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0518-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 May 14, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe DiPietro
THEME: Oh, Who? … today’s themed answers sound like well-known phrases, but are written as if they’re Irish names, with an O’ in the middle:
22A. Irish chemist? : ANGIE O’GRAM (from “angiogram”)
24A. Irish arborist? : WILL O’TREES (from “willow trees”)
32A. Irish secretary? : JEAN O’TYPING (from “genotyping”)
47A. Irish algebra teacher? : COREY O’GRAPH (from “choreograph”)
63A. Irish woodworker? : PATTY O’FURNITURE (from “patio furniture”)
83A. Irish mountain climber? : NATE O’SUMMIT (from “NATO summit”)
96A. Irish dogsled racer? : JUNE O’ALASKA (from “Juneau, Alaska”)
110A. Irish health care worker? : MAE O’CLINIC (from “Mayo Clinic”)
112A. Irish painter? : MEL O’YELLOW (from “Mellow Yellow”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 23s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

18. Univ. in Troy, N.Y. : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

19. Quarter back, possibly : CHANGE
If using cash, one might get a quarter back, 25 cents in change.

20. Like some workers : APIAN
Something “apian” is related to bees. “Apis” is the Latin for “bee”.

21. Edison's middle name : ALVA
Thomas Alva Edison was nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

22. Irish chemist? : ANGIE O’GRAM (from “angiogram”)
An angiogram is an x-ray (usually) image taken of the circulatory system, often enhanced by the introduction of a radio-opaque “dye” into the bloodstream.

26. Harvey of Hollywood : WEINSTEIN
Harvey Weinstein founded the entertainment company Miramax Films in 1979, along with his brother Bob Weinstein. The Weinsteins sold Miramax to Disney 1993, but stayed on with the company until 2005 when they left to set up the Weinstein Company.

27. China's Zhou ___ : ENLAI
Zhou Enlai (also Chou En-Lai) was the first government leader of the People's Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon's famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

28. How pastrami is usually ordered : ON RYE
In the US, pastrami was originally called "pastrama", a dish brought to America by Jewish immigrants from Romania in the second half of the the nineteenth century. The original name may have evolved from the Turkish word "pastirma" meaning "pressed". "Pastrama" likely morphed into "pastrami" influenced by the name of the Italian sausage called salami.

30. "Scary Movie," for one : SPOOF
“Scary Movie” is one of those parody movies, a film released in 2000 that pokes fun at famous horror films. It was advertised with the tagline “No mercy. No shame. No sequel”. The “no sequel” reference was a parody in itself, making fun of the fact that slasher movies in particular were made into strings of sequels. But there was in fact to be a sequel to “Scary Movie”, in fact three of them with one more on the way. “Scary Movie 2” came out in 2001, with the tagline “We lied”.

31. Love letters? : SWAK
Sealed With A Kiss (SWAK)

42. Bird on a Canadian dollar : LOON
The great northern loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and the state bird of Minnesota. The loon once appeared on Canadian $20 bills and also appears on the Canadian one dollar coin, giving the coin the nickname "the Loonie".

43. All-human bridge? : TOO
All too human …

46. When the day's done, to Donne : E’EN
John Donne is one of England's most celebrated poets, working at the start of the 17th century. He spent much of his life in poverty and even spent a short time in prison for having married his wife without procuring the appropriate permissions. After his release, his wife bore him 12 children in 16 years, passing away a few days after the twelfth child was born.

51. Missile Command maker : ATARI
“Missile Command” is a fun arcade game that was introduced by Atari in 1980. Playing the game involves protecting six cities that are being attacked by ballistic missiles. The original game’s design featured six cities in California, namely Eureka, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego.

52. Noodges : NAGS
Noodge is a slang term, meaning "to nag", or as a noun it can mean "a nag". It comes into English from the Yiddish word "nudyen" meaning "to bore, be tedious".

54. Big name in restaurant reviews : ZAGAT
The Zagat Survey is best known for rating restaurants across the major cities of the US, but it also rates things like hotels, nightlife, shopping, airlines and even zoos. The survey was started by Tim and Nina Zagat in 1979, and back then the survey was simply a collection of New York City restaurant ratings provided by friends of the couple.

55. "Hard ___!" (nautical command) : ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

57. When the day's done, to Denis : NUIT
“Nuit” is French for “night”.

59. End of a game? : ALAI
A cesta (also “xistera”) is a wicker scoop strapped to the wrist that is used for catching and throwing the ball in jai alai. Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language.

61. Long, angry complaint : SCREED
A screed is a long speech or piece of writing, usually full of emotion.

71. California county or its seat : NAPA
The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

75. Jack-in-the-pulpit, e.g. : ARUM
Jack-in-the-pulpit is a perennial plant native to eastern North America. It's a nasty plant though and contains oxalic acid, a compound that can be very painful if ingested and that can even cause death if taken in sufficient quantities.

79. ___ City (Baghdad area) : SADR
Sadr City is a suburb of Baghdad, oft in the news these days. Sadr City is named after the deceased Shia leader Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr.

83. Irish mountain climber? : NATE O’SUMMIT (from “NATO summit”)
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down."

87. Canadian blockhead : HOSER
“Hoser” is a Canadian slang term for a boorish person, especially a man fond of his beer. An alternative expression with the same meaning is “hose-head”. The term was popularized by Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas while portraying the characters Bob and Doug McKenzie on the comedy show SCTV.

88. Suffix with zinc : -ITE
Zincite is the mineral form of zinc oxide.

89. Victory goddess : NIKE
Nike was the Greek goddess of victory, often referred to as the Winged Goddess of Victory. The athletic shoe company Nike uses the “Nike swoosh” as its logo, which is based on the goddess’s wing.

93. Where the Storting meets : OSLO
The Storting is the Norwegian parliament and is located in Oslo, Norway's capital city. The Storting differs in structure from say the US Congress and the British Parliament in that is "unicameral", it has only one legislative chamber.

94. Light reddish-brown horses : SORRELS
The sorrel color of horse is a copper-red, although it is often used these days to describe any horse with chestnut coloring.

96. Irish dogsled racer? : JUNE O’ALASKA (from “Juneau, Alaska”)
Given that it’s the capital of the vast state of Alaska, it is perhaps not surprising to learn that the municipality of Juneau is almost as big as the area of the states of Rhode Island and Delaware combined, and yet has only a population of about 31,000 people!

99. 1979 Roman Polanski film : TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy's 1891 novel is "Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented". When it was originally published, "Tess ..." received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society's attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski's "Tess" released in 1979. Polanski apparently made "Tess" because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy's novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads "To Sharon".

101. Places for panels : DAISES
Ultimately our word "dais" comes from the Latin "discus" meaning a "disk-shaped object". I guess that many a dias was disc-shaped ...

106. Some investment bonds, for short : MUNIS
A municipal bond (muni) is one that is issued by a city or local government, or some similar agency. Munis have an advantage over other investments in that any interest earned on the bond is usually exempt from state and federal income taxes.

107. Band with the 1974 #1 hit "The Night Chicago Died" : PAPER LACE
The British band Paper Lace are known in the US as one-hit wonders, having topped the US charts in 1974 with “The Night Chicago Died”. On the other side of the Atlantic, Paper Lace are known as a “two-hit wonder”, having also topped the British charts with the anti-war song “Billy Don’t Be a Hero” that same year.

110. Irish health care worker? : MAE O’CLINIC (from “Mayo Clinic”)
The Mayo Clinic started out as a private practice run by Dr. William Mayo, an immigrant from the North of England who arrived in the US in 1846. Mayo's first practice was with his two sons, which evolved into a clinic set up with six other doctors.

112. Irish painter? : MEL O’YELLOW (from “Mellow Yellow”)
“Mellow Yellow” is a fun song that written and recorded in 1967 by the Scottish singer Donovan. There have been all sorts of rumors about the meaning of the term “mellow yellow”. The most common is that to refers to dried banana skins, and that they could be smoked to get high. All unfounded ...

116. Yard filler, maybe : ALE
A yard of ale is a very tall glass, one that is just under a yard (three feet) long. It holds about 60 fluid ounces of beer. I’ve tried drinking out of one, and it is extremely difficult. There is a bulb at the bottom of the glass. When you get towards the end of the drink, that bulb causes a kind of airlock and the remainder of the beer rushes to the top of the glass splashing you in the face.

118. Director von Sternberg : JOSEF
Josef von Sternberg was an American film director who was born in Austria. He was actually born with the name “Sternberg” and add the “von” early in his career. Even though von Sternberg worked primarily in the US, one of his most famous projects was “The Blue Angel” filmed in Germany, starring Emil Jannings and Marlene Dietrich.

Down
2. Problem in bed, for some : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

4. Light quanta : PHOTONS
In the field of electromagnetic radiation, a photon is the basic unit of light, an elementary particle. The photon is believed to have no mass, but this fact does seem to create some theoretical inconsistencies ... which I just don't understand!

6. Calvary inscription : INRI
The letters written on the cross on which Jesus died were “INRI”. INRI is an acronym for the Latin "Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum", which translates into English as "Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews".

Jesus was crucified at a location outside the walls of Jerusalem called Calvary or Golgotha, or “place of the skull” in English.

7. Richard of "A Summer Place" : EGAN
Richard Egan was an actor from San Francisco. One of Egan’s more famous roles was playing Elvis Presley’s older brother in “Love Me Tender”. Rod Serling eventually chose to narrate his epic “The Twilight Zone” series himself, but his first choice for narrator had been Richard Egan. It was perhaps lucky that Egan couldn’t do the “The Twilight Zone” gig due to other contractual obligations, as Serling's commentary added so much to the show.

"A Summer Place" is a 1959 movie based on a novel of the same name by Sloan Wilson. The film is a romantic drama starring Richard Egan and Dorothy McGuire. “Theme from A Summer Place” became a number one hit for Percy Faith in 1960.

8. ___ Bums (Brooklyn Dodgers nickname) : DEM
The Brooklyn dodgers were nicknamed “Dem Bums” by the sports cartoonist Willard Mullin.

11. Rice dish : PILAF
“Pilaf” is a Persian word, and we use it to describe rice that is browned in oil and then cooked in a seasoned broth.

12. Anklebones : TALI
The collection of seven bones in the foot just below the foot are known collectively as the tarsus. One of those bones is the talus (plural “tali”), more commonly called the ankle bone. The talus is the lower part of the ankle joint and articulates with the lower ends of the tibia and fibula in the lower leg.

13. ___-Caps (candy) : SNO
Sno-Caps are a brand of candy usually only available in movie theaters. Sno-caps have been around since the 1920s, would you believe?

15. Chaucer work that invokes the book of Job, with "The" : CLERK'S TALE
“The Clerk’s Tale” is one of Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales”.

Geoffrey Chaucer was an English author. He is often referred to as the father of English literature because he established vernacular English as a legitimate language for artistic works, as up to that point authors used French or Latin. Chaucer's most famous work is actually unfinished, a collection of stories called "The Canterbury Tales", all written at the end of the 14th century.

16. Tony-winning actress Judith : IVEY
Judith Ivey is an actress from El Paso, Texas. Ivey is perhaps best known for playing B. J. Poteet in the last season of the TV show “Designing Women”.

19. Jai alai basket : CESTA
A cesta (also “xistera”) is a wicker scoop strapped to the wrist that is used for catching and throwing the ball in jai alai. Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language.

23. ___ Johansson, 1959-60 world heavyweight champion : INGEMAR
Ingemar Johansson was a Swedish boxer, and former heavyweight champion of the world. Johansson won the title by defeating Floyd Patterson in 1959.

25. AAA service : TOWING
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

27. Protestant denom. : EPISC
The Episcopal Church in the US is a branch of the Anglican Communion, and so is associated with the Church of England. The Episcopal Church is descended from the Church of England’s presence in the American colonies, prior to the American Revolution. The American Anglicans split with mother church, largely because the clergy of the Church of England are required to swear allegiance to the British monarch. Members of the Episcopal Church are known as Episcopalians. “Episcopal” is an adjective and “Episcopalian” is a noun.

35. Positive principle : YANG
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

36. Versatile bean : SOYA
What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink "soya milk".

37. Pith helmet : TOPEE
Pith helmets were worn by mainly Europeans in the tropics, often on safari or as part of a military uniform. The helmet was light in weight, covered with cloth and made from cork or pith. Pith helmets were also called safari helmets, topees and topis.

39. Breeze : SNAP
It’s a breeze, it’s easy, it’s a snap.

45. "Tony n' ___ Wedding" : TINA’S
“Tony n' Tina's Wedding” is described as “environmental theater” as there is a lot of audience participation. The play is basically an Italian-American wedding and reception, with the audience playing the guests.

48. Springfield Plateau area : OZARKS
The Ozark Mountains aren't really mountains geographically speaking, and the Ozarks are better described by the alternate name, the Ozark Plateau. It's not really certain how the Ozarks got their name, but my favorite theory is that "Ozarks" is the phonetic spelling of "aux Arks", short for "of Arkansas" in French.

50. Numismatist's classification : RARE
A numismatist is a coin collector. The term “numismatics” comes into English via French from the Latin word “nomisma”, meaning ”coin”.

53. Preinstalled iPhone browser : SAFARI
Clever clue. Safari is Apple's flagship Internet browser. Personally, I use Google Chrome ...

60. Montréal suburb Côte St.-___ : LUC
Côte Saint-Luc is a suburb of Montreal that is located on the actual island of Montreal.

63. Pear or quince : POME
The Latin word for "fruit" is “pomum”, which gives us the botanical term "pome" used for a group of fleshy fruits, including apples and pears.

The quince is a fruit related to the apple and pear. Some people suggest that the fruit eaten from the Tree of Knowledge by Adam and Eve was in fact a quince.

64. Utah city : OREM
Orem, Utah was originally known as "Sharon" (a Biblical name), then "Provo Bench", and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called "Orem". Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

65. One of the Gandhis : INDIRA
Indira Gandhi's father was Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Minister of India (and the "Nehru" of the Nehru Jacket). Indira herself became Prime Minister in 1966. She was assassinated in 1984 by two of her own bodyguards, as she was walking to meet Peter Ustinov who was about to interview her for Irish television.

66. Foot bone : TARSAL
The tarsals are the ankle bones, equivalent to the carpals in the wrist.

67. Indian princesses : RANIS
“Raja” (also “rajah”) is word derived from Sanskrit that is used particularly in India for a monarch or princely ruler. The female form is “rani” (also “ranee”) and is used for a raja’s wife.

68. Orphic hymn charmer : ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of Lyric Poetry.

Orpheus is a figure from Greek mythology, very often associated with poetry, singing, music and the lyre in particular. In ancient Greece there was even an Orphic cult that in effect adopted the poetry ascribed to Orpheus as central to the cult's belief system. The adjectives "Orphic" and "Orphean" describe things pertaining to Orpheus, and because of his romantic, musical bent, the term has come to describe anything melodious or enchanting.

73. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. Hershiser lives in Las Vegas and when he isn't working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables.

74. Lighting expert? : PYRO
“Pyro-” is the combining form of the Greek word for "fire". A pyromaniac (a "pyro") is someone with an abnormal desire to start fires, or with a general obsession with fire.

77. "Great" birds : AUKS
Auks are penguin-like sea birds that live in colder northern waters including the Arctic. Like penguins, auks are great swimmers, but unlike penguins, auks can fly.

78. Marie Curie, e.g.: Abbr. : MME
Marie Curie lived a life of firsts. She was the first female professor at the University of Paris, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and indeed was the first person to win two Nobel prizes (in 1903 and 1911). Most of Curie’s work was in the field of radioactivity, and was carried out in the days when the impact of excessive radiation on the human body was not understood. She died from aplastic anemia, caused by high exposure to radiation. To this day, Curie's personal papers are kept preserved in lead-lined boxes as they are highly radioactive, even her personal cookbook.

96. She married Bobby on "The Sopranos" : JANICE
On the HBO hit show "The Sopranos", Janice is a Tony Soprano’s elder sister. Janice is played by actress Aida Turturro.

97. Social welfare org. : UNICEF
The United Nations Children’s Fund is known by the acronym UNICEF because the organization’s original name when it was founded in 1946 was the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund.

98. Eastern wrap: Var. : SAREE
The item of clothing called a "sari" (also "saree") is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that's a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

100. Bonito relatives : TUNAS
Bonito is the name given to several species of fish, intermediate in size between mackerel and tuna. The name comes directly from the Spanish word for “pretty”. In some parts of Spain, tuna is known as "Bonito del Norte".

102. Possible water contaminator : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

104. Barbra's "Funny Girl" co-star : OMAR
Omar Sharif is the great Hollywood actor from Egypt, an actor who played major roles in memorable movies such as "Doctor Zhivago" and "Lawrence of Arabia". But to me he is my bridge hero (the card game). In his heyday Sharif was one of the best bridge players in the world.

Barbra Streisand has recorded 31 top-ten albums since 1963, more than any other female recording artist. In fact, she has had an album in the top ten for the last five decades, a rare achievement in itself.

The movie "Funny Girl" stars Barbra Streisand in the title role of Fanny Brice. The real Fanny Brice was a theater and film actress, and "Funny Girl" is very loosely based on her life story. Fanny Brice was born into a Hungarian Jewish family in New York City, with the real name of Fania Borach.

105. ___ noir : CAFE
“Café noir” is French for “black coffee”.

106. "The Hunter (Catalan Landscape)" painter : MIRO
Joan Miro was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miro was "the most Surrealist of us all".

107. Fertilizer ingredient : PEAT
When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs.

108. Bit of stagnant-water growth : ALGA
Algae are similar to terrestrial plants in that they use photosynthesis to create sugars from light and carbon dioxide, but they differ in that they have simpler anatomies, and for example lack roots.

109. Lucrative Internet biz : PORN
The word "pornography" comes from the Greek "pornographos" meaning "writing of prostitutes".

111. War on Poverty prez : LBJ
President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) is one of only four people to have held all four elected federal offices, namely US Representative, US Senator, US Vice-President and US President. As President he is perhaps best remembered for escalating involvement in the Vietnam War, and for his “Great Society” legislation.

112. What can open files? : MIS-
“Mis-” is the prefix in the word “misfiles”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pat : DAB
4. Nosed around : PRIED
9. Univ. divisions : DEPTS
14. Early third-century year : CCIV
18. Univ. in Troy, N.Y. : RPI
19. Quarter back, possibly : CHANGE
20. Like some workers : APIAN
21. Edison's middle name : ALVA
22. Irish chemist? : ANGIE O’GRAM (from “angiogram”)
24. Irish arborist? : WILL O’TREES (from “willow trees”)
26. Harvey of Hollywood : WEINSTEIN
27. China's Zhou ___ : ENLAI
28. How pastrami is usually ordered : ON RYE
29. Serenaded : SANG TO
30. "Scary Movie," for one : SPOOF
31. Love letters? : SWAK
32. Irish secretary? : JEAN O’TYPING (from “genotyping”)
36. Targets for a delivery : SHIPS TO
39. One may take you in : SCAM
41. Mists : SPRAYS
42. Bird on a Canadian dollar : LOON
43. All-human bridge? : TOO
44. Barely bite : NIP AT
46. When the day's done, to Donne : E’EN
47. Irish algebra teacher? : COREY O’GRAPH (from “choreograph”)
51. Missile Command maker : ATARI
52. Noodges : NAGS
54. Big name in restaurant reviews : ZAGAT
55. "Hard ___!" (nautical command) : ALEE
56. Digs of pigs : PEN
57. When the day's done, to Denis : NUIT
59. End of a game? : ALAI
61. Long, angry complaint : SCREED
63. Irish woodworker? : PATTY O’FURNITURE (from “patio furniture”)
67. Lie : REPOSE
70. Part of a dishwasher : RACK
71. California county or its seat : NAPA
72. Beat : TOP
75. Jack-in-the-pulpit, e.g. : ARUM
76. Finger-pointer : NAMER
79. ___ City (Baghdad area) : SADR
81. Lie : STORY
83. Irish mountain climber? : NATE O’SUMMIT (from “NATO summit”)
86. Family nickname : SIS
87. Canadian blockhead : HOSER
88. Suffix with zinc : -ITE
89. Victory goddess : NIKE
90. Set crowd, maybe : EXTRAS
93. Where the Storting meets : OSLO
94. Light reddish-brown horses : SORRELS
96. Irish dogsled racer? : JUNE O’ALASKA (from “Juneau, Alaska”)
99. 1979 Roman Polanski film : TESS
100. Places for fuel : TANKS
101. Places for panels : DAISES
104. Fall shade : OCHRE
106. Some investment bonds, for short : MUNIS
107. Band with the 1974 #1 hit "The Night Chicago Died" : PAPER LACE
110. Irish health care worker? : MAE O’CLINIC (from “Mayo Clinic”)
112. Irish painter? : MEL O’YELLOW (from “Mellow Yellow”)
113. Do sometimes called a "natural" : AFRO
114. Support : BRACE
115. "So true" : I AGREE
116. Yard filler, maybe : ALE
117. Snorkeling locale : REEF
118. Director von Sternberg : JOSEF
119. Put up with : STAND
120. "___ not!" : DID

Down
1. Ties : DRAWS
2. Problem in bed, for some : APNEA
3. Like some bands with only modest Western popularity : BIG IN JAPAN
4. Light quanta : PHOTONS
5. Burning sensation? : RAGE
6. Calvary inscription : INRI
7. Richard of "A Summer Place" : EGAN
8. ___ Bums (Brooklyn Dodgers nickname) : DEM
9. Suddenly strike : DAWN ON
10. Novel ending : EPILOG
11. Rice dish : PILAF
12. Anklebones : TALI
13. ___-Caps (candy) : SNO
14. Steal, as a vehicle : CARNAP
15. Chaucer work that invokes the book of Job, with "The" : CLERK'S TALE
16. Tony-winning actress Judith : IVEY
17. Still-life subject : VASE
19. Jai alai basket : CESTA
23. ___ Johansson, 1959-60 world heavyweight champion : INGEMAR
25. AAA service : TOWING
27. Protestant denom. : EPISC
30. One who bugs people? : SPY
31. Riddles with bullets : SHOOTS UP
33. Christmas Day urging : OPEN IT
34. Compact : TREATY
35. Positive principle : YANG
36. Versatile bean : SOYA
37. Pith helmet : TOPEE
38. Voiced some pleasure : OOHED
39. Breeze : SNAP
40. Quote : CITE
42. Advantage, with "up" : LEG
45. "Tony n' ___ Wedding" : TINA’S
48. Springfield Plateau area : OZARKS
49. Pour : RAIN
50. Numismatist's classification : RARE
53. Preinstalled iPhone browser : SAFARI
58. Setting set : UTENSILS
60. Montréal suburb Côte St.-___ : LUC
62. Hard drive malfunction : CRASH
63. Pear or quince : POME
64. Utah city : OREM
65. One of the Gandhis : INDIRA
66. Foot bone : TARSAL
67. Indian princesses : RANIS
68. Orphic hymn charmer : ERATO
69. "Let's shake!" : PUT ‘ER THERE!
72. Prepare the first course, say : TOSS A SALAD
73. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
74. Lighting expert? : PYRO
77. "Great" birds : AUKS
78. Marie Curie, e.g.: Abbr. : MME
80. About : AS TO
82. Got sick : TOOK ILL
84. "I'll be right with you" : ONE SEC
85. Some distance races : TEN-KS
91. Marks (out) : XES
92. Depressed-looking : SAD-EYED
95. Cover with new shingles : REROOF
96. She married Bobby on "The Sopranos" : JANICE
97. Social welfare org. : UNICEF
98. Eastern wrap: Var. : SAREE
100. Bonito relatives : TUNAS
102. Possible water contaminator : E COLI
103. Tailored : SEWED
104. Barbra's "Funny Girl" co-star : OMAR
105. ___ noir : CAFE
106. "The Hunter (Catalan Landscape)" painter : MIRO
107. Fertilizer ingredient : PEAT
108. Bit of stagnant-water growth : ALGA
109. Lucrative Internet biz : PORN
111. War on Poverty prez : LBJ
112. What can open files? : MIS-


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1 comment :

Anonymous said...

very clever and amusing

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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