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Vacation Alert

I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0314-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Mar 14, Friday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Olschwang
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. One way to get the beat going? : CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

13. Master, in Mysore : SAHIB
"Sahib" is most recognized as a term of address in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use "mister" in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

Mysore lies about 100 miles southwest of Bangalore. Tourists flock to Mysore especially during the ten-day Mysore Dasara festival, a draw not only for Indians but foreigners as well.

20. "Am ___ France?": King Lear : I IN
Shakespeare was inspired to write his famous drama “King Lear” by the legend of "Leir of Britain", the story of a mythological Celtic king.

21. Jeans reinforcer : RIVET
Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase "de Nimes" (from Nimes) gives us the word "denim". Also, the French phrase "bleu de Genes" (blue of Genoa) gives us our word "jeans".

23. Chinese dish eponym : TSO
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

24. See 39-Across : AMICI
(39A. Lang. in which "friends" is 24-Across : ITAL)
“Amici” is the Italian word for "friends" (singular "amico").

25. Magazine industry's equivalent of a Pulitzer : ELLIE
The National Magazine Awards honor excellence in the magazine industry. The physical aware is a copper-colored sculpture by Alexander Calder that looks a bit like an elephant. As a result, the National Magazine Awards are affectionately referred to as “Ellies”.

27. Not nixed : OKD
Okayed (OKd)

The use of "nix" as a verb, meaning "to shoot down", dates back to the early 1900s. Before that "nix" was just a noun meaning "nothing". "Nix" comes from the German "nichts", which also means "nothing".

31. Living or dead follower : END
The idiom “the living end” means “outrageous” as in “Oh, you are the living end!”

32. Yom Kippur War setting : SINAI
The Yom Kippur War started on October 6 in 1973 with a surprise move by Syria and Egypt into the Sinai Peninsula and the Golan Heights. The conflict quickly escalated into a confrontation between the US and the Soviet Union, as both superpowers rushed arms to the opposing states. Within a week, Israeli forces had regained the land that had been lost and two weeks later had advanced within striking range of both Cairo and Damascus. A UN brokered ceasefire brought the war to an end on October 25, after just 19 days of fighting.

35. Vet : EX-GI
The initials "G.I." stand for "Government Issue" and not "General Infantry" as is often believed. GI was first used in the military to denote equipment made from Galvanized Iron and during WWI, incoming German shells were nicknamed "GI cans". Soon after, the term GI came to be associated with "Government Issue" and eventually became an adjective to describe anything associated with the Army.

36. Mutating, highly resistant microbe : ANDROMEDA STRAIN
“The Andromeda Strain” is a 1969 novel by Michael Crichton, a very exciting technical drama about an extraterrestrial organism that threatens the human population. The book was made into quite a successful film that was released in 1971.

40. Start of an intermission? : ENTR’
The term entr'acte comes to us from French, and is the interval between two acts ("entre" deux "actes") of a theatrical performance. It often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

41. Boo Boo Bear's co-creator : HANNA
Boo-Boo Bear was the sidekick to Yogi Bear on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon classic “The Yogi Bear Show”.

Yogi Bear made his debut for Hanna-Barbera in 1958, on the Huckleberry Hound Show before he was given his own series. Do you remember that collar that Yogi wore around his neck? That was a little trick from the animators. By using the collar, for many frames all they had to do was redraw everything from the collar up, saving them lots and lots of time.

42. "___ name I love" ("America" lyric) : THY
The patriotic song “America” is also known by its first line, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”. The song was written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1831, and was the de facto national anthem of the country until “The Star-Spangled Banner” was declared the official anthem.

44. Campus letter : ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character "H". Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

47. Old paper parts : ROTOS
“Roto” is a short for “rotogravure”, a photomechanical process used for printing pictures and some typeset matter. By extension, a “roto” was also a section of a paper printed using such a process, particularly a magazine section.

58. He proclaimed "I shook up the world" : ALI
Muhammad Ali fought Sonny Liston for the World Heavyweight Championship twice. The first bout was in 1964 in Miami, and the second in 1965 in Lewiston, Maine. In the first fight, Liston failed to come out of his corner for the seventh round. On seeing this, Ali (or “Cassius Clay” as he was then) ran to the ropes yelling “I’m the greatest!” and “I shook up the world”.

59. Gervasi who directed 2012's "Hitchcock" : SACHA
Sacha Gervasi is journalist, screenwriter and film director from London.

60. Shake in an opera house : TRILL
In music a “trill” is the rapid alternation of two tones that are very close to each other to make a vibrato sound.

61. Year Charles IX was born : MDL
1550 (MDL) was the birth year of two kings named Charles IX, namely Charles IX of France and Charles IX of Sweden. Take your pick ...

62. Rectangular paving stone : SETT
A sett is a small rectangular paving stone with a rounded top used to make a road surface. It’s like a cobblestone, I think …

Down
1. Test pilot's protection : G-SUIT
A G-suit is needed when astronauts and aviators are subject to high accelerations. Such acceleration can cause blood to pool in the lower part of the body, reducing the supply to the brain and possibly leading to a blackout. A G-suit is basically a special pair of tight-fitting pants that are fitted with inflatable bladders. The bladders inflate during high accelerations, tightening around the legs and abdomen, reducing the amount of blood pooling.

2. Mecca or Medina : OASIS
Mecca is in the Makkah province of Saudi Arabia and is the holiest city in Islam. Every year several million Muslims perform the Hajj, a holy pilgrimage to Mecca.

Medina is a city in western Saudi Arabia. Medina is the second holiest city in the Islamic tradition after Mecca, as it is the burial place of the Prophet Muhammad.

3. 1985 Ralph McInerny novel : THE NOONDAY DEVIL
Ralph McInerny was an author and Philosophy Professor at Notre Dame. McInerny’s most famous novels are the Father Dowling series of mystery stories.

5. Longtime airer of "Any Questions?" : BBC RADIO
The BBC is my favorite radio service, and one that I listen to everyday. The service began broadcasting back in 1922. Radio is still a major offering of the BBC, even in these days of television. In fact, the weekly magazine that lists all BBC television and radio shows is still known as “Radio Times”.

"Any Questions?" is a popular BBC Radio show that is broadcast weekly. The show first aired in 1948 and features a panel debating political issues of the day. There is also a weekly phone-in “response” show called “Any Answers?”

9. Range of sizes, briefly : SML
Small (S), Medium (M) and Large (L)

10. Mathematics branch associated with fractals : COMPLEX ANALYSIS
A fractal is a fascinating geometric shape, one that can be split into parts, each of which is a smaller version (almost identical to) of the larger shape. The name "fractal" comes from the Latin "fractus" meaning "broken" or "fragmented". Fractals are found all over nature, most notably the shapes created by ice crystals. It can be hard to tell the difference between the shapes of ice as it freezes on glass, viewed with the eye or viewed under a microscope. Fractals can also be seen in clouds, snow flakes, and even cauliflower and broccoli!

12. Jockey Turcotte : RON
The Canadian jockey Ron Turcotte is best known for riding Secretariat, the horse that won the Triple Crown in 1973. Sadly, Turcotte came off his ride in a race at Belmont Park in 1978 and sustained an injury that left him a paraplegic.

18. Biathlon need : AIM
A biathlon is an event requiring expertise in two sporting disciplines. The most common biathlon is the winter sport that combines cross-country skiing with rifle shooting. This traditional biathlon was born out of an exercise for soldiers in Norway.

19. Cádiz condiment : SAL
In Spanish, one might partner set the pepper (pimienta) by the salt (sal).

26. Twin Cities suburb : EDINA
Edina, Minnesota lies just southwest of Minneapolis. The town takes its name from Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. It was suggested by a Scottish mill owner at the time a new village was being set up in 1888.

28. Jazz player Malone : KARL
Karl Malone is a retired professional basketball player who was nicknamed “the Mailman”. Malone played most of his career with the Utah Jazz, from 1985 to 2004.

30. Places for quick operations, briefly : ERS
Emergency Room (ER)

35. "In principio ___ Verbum" : ERAT
"In principio erat Verbum" are the opening lines of what is called the Last Gospel, a passage from the gospel according to St. John. The words (and those that follow) are used in the Roman Catholic Mass, and translate as "In the beginning was the Word".

38. Things to play with matches? : THE SLOTS
Slot machines earned the nickname "one-armed bandits" simply because they had "one arm", the handle pulled to operate the machine, and they robbed you of all your money!

43. Its natives are called Loiners : LEEDS
I went to school for a while not far from Leeds in West Yorkshire in the north of England. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, Leeds was a major center for the production and trading of wool, and then with the onset of mechanization it became a natural hub for manufacture of textiles. These days Leeds is noted as a shopping destination and so has been dubbed “the Knightsbridge of the North”. People from Leeds are known locally as “Loiners”, but nobody really knows why.

46. Master's seeker's hurdle, briefly : GRE
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

48. Shell accessory : OAR
A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”.

50. Holders of many selfies : CELLS
A “selfie” is a self-portrait, usually one taken with a digital camera or cell phone.

55. Flight for someone 8-Down : LAM
(8D. Withdrawing : BEATING A RETREAT)
To be "on the lam" is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. "On the lam" is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word "lam" also means to "beat" or "thrash", as in "lambaste". So "on the lam" might derive from the phrase "to beat it, to scram".

57. The Rams of the A-10 Conf. : URI
The University of Rhode Island (URI) was first chartered as an agricultural school, back in 1888. URI's main campus today is located in the village of Kingston.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Did some above-average work : GOT A B
6. Doesn't just tear up : SOBS
10. One way to get the beat going? : CPR
13. Master, in Mysore : SAHIB
14. Hostiles : ENEMY
16. "Well, well, well!" : OHO!
17. He may be trying to unload crates : USED CAR SALESMAN
20. "Am ___ France?": King Lear : I IN
21. Jeans reinforcer : RIVET
22. They're easily fleeced : SAPS
23. Chinese dish eponym : TSO
24. See 39-Across : AMICI
25. Magazine industry's equivalent of a Pulitzer : ELLIE
27. Not nixed : OKD
29. Composition of some wreaths : CONES
31. Living or dead follower : END
32. Yom Kippur War setting : SINAI
34. Dam designer: Abbr. : ENGR
35. Vet : EX-GI
36. Mutating, highly resistant microbe : ANDROMEDA STRAIN
39. Lang. in which "friends" is 24-Across : ITAL
40. Start of an intermission? : ENTR’
41. Boo Boo Bear's co-creator : HANNA
42. "___ name I love" ("America" lyric) : THY
43. Shop spinner : LATHE
44. Campus letter : ETA
45. Fence alternative : HEDGE
47. Old paper parts : ROTOS
49. Monitor option, for short : LCD
52. "___ back!" : WE’RE
53. Kind of training done by music majors : AURAL
54. The shorter you are? : YER
55. Tend to work without a net : LIVE DANGEROUSLY
58. He proclaimed "I shook up the world" : ALI
59. Gervasi who directed 2012's "Hitchcock" : SACHA
60. Shake in an opera house : TRILL
61. Year Charles IX was born : MDL
62. Rectangular paving stone : SETT
63. Unlikely bruiser : SISSY

Down
1. Test pilot's protection : G-SUIT
2. Mecca or Medina : OASIS
3. 1985 Ralph McInerny novel : THE NOONDAY DEVIL
4. Support : AID
5. Longtime airer of "Any Questions?" : BBC RADIO
6. Place for a delivery : SERVICE ENTRANCE
7. Withdrawing words : ON SECOND THOUGHT
8. Withdrawing : BEATING A RETREAT
9. Range of sizes, briefly : SML
10. Mathematics branch associated with fractals : COMPLEX ANALYSIS
11. Establishing by degrees : PHASING IN
12. Jockey Turcotte : RON
15. Many nods : YESES
18. Biathlon need : AIM
19. Cádiz condiment : SAL
26. Twin Cities suburb : EDINA
28. Jazz player Malone : KARL
30. Places for quick operations, briefly : ERS
32. Speaks to Shakespeare? : SAITH
33. Not domestically : IN THE WILD
35. "In principio ___ Verbum" : ERAT
37. "Tell ___ story" : ME A
38. Things to play with matches? : THE SLOTS
43. Its natives are called Loiners : LEEDS
46. Master's seeker's hurdle, briefly : GRE
48. Shell accessory : OAR
50. Holders of many selfies : CELLS
51. With no sparkle : DRYLY
55. Flight for someone 8-Down : LAM
56. Small power sources : AAS
57. The Rams of the A-10 Conf. : URI


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2 comments :

Apu Ghosh said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Bigsly said...

I love your blog and read it often... There is an error with this puzzle: Ali actually said, "I shocked the world!" when he defeated Liston. I've seen the clip in a documentary.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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