Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

Vacation Alert

I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0227-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 14, Thursday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Stanley Newman
THEME: Bar Sign … the themed answers give us the text that might be seen on a (whimsical) sign at a neighborhood bar:
15A. Sign at a neighborhood bar, part 1 : DON'T TALK ABOUT
24A. Part 2 of the sign : YOURSELF - WE
48A. Part 3 of the sign : WILL DO THAT
58A. End of the sign : AFTER YOU LEAVE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Orville Wright or Neil Armstrong : OHIOAN
Wilbur was the older of the two Wright brothers, and he was born in 1867 in Millville, Indiana. By the time that Orville was born in 1871, the family was living in Dayton, Ohio. The Wrights spent a few years of their youth back in Richmond, Indiana, before settling in Dayton for the rest of their lives. The brothers both died in Dayton; Wilbur in 1912 and Orville in 1948.

Neil Armstrong was the most private of individuals. You didn't often see him giving interviews, unlike so many of the more approachable astronauts of the Apollo space program. His famous, "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind" statement; that was something that he came up with himself while Apollo 11 was making its way to the moon.

14. ___ Avenue (Mets' community website) : AMAZIN’
There is an online community of New York Mets fans called Amazin’ Avenue (at AmazinAvenue.com). Presumably the website is named for the Amazin’ Mets, the 1969 team that won the World Series.

18. Server of Duff Beer to Homer Simpson : MOE
Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender in "The Simpson" animated TV show. I don't really care for "The Simpsons", but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the character ... him I like.

19. Dry Idea alternative : ARRID
Arrid is an antiperspirant deodorant brand introduced in the thirties. Slogans associated with Arrid have been "Don't be half-safe - use Arrid to be sure", "Stress stinks! Arrid works!" and "Get a little closer".

Dry Idea is a range of personal care products that is now produced by the Dial Corporation. One of Dry Idea’s more famous taglines is “Never let them see you sweat”.

33. Play a round : GOLF
There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

35. General Motors subsidiary : OPEL
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we'd say "estate car" in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

37. Artist known as either Jean or Hans : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

40. Gatsby-era hairstyles : BOBS
A "bob cut" is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s a "bob" was the name given to a horse's tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their "mop tops", with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women's hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it ...

"The Great Gatsby" is the 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, that tells of the prosperous life of Jay Gatsby during the Roaring 20s. Gatsby develops an obsessive love for Daisy Fay Buchanan, a girl he met while serving during WWI, and meets again some years later after he has improved his social standing.

42. Some Coleridge colleagues : ODISTS
Samuel Taylor Coleridge was a pioneer for the Romantic Movement in England, along with his friend William Wordsworth. Coleridge’s most famous works are “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “Kubla Khan”, my wife’s favorite poem.

52. Alliance HQ'd near the White House : OAS
The Organization of American States (OAS) has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. All the independent states in the Americas are members of the group except Honduras, which had its membership suspended after the country's 2009 coup.

53. Key molecule for protein synthesis : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

55. Adams of "American Hustle" : AMY
Amy Adams is an American actress. although she was actually born in Vicenza, Italy. My favorite film of hers so far is the outstanding "Julie & Julia" in which she acted alongside Meryl Streep. I highly recommend this truly delightful movie.

"American Hustle" is a 2013 movie with a plotline that is loosely based on the famous FBI ABSCAM sting of the late seventies and early eighties. The film stars Christian Bale and Amy Adams as two con artists who are forced to work with an FBI agent played by Bradley Cooper.

The FBI set up a sting operation in 1978, eventually targeting corruption within Congress. Central to the "scam" was a front company called "Abdul Enterprises, Ltd", giving the whole operation the nickname "Abscam". At the end of the say, one senator and five House members were convicted of bribery and conspiracy. Kraim Abdul Rahman was the fictional sheik that gave "his" name to the front company.

61. Epicurean explorer : FOODIE
An epicure is a gourmet, one who appreciates fine food and drink in particular. The term is derived from the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus.

62. "Anything Goes" composer : PORTER
"Anything Goes" is a musical by Cole Porter, and tells of the goings on aboard an ocean liner sailing from New York to London. Some of the famous songs from the show are "Anything Goes", "You're the Top", "I Get a Kick Out of You" as well as "The Gypsy in Me".

Cole Porter was a little unusual amongst his peers in that he was one of the few successful songwriters who wrote both lyrics and musics for his compositions. Porter was seriously injured in a riding accident when in his forties and was left disabled and in pain. Despite this, he continued to work and produced his most successful work after the accident.

63. U.S.O. Care Package recipients : TROOPS
The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of FDR "to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces". A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

Down
3. "Hit 'em where they ___" : AIN'T
The phrase “Keep your eye clear, and hit ‘em where they ain’t” is advice that was first given by professional baseball player Willie Keeler. Keeler played from 1892 to 1910, mainly for the Baltimore Orioles, Brooklyn Superbas and New York Highlanders.

6. Hardest substance in the human body : ENAMEL
Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

8. Org. offering group practice membership : AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

9. Ring of rebels : CABAL
A cabal is a small group of secret plotters, perhaps scheming against a government or an individual.

10. Columbus stopping point of 1493 : AZORES
The Azores is an archipelago of nine volcanic islands in the North Atlantic lying about 1,000 miles west of Portugal. The Azores are an autonomous region belonging to Portugal.

Christopher Columbus made four voyages of discovery to the Americas. The first voyage, of 1492-1493, took Columbus and his crew to several islands in the Caribbean including Cuba. His return to Europe was via the Azores, specifically the island of Santa Maria.

11. Active when the sun shines : DIURNAL
A diurnal animal is active during the day, whereas a nocturnal animal is active at night.

17. Pre-Columbian civilization : MAYA
The Maya civilization held sway in Central America and Mexico from about 350 AD until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.

The pre-Columbian era is that period in the history of the Americas before the Europeans really made their presence known. “Pre-Columbian” implies “before 1492, before the voyages of Christopher Columbus”.

25. Many a tune in "The Sting" : RAG
Ragtime music was at the height of it popularity in the early 1900s. It takes its name from its characteristic "ragged" rhythms. The most famous ragtime composer was Scott Joplin, who had a big hit with his "Maple Leaf Rag" when it was published in 1899. He followed that up with a string of hits, including the "Pine Apple Rag" (sic). Ragtime fell out of favor about 1917 when the public turned to jazz. It had a resurgence in the forties when jazz musicians started to include ragtime tunes in their repertoires. But it was the 1973 movie "The Sting" that brought the true revival, as the hit soundtrack included numerous ragtime tunes by Scott Joplin, including the celebrated "The Entertainer" originally published in 1902.

"The Entertainer" is a piano rag from the very early 1900s that was written by Scott Joplin. "The Entertainer" regained its popularity in the 1970s when it was chosen as the theme music for the marvelous film “The Sting”. The ragtime score in “The Sting” was a bit of an anachronism, as the popularity of ragtime music had waned by the 1930s, the era in which the film was set.

34. Patriot Act enforcer : FBI
The USA PATRIOT Act was signed into law in 2001 soon after the September 11th terrorist attacks. The name of the act is actually an acronym, standing for “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism”.

37. Locale of three Summer Olympics : ASIA
So far three Summer Olympics have been held in Asia:
- Tokyo, Japan in 1964
- Seoul, South Korea in 1988
- Beijing, China in 2008

44. Suede source : TANNERY
Leather is of course made from animal skins. When the flesh, fat and hair is removed from the skin and it is dried, the resulting product is called “rawhide”. An additional treatment of the skin with chemicals that permanently alter the protein structure of the skin is called “tanning”, and the resulting product is “leather”.

Suede is leather made from the underside of the skin, mainly from a lamb. As such it is very soft, although not as durable as leather made from the exterior skin. The soft leather was, and is still used for making gloves. Back in 1859 these gloves were called "gants de Suede" in France, or "gloves of Sweden". So, the name "suede" comes from the French word for Sweden.

51. Belief : CREDO
“Credo” is the Latin word for "I believe", and we use it in English as an alternate for “creed”.

57. "In time we ___ that which we often fear": Shak. : HATE
"In time we hate that which we often fear" is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “Antony and Cleopatra”.

"Antony and Cleopatra" is one of William Shakespeare's tragedies, telling the story of the relationship between Mark Antony and Cleopatra after the death of Julius Caesar.

59. Cut in the direction of the grain : RIP
In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special rip saw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

60. Christie's offering : LOT
Christie’s is an auction house based in London, the largest auction house in the world. The business was founded in 1766 by James Christie.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pretty hard to find : SCARCE
7. Front : FACADE
13. Orville Wright or Neil Armstrong : OHIOAN
14. ___ Avenue (Mets' community website) : AMAZIN’
15. Sign at a neighborhood bar, part 1 : DON'T TALK ABOUT
17. Spars : MASTS
18. Server of Duff Beer to Homer Simpson : MOE
19. Dry Idea alternative : ARRID
21. Big, clumsy guy : APE
22. Indeed : YEA
23. Quite a bit : PLENTY
24. Part 2 of the sign : YOURSELF - WE
28. Crowd drawer, often : SALE
29. Severely consternate : APPALL
30. Go up, up, up : SOAR
32. Made the first move : LED
33. Play a round : GOLF
35. General Motors subsidiary : OPEL
37. Artist known as either Jean or Hans : ARP
40. Gatsby-era hairstyles : BOBS
42. Some Coleridge colleagues : ODISTS
46. Accommodate, as passengers : SEAT
48. Part 3 of the sign : WILL DO THAT
50. Folly : IDIOCY
52. Alliance HQ'd near the White House : OAS
53. Key molecule for protein synthesis : RNA
54. Fire : ARDOR
55. Adams of "American Hustle" : AMY
56. Prone to beefing : WHINY
58. End of the sign : AFTER YOU LEAVE
61. Epicurean explorer : FOODIE
62. "Anything Goes" composer : PORTER
63. U.S.O. Care Package recipients : TROOPS
64. Coldly determined : STEELY

Down
1. Redundant-sounding refreshment : SODA POP
2. Formed, as schoolyard teams, say : CHOSE UP
3. "Hit 'em where they ___" : AIN'T
4. Turns bad : ROTS
5. Subject of many a viral video : CAT
6. Hardest substance in the human body : ENAMEL
7. Forgery : FAKE
8. Org. offering group practice membership : AMA
9. Ring of rebels : CABAL
10. Columbus stopping point of 1493 : AZORES
11. Active when the sun shines : DIURNAL
12. Provide, as a right : ENTITLE
16. Slacks off : LOAFS
17. Pre-Columbian civilization : MAYA
20. Like some blonds : DYED
22. Blond : YELLOWY
23. Staple of Chinese cuisine : PEA PODS
25. Many a tune in "The Sting" : RAG
26. Challenging employer for a maid : SLOB
27. Seek to espouse : WOO
31. Second version : REDO
34. Patriot Act enforcer : FBI
36. Fiction course, for short : LIT
37. Locale of three Summer Olympics : ASIA
38. Second version : REDRAFT
39. Purchased : PAID FOR
41. Time-stretching effect : SLO-MO
43. Contract : SHRIVEL
44. Suede source : TANNERY
45. Canine command : STAY
47. Overdone : TOO TOO
49. Easy hoops shots : LAYUPS
51. Belief : CREDO
55. All those in favor : AYES
56. Used to be : WERE
57. "In time we ___ that which we often fear": Shak. : HATE
59. Cut in the direction of the grain : RIP
60. Christie's offering : LOT


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

No comments :

Tell a Friend About NYTCrossword.com:

Facebook Twitter Google Email

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive