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0720-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Jul 14, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Eric Berlin
THEME: Moving Parts … today’s puzzle comes with a note:
The answer to each starred clue must have two consecutive letters removed before it is written into the grid. These letters will move to a pair of circles elsewhere in the puzzle. (In all cases, new words will be formed.) The nine letter pairs, when properly arranged, will spell an appropriate answer at 72-Across.
We need to TAKE a pair of circled letters from nine of the across-answers in the grid so that they match their clue. We then GIVE each of those nine pairs of letters to the answer of the appropriate starred clue, so that it also makes sense of its clue. We then have to arrange the pairs of letters so that they reveal to us A LITTLE GIVE AND TAKE (AL-IT-TL-EG-IV-EA-ND-TA-KE).
72A. See instructions : A LITTLE GIVE AND TAKE

21A. Burger go-with : FRIE(ND)S (fries)
86D. *Old West robber : BA(ND)IT

22A. Yolk surrounder : WHIT(TL)E (white)
90D. *Not rough : GEN(TL)E

39A. Idea : NO(TA)TION (notion)
8A. *Turn, as a wheel : RO(TA)TE

51A. Openly defy : F(AL)L OUT (flout)
53A. *Royal messenger : HER(AL)D

96A. Plain to see : OVER(EA)T (overt)
43A. *Words of praise : PA(EA)N

112A. Indigenous : N(EG)ATIVE (native)
14D. *Great in number : L(EG)ION

121A. Beast of burden : BURR(IT)O (burro)
115D. *Newton subject : GRAV(IT)Y

133A. Babble on : PR(IV)ATE (prate)
88A. *Piddling : TR(IV)IAL

138A. Asparagus unit : SPEA(KE)R (spear)
8D. *Upbraids : REBU(KE)S
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 16m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Edible plant extract : PALM OIL
Palm oil and coconut oil are two of the vegetable oils that aren’t very good for our health. Both are high in saturated fat.

Saturated fats differ from unsaturated fats chemically in that saturated fats have chains of fatty acids that are relatively straight, allowing individual molecules to pack closely together. This close packing largely explains why saturated fats are solid at room temperature. Unsaturated fatty acids on the other hand have "kinks" in the chains of their fatty acids, so that they cannot pack together closely. Unsaturated fats are generally liquid at room temperature. Food manufacturers have learned that humans get sick by consuming saturated fats (i.e. fats from animal sources). So, they market "healthy" vegetable fats (naturally unsaturated and liquid at room temperature) that they have magically transformed in solid fats (like vegetable spreads). All they did was saturate the healthy fats, so that now they solidify at room temperature, and in our arteries. There should be a law ...

20. Former Nebraska senator James : EXON
J. James Exon was a US Senator from Nebraska and a former governor of the state. Exon was a Democrat, and one who never lost an election for office.

25. Low numero : TRE
In Italian, three (tre) is a low number (numero).

29. Cologne conjunction : UND
“Und” is the German for “and”.

Cologne is the fourth largest city in Germany, and is known as “Koln” in German.

45. Strangle : GAROTTE
The handheld weapon known as a garrote (or garotte) was in particular used by murderers and robbers harassing travelers in India. These felons were known locally as "thuggees" (from the Hindi word for "thief"). This gave us our contemporary word "thug", meaning a brute.

47. Cartoon dog : ASTRO
Astro is the pet dog on the animated television show “The Jetsons”.

“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it was debuted in 1963 by ABC, "The Jetsons" was the network’s first ever color broadcast.

49. Italian dish that needs much stirring : RISOTTO
Risotto is an Italian rice dish that is usually served as a first course in Italy, but as a main course here in North America.

57. Tony-winning musical with the song "Find Your Grail" : SPAMALOT
“Monty Python and the Holy Grail” was released as a movie in 1975, and was a great success. Some thirty years later the film’s storyline was used as inspiration for the hit musical “Spamalot”. I saw “Spamalot” for the first time relatively recently and wasn’t that impressed. But, mine was very much a minority opinion ...

60. Long March participant : MAOIST
“The Long March” was a retreat by the Communist Red Army through much of China, falling back from the advances of the army of the Chinese Nationalist Party. Taking place in 1934-1935, the Long March is famous for the ascent to power of Mao Zedong as he led the retreating forces. As a result of the Long March, the Communist Party was able to recover and rebuild in the northern part of the county. The orderly retreat and respect shown for the Chinese peasantry led to the rise of popularity of the Communist Party with the populace.

63. Raised transports : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

66. Classic muscle cars : GTOS
The acronym GTO stands for Gran Turismo Omologato, which is an Italian phrase that translates as “Grand Touring Homologated”. Italian car manufacturers started the tradition of calling their luxury performance cars “Gran Turismo”, and calling those cars they approved for racing “Gran Turismo Omologato”. The phrase “gran turismo omologato” translates as “grand touring homologated”, with “homologated” being a technical term signifying official approval.

78. Wise men : THE MAGI
"Magi" is the plural of the Latin word "magus", a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the "wise men from the East" who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born.

86. Eagle's org. : BSA
As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910.

The rank of Eagle Scout was introduced by the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) in 1911. A candidate for Eagle Scout must have first earned a minimum of 21 merit badges, and demonstrate leadership skills and embrace Scout Spirit. Prior to 1911, the highest rank attainable in the BSA was Wolf Scout.

100. Trickster of American Indian mythology : RAVEN
According to Native American mythology, the god Raven was the creator of the world, yet was also a skillful trickster.

101. Close overlap of fugue voices : STRETTO
“Stretto” is a musical term. In a fugue, stretto is the imitation of a motif in close succession, so closely that the answer to the motif has not been completed.

A fugue is similar to a round in that it is a piece written for two or more voices, with themes that are introduced and taken up by different voices at different pitches. The most famous composer of fugues has to be Bach.

114. Caroled : SANG
The word "carol" came into English via the Old French word "carole", which was a "dance in a ring". When "carol" made it into English, about 1300 AD, the term was used to describe a dance as well as a joyful song. Around 1500 AD, carols that were sung came to be associated with Christmas.

117. Prix ___ : FIXE
On a restaurant menu, items that are "à la carte" are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked "table d'hôte" (also called "prix fixe") is a fixed-price menu with limited choice.

118. Sci-fi's Hubbard : L RON
L. Ron Hubbard wrote a self-improvement book in 1950 called "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health". A few years later the concepts were used in the founding of the Church of Scientology.

124. Many ski lodges : A-FRAMES
A A-frame house is one that has a steeply-angled roof, one forming the shape of the letter “A”. The A-frame design is popular in snowy regions, as the roof is so steeply pitched that it does not collect snow.

134. Cathedral area : NAVE
In large Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, where most of the congregation are seated.

137. Peevish state : SNIT
The exact etymology of “snit”, meaning “fit of temper”, isn’t really known. The term was first used in print in the play “Kiss the Boys Goodbye” by Clare Booth Luce, which dates back to the 1930s and is set in the American South.

Down
1. One of eight Eng. kings : EDW
There have been eight kings of England named Edward. Edward I was on the throne from 1272 to 1307 and was also known as Edward Longshanks. The “Longshanks” name came from Edward’s exceptional height. Edward VIII was on the British throne for less than a year. Famously, Edward VIII abdicated in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

4. Used tire : RETREAD
A retread tire is one that has been recycled, possibly more than once. The tread of the old tire is buffed away, and and new rubber tread is applied to the "bare" tire using some special process that seems to work really well. Retreads are a lot cheaper, and obviously are relatively friendly to the environment.

6. Glad-handing sort : POL
Politician (pol)

"Glad hand", meaning to extend a welcome" has been around as an expression since the end of the 1800s, although it was used less cynically back then. Then along came politicians ...

7. Two-channel : STEREO
Monophonic sound ("mono") is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

12. Cpl.'s inferior : PFC
A Private First Class (PFC) is inferior in rank to a corporal (Cpl.)

18. W.W. II craft : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

30. Neither blue nor red?: Abbr. : IND
On political maps, red states are Republican and blue states Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

34. Saucier's boss : CHEF
“Saucier” is a French term, the name for the cook in charge of making the sauces in a large commercial kitchen. The saucier also makes stews and hot hors d'oeuvres, and sautés items as required.

37. Tenor from Naples : CARUSO
Enrico Caruso was an Italian tenor from Naples, famous as one of the first opera singers to embrace the phonograph technology of the early 1900s. He made 290 recordings that were released between 1902 and 1920, and today they’re all available on CD or as digital downloads.

38. Don of "The Andy Griffith Show" : KNOTTS
Don Knotts was a comedic actor who played two major roles on television: Barney Fife on “The Andy Griffith Show” in the sixties, and Ralph Furley on “Three’s Company” in the seventies and eighties. Knotts appeared with child actor Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”, and in fact the two are sixth cousins.

41. Mex. miss : SRTA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

42. 41-Down's room : SALA
A room (sala) is a division (división) of a house (casa), in Spanish.

52. French fine : AMENDE
“Amende” is French for “fine”, as in the punishment handed out for violating some laws. One has to make “amendments” for the wrongdoing.

54. "___ Enchanted" : ELLA
"Ella Enchanted" is the title of a fantasy novel written by Gail Carson Levine, and published in 1997. It is a retelling of the story of Cinderella, with lots of mythical creatures added. A film adaptation was released in 2004, starring Anne Hathaway in the title role.

55. Mideast currency : RIAL
The "Rial" is name of the currency of Iran (as well as Yemen, Oman, Cambodia and Tunisia).

59. Fictional estate : TARA
Rhett Butler hung out with Scarlett O'Hara at the Tara plantation in Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind". Tara was founded not far from the Georgia city of Jonesboro by Scarlett's father, Irish immigrant Gerald O'Hara. Gerald named his new abode after the Hill of Tara back in his home country, the ancient seat of the High King of Ireland.

62. Chanteuse Eartha : KITT
Eartha Kitt sure did have a unique voice and singing style. Her rendition of "Santa Baby" has to be one of the most distinctive and memorable recordings in the popular repertoire. Some of you will no doubt remember Eartha playing Catwoman on the final series of the TV show "Batman".

65. State with the motto "Oro y plata" : MONTANA
"Oro y Plata" means "gold and silver", and is the state motto of Montana. The motto was written in Spanish, solely because "it had a nice ring to it".

68. Half sister of Ares : ATHENA
In Greek mythology the god Ares was the half-brother of the goddess Athena, although the two were regarded as enemies. Both deities are associated with war, with Athena representing strategic warfare whereas Ares is linked to momentary, passionate violence.

70. Bird: Prefix : AVI-
The prefix “avi-” means “bird-related” as in “aviculture”, the breeding of birds.

71. "Undo" mark : STET
"Stet" is a Latin word meaning "let it stand". In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word "stet" and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

73. Overseas prince : EMIR
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

74. Box office : GATE
The term "box office" may date back to Shakespearean times. In those days long past, patrons would deposit fees for seeing theater performances in boxes. The full boxes would be collected and placed in an office called, imaginatively enough, the "box office".

75. ___ Plus : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

76. Actor Dullea : KEIR
Keir Dullea is an actor best known for portraying one of the two main astronauts in the (1968) film “2001: A Space Odyssey”.

77. Latin "was to be" : ERAT
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

81. Three-ingredient treats : S’MORES
S'mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s'more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called "Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts". Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

82. World capital where Monopoly is banned : HAVANA
Apparently, when Fidel Castro came to power in Cuba he banned the very popular game “Monopoly”, as he viewed it as a symbol of capitalism. In fact, he ordered that every copy of the game on the island be destroyed.

92. Like the cry "Veni, vidi, vici" : CAESAREAN
The oft-quoted statement "Veni, vidi, vici" ("I came, I saw, I conquered") is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BC and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

93. Abbr. in some city names : HGTS
Heights (Hgts.)

102. Windy City paper, with "the" : TRIB
"The Chicago Tribune" was first published in 1847. The most famous edition of "The Trib" was probably in 1948 when the headline was "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN", on the occasion of that year's presidential election. When it turned out Truman had actually won, the victor picked up the paper with the erroneous headline and posed for photographs with it ... a famous, famous photo, that must have stuck in the craw of the editor at the time.

103. Election night data : RETURNS
It seems that the derivation of Chicago's nickname as the "Windy City" isn't as obvious as I would have thought. There are two viable theories. First that the weather can be breezy, with wind blowing in off Lake Michigan. The effect of the wind is exaggerated by the grid-layout adopted by city planners after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The second theory is that "windy" means "being full of bluster". Sportswriters from the rival city of Cincinnati were fond of calling Chicago supporters "windy" in the 1860s and 1870s, meaning that they were full of hot air in their claims that the Chicago White Stockings were superior to the Cincinnati Red Stockings.

105. One of the Windward Islands : ST LUCIA
The Caribbean island nation of Saint Lucia has a population of less than 200,000. Remarkably, Saint Lucia has produced two Nobel Laureates: economist Arthur Lewis and poet Derek Walcott.

107. Nobel-winning writer Andric : IVO
Ivo Andrić was a novelist from former Yugoslavia who won the 1961 Nobel Prize for Literature.

108. N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer Dawson : LEN
Len Dawson is a retired AFL-NFL quarterback who played for the Kansas City Chiefs (originally the Dallas Texans).

111. Former transportation secretary Norman : MINETA
Norman Mineta is a democrat who served as Secretary of Transportation in the George W. Bush administration. Mineta served for over five in the post, resigning in 2006, making him the longest serving Transportation Secretary ever. Mineta was born to Japanese immigrant parents and spent some of his childhood years with his family in an internment camp in Wyoming during WWII.

115. *Newton subject : GRAV(IT)Y
Sir Isaac Newton was one of the most influential people in history, the man who laid the groundwork for all of classical mechanics. The story about an apple falling on his head, inspiring him to formulate his theories about gravity, well that's not quite true. Newton often told the story about observing an apple falling in his mother's garden and how this made him acutely aware of the Earth's gravitational pull. However, he made no mention of the apple hitting him on the head.

117. Choice cut : FILET
The center-cut of a beef tenderloin is one of three cuts, along with the butt and the tail. The center-cut is used for filet mignon, and also for the dishes Chateaubriand and Beef Wellington.

120. Latin "you love" : AMAS
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

122. Sitarist Shankar : RAVI
Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous virtuoso (to us Westerners) from the world of Indian classical music, and was noted for his sitar playing. Also, Shankar was the father of the beautiful pop singer Norah Jones.

123. Nickname for José : PEPE
“José” is the Spanish for “Joseph”. Friends might also refer to José as “Pepe”. Both José and Pepe derive from Saint Joseph, the father of Jesus. Saint Joseph is sometimes referred to as “padre putativo” meaning “presumed father". The acronym “PP”, standing for “padre putativo”, led to the name “Pepe”.

124. P.D. alert : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

125. Brother's title : FRA
The title "Fra" (brother) is used by Italian monks.

131. Bishop's domain : SEE
In the Roman Catholic Church, an episcopal see is the official seat of a bishop, and is usually described by the town or city where the bishop resides and has his cathedral. The most famous see in the church is called the Holy See, the episcopal see of the Bishop of Rome, the Pope.

132. Classic fantasy game co. : TSR
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Swaddles, e.g. : ENWRAPS
8. *Turn, as a wheel : RO(TA)TE
12. Edible plant extract : PALM OIL
19. Be too fearful to : DARE NOT
20. Former Nebraska senator James : EXON
21. Burger go-with : FRIE(ND)S (fries)
22. Yolk surrounder : WHIT(TL)E (white)
23. Bit of sweat : BEAD
24. Most hip : COOLEST
25. Low numero : TRE
26. Cowboys' activity : ROUNDUP
29. Cologne conjunction : UND
30. Slushy drink : ICEE
32. Kitten sounds : MEWS
33. Detailed plans : SPECS
35. Use a straw : SUCK
39. Idea : NO(TA)TION (notion)
41. Hides away : STASHES
43. *Words of praise : PA(EA)N
44. Thingamajig : DOODAD
45. Strangle : GAROTTE
47. Cartoon dog : ASTRO
49. Italian dish that needs much stirring : RISOTTO
51. Openly defy : F(AL)L OUT (flout)
53. *Royal messenger : HER(AL)D
57. Tony-winning musical with the song "Find Your Grail" : SPAMALOT
60. Long March participant : MAOIST
61. Not ___ (none) : A LICK
63. Raised transports : ELS
64. Unchanged : SAME
66. Classic muscle cars : GTOS
67. Not just slow : GLACIAL
69. Theater supporters : PATRONS
72. See instructions : A LITTLE GIVE AND TAKE
78. Wise men : THE MAGI
79. Is on the brink : TEETERS
81. Get rid of : SHED
85. ___ menu : EDIT
86. Eagle's org. : BSA
88. *Piddling : TR(IV)IAL
89. Smear : MALIGN
91. Locks up again : RECHAINS
95. Painterish : ARTY
96. Plain to see : OVER(EA)T (overt)
98. Stir up : AGITATE
100. Trickster of American Indian mythology : RAVEN
101. Close overlap of fugue voices : STRETTO
104. Attack : ASSAIL
109. K.C.-to-Detroit dir. : ENE
110. She rules : EMPRESS
112. Indigenous : N(EG)ATIVE (native)
114. Caroled : SANG
116. "___ deal?" : IS IT A
117. Prix ___ : FIXE
118. Sci-fi's Hubbard : L RON
119. Appeared in print : RAN
121. Beast of burden : BURR(IT)O (burro)
123. Young seal : PUP
124. Many ski lodges : A-FRAMES
128. Legitimate : REAL
129. Formed from a mold : DIECAST
133. Babble on : PR(IV)ATE (prate)
134. Cathedral area : NAVE
135. Stay-at-home workers? : UMPIRES
136. Tot-watched : BABYSAT
137. Peevish state : SNIT
138. Asparagus unit : SPEA(KE)R (spear)

Down
1. One of eight Eng. kings : EDW
2. Informal turndown : NAH
3. Email, say : WRITE TO
4. Used tire : RETREAD
5. Pay to play : ANTE
6. Glad-handing sort : POL
7. Two-channel : STEREO
8. *Upbraids : REBU(KE)S
9. Field team : OXEN
10. Mushroom : TOADSTOOL
11. Reach, eventually : END UP AT
12. Cpl.'s inferior : PFC
13. Stir up : AROUSE
14. *Great in number : L(EG)ION
15. Card combinations : MELDS
16. Low number : ONE
17. Checks at the door, say : IDS
18. W.W. II craft : LST
27. Soccer blooper : OWN GOAL
28. Bother : PEST
30. Neither blue nor red?: Abbr. : IND
31. Say sweet words : COO
32. Some dresses : MIDIS
34. Saucier's boss : CHEF
36. In the mood : UP TO IT
37. Tenor from Naples : CARUSO
38. Don of "The Andy Griffith Show" : KNOTTS
40. Sticky stuff : TAR
41. Mex. miss : SRTA
42. 41-Down's room : SALA
46. Convenience store sights : ATMS
48. Slow, hard progress : SLOG
50. Stepped in for : SPELLED
52. French fine : AMENDE
53. Witch : HAG
54. "___ Enchanted" : ELLA
55. Mideast currency : RIAL
56. 701, once : DCCI
58. Bone: Prefix : OSTE-
59. Fictional estate : TARA
62. Chanteuse Eartha : KITT
65. State with the motto "Oro y plata" : MONTANA
68. Half sister of Ares : ATHENA
69. Greedy sort : PIG
70. Bird: Prefix : AVI-
71. "Undo" mark : STET
73. Overseas prince : EMIR
74. Box office : GATE
75. ___ Plus : ATRA
76. Actor Dullea : KEIR
77. Latin "was to be" : ERAT
80. Underhanded : SLY
81. Three-ingredient treats : S’MORES
82. World capital where Monopoly is banned : HAVANA
83. Football team : ELEVEN
84. Terrible : DIRE
86. *Old West robber : BA(ND)IT
87. "Shaddup!" : SIT ON IT!
90. *Not rough : GEN(TL)E
92. Like the cry "Veni, vidi, vici" : CAESAREAN
93. Abbr. in some city names : HGTS
94. Old West transport : STAGE
97. Shortening in recipes? : TSPS
99. Spanish "that" : ESA
102. Windy City paper, with "the" : TRIB
103. Election night data : RETURNS
105. One of the Windward Islands : ST LUCIA
106. Facility for small planes : AIRPARK
107. Nobel-winning writer Andric : IVO
108. N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer Dawson : LEN
111. Former transportation secretary Norman : MINETA
113. Large-scale evacuation : EXODUS
115. *Newton subject : GRAV(IT)Y
117. Choice cut : FILET
120. Latin "you love" : AMAS
122. Sitarist Shankar : RAVI
123. Nickname for José : PEPE
124. P.D. alert : APB
125. Brother's title : FRA
126. Poke fun at : RIB
127. Collection : SET
130. Prankster : IMP
131. Bishop's domain : SEE
132. Classic fantasy game co. : TSR


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

2 comments :

innovationjw051 said...
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Anonymous said...

I *REALLY* do not enjoy these 'cute' devices. Half the time, I don't get all the Rube Goldberg directions, and even when I do, it doesn't add anything to the puzzle. It's not clever, it's actually annoying.

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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