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Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

0119-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Jan 14, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Olden Goldies … each of today’s themed answers is a GOLDEN OLDIE song title, but with the sound of the start of two words swapped, in the style of Dr. Spooner:
23A. Traffic cop's answer upon being asked "Describe your job"? [1975] : I CITE THE WRONGS (from “I Write the Songs”)
32A. Post-tornado highway detritus, perhaps? [1974] : RAFTER IN THE LANE (from “Laughter in the Rain”)
50A. Remark about a female stoner? [1980] : SHE'S SO HIGH (from “He’s So Shy”)
72A. Roast pig after a pig roast? [1956] : DOWNED HOG (from “Hound Dog”)
89A. Napa Valley excursion, maybe? [1963] : FUN WINE DAY (from “One Fine Day”)
108A. Data request from a good ol' furnace repairman? [1953] : YOUR HEATIN’ CHART (from “Your Cheatin’ Heart”)
122A. Frontiersman awakening in a foul mood? [1969] : MAD BOONE RISING (from “Bad Moon Rising”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Egyptian resurrection symbol : SCARAB
Scarabs were amulets in ancient Egypt. Scarabs were modelled on the dung beetle, as it was viewed as a symbol of the cycle of life.

23. Traffic cop's answer upon being asked "Describe your job"? [1975] : I CITE THE WRONGS (from “I Write the Songs”)
Even though he writes a lot of songs, Barry Manilow didn’t write his 1976 chart topper “I Write the Songs”. That was composed by Bruce Johnston in 1975 and first recorded by the Captain & Tennille.

27. Fictional user of a 21-Across : AHAB
(21A. Weapon for 27-Across : HARPOON)
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly Captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville's "Moby Dick".

28. Follower of A, B or AB, informally : NEG
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a "universal donor".

32. Post-tornado highway detritus, perhaps? [1974] : RAFTER IN THE LANE (from “Laughter in the Rain”)
“Laughter in the Rain” is a song written and recorded by Neil Sedaka that topped the charts in 1975.

36. Scarlett's sister-in-law and best friend in "Gone With the Wind" : MELANIE
Melanie Hamilton is a character in Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone with the Wind”. Melanie is portrayed by Olivia de Havilland in the famous 1939 big screen adaptation of the novel.

39. Inter ___ : ALIA
Inter alia means "among other things" in Latin.

43. Big inits. in health products : GNC
General Nutrition Centers (GNC) is a retailer of health and nutrition supplements based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

48. Chemical compounds in tea : TANNINS
A substance that is astringent is a chemical compound that tends to shrink or constrict body tissues. Some red wines can have an astringent taste, a dry and puckering feeling, because of the presence of tannins. Tannins occur naturally in plants, probably as a defensive measure against predators who shy away from the astringent. The word "tannin" comes from an Old German word for oak or fir tree, as in "Tannenbaum".

50. Remark about a female stoner? [1980] : SHE'S SO HIGH (from “He’s So Shy”)
“He’s So Shy” is a 1980 hit for the Pointer Sisters. Although the title is reminiscent of the 1963 hit for the Chiffons called “He’s So Fine”, there is no relationship between the two numbers.

56. Cracker brand : RITZ
I've always liked Ritz crackers. They've been around since 1934 when they were introduced by Nabisco. The name Ritz was chosen because the marketing folks felt that the association with Ritz-Carlton would evoke images of wealth and the high life.

63. British heads : LOOS
In old sailing ships the toilet area for the regular sailors was located in the forward part (the head) of the ship, hence the term "head" that has been used since then for any toilet on board a boat.

65. Jour's opposite : NUIT
In French, the day (jour) is the opposite of the night (nuit).

67. Familia members : TIAS
In Spanish, aunts (tias) are members of the family (familia).

72. Roast pig after a pig roast? [1956] : DOWNED HOG (from “Hound Dog”)
The Elvis Presley classic “Hound Dog” was a big hit, but his wasn’t the first version of the song to make it to number one in the charts. Presley released “Hound Dog” in 1956, but Big Mama Thornton had brought the song to the top spot back in 1953.

79. Base figs. : NCOS
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

81. ___' Pea : SWEE
Originally Popeye used the nickname "Swee'pea" to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye's doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him "Swee'Pea".

86. Moolah : KALE
Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dinero, dough and moola (also moolah) are all slang terms for money.

89. Napa Valley excursion, maybe? [1963] : FUN WINE DAY (from “One Fine Day”)
“One Fine Day” is a song written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin that was a 1963 hit for the Chiffons. The title of the song was inspired by the famous aria “Un bel di” (“One Fine Day”) from Puccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly”.

94. R&B's ___ Hill : DRU
Dru Hill is an R&B singing group from Baltimore, Maryland. Dru Hill was formed in 1992, and is still going strong today. The name “Dru Hill” comes from Druid Hill Park which is found on the west side of Baltimore.

97. Pulitzer-winning novelist Jennifer : EGAN
Jennifer Egan is an author who grew up in San Francisco. Egan’s 2010 novel “A Visit from the Goon Squad” won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Actually, “A Visit from the Goon Squad” is structured in such a way that it is sometimes described as a collection of linked short stories.

98. Java : JOE
It seems that no one really knows why we refer to coffee as "joe", but we've been doing so since early in WWII.

Back in 1850, the name "java" was given to a type of coffee grown on the island of Java, and the usage of the term spread from there.

100. Displayed for scoring, as in gin rummy : MELDED
Gin rummy is a variant of the slower game of standard rummy and was introduced in 1909 by one Elwood Baker and his son.

101. Santa ___, Calif. : ROSA
Santa Rosa is the largest city in California's Wine Country, and the county seat of Sonoma County. The epicenter of the so-called 1906 San Francisco Earthquake was located near Santa Rosa, so there was actually more damage in Santa Rosa, for the size of the city, than there was in San Francisco.

103. Ghana neighbor : TOGO
Togo is a country on the West African coast, located between Ghana to the west and Benin to the east.

The name "Ghana" means "warrior king" in the local language. The British established a colony they called Gold Coast in 1874, later to become Ghana, as part of the scramble by Europeans to settle as much of Africa as they could. One of Ghana's most famous sons is Kofi Annan, the diplomat who served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007.

108. Data request from a good ol' furnace repairman? [1953] : YOUR HEATIN’ CHART (from “Your Cheatin’ Heart”)
“Your Cheatin’ Heart” is a country song that was written and recorded by Hank Williams in 1952. The “cheatin’ heart” referred to by Williams is his first wife Audrey Sheppard. Audrey and Hank had a turbulent marriage that came to an end with mutual claims of infidelity.

112. Regatta racer : YACHT
The word "regatta" is Venetian dialect and was originally used to describe boat races among the gondoliers of Venice on the Grand Canal back in the mid-1600s.

117. Roulette, e.g. : JEU
“Jeu” is the French word for “game”.

The name "roulette" means "little wheel" in French, and the game as we know it today did in fact originate in Paris, in 1796.

122. Frontiersman awakening in a foul mood? [1969] : MAD BOONE RISING (from “Bad Moon Rising”)
Daniel Boone was a pioneer and folk hero. For frontiersman Boone, the frontier was what we now call the state of Kentucky. He led the building of the Wilderness Road through the famous Cumberland Gap in the Appalachians, a route subsequently taken by hundreds of thousands of migrants into Kentucky. Boone fought in the Revolutionary War with distinction, and after the war returned to Kentucky and got himself into land speculation. He became mired in debt, forcing him to emigrate to Missouri to settle down on land that was at that time owned by the French. It was there that he spent the last decades of his life.

“Bad Moon Rising” is a song recorded by Creedence Clearwater Revival. Written by band member John Fogerty, the song was inspired by the composer watching the hurricane scene in the movie “The Devil and Daniel Webster”.

126. About whom Nabokov said "She was like the composition of a beautiful puzzle - its composition and its solution at the same time" : LOLITA
Vladimir Nabokov's novel "Lolita" has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man's obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl. Although "Lolita" is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. "Lolita" became the first book since "Gone with the Wind" to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

128. Marcos who collected shoes : IMELDA
Imelda Marcos is the widow of former Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos, and is a former politician in her own right. Imelda fled the Philippines with her husband and family in 1986, ending up in exile in Hawaii. She was allowed to return in 1991, and set up residence in an apartment block in Manila. One of my personal claims to fame is that I lived for two years in an apartment block right next door to Imelda Marcos when I lived in Manila …

129. Rendezvous : TRYSTS
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

131. Some Civil War shots : SEPIAS
Sepia is that lovely rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. "Sepia" is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish.The "sepia tone" of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

Down
1. Long pitch : SPIEL
A spiel is a lengthy speech or argument designed to persuade, like a sales pitch. "Spiel" comes to us from German, either directly ("spiel" is the German for "play") or via the Yiddish "shpil".

2. Dragon fruit plants : CACTI
The fruit of several species of cactus is called a pitaya or dragon fruit. Dragon fruit is edible, although one only eats the flesh inside the skin.

3. Generating some buzz? : APIAN
“Apis” is the Latin for “bee”.

4. Templeton, e.g., in "Charlotte's Web" : RAT
"Charlotte's Web" is a children's novel by author E. B. White. Charlotte is a barn spider, who manages to save the life of a pig named Wilbur. Wilbur is a pet pig, owned by the farmer's daughter, Fern Arable. The story also includes a gluttonous rat called Templeton who provides some light and comical moments.

6. Setting for David's "The Death of Marat" : BATH
Jean-Paul Marat was a prominent figure in the French Revolution. Marat was famously murdered in his bath by a young woman called Charlotte Corday who was a Royalist. The gruesome event was immortalized in a celebrated painting by Jacques-Louis David called “The Death of Marat”.

7. Everything being considered : SHEBANG
The word "shebang" is probably a derivative of "shebeen", an Irish word for a "speakeasy", where liquor was drunk and sold illegally. In English "shebang" was originally a "hut" or a "shed". Just how this evolved into the expression "the whole shebang", meaning “everything”, is unclear.

8. Bray part : HAW
“Hee-haw” brayed the donkey
.
9. Hockey great whose name is a homophone of 88-Across and 123- and 124-Down : ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn't skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

15. ___ nous : ENTRE
"Entre nous" is French for "between us".

16. Supposed ancestor of Dracula : ATTILA
According to the Bram Stoker novel, Count Dracula claims to be descended from Attila the Hun.

In his day, Attila the Hun was the most feared enemy of the Roman Empire, until he died in 453 AD. Attila was the leader of the Hunnic Empire of central Europe and was famous for invading much of the continent. However, he never directly attacked Rome.

"Dracula" is a novel written by the Irish author Bram Stoker, and first published in 1897. Dracula wasn't the first vampire of literature, but he certainly was the one who spawned the popularity of vampires in theater, film and television, and indeed more novels. Personally, I can't stand vampire fiction ...

17. Spotted horse : PIEBALD
A piebald (or pied) horse is one with dark patches on a white background. A skewbald horse on the other hand is dark with white patches.

18. Big name in TV talk : ARSENIO
Arsenio Hall got his big break with his role in "Coming to America" with Eddie Murphy in 1988. The following year he started hosting "The Arsenio Hall Show", which ran until 1994. He had a loyal group of fans that had the habit of almost "barking" while pumping their fists in the air. The move became so popular it extended far beyond the influences of Arsenio, and to this day can be seen performed as a mark of appreciation. Not by me, mind you ...

24. ___-kiri : HARA
"Harakiri" translates from Japanese into "cutting the belly", and is a form of ritual suicide. Harakiri is the term used in speech which is equivalent to "seppuku", the term used in writing for the same ritual suicide. The act is carried out by plunging a short blade into the belly and moving it from left to right, slicing through the organs within the abdomen.

29. Old "From one beer lover to another" sloganeer : STROH’S
Bernard Stroh was the son of a German brewer. Stroh immigrated to the US in 1848 and set up his own brewery in 1850 in Detroit. Years later, the Stroh Brewing Company introduced a European process called fire-brewing. This results in higher temperatures at a crucial stage in the brewing process, supposedly bringing out flavor. Stroh's is the only American beer that still uses this process.

31. Fed : T-MAN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (the “T” stands for Treasury).

35. iPod model : NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

37. Name that starts a well-known "ism" : LENIN
“Lenin” wasn’t the birth name of the Russian leader. He was born Vladimir Ulyanov, and originally took the name Lenin as a pen name.

41. Backless seat for one : TABORET
A taboret (also “tabouret”) is a type of stool, one without a back or arms. “Tabouret” is the diminutive of the Old French word “tabour” meaning “drum”, a reference to the stool’s resemblance to the instrument.

45. Space cadet : DITZ
The expression "space cadet" is used to describe someone who is eccentric and disconnected with reality. It may even imply that the person is a user of hallucinogens. The phrase has been around since the sixties, and could be derived from the science fiction TV show "Tom Corbett, Space Cadet", which aired in the fifties.

53. Warren ___, baseball's winningest lefty : SPAHN
Warren Spahn was a left-handed pitcher, who won 363 games, more than any other left-handed pitcher in history. The Warren Spahn Award has been presented annually by the Oklahoma Sports Museum since 1999.

57. Jerusalem's Mount ___ : ZION
Mount Zion is a hill in Jerusalem that his home to a number of important sites including King David’s Tomb, the Room of the Last Supper and the Chamber of the Holocaust. The Catholic cemetery on Mount Zion is also where Oskar Schindler was buried, the German national who saved over 1,000 Jews during the Holocaust.

60. "Truthiness," e.g., before Stephen Colbert : NON-WORD
Stephen Colbert is a political satirist who hosts his own show on Comedy Central called "The Colbert Report". Colbert's first love was theater, and so he studied to become an actor. He then moved into comedy, and ended up on the "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart". He left "The Daily Show" in 2005 to set up his own spin-off called "The Colbert Report". In his own inimitable way, Colbert likes to use a "French" pronunciation for the name of his show, so "The Colbert Report" comes out as "The Col-bear Rep-oar".

61. Etiologist's study : DISEASE
In general terms, etiology is the study of causes and origination. In the world of medicine, etiology is the study of the factors that cause an illness.

64. Line in writing : SERIF
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif (using the French word "sans" meaning "without"). Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I'm not so sure though ...

66. Shopper in the juniors section, maybe : TWEEN
The term "tween" is now used to describe preadolescence, the years between 10 and 12 years of age.

71. "Side by Side by Sondheim," e.g. : REVUE
“Revue” is the French word for “review”.

73. Mass gathering site : NAVE
In large, Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, where most of the faithful are seated.

77. Leader after Mao : DENG
Deng Xiaoping was the Paramount Leader of the People’s Republic of China from 1978 to 1992. It was Deng Xiaoping who is given the credit for setting policies that led to China’s current economic boom. He moved the country towards a market economy and opened the borders to allow foreign investment.

90. Trying to break a tie, say : IN OT
In overtime (O.T.)

91. Spa class : YOGA
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

93. "Lohengrin" lass : ELSA
"Lohengrin" is a very popular opera by Richard Wagner, first performed in 1850. Many arias from "Lohengrin" are staples on "Opera's Greatest Hits" collections.

We've often heard the "Bridal Chorus" from Richard Wagner's opera "Lohengrin". It's the tune to "Here comes the bride ...", which is played regularly at the start of wedding ceremonies as the bride walks down the aisle. In the opera, the "Bridal Chorus" is sung not at the start of the ceremony but afterwards, by the women of the wedding party as they accompany newlywed Elsa to the bridal chamber.

102. Stella ___ (beer) : ARTOIS
The Belgian beer Stella Artois is named for the brewer Sebastianus Artois. Artois was the master brewer at the Den Horen Brewery in Leuven, Belgium in the early 1700s. The Den Horen Brewery has been around at least since 1366 … yes, 1366!

104. 1997 Demi Moore title role : GI JANE
G.I. Joe was the original "action figure", the first toy to carry that description. G.I. Joe first hit the shelves in 1964. There have been a few movies based on the G.I. Joe figure, but, more famous than all of them I would say is the 1997 movie "G.I. Jane" starring Demi Moore in the title role. I think this movie had some potential, to be honest, but it really did not deliver in the end.

109. Singer John with the 1988 title track "Slow Turning" : HIATT
John Hiatt is a rock guitarist and singer-songwriter from Indianapolis.

110. "Cómo ___?" : ESTAS
“Cómo estas?” is Spanish for “how are you?”

111. Like beef for fondue : CUBED
“Fondu(e)” is the French word for “melted”.

113. Dish in a bowl : CHILI
The full name of the dish that is often called simply "chili" is "chili con carne", Spanish for "peppers with meat". The dish was first created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

114. Odyssey maker : HONDA
The honda Odyssey is a minivan that been around since 1994.

115. Features of much Roman statuary : TOGAS
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a "stola".

119. Georgia O'Keeffe subject : IRIS
Georgia O'Keeffe was an influential American artist, one who led the introduction of American art into Europe. Famously, she was married to photographer Alfred Stieglitz who helped develop her career in the early days. Georgia O'Keeffe's last home was in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she had done a lot of her work during her lifetime. She died there in 1986, at the ripe old age of 98. One of her most famous paintings is from 1926, called "Black Iris III".

122. Gullet : MAW
“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.
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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Egyptian resurrection symbol : SCARAB
7. Ought to have, informally : SHOULDA
14. "Come on, help me out" : BE A PAL
20. Tropical juice type : PAPAYA
21. Weapon for 27-Across : HARPOON
22. Total : ENTIRE
23. Traffic cop's answer upon being asked "Describe your job"? [1975] : I CITE THE WRONGS (from “I Write the Songs”)
25. Certify : ATTEST
26. Fraternity letter : ETA
27. Fictional user of a 21-Across : AHAB
28. Follower of A, B or AB, informally : NEG
29. Positions in old monasteries : SCRIBES
30. Like some rollers after use : LINTY
32. Post-tornado highway detritus, perhaps? [1974] : RAFTER IN THE LANE (from “Laughter in the Rain”)
36. Scarlett's sister-in-law and best friend in "Gone With the Wind" : MELANIE
38. Brand : SEAR
39. Inter ___ : ALIA
40. Chilling : AT EASE
43. Big inits. in health products : GNC
44. Hub : NODE
47. Speck : DOT
48. Chemical compounds in tea : TANNINS
50. Remark about a female stoner? [1980] : SHE'S SO HIGH (from “He’s So Shy”)
55. Epitome of simplicity : ABC
56. Cracker brand : RITZ
58. Lose it : SNAP
59. DNA structure : STRANDS
63. British heads : LOOS
65. Jour's opposite : NUIT
67. Familia members : TIAS
69. Get closer : ZERO IN
70. Repeated cry accompanying a gavel hit : ORDER
72. Roast pig after a pig roast? [1956] : DOWNED HOG (from “Hound Dog”)
75. Stressed : TENSE
76. Fume : SEE RED
78. Close : NEAR
79. Base figs. : NCOS
81. ___' Pea : SWEE
82. Attempts : STRIVES
84. "If I ___ ..." : EVER
86. Moolah : KALE
88. See 9-Down : OAR
89. Napa Valley excursion, maybe? [1963] : FUN WINE DAY (from “One Fine Day”)
92. Sundry : DIVERSE
94. R&B's ___ Hill : DRU
97. Pulitzer-winning novelist Jennifer : EGAN
98. Java : JOE
100. Displayed for scoring, as in gin rummy : MELDED
101. Santa ___, Calif. : ROSA
103. Ghana neighbor : TOGO
106. Yes-men : AGREERS
108. Data request from a good ol' furnace repairman? [1953] : YOUR HEATIN’ CHART (from “Your Cheatin’ Heart”)
112. Regatta racer : YACHT
116. Believer in a strong centralized government : STATIST
117. Roulette, e.g. : JEU
118. On the job : AT IT
120. "Yoo-___" : HOO!
121. Not bankrupt : AFLOAT
122. Frontiersman awakening in a foul mood? [1969] : MAD BOONE RISING (from “Bad Moon Rising”)
126. About whom Nabokov said "She was like the composition of a beautiful puzzle - its composition and its solution at the same time" : LOLITA
127. Teed off : ANGERED
128. Marcos who collected shoes : IMELDA
129. Rendezvous : TRYSTS
130. Lawn care tools : WEEDERS
131. Some Civil War shots : SEPIAS

Down
1. Long pitch : SPIEL
2. Dragon fruit plants : CACTI
3. Generating some buzz? : APIAN
4. Templeton, e.g., in "Charlotte's Web" : RAT
5. Words stated with a salute : AYE AYE,SIR
6. Setting for David's "The Death of Marat" : BATH
7. Everything being considered : SHEBANG
8. Bray part : HAW
9. Hockey great whose name is a homophone of 88-Across and 123- and 124-Down : ORR
10. Barely ahead : UP ONE
11. Recluses : LONERS
12. Pup : DOGGIE
13. True or false: Abbr. : ANS
14. Sun spot : BEACH
15. ___ nous : ENTRE
16. Supposed ancestor of Dracula : ATTILA
17. Spotted horse : PIEBALD
18. Big name in TV talk : ARSENIO
19. "Dig in!" : LET'S EAT!
24. ___-kiri : HARA
29. Old "From one beer lover to another" sloganeer : STROH’S
31. Fed : T-MAN
33. Dive shop rentals : FINS
34. PC whizzes : TECHS
35. iPod model : NANO
37. Name that starts a well-known "ism" : LENIN
40. Speechless : AT A LOSS
41. Backless seat for one : TABORET
42. Secret language device : ENCODER
45. Space cadet : DITZ
46. Marsh hunter : EGRET
49. Bit of jewelry : STUD
51. Input : ENTERED
52. Stated : SAID
53. Warren ___, baseball's winningest lefty : SPAHN
54. Flock : sheep :: drove : ___ : HARES
57. Jerusalem's Mount ___ : ZION
60. "Truthiness," e.g., before Stephen Colbert : NON-WORD
61. Etiologist's study : DISEASE
62. Had a haughty reaction : SNEERED
64. Line in writing : SERIF
66. Shopper in the juniors section, maybe : TWEEN
68. What may not come out in the wash? : SOCK
71. "Side by Side by Sondheim," e.g. : REVUE
73. Mass gathering site : NAVE
74. Push : GOAD
77. Leader after Mao : DENG
80. Guck : SLIME
83. Try to hit, as a fly : SWAT AT
85. Indian head : RAJAH
87. Like clockwork : EVERY TIME
90. Trying to break a tie, say : IN OT
91. Spa class : YOGA
93. "Lohengrin" lass : ELSA
94. Cure, in a way : DRY SALT
95. Support : ROOT FOR
96. As a rule : USUALLY
99. To-dos : ERRANDS
102. Stella ___ (beer) : ARTOIS
104. 1997 Demi Moore title role : GI JANE
105. Jittery : ON EDGE
107. Cigar butt? : -ETTE
109. Singer John with the 1988 title track "Slow Turning" : HIATT
110. "Cómo ___?" : ESTAS
111. Like beef for fondue : CUBED
113. Dish in a bowl : CHILI
114. Odyssey maker : HONDA
115. Features of much Roman statuary : TOGAS
119. Georgia O'Keeffe subject : IRIS
122. Gullet : MAW
123. See 9-Down : ORE
124. See 9-Down : O’ER
125. Pennant race mo. : SEP


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

5 comments :

Peter A said...

Pretty feeble theme imo. Like "rafter in the lane" for one

Kevin Quinn said...

Hello Bill,

I hate to nit-pick typos, but...
In your comments for 119-D, you have Georgia O'keeffe living to The ripe old age of 1986(!) (does that make her a "kilo- nonacento-octagenerian" or something like that?)

I thought Methuselah had a decent run at 969 candles on his birthday cake! :)

Oh well... At least you have the correct "98" floating in the middle of that figure. Just lop off the one and the six, then no one can accuse you of the faux-pas of over stating a lady's age. :)

Thanks for your response to my last message, btw, always nice to get your feedback on the puzzle constructors.

Ciao for now, (hey, that rhymes!)


-Kevin Quinn

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Kevin.

There are two axioms that get me every time:

- More haste, less speed
- Never be your own editor

Thank for spotting the typo. I really do need the help :)

Kevin Quinn said...

Alright, just one more...

Makes Bilbo Baggins' "eleventy-first" birthday party seem like a baby shower! :)

Ok, That's all I've got...

(sorry, couldn't resist)

Cheers,

-Kevin Quinn

Bill Butler said...

Oh, Kevin. Kevin, Kevin, Kevin ...

:o)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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