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0322-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Mar 14, Saturday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Greg Johnson
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

18. Obsolescent storage device : ZIP DRIVE
A Zip drive is a disk storage system that manufactured by Iomega starting in 1994. In its day, zip drives and zip discs provided a relatively large amount of portable computer storage at a very reasonable price.

19. Historic first name in W.W. II : ENOLA
The Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, on Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

20. Locale of three presidential libraries : TEXAS
The three presidential libraries in Texas are:
- The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, in Austin
- The George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, in College Station
- The George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas

21. Fried : LIT
“Fried” and “lit” are two slang terms meaning “drunk”.

27. Rescuer of Princess Peach : MARIO
Princess Peach is the princess of the Mushroom Kingdom in Nintendo’s “Mario” universe. Princess Peach is Mario’s love interest.

29. Churchyard gravedigger : SEXTON
A sexton is an officer in a church who looks after the building and perhaps an attached graveyard. The term “sexton” comes from the Medieval Latin word “sacristanus” which means “custodian of sacred objects”.

34. Truckloads : LEGIONS
The word “legion” can be used to mean “a large number”.

36. Remains after the aging process : LEES
The dregs in wine, the sediment that settles during fermentation (and sometimes in the bottle), is also called "lees".

38. Santa's reindeer, e.g. : TEAM
We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:
- Dasher
- Dancer
- Prancer
- Vixen
- Comet
- Cupid
- Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
- Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)
Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

43. Lou's "La Bamba" co-star : ESAI
Esai Morales is best known for his role in the 1987 movie "La Bamba". The film depicted the life of Ritchie Valens (played by Lou Diamond Phillips) and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Morales).

44. Concord concoction : GRAPE JELLY
Concord grapes are mostly used to make grape jelly, and are only occasionally used as table grapes or for making wine. The Concord cultivar was developed in the mid 1800s by Ephraim Wales Bull in Concord, Massachusetts, hence the name.

46. Many a "Meet the Press" guest, informally : POL
NBC’s news and interview show “Meet the Press” was first aired in 1947. That’s a long time ago, and so “Meet the Press” is the longest-running television series in US broadcasting history.

47. Swindler's moola : GRIFT
“Grift” is money made dishonestly, especially as the result of a swindle. The term perhaps is an alteration of the the word “graft”, which can have a similar meaning.

Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dinero, dough and moola (also moolah) are all slang terms for money.

49. She had a single-season stint on "The View" : O'DONNELL
We don’t get to see Rosie O’Donnell on the screen very much these days. She had a very successful chat show that ran from 1996 to 2002. My favorite performance of hers on the big screen is in a supporting role to Meg Ryan in the 1993 movie “Sleepless in Seattle”.

"The View" is a talk show that was created by Barbara Walters and Bill Geddie in 1997. The show features a panel of five women as co-hosts.

51. Many a worker at Union Pacific headquarters : OMAHAN
The Union Pacific Railroad is the largest railroad in the US. Union Pacific operates over 8,000 locomotives, and all of that rolling stock operates west of Chicago and New Orleans. The company’s headquarters is in Omaha, Nebraska.

52. Like Enterprise vehicles : RENTABLE
Enterprise Rent-A-Car was established in 1957 by Jack. C. Taylor in St. Louis, Missouri, where the company is still headquartered today. The company was originally called Executive Leasing Company. The name was changed in 1962 in honor of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise on which Taylor served during WWII.

55. One of Leakey's "Trimates" : FOSSEY
The so-called “Trimates” were three female anthropologists famous for studying primates in the wild, namely Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birutė Galdikas. All three researchers were sent out into the field by British paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey, so the Trimates were sometimes referred to as “Leakey’s Angels”.

Down
1. Decorated band along a wall : FRIEZE
A frieze is an architectural feature found in many Roman and Greek buildings. Inside a room, frieze is the name given to the upper part of the wall, between the picture rail and the crown molding. Outside of a room, the term frieze is the name given to any extended decoration that is positioned above eye level. Perhaps the most famous frieze comes from the Parthenon in Athens. Over a third of this highly decorated feature was removed from Athens and taken to London in the early 1800s by the Earl of Elgin, where they remain on display in the British Museum. These famous "Elgin Marbles" are subject of much controversy as the legality of the removal is in dispute.

2. "Reality leaves a lot to the imagination" speaker : LENNON
After the break-up of the Beatles, John Lennon moved to New York with his wife Yoko Ono to the US and settled in New York City. Lennon became active in the anti-Vietnam War movement and fell foul of the Nixon administration. Spurred on by the administration, the INS spent three and a half years trying to deport Lennon based on a 1968 misdemeanor conviction for the possession of cannabis. Ono was granted permanent residence status in 1973, but it wasn’t until 1975 that Lennon received his Green Card.

3. He directed Bela Lugosi in "Bride of the Monster" : ED WOOD
Ed Wood was a screenwriter, director, producer and actor who made a lot of low-budget films during the 1950s. Wood worked a lot with the actor Bela Lugosi and when Lugosi passed away, the popularity of Wood’s films died off with his star. Tim Burton made a biopic about the life and career of Ed Wood that was released in 1994, a movie that was simply called “Ed Wood”.

Bela Lugosi was a Hungarian stage and screen actor, best known for playing the title role in the 1931 film "Dracula" and for playing the same role on Broadway. Lugosi found himself typecast for the rest of his career and almost always played the role of the villain, often in horror movies. When he passed away in 1956, his wife had him buried in the costume he wore playing Count Dracula on Broadway.

4. High rollers, in casino lingo : WHALES
The “casino” originated in the 1700s, first describing a public room for music or dancing. The name “casino” is a diminutive of “casa” meaning “house”.

5. Cheap, shoddy merchandise : BORAX
It was once customary for sellers of cheap furniture to give away borax soap as incentive to buy, which perhaps led to the use of “borax” to mean cheap merchandise or tasteless furnishings.

6. Financial statement abbr. : YTD
Year-to-date (YTD)

7. Outdoor wedding settings : GAZEBOS
A gazebo is a roofed structure, often octagonal in shape, that is found mainly in public spaces. Gazebos can be quite small, or can be large enough to perhaps serve as a bandstand. The actual etymology of the term “gazebo” seems to be a bit of a mystery, and there are some misconceptions out there.

8. Alchemist's offering : ELIXIR
An elixir is a solution of alcohol and water that is used to deliver a medicine. The term “elixir” can also be used to mean a medicine that has the power to cure all ills.

9. Green party V.I.P.? : ST PAT
There is a fair amount known about St. Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as St. Patrick's Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

10. Three Stooges creator Healy and others : TEDS
Ted Healy had a successful stage and film career of his own, but now is best remembered as the creator of the Three Stooges. Healy hired Moe Howard as a “stooge” for his vaudeville act in 1922, and then his brother Shemp Howard as a heckler in 1923. He pulled in Larry Fine in 1925. The trio of Moe, Shemp and Larry parted ways with Healy in 1931 over a contract dispute, and the three eventually evolved into the Three Stooges.

11. Concourse abbr. : ARR
Arrival (arr.)

14. Troopers' toppers : STETSONS
Stetson is a brand name of hat, manufactured by the John B. Stetson Company of St. Joseph, Missouri. The so called "cowboy hat" that Stetson pioneered was such a success that the company became the largest hat maker in the world, producing over 3.3 million hats per year.

20. Almanac info : TIDES
A nautical almanac is a book used by navigators, usually at sea. The main content has traditionally been tables of star position designed to help determine one's geographical position. Some almanacs also include tide tables.

23. Large pack : HORDE
A “horde” is a large crowd. "Horde" ultimately derives from the Turkish “ordu” that means “camp, army”.

27. What an 18-Across's capacity is measured in, briefly : MEGS
In the world of computing, one kilobyte (1k) is one thousandth of a megabyte (“1 meg”).

29. Message sometimes written below "F" : SEE ME
A teacher might write the message “see me” on a paper that has been graded with an F.

33. "___ se habla español" : AQUI
"Aqui se habla español" translates from Spanish as “Spanish is spoken here”.

34. Did an entrechat : LEAPT
In the world of ballet, to perform an “entrechat” a dancer jumps into the air and rapidly crosses the legs before and behind.

38. Voice lesson subjects : TRILLS
In music a “trill” is the rapid alternation of two tones that are very close to each other to make a vibrato sound.

39. Protection for flowers in bud : SEPALS
In a flower, the sepals are those green, leaf-like structures that are “interleaved” with the petals, providing support. Prior to acting as support for the petals, the sepals protect the flower in bud.

42. Biggest city on the smallest continent : SYDNEY
Sydney is the most populous city in Australia, and the capital of the state of New South Wales. Captain James Cook landed at Botany Bay (which is now in Sydney) in 1770, starting the European habitation of Australia. The British then set up a penal colony on Botany Bay. That colony was named “Sydney” after the British Home Secretary at the time, Thomas Townshend, Lord Sydney.

The seven continents, in order of size, are:
1. Asia
2. Africa
3. North America
4. South America
5. Antarctica
6. Europe
7. Australia

44. Diving bird : GREBE
A grebe is a small to medium-sized freshwater diving bird. Although they appear to be very different, recent molecular studies have shown that grebes and flamingos are closely related.

45. Mammoth : JUMBO
James Anthony Bailey collaborated with P. T. Barnum to establish Barnum and Bailey's Circus. It was Bailey who negotiated the deal to buy a famous elephant from London Zoo in 1882, the one called "Jumbo". It was the exposure that Jumbo got in the circus that brought into common usage our term "jumbo" meaning "huge".

47. Cookout irritant : GNAT
Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Passed in a blur, say : FLEW BY
7. Develops gradually : GESTATES
15. Smoking : RED-HOT
16. Change-making : ALTERANT
17. Where to look for self-growth : INWARD
18. Obsolescent storage device : ZIP DRIVE
19. Historic first name in W.W. II : ENOLA
20. Locale of three presidential libraries : TEXAS
21. Fried : LIT
22. One often behind bars : ZOO EXHIBIT
24. Ditch : TOSS
25. Doesn't carry on : ENDS
26. Oxygen's lack : ODOR
27. Rescuer of Princess Peach : MARIO
28. Near: Fr. : PRES
29. Churchyard gravedigger : SEXTON
30. Signs of things to come : HERALDS
34. Truckloads : LEGIONS
35. Hard to grasp : OPAQUE
36. Remains after the aging process : LEES
37. Opposite of 28-Down : MINUS
38. Santa's reindeer, e.g. : TEAM
39. Some sharp words : SASS
43. Lou's "La Bamba" co-star : ESAI
44. Concord concoction : GRAPE JELLY
46. Many a "Meet the Press" guest, informally : POL
47. Swindler's moola : GRIFT
48. Hiked : UPPED
49. She had a single-season stint on "The View" : O'DONNELL
51. Many a worker at Union Pacific headquarters : OMAHAN
52. Like Enterprise vehicles : RENTABLE
53. Fired up? : ABLAZE
54. Best, as friends : TIGHTEST
55. One of Leakey's "Trimates" : FOSSEY

Down
1. Decorated band along a wall : FRIEZE
2. "Reality leaves a lot to the imagination" speaker : LENNON
3. He directed Bela Lugosi in "Bride of the Monster" : ED WOOD
4. High rollers, in casino lingo : WHALES
5. Cheap, shoddy merchandise : BORAX
6. Financial statement abbr. : YTD
7. Outdoor wedding settings : GAZEBOS
8. Alchemist's offering : ELIXIR
9. Green party V.I.P.? : ST PAT
10. Three Stooges creator Healy and others : TEDS
11. Concourse abbr. : ARR
12. Personalize for : TAILOR TO
13. Picture : ENVISION
14. Troopers' toppers : STETSONS
20. Almanac info : TIDES
23. Large pack : HORDE
24. Get set to take off : TAXI
27. What an 18-Across's capacity is measured in, briefly : MEGS
28. Opposite of 37-Across : PLUS
29. Message sometimes written below "F" : SEE ME
30. Regular embarkation location : HOME PORT
31. Series starter : EPISODE I
32. Left : RAN ALONG
33. "___ se habla español" : AQUI
34. Did an entrechat : LEAPT
36. Flier : LEAFLET
38. Voice lesson subjects : TRILLS
39. Protection for flowers in bud : SEPALS
40. Socially dominant sorts : ALPHAS
41. Dirty rat : SLEAZE
42. Biggest city on the smallest continent : SYDNEY
44. Diving bird : GREBE
45. Mammoth : JUMBO
47. Cookout irritant : GNAT
50. ___ root (math quantity) : NTH
51. Bungler : OAF


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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