Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

Greetings from Mammoth Lakes, California

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! We had probably the last hike of our trip this morning (strenuous, past beautiful alpine lakes), and then opted for vegging out by the pool for a change this afternoon. Almost home ...

Bill

0323-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Mar 14, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood
THEME: Bright Ideas … there’s a note accompanying today’s crossword:
When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading counterclockwise from the top, will spell a phrase relating to the puzzle's theme.
That phrase is “AHA MOMENT”, when the lightbulb (depicted by the circled letters) goes on.

The themed answers are:
23A. Start of a motivational comment attributed to 86-Across : I HAVE NOT FAILED. I’VE JUST
29A. Middle of the comment : FOUND TEN THOUSAND WAYS
43A. End of the comment : THAT WON’T WORK

86A. See 23-Across : THOMAS EDISON
96A. Nickname for 86-Across : THE WIZARD OF MENLO PARK
106A. Development of 86-Across ... as depicted in the middle of this grid : INCANDESCENT LIGHT BULB
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Sister of Helios : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

18. Gambling mecca : MONACO
The Principality of Monaco is on the Mediterranean coast, and is otherwise surrounded by France, even though it is just under 10 miles from the Italian border. Monaco is the world’s most densely populated country, and the world’s second smallest country (the smallest being Vatican City). The principality has been very prosperous since the late 1800s, with the economy given a tremendous boost with the opening of several gambling casinos.

19. Saint's home, for short : NFC SOUTH
National Football Conference (NFC) South.

The New Orleans Saints football team takes its name from the jazz song “When the Saints Go Marching In”, a tune that is very much associated with the city. The team was founded in 1967, on November 1, which is All Saints’ Day in the Roman Catholic tradition.

22. Venomous African tree-dweller : MAMBA
The mamba, and most famously the black mamba, is a highly venomous snake that used to be responsible for a great number of fatalities before anti-venoms became available. Mamba venom is a deadly mix of neurotoxins that attack the nervous system, and cardiotoxins that attack the heart so a bite, if left untreated, causes the lungs and the heart to shut down.

26. Justin Timberlake's "Cry ___ River" : ME A
“Cry Me a River” is a 2002 song written and performed by Justin Timberlake. The song was apparently inspired by the singer’s former relationship with Britney Spears.

38. Director Nicolas : ROEG
Nicolas Roeg is film director from England with quite the pedigree when it comes to association with great movies. He contributed to 1962’s “Lawrence of Arabia”, and he himself directed noted films like “Walkabout” (1972), “Don’t Look Now” (1973) and “The Man Who Fell to Earth” (1976).

39. Record : LOG
The word "logbook" dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel's speed, progress etc. using a "log". A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

40. Facial moisturizing brand : OLAY
Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1949. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

41. "Power" suffix : -ADE
Powerade is one of those sports drinks, the only real competitor to Gatorade. Pepsi makes Gatorade, so in 1988, Coke introduced Powerade. I really do question the value of these hyped-up beverages ...

48. College major, briefly : SOC
Sociology (Soc.)

49. Commercial lead-in to Pen : EPI-
EpiPen is a brand name of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, usually for the treatment of an allergic reaction.

52. Osaka-to-Sapporo dir. : NNE
The Japanese city of Osaka used to be called Naniwa, with the name changing to Osaka some time before 1500. "Osaka" can be translated either as "large hill" or "large slope".

Sapporo is the fourth largest city in Japan, and lies on the island of Hokkaido. The city and surrounding area was home to the first Olympic Games to be held in Asia, the Winter Games of 1972. For the beer drinkers out there, Sapporo is also home to Sapporo Brewery, with the Sapporo beer being one of the more internationally recognizable brand names.

59. Resort city in 1945 news : YALTA
The Yalta Conference was a wartime meeting between WWII leaders Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Held in February of 1945, the conference is most remembered for decisions made on the post-war organization of Europe. To a large extent, the three leaders made decisions carving up influence around the world that has had implications to this day.

63. Ball player? : SEAL
There are three families of seals. The first is the walrus family, the second the eared seals (like sea lions), and thirdly the earless seals.

65. Ray Charles hosted it in 1977: Abbr. : SNL
Saturday Night Live (SNL)

Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker, Ray Charles Robinson. His life was a wild ride, well represented in the excellent biopic called “Ray” released in 2004 and starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray Charles was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

73. Birthplace of Buddha, now : NEPAL
Gautama Buddha was the sage on whose teachings the Buddhist tradition was founded. It is generally believed that the Buddha was born as Siddhartha Gautama in Kapilavastu in present-day Nepal, in about 563 BCE.

75. Pitcher Mike with 270 wins : MUSSINA
Mike “Moose” Mussina is a former pitcher who played for the Baltimore Orioles and the New York Yankees. Outside of baseball, Mussina loves to solve crosswords. He even appears in the very entertaining 2006 documentary film about the New York Times Crossword called “Wordplay” (highly recommended viewing!).

78. Christmas cookie ingredient : NUTMEG
The fruit of the nutmeg tree yields two very different spices. What we call “nutmeg” comes from the seed of the tree. “Mace” is the dried covering of the seed.

81. Eponymous German physicist : OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

82. Combined with : CUM
The preposition “cum” means “together with”, as in “kitchen-cum-dining room”. “Cum” is Latin for “with”.

83. Watering hole for Homer and Barney : MOE’S
Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender and owner of Moe’s Tavern in "The Simpsons" animated TV show. I don't really care for "The Simpsons", but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the Moe character ... him I like ...

85. Pelican's home, for short : NBA
The New Orleans Pelicans joined the NBA in 1988 as an expansion team, originally based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The team was going to be called the Charlotte Spirit, but the name was changed following a "name the team" contest run in the local area. During the Revolutionary War, Lord General Cornwallis had referred to Charlotte as a "veritable nest of hornets" due the city's resistance to British occupation, which explains the local fans' fondness for the name "Hornets". The franchise was moved to New Orleans for the 2002 season, as attendance wasn't big enough to sustain the team in Charlotte. The team had to play two seasons in Oklahoma City due to damage caused by Hurricane Katrina, and played as the New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets. After several years back in New Orleans, the franchise was renamed to the Pelicans, a nod to the Brown Pelican that is the Louisiana state bird.

86. See 23-Across : THOMAS EDISON
Thomas Edison had 1,093 patents in his name in the US, and 2,332 patents worldwide.

90. The Durbeyfield girl, in literature : TESS
In Thomas Hardy’s novel, the heroine and title character is Tess Durbeyfield. Her father is an uneducated peasant and when he hears that his name is a corruption of the noble name of “D’Urbeville”, the news goes to his head.

The full name of Thomas Hardy's 1891 novel is "Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented". When it was originally published, "Tess ..." received very mixed reviews, largely because it addressed some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (attitudes towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski's "Tess" released in 1979. Polanski apparently made "Tess" because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy's novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that just says "To Sharon".

91. Dr. Seuss animal : CAT
Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel was commander of the Animation Department of the USAF during WWII. He was behind many propaganda films including one called "Our Job in Japan". Even though the film was produced specifically as propaganda, this same movie was used after the war as a basis for the short feature "Design for Death", a study of Japanese culture released in 1947 and winner of an Oscar for best Documentary.

92. It has paper denominations from 5 to 500 : EURO
The European Union (EU) today stands at a membership of 27 states. The Euro is the official currency of only 16 of the 27. The list of states in the EU that don't use the Euro includes the UK, Denmark and Sweden.

93. Ex-Fed head Bernanke : BEN
Ben Bernanke was Chairman of the Federal Reserve for two terms after being appointed by President George W. Bush in 2006. Bernanke and his wife have a 30-year fixed rate mortgage with a rate of just over 5% and one car, a Ford Focus. Modest enough …

94. Some body work, in slang : TATS
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo".

95. Zippo alternatives : BICS
Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

The first Zippo lighter was made in 1933, in Bradford, Pennsylvania. The name "Zippo" was simply a word invented by the company founder, George Blaisdell, as he liked the word "zipper". You can buy one today for $12.95, or if you want the solid gold model ... for $8,675.95.

96. Nickname for 86-Across : THE WIZARD OF MENLO PARK
Thomas Alva Edison was nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

104. Saffron-flavored dish : PAELLA
Paella is sometime referred to as the Spanish national dish, but not by Spaniards. In Spain, paella is regarded as a typical regional dish from Valencia.

106. Development of 86-Across ... as depicted in the middle of this grid : INCANDESCENT LIGHT BULB
Located just a few miles from here is the Centennial Light, an incandescent light bulb that is maintained by the Fire Department in Livermore, California. The bulb is a 4-watt, hand-blown bulb with a carbon filament that was donated to the Fire Department in 1901. It has been (almost) continuously lighting since that time and is noted in the “Guinness Book of World Records” as the world’s longest-lasting light bulb.

115. World capital on the slope of an active volcano : QUITO
The full name of the capital city of Ecuador is San Francisco de Quito. Quito is the second-highest administrative capital city in the world, after La Paz, Bolivia.

116. Dolph of "Rocky IV" : LUNDGREN
Dolph Lundgren is an actor and martial artist from Sweden. Lundgren’s debut role was a small one, acting as a KGB henchman in the James Bond movie “A View to a Kill”. His big break was starring opposite Sylvester Stallone in “Rocky IV”, playing a scary Russian boxer.

119. D.C. mover and shaker: Abbr. : SEN
Senator (Sen.)

120. Scandinavian coin : ORE
The Swedish Krona is divided into 100 öres, a term derived from the Latin “aureus” meaning “gold”.

The Norwegian and Danish krone are divided into 100 öres.

121. Actor Christian : SLATER
Christian Slater is an actor from New York City. My favorite roles that he has played are in “Broken Arrow” with John Travolta, and in the TV series “The West Wing”.

Down
1. French kiss recipient, maybe : AMI
A male friend in France is "un ami", and a female friend is "une amie".

3. Bit of a code : DNA MOLECULE
RNA and DNA are very similar molecules. One big difference is that RNA is a single strand structure, whereas DNA is famously a double-helix. Another difference is that RNA contains ribose as a structural unit, and DNA contains deoxyribose i.e. ribose with one less oxygen atom. And that ribose/deoxyribose difference is reflected in the full name of the two molecules: ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

6. Security Council veto : NON
“Non” is French for “no”.

The United Nations Security Council has 15 members, 5 of whom are permanent and who have veto power over any resolution. The 10 non-permanent members are elected into place, and hold their seats for two years. The UN charter requires that authorized representatives of the member nations are always present at UN headquarters so that the Security council can meet at any time. The permanent members are:
- China
- France
- Russia
- United Kingdom
- United States

10. The French way? : RUE
“Rue” is the French word for “street”.

11. It may be delayed by a storm: Abbr. : ETD
Expected time of departure (ETD)

12. United Center team : CHICAGO BULLS
The Chicago Bulls have won six NBA championships in the life of the franchise, all of them in the nineties. They won in the 1991, 1992 and 1993 seasons (a so-called “three-peat”), and then again in 1996, 1997 and 1998 (a second “three-peat”).

14. Garden State casino, informally, with "the" : TAJ
Donald Trump's Taj Mahal Casino Resort opened up for business in Atlantic City in 1990.

15. Outback native : EMU
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an "Emu War" in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the "invading force". The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of "war", the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

17. Yoga base : MAT
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

21. Nondairy item in the dairy aisle : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

24. Ones without a leg to stand on? : OCTOPI
The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural.

29. Blues Brothers wear : FEDORAS
A fedora is a lovely hat, I think. It is made of felt, and is similar to a trilby, but has a broader brim. "Fedora" was a play written for Sarah Bernhardt and first performed in 1889. Bernhardt had the title role of Princess Fedora, and on stage she wore a hat similar to a modern-day fedora. The play led to the women's fashion accessory, the fedora hat, commonly worn by women into the beginning of the twentieth century. Men then started wearing fedoras, but only when women gave up the fashion ...

The Blues Brothers is a blues band created in 1978 for a Saturday Night Live sketch. The original Blues Brothers were Dan Aykroyd (Elwood Blues) and John Belushi ("Joliet" Jake Blues).

36. Comic Wanda : SYKES
Wanda Sykes is a very successful American comedienne and comic actress. Interestingly, Sykes spent her first five years out of school working for the NSA. I saw her perform in Reno quite recently, and she is very, very funny.

42. "Death Magnetic" band : METALLICA
Metallica is a heavy metal band from Los Angeles, formed in 1981. Not my thing ...

43. Drinking binge : TOOT
"Toot" is slang for a binge of drinking, and for a snort of cocaine. Not good either way, I guess ...

45. Many an Al Jazeera viewer : ARAB
Al Jazeera is an independent news service owned by the state of Qatar. Since 2006, Al Jazeera has been broadcasting an English language channel, hiring many top journalists from American news outlets. “Al jazeera” is Arabic for “the island”.

46. Pioneer org. : NASA
NASA’s Pioneer program was a series of unmanned missions designed to explore the planets in our solar system. The most famous of the probes are Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11. Pioneer 10 was launched in 1972 and became the first spacecraft to fly by Jupiter. NASA lost its radio link with Pioneer 10 in 2003. Pioneer 12 was launched in 1973 and was the first spacecraft to encounter Saturn. Communication with Pioneer 12 was lost in 1995.

47. Five-time Super Bowl champions, informally : THE NINERS
The very successful National Football League team in San Francisco takes its name from the gold prospectors who flooded into Northern California around 1849 during the California Gold Rush. These 1849-prospectors became known as the "49ers".

The California gold rush actually started in 1848. The first to exploit the find were those people already in California. By 1849 the word had spread and gold-seekers started to arrive from all over the world. The “out-of-towners” who arrived in 1849 became known as forty-niners.

50. Barak's successor : SHARON
Ariel Sharon was a former Prime Minister of Israel. While still in office in 2005, Sharon suffered two debilitating strokes that left him in a permanent vegetative state from early 2006, until he finally passed away in early 2014.

55. Travel agency listings : SPAS
The word "spa" migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name "Spa" comes from the Walloon word "espa" meaning "spring, fountain".

56. Cabooses : TUSHES
“Tush”, a word for the backside, is an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

The word "caboose" originally came from Middle Dutch and was the word for a ship's galley. When the last car in a train in North America was given a stove for the comfort of the crew, it took on the name "caboose". The term has also become slang for a person’s backside.

58. Starts of news articles : LEDES
The opening paragraph in any work of literature is often just called “the lead”. In the world of journalism, this is usually referred to as “the lede”.

60. Deli stock with seeds : SESAME BAGELS
The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

71. Appropriate flowers for Mother's Day? : MUMS
Chrysanthemums are perennial flowering plants that are often called “mums”.

Note the official punctuation in “Mother’s Day”, even though one might think it should be “Mothers’ Day”. President Wilson, and Anna Jarvis who created the tradition, specifically wanted Mother's Day to honor the mothers within each family and not just "mothers" in general, so they went with the "Mother's Day" punctuation.

72. Bootleggers' banes : T-MEN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T is for Treasury).

“To bootleg” is make or smuggle alcoholic drinks illegally. The term arose in the late 1800s as slang for the practice of concealing a flask of liquor down the leg of a high boot. The term has been extended to mean the illegal production and sale of just about anything.

74. Exams offered four times a yr. : LSATS
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

75. Certain Bach composition : MOTET
A motet is a simple musical composition based on a sacred text, usually sung without an accompaniment. The term "motet" is a diminutive form of “mot”, the French for "word".

Johann Sebastian Bach raised a very large family. He had seven children with his first wife, who died suddenly. He had a further thirteen children with his second wife. Of his twenty youngsters, there were four sons who became famous musicians in their own right:
- Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (aka "the Halle Bach")
- Carl Philipp Bach (aka "the Hamburg Bach")
- Johann Christoph Bach (aka "the Buckeberg Bach")
- Johann Christian Bach (aka "the London Bach")

77. Gooey campfire treat : S'MORE
S'mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s'more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called "Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts". Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

80. Cesare Angelotti in "Tosca," e.g. : BASSO
Unlike so many operas, "Tosca" was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. "Tosca" is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America, although I've only seen it once myself.

87. Place to store hay : MOW
A “mow” is a location in a barn where hay or other feed is stored.

88. German article : DER
“Der”, “die” and “das” are German words meaning “the”. “Der” is used with a masculine noun, “die” with a feminine noun and “das” with a neuter noun.

89. Third line on many a ballot: Abbr. : IND
Independent (Ind.)

94. One with bills piling up? : TELLER
“To tell” can mean “to count”, as in “telling one’s blessings” and “there are 16, all told”. This usage of the word “tell” gives us the term “bank teller”.

95. "My Name Is ___," gold album of 1965 : BARBRA
Barbra Streisand has recorded 31 top-ten albums since 1963, more than any other female recording artist. In fact, she has had an album in the top ten for the last five decades, a rare achievement in itself.

98. One of two parts of a British puzzle? : ZED
There are two letters Z in the word “puzzle”.

The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

99. ___ page : OP-ED
Op-ed is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

100. Canine : FANG
The canine teeth of a mammal are also called the eye teeth. The name “canine” is used because these particular teeth are very prominent in dogs. The name “eye” is used because in humans the eye teeth are located in the upper jaw, directly below the eyes.

101. D.C. mover : METRO
The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) provides transit service within and around Washington, D.C. The service generally goes by the name “Metro”. The authority’s two main services are Metrorail and Metrobus.

102. Pi ___, "Life of Pi" protagonist : PATEL
The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy called Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

106. 100s of ordinary people? : IQS
The original Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale for scoring IQ tests was developed by French psychologist Alfred Binet and his student Theodore Simon. The scale was revised in 1916 by Lewis M. Terman, a psychologist at Stanford University, resulting in the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale.

111. "___ = Politics" (TV slogan) : CNN
CNN (Cable News Network) was launched in 1980, and was the first television channel in the world to provide news coverage 24 hours a day.

113. Food Network host Sandra : LEE
Sandra Lee is a host of cooking shows including two that promote her “Semi-Homemade” concept, mixing pre-packaged foods with fresh ingredients. Lee lives with Governor of New York Andrew Cuomo.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Expands, in a way : ADDS ON
7. Sister of Helios : EOS
10. ___ room : REC
13. Elite unit : A-TEAM
18. Gambling mecca : MONACO
19. Saint's home, for short : NFC SOUTH
22. Venomous African tree-dweller : MAMBA
23. Start of a motivational comment attributed to 86-Across : I HAVE NOT FAILED. I’VE JUST
26. Justin Timberlake's "Cry ___ River" : ME A
27. [That makes me so uncomfortable] : [CRINGE]
28. Lockup : CAN
29. Middle of the comment : FOUND TEN THOUSAND WAYS
37. Toolbar feature : HELP
38. Director Nicolas : ROEG
39. Record : LOG
40. Facial moisturizing brand : OLAY
41. "Power" suffix : -ADE
42. Sticks in the closet? : MOPS
43. End of the comment : THAT WON’T WORK
48. College major, briefly : SOC
49. Commercial lead-in to Pen : EPI-
50. Rocket : SOAR
51. Cousin of "Ugh!" : BAH!
52. Osaka-to-Sapporo dir. : NNE
53. Law firm department : TRUSTS
55. Fired on : SHOT AT
57. Good-for-nothing : USELESS
59. Resort city in 1945 news : YALTA
60. Small scene : SPAT
61. Restricted part of an urban area : BUS LANE
63. Ball player? : SEAL
64. Prominent feature of an Obama caricature : EAR
65. Ray Charles hosted it in 1977: Abbr. : SNL
66. Couple at the altar? : I DOS
69. Start to show one's real potential : BLOSSOM
72. So : THUS
73. Birthplace of Buddha, now : NEPAL
75. Pitcher Mike with 270 wins : MUSSINA
78. Christmas cookie ingredient : NUTMEG
80. Plagues : BESETS
81. Eponymous German physicist : OHM
82. Combined with : CUM
83. Watering hole for Homer and Barney : MOE’S
84. Coin collector : JAR
85. Pelican's home, for short : NBA
86. See 23-Across : THOMAS EDISON
90. The Durbeyfield girl, in literature : TESS
91. Dr. Seuss animal : CAT
92. It has paper denominations from 5 to 500 : EURO
93. Ex-Fed head Bernanke : BEN
94. Some body work, in slang : TATS
95. Zippo alternatives : BICS
96. Nickname for 86-Across : THE WIZARD OF MENLO PARK
103. Barrel of fun? : KEG
104. Saffron-flavored dish : PAELLA
105. Brow line? : ARC
106. Development of 86-Across ... as depicted in the middle of this grid : INCANDESCENT LIGHT BULB
115. World capital on the slope of an active volcano : QUITO
116. Dolph of "Rocky IV" : LUNDGREN
117. More chilling : EERIER
118. Throw around : STREW
119. D.C. mover and shaker: Abbr. : SEN
120. Scandinavian coin : ORE
121. Actor Christian : SLATER

Down
1. French kiss recipient, maybe : AMI
2. "How silly of me!" : D’OH!
3. Bit of a code : DNA MOLECULE
4. Stockpile : SAVE UP
5. View that may cost you extra : OCEAN
6. Security Council veto : NON
7. Ins : ENTREES
8. Near future : OFFING
9. Hardly enough : SCANT
10. The French way? : RUE
11. It may be delayed by a storm: Abbr. : ETD
12. United Center team : CHICAGO BULLS
13. Update, say : AMEND
14. Garden State casino, informally, with "the" : TAJ
15. Outback native : EMU
16. Crunches crunch them : ABS
17. Yoga base : MAT
20. ___ of relief : SIGH
21. Nondairy item in the dairy aisle : OLEO
24. Ones without a leg to stand on? : OCTOPI
25. Part of a moving line : VAN
29. Blues Brothers wear : FEDORAS
30. Nosedives : DROPS
31. Utmost: Abbr. : ULT
32. Farm mother : SOW
33. "My word!" : WOW!
34. Stag, maybe : ALONE
35. "The fish that got away" and others : YARNS
36. Comic Wanda : SYKES
37. Hurried : HASTY
42. "Death Magnetic" band : METALLICA
43. Drinking binge : TOOT
44. Accessory for the 91-Across : HAT
45. Many an Al Jazeera viewer : ARAB
46. Pioneer org. : NASA
47. Five-time Super Bowl champions, informally : THE NINERS
50. Barak's successor : SHARON
54. Sharp pains : STABS
55. Travel agency listings : SPAS
56. Cabooses : TUSHES
58. Starts of news articles : LEDES
60. Deli stock with seeds : SESAME BAGELS
62. Tight : SNUG
67. What an electric current does not flow through : OPEN CIRCUIT
68. Relaxed, say : SAT BACK
70. Difficult weight : ONUS
71. Appropriate flowers for Mother's Day? : MUMS
72. Bootleggers' banes : T-MEN
74. Exams offered four times a yr. : LSATS
75. Certain Bach composition : MOTET
76. "For sure" : UH-HUH
77. Gooey campfire treat : S'MORE
79. "Not ___ shabby!" : TOO
80. Cesare Angelotti in "Tosca," e.g. : BASSO
84. It gets you off schedule : JET LAG
87. Place to store hay : MOW
88. German article : DER
89. Third line on many a ballot: Abbr. : IND
90. Sunbathing evidence : TAN LINE
94. One with bills piling up? : TELLER
95. "My Name Is ___," gold album of 1965 : BARBRA
97. "Tell me about it!" : I KNOW!
98. One of two parts of a British puzzle? : ZED
99. ___ page : OP-ED
100. Canine : FANG
101. D.C. mover : METRO
102. Pi ___, "Life of Pi" protagonist : PATEL
106. 100s of ordinary people? : IQS
107. Fanatic : NUT
108. Geometry fig. : CIR
109. Had something : ATE
110. Bring into court : SUE
111. "___ = Politics" (TV slogan) : CNN
112. Guys : HES
113. Food Network host Sandra : LEE
114. "It's f-f-freezing!" : BRR!


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1 comment :

Anonymous said...

My name is Sophia from usa,i never believe in spell until i contacted this great man of spirit called DR ABIZA.Me and my husband have been married for three years and we had a baby boy,before we got married we dated for two years and we love each other so much.But i never knew that he was having an affair with one of my closest friend and they have been seen each other for about four months.One day he came home and raise up an unnecessary argument with me and we had a quarrel so he threaten to live the house which he did the following day and he left me and the kid to be with my so called friend,so in the course of my distress i was reading some pages on the internet on how to get back a lost husband,then i saw a testimony by Jessica on how DR ABIZA help her to get back her ex boy friend,so i also contacted the DR via the email address provided by Jessica and he told me that my friend cast a spell on my husband that made him to leave me and the kid to be with her.To cut the story short,DR ABIZA also told me what to do which i did and my friend hated my husband so much that she never wanted to see him again and after three days my husband came back to me begging for my forgiveness.Today am happy with my husband again.If you are having any problem like this you can email him through this address:{DRABIZASPELLTEMPLE20@HOTMAIL.COM},and you can count on him for a great help. udl

Tell a Friend About NYTCrossword.com:

Facebook Twitter Google Email

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive