALIEN ATTACK
53. The Palins, e.g. : ALASKANS
55. Musical notation : REST
56. ___ bleu : CORDON
57. Tad : BIT
58. Motor coach : AUTOBUS
62. To boot : AT THAT
64. Lay off : IDLE
65. MGM symbol : LEO
66. Orbit competitor : TRIDENT
67. Bloody Mary stirrer : CELERY
68. Others, to Ovid : ALIA
69. Make a boner : ERR
70. Colorful bird : TANAGER
71. "Bam!" man : EMERIL
72. Advance : LEND
73. The "what" of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant : WEAPON
79. Saturnalia : ORGY
83. Thing in doubt? : SILENT B
90. Conned : HAD
93. Wrestling star Lou : ALBANO
94. Opening for a dermatologist? : PORE
95. Running wild : ON A TEAR
96. Jungian complex : EGO
97. Bordeaux wine : CLARET
98. Some Ivy Leaguers : ELIS
99. Start of the accusation : MISS SCARLET
101. Untouched? : SANE
102. ___ girl : VALLEY
104. Firm group: Abbr. : ATTYS
105. Tennis's Petrova : NADIA
106. Like some football teams : DEFENSIVE
108. Fringe : EDGING
109. ___-Cat : SNO
111. Makeshift ballot box : URN
112. Classic gaming inits. : NES
113. Middle of the accusation : IN THE LOUNGE
118. Expressing : CONVEYING
121. Feature of a baseball shutout : NO RUNS
122. Sainted archbishop of Canterbury who founded Scholasticism : ANSELM
123. Phone abbr. : OPER
126. Friend of Franco : AMIGO
127. What Lou Gehrig played : FIRST
132. 1939 Garland co-star : LAHR
133. Home-body? : UMPIRE
135. End of the accusation : WITH THE ROPE
137. Author Kingsley or Martin : AMIS
138. Actor Richard : CRENNA
139. "So that's ___?" : A NO
140. 1990s-2000s Volkswagen vehicle : EUROVAN
141. 2010 film "___ Men" : REPO
142. Greeted the villain : HISSED
143. Want : YEN
144. Director Mack of early slapstick : SENNETT

Down
1. Chateau ___ Michelle : STE
2. Hesitant sounds : UHS
3. Fixed : SET
4. Ballpark fare : PRETZELS
5. More elusive : EELIER
6. Appeases : CALMS
7. Coat rack : TREE
8. A.T.M. offering : DEPOSIT
9. Formally declare : ENOUNCE
10. Move like a butterfly : FLITTER
11. Become entwined : RAVEL
12. Tony the Twin : OLIVA
13. More anomalous : ODDER
14. Its seal has an anchor and a moose : MAINE
15. Prehistoric menace : PTERODACTYL
16. Noughts-and-crosses loser : OOX
17. Have a thought : OPINE
18. "Cool it!" : RELAX!
19. Cub Scouts leader : AKELA
20. Cries of pride : TADAS
30. It may contain aspartame : DIET SODA
32. Starting point? : EDEN
34. Genial : AFFABLE
35. Not so smooth, maybe : MEALIER
36. An ace is a good one : AVIATOR
39. Completely, after "in" : TOTO
41. Major part of a tooth : DENTIN
44. Bush who wrote "Spoken From the Heart" : LAURA
45. ___ to the finish : A RACE
46. "I don't care what they do" : LET ‘EM
47. Basket fiber : ISTLE
48. It's a knockout : ETHER
49. Ordeal : TRIAL
50. Confound : ADDLE
51. Farrell or Firth : COLIN
52. Work, as clay : KNEAD
54. Actor William : KATT
59. Entreat : BEG
60. French article : UNE
61. Bering ___: Abbr. : STR
63. Mr. Onassis : ARI
73. W.W. II group : WACS
74. "___ Enchanted" : ELLA
75. Captain's last order : ABANDON SHIP!
76. "Gay" city : PAREE
77. Pepsi brand : ONE
78. Hardly at all : NOT VERY MUCH
79. Some German cars : OPELS
80. Cartoony clubs : ROLLING PINS
81. React to a loss : GRIEVE
82. "Uh-huh, definitely" : YES YES
83. "Brave New World" drug : SOMA
84. Part of U.S.: Abbr. : INIT
85. Endure : LAST
86. E-commerce site : ETSY
87. Crime buster Eliot : NESS
88. Tic ___ (candy) : TAC
89. Antony's player in "Julius Caesar," 1953 : BRANDO
90. Repressed : HELD IN
91. Inevitability of life : AGEING
92. Result of 91-Down, maybe : DOTAGE
100. Sauce brand : RAGU
103. Years abroad : ANNI
107. Coke, for one : FUEL
108. High rails : ELS
109. Having no direction, in math : SCALAR
110. Generic : NO-NAME
113. Sort of : IN A WAY
114. In ___ Patris (prayer words) : NOMINE
115. King in "The Little Mermaid" : TRITON
116. Grant for filmmaking? : HUGH
117. Cybermemos : E-NOTES
119. Recto's flip side : VERSO
120. Slangy denials : NOPES
124. Coastal raptor : ERNE
125. Scanned : READ
127. Bit of office greenery : FERN
128. Unyielding : IRON
129. Go all over : ROVE
130. Tiff : SPAT
131. Backpack item : TENT
134. Dr.'s order : MRI
136. Cry's partner : HUE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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