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0727-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Jul 14, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Randolph Ross
THEME: What’s My Line? … our themed answers todays are all verbal lines that one might use in certain situations, and the clues all look like unrelated and common phrases that end with LINE:
22A. Telephone line : SORRY, WRONG NUMBER
30A. Cruise line : SHOW ME THE MONEY
52A. Story line : ONCE UPON A TIME
77A. Finish line : THAT’S ALL, FOLKS
101A. Fault line : IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME
111A. Laugh line : TAKE MY WIFE, PLEASE!
14D. Help line : I'LL GET IT
15D. Date line : MAY I SEE YOU AGAIN?
39D. Power line : MIGHT MAKES RIGHT
84D. Subway line : EAT FRESH
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 32m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … FARFEL (falfel), MIGHT MAKES RIGHT (might makes light!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Sandwiches with toothpicks : BLTS
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

5. Corner key : CTRL
The control key (Ctrl) is usually located at the bottom-left of PC’s keyboard.

9. Refuse : CHAFF
The “chaff” is the dry husk that surrounds grains in cereal grasses, and it’s what’s left after threshing. We use the term “chaff” in a figurative sense as well, to mean “trivial or worthless matter”.

14. Alternative to texted : IMED
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

18. European capital, to natives : PRAHA
The beautiful city of Prague (“Praha” in Czech) is today the capital of the Czech Republic. Prague's prominence in Europe has come and gone over the centuries. For many years the city was the capital of the Holy Roman Empire.

20. Jimmy ___, "They'll Do It Every Time" cartoonist : HATLO
Jimmy Hatlo was the cartoonist behind the strip “They’ll Do It Every Time”, which he drew from it’s inception in 1929 until he passed away in 1963.

21. "Le Roi d'Ys" composer : LALO
Édouard Lalo was a classical composer from France. Lalo’s most famous work is probably the complex opera “Le roi d’Ys”, which is based on a Breton legend.

25. "___ Eyes" (1975 Eagles hit) : LYIN’
The Eagles song “Lyin’ Eyes” was recorded in 1975. Written by band members Don Henley and Glenn Frey, the lyrics were inspired by a meeting between a man and a woman the composers witnessed in Dan Tana’s Bar & Restaurant in Los Angeles. Henley and Frey imagined a scenario of secret love, and “Lyin’ Eyes” was born.

29. Gut feeling? : AGITA
Agita is another name for acid indigestion, and more generally can mean “agitation, anxiety”.

30. Cruise line : SHOW ME THE MONEY
"Jerry Maguire" is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several liines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:
- “Show me the money!”
- “You complete me”
- “You had me at ‘hello’”

37. San ___, Calif. : RAMON
The city of San Ramon is just a couple of miles from where I live in the San Francisco Bay Area. One of San Ramon’s claims to fame is that it is home to the Chevron headquarters.

40. "Double" or "triple" feat : AXEL
An “axel” is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. It was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

41. Special somethings : DOOZIES
Eleanora Duse was an Italian actress, known professionally simply as “Duse”. There is a theory that our term “doozy” derived from Eleanora’s family name. I guess she was a “doozy”.

43. Late actor Wallach : ELI
Eli Wallach appeared consistently and made great performances on the big and small screens since the 1950s. Wallach's most famous role was probably as “the Ugly” in “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”. More recently he gave a very strong performance in 2006’s “The Holiday”. Sadly, Wallach passed away in june 2014, at the age of 98.

44. Vinyl-roofed car : LANDAU
A landau is a 4-wheeled, horse-drawn carriage. It was quite sophisticated, with metal springs for a comfortable ride, and the smaller version (a “landaulet”) had a top that could fold down. Landaus were so called as they were first produced in the German city of Landau. More recently, the term “landau” was used for an automobile designed to look like a convertible, but with a fixed roof. The fixed roof is covered in vinyl to make it appear “convertible”.

48. Butler's quarters? : TARA
Rhett Butler hung out with Scarlett O'Hara at the Tara plantation in Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind". Tara was founded not far from the Georgia city of Jonesboro by Scarlett's father, Irish immigrant Gerald O'Hara. Gerald named his new abode after the Hill of Tara back in his home country, the ancient seat of the High King of Ireland.

49. Tickle Me Elmo maker : TYCO
Tickle Me Elmo was a sensational fad in the late nineties, with stores raising prices dramatically above the recommended retail price to take advantage of demand. Reportedly, prices as high as $1500 were paid at the height of the craze. The toy's manufacturer, Tyco, originally planned to market the "tickle" toy as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil (after the "Looney Tunes" character), but then went with "Elmo" after they bought the rights to use "Sesame Street" names.

56. First two words of "Dixie," often : OH, I
Oh, I wish I was in the land of cotton,
Old times there are not forgotten.
Look away, look away, look away Dixie Land!
“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

57. Longtime baseball union exec Donald : FEHR
Donald Fehr has been the executive director of the NHL Players Association since 2010. Fehr also served as the executive director of the MLB Players Association, from 1983 to 2009.

60. Romance novelist Roberts : NORA
Nora Roberts is a very successful author who has written over 165 romance novels. Roberts writes under a number of pen names: J.D. Robb, Jill March and Sarah Hardesty.

61. ___ de Champlain, founder of Quebec : SAMUEL
Samuel de Champlain was a French navigator, cartographer and explorer, and the man who made the first accurate map of “New France”, that ares on the east coast of North America that was colonized by the French starting in 1534. Champlain was also the first European to explore and describe the Great Lakes. In 1608, he founded the settlement that is now Quebec City. He named Lake Champlain, partially in today’s New York, Vermont and Quebec, after himself, as he was the first European to explore and describe the body of water.

63. Like the Marx Brothers : ANTIC
The five Marx Brothers were born to "Minnie" and "Frenchy" Marx in New York City. The more famous older boys were Chico, Harpo and Groucho. Zeppo was the youngest brother, and he appeared in the early Marx Brothers movies. The fifth son was called Gummo, and he decided to pursue a different career off the stage.

70. Car featured in the "Transformers" movies : CAMARO
The Chevrolet Camaro is a car produced by General Motors from 1966 to 2002, and reintroduced in 2009. The Camaro shared much of its design with the Pontiac Firebird, and was introduced as a potential competitor to the Ford Mustang.

The 2007 blockbuster hit “Transformers” is inspired by a line of toys. Toy transformers can be morphed from their mundane looking appearance as a vehicle or perhaps an animal, into a robotic action figure. Not a movie I will be renting though ...

72. Country with the most all-time medals in Olympic baseball : CUBA
Baseball was introduced as an Olympic sport in 1992. It was voted out of the games for 2012, becoming the first sport removed from the Olympics since polo was removed in 1936.

73. Pathet ___ (old revolutionary group) : LAO
The Pathet Lao was a communist organization in Laos that assumed political power 1975 after the Laotian Civil War.

75. Fit of fever : AGUE
An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

76. Capt.'s prediction : ETA
Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

83. Astronaut Slayton : DEKE
WWII pilot Deke Slayton was chosen as one of the original Mercury Seven astronauts, but he never flew in that program as he was grounded when it was discovered that he had a heart murmur. Famously, Slayton was then made NASA’s director of flight crew operations from 1963 to 1972. He eventually was cleared medically so that he went into space as docking module pilot on the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. Slayton was 51 years old when he flew, making him the oldest person to fly in space up to that time.

87. Iraq War danger, for short : IED
Sadly, having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am all too familiar with the devastating effects of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). One has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others. Of course these days, IEDs are very much in the news in Iraq and Afghanistan.

92. Names hidden in Al Hirschfeld drawings : NINAS
Al Hirschfeld was a caricaturist known for sketching simple, black and white portraits of celebrities. His wife gave birth to a daughter in 1945 who they called Nina. Soon after her arrival into the world, Hirschfeld started to include Nina's name in his portraits, hiding the word "Nina" somewhere in the drawing. Often her name would appear more than once, so Hirschfeld got into the habit of adding a number after his signature, denoting how many times "Nina" appeared. In 1966 he drew a portrait of Nina herself, and titled it "Nina's Revenge". There wasn't even one occurrence of Nina's name in the drawing, but there were two appearances each of "Al" and "Dolly", Nina's parents!

94. Gown accessory : STOLE
A stole is a lady's clothing accessory, a narrow shawl. A stole can be made of quite light decorative material or it can be heavier, especially if made of fur.

96. Hunt in "Mission: Impossible" : ETHAN
It was Tom Cruise’s idea to adapt the “Mission Impossible” television series for the big screen, and it became the first project for Cruise’s own production company. Tom Cruise took on the starring role of Ethan Hunt in the movies, the point man for the Impossible Missions Force (IMF).

99. Small pellets of noodle dough in Jewish cuisine : FARFEL
Farfel are flake-shaped pieces of pasta used in Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.

106. Foreign princes : EMIRS
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

107. Hogan contemporary : SNEAD
Sam Snead was probably the most successful golfer never to win a US Open title, as he won a record 82 PGA Tour events. He did win seven majors, but never the US Open. He was also quite the showman. He once hit the scoreboard at Wrigley Field stadium with a golf ball, by teeing off from home plate.

Ben Hogan was one of only five golfers to win all four majors (alongside Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Gary Player and Gene Sarazen). Hogan’s record is particularly remarkable as he survived a near-fatal car accident when he was 36, after which doctors suggested he might never walk again. Hogan and his wife had been in a head-on collision with a Greyhound bus.

108. Road shoulder : BERM
A berm is narrow ledge, usually at the top or bottom of a slope. The name “berm” is also used as the shoulder of a road in some parts of the United States.

110. Old Venetian V.I.P. : DOGE
Doges were the elected chief magistrates of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

111. Laugh line : TAKE MY WIFE, PLEASE!
Henny Youngman was comedian known for his one-liners, most famously “Take my wife - please!” Youngman grew up in Brooklyn, New York but was actually born in Liverpool in England.

114. "I Ain't Marching Anymore" singer/songwriter : OCHS
Phil Ochs was an American protest singer who was active in the days of the Vietnam War.

115. Bayer brand : ALEVE
Aleve is a brand name for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

118. Chris who played Mr. Big on "Sex and the City" : NOTH
The actor Chris Noth is best known for his television roles. Noth played Detective Mike Logan on “Law & Order” and Big on “Sex and the City”. You can now see him in a leading role on the show “The Good Wife”.

Is it just me or would “Sex and the City” be so much better off without the two romantic leads, Carrie and Mr. Big? Carrie Bradshaw is played by Sarah Jessica Parker, and Mr. Big (aka John James Preston) is played by Chris Noth. We never found out Mr Big's first name (John) until the series finale, and his full name wasn't revealed until the first movie came out.

120. Gallic greeting : ALLO
The French use “Allo!” as a greeting when answering the phone. I used to watch a very entertaining British sitcom as a young man called “‘Allo ‘Allo!” that was about the resistance movement in WWII France.

121. Spanish 3 + 3 : SEIS
In Spanish, two x three (dos x tres) equals six (seis).

Down
2. Slow : LARGO
Largo is a instruction to play a piece of music with a very slow tempo. “Largo” is the Italian word for “broadly”.

5. Cartier units : CARATS
A carat is a unit of mass used in measuring gemstones that is equal to 200 mg.

Cartier is a manufacturer of jewelry and watches based in Paris that has had a long association with royalty and the very rich. According to King Edward VII, Cartier is “the jeweller of kings and the king of jewellers”.

6. Throat soother : TROCHE
A troche is a medicinal lozenge, like a pastille, and is usually circular in shape. “Troche” ultimately derives from the Greek word for “wheel”.

9. French connection? : CHUNNEL
The Channel Tunnel between the UK and France is also known familiarly as “the Chunnel”, and in French as “Le tunnel sous la Manche” (translating as “the tunnel under the English Channel”. The earliest credible proposal for a tunnel under the Channel was made in 1802. The plan was for the 1802 tunnel to be illuminated with oil lamps and for transportation to be provided by horse-drawn carriages. There was even a plan for an artificial island to be placed mid-Channel where horses would be changed.

10. Exemplar of indecision : HAMLET
To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous fortune;
Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles ...
There has been centuries of debate about how one interprets Hamlet's soliloquy that begins "To be or not to be ...". My favorite opinion is that Hamlet is weighing up the pros and cons of suicide ("to not be").

17. Robert who played filmdom's Mr. Chips : DONAT
Robert Donat was a marvelous actor who starred in two of my favorite films: “The 39 Steps” from 1935 and “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” from 1939.

The fabulous 1939 movie “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” is an adaptation of a novel of the same name by James Hilton. Heading the cast are British actors Robert Donat and Greer Garson. “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” was remade as musical in 1969 starring Peter O’Toole and Petula Clark. I haven’t seen the remake, and frankly am a little scared to do so …

24. Weeper of myth : NIOBE
In Greek mythology, when her children were killed, Niobe fled to Mt. Sipylus where she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is in fact a Niobe's Rock on Mt. Sipylus that resembles a female face, and so is known as "The Weeping Rock".

29. Only non-Southern state won by the G.O.P. in '64 : ARIZ
Barry Goldwater was a five-term US Senator for the state of Arizona noted for this right-wing positions. He was known for a while as “Mr. Conservative”, something that didn’t help him with the electorate in the 1964 race for the White House as he lost to the incumbent President Johnson in a landslide. In fact, the only non-Southern state that Goldwater carried was his native Arizona.

31. College in Atherton, Calif. : MENLO
Menlo College is a private school located in Atherton, California, one of the wealthiest and most expensive cities in the country. Menlo was founded in 1927 as when the existing Menlo School for Boys grew to include a junior college. Today the school specializes in providing four-year business degrees. One of Menlo’s more famous alumni is newspaper heiress and kidnap victim Patty Hearst.

36. Famous Amos : TORI
Tori Amos is an American pianist and singer. Amos started playing the piano at two years old, and was composing piano pieces by age five. She was playing in piano bars (chaperoned by her father) when she was 14. I'm going to have to find some of her music (I lead such a sheltered life ...)!

39. Power line : MIGHT MAKES RIGHT
The phrase “might makes right”, is a negative assessment of power, implying that just because one is has the power to do something doesn’t necessarily mean it’s right.

40. Org. with the Sullivan Award for character, leadership and sportsmanship : AAU
Amateur Athletic Union (AAU)

41. Baud measurement : DATA FLOW
In telecommunications, the “baud” unit represents pulses per second. The higher the baud rate of a modem, the faster information can be transferred. The baud unit is named for Émile Baudot, a pioneer in the world of telecommunications.

42. I.R.S. form with a line for "Casualty and Theft Losses" : SCHEDULE A
Schedule A is an attachment that can be filed with IRS Form 1040. We use Schedule A to itemize deductions, an alternative to taking the standard deduction.

46. Birthplace of Pres. Polk : N CAR
James Knox Polk was the 11th US President. He is known as a president who delivered on promises that he made during his election campaign. He left office after serving only one term, as he had promised the voters, and then contracted cholera on a goodwill tour of the South. He died at only 53 years of age, the youngest age for any president to die in retirement. He also enjoyed the shortest retirement of any president, at only 103 days. I guess that's why no one keeps their campaign promises these days ...

48. Starch source : TARO
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

50. Canola, soybean and peanut : OILSEEDS
Canola is a type of rapeseed, and Canola oil is made from the seeds. The particular cultivar used in oil production was developed in Canada, and the name Canola in fact comes from "CANadian Oil, Low Acid".

53. Former center of Los Angeles : O’NEAL
Shaquille O'Neal is one of the heaviest players ever to have played in the NBA (weighing in at around 325 pounds). Yep, he's a big guy ... 7 foot 1 inch tall.

58. Coastline feature : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

62. Start of an apology : MEA
Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase "mea culpa" meaning "my fault", as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term "mea maxima culpa" translates as "my most grievous fault".

64. PC component : CRT
Cathode Ray Tube (CRT)

66. Mug : PUSS
“Puss” is a slang word meaning “face”, or in particular “mouth”. The term derives from the Irish word “pus”, which translates as “lip, mouth”.

The verb "mug" means to make an exaggerated facial expression. The term comes from mugs used to drink beer (called Toby mugs) that are the made in the shape of heads with grotesque expressions. “Mug” can also be a noun meaning “face”.

67. Alley org. : PBA
Professional Bowlers Association (PBA)

68. F.D.R.'s Scottie : FALA
Fala was the famous Scottish Terrier that was ever present at the side of President Franklin D. Roosevelt for many years. The terrier was a Christmas gift to the president from his cousin, who had named the dog Big Boy while she trained him as a puppy. President Roosevelt renamed him after an ancestor of his from Falahill in Scotland, so the dog’s full name was Murray the Outlaw of Falahill. Fala lived on for several years after the president’s passing. I’ve had the privilege of visiting the gravesites of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt in Hyde Park, New York, and Fala is buried just a few feet away from his master.

79. Almost stop with the head facing the wind, as a ship : LIE TO
A boat is said to lie to when it is held stationary with its head into the wind, it “lies” with the bow pointing “to” the wind.

80. Blooming business? : FTD
Back in 1910, fifteen florists from around America agreed to fulfill each other's orders using the telegraph system, setting up what they called the Florists' Telegraph Delivery. The concept grew so large that in 1965 the group started to offer international service, and changed its name to Florists' Transworld Delivery (FTD).

81. 1967 war locale : SINAI
The Six-Day War took place from June 5th to June 10th, 1967, and was fought between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan and Syria. By the time the ceasefire was signed, Israel had seized huge swaths of land formerly controlled by Arab states, namely the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula, the West Bank of the Jordan River and the Golan Heights. The overall territory under the control of Israel grew by a factor of three in just six days.

84. Subway line : EAT FRESH
The SUBWAY chain of fast food restaurants is the largest single-brand restaurant in the world. I’m a big fan of SUBWAY sandwiches …

90. Bagel toppers : SESAMES
The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

95. Work on the docks : STEEVE
A stevedore, or longshoreman, is someone employed in the loading and unloading of ships at a port. The word "stevedore" comes from the Spanish "estibador", meaning "one who loads cargo", with the verb “to steeve” meaning to load cargo in a hold. The word "longshoreman", is simply from "a man who works alongshore".

97. Ring leader? : TORERO
“Matador” is a Spanish word used in English for a bullfighter, although the term isn't used in the same way in Spanish. The equivalent in Spanish is "torero". "Matador" translates aptly enough as “killer”.

100. Discontinued gas brand : AMOCO
Amoco is an abbreviation for the American Oil Company. Amoco was the first oil company to introduce gasoline tanker trucks and drive-through filling stations. I wonder did they know what they were starting ...?

102. Govt. security : T-BILL
A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

104. Law man : MOSES
Moses is an important prophet in Christianity and Islam, and the most important prophet in Judaism. It fell to Moses to lead the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt across the Red Sea. He was given the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai, and then wandered the desert with his people for forty years. Moses then died within sight of the Promised Land.

105. Fall setting : EDEN
In the Christian tradition, the “fall of man” took place in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve succumbed to the temptation of eating from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, against the bidding of God. As a result, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden to prevent them becoming immortal by eating from the tree of life. The first humans had transitioned from a state of innocent obedience to a state of guilty disobedience.

111. Part of a winning combination : TAC
When I was growing up in Ireland we played "noughts and crosses" ... our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

112. Ring org. : WBA
World Boxing Association (WBA)

113. Discophile's collection : LPS
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm "single" the following year, in 1949.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sandwiches with toothpicks : BLTS
5. Corner key : CTRL
9. Refuse : CHAFF
14. Alternative to texted : IMED
18. European capital, to natives : PRAHA
19. Discipline : AREA
20. Jimmy ___, "They'll Do It Every Time" cartoonist : HATLO
21. "Le Roi d'Ys" composer : LALO
22. Telephone line : SORRY, WRONG NUMBER
25. "___ Eyes" (1975 Eagles hit) : LYIN’
26. "Let ___" : IT GO
27. Dash : RACE
28. Union gain? : IN-LAW
29. Gut feeling? : AGITA
30. Cruise line : SHOW ME THE MONEY
33. Like one's favorite radio stations, typically : PRESET
34. Perfect, e.g. : TENSE
35. Sarcastic retort : I BET!
36. Played out : TRITE
37. San ___, Calif. : RAMON
40. "Double" or "triple" feat : AXEL
41. Special somethings : DOOZIES
43. Late actor Wallach : ELI
44. Vinyl-roofed car : LANDAU
48. Butler's quarters? : TARA
49. Tickle Me Elmo maker : TYCO
51. Like : DIG
52. Story line : ONCE UPON A TIME
56. First two words of "Dixie," often : OH, I
57. Longtime baseball union exec Donald : FEHR
59. Loudmouth's talk : YAP
60. Romance novelist Roberts : NORA
61. ___ de Champlain, founder of Quebec : SAMUEL
63. Like the Marx Brothers : ANTIC
65. Pinched : RIPPED OFF
69. Interprets : READS
70. Car featured in the "Transformers" movies : CAMARO
72. Country with the most all-time medals in Olympic baseball : CUBA
73. Pathet ___ (old revolutionary group) : LAO
75. Fit of fever : AGUE
76. Capt.'s prediction : ETA
77. Finish line : THAT’S ALL, FOLKS
82. Draft pick : ALE
83. Astronaut Slayton : DEKE
85. Email virus, power outage, etc. : WOES
86. Formal confession : IT WAS I
87. Iraq War danger, for short : IED
88. Maze feature : DEAD END
90. Shake off : SHED
92. Names hidden in Al Hirschfeld drawings : NINAS
94. Gown accessory : STOLE
95. Politician's goal : SEAT
96. Hunt in "Mission: Impossible" : ETHAN
99. Small pellets of noodle dough in Jewish cuisine : FARFEL
101. Fault line : IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME
106. Foreign princes : EMIRS
107. Hogan contemporary : SNEAD
108. Road shoulder : BERM
109. Stove cover : HOOD
110. Old Venetian V.I.P. : DOGE
111. Laugh line : TAKE MY WIFE, PLEASE!
114. "I Ain't Marching Anymore" singer/songwriter : OCHS
115. Bayer brand : ALEVE
116. Picture problem : BLUR
117. Some spinners, informally : PR MEN
118. Chris who played Mr. Big on "Sex and the City" : NOTH
119. Lets go of : CEDES
120. Gallic greeting : ALLO
121. Spanish 3 + 3 : SEIS

Down
1. Stock : BROTH
2. Slow : LARGO
3. Target, as a football receiver : THROW TO
4. Approximately : SAY
5. Cartier units : CARATS
6. Throat soother : TROCHE
7. Name meaning "born again" : RENEE
8. Trail : LAG
9. French connection? : CHUNNEL
10. Exemplar of indecision : HAMLET
11. How an angry dog should be kept : AT BAY
12. Zipped : FLEW
13. Endorsing : FOR
14. Help line : I'LL GET IT
15. Date line : MAY I SEE YOU AGAIN?
16. A-list : ELITE
17. Robert who played filmdom's Mr. Chips : DONAT
18. Trident-shaped letters : PSIS
23. House ___ : WREN
24. Weeper of myth : NIOBE
29. Only non-Southern state won by the G.O.P. in '64 : ARIZ
31. College in Atherton, Calif. : MENLO
32. Confusion : MIX-UP
33. Some charity events : PRO-AMS
36. Famous Amos : TORI
37. Embarrassed : RED-FACED
38. Put off : ALIENATED
39. Power line : MIGHT MAKES RIGHT
40. Org. with the Sullivan Award for character, leadership and sportsmanship : AAU
41. Baud measurement : DATA FLOW
42. I.R.S. form with a line for "Casualty and Theft Losses" : SCHEDULE A
45. "___ calls?" : ANY
46. Birthplace of Pres. Polk : N CAR
47. Drew : DEPICTED
48. Starch source : TARO
50. Canola, soybean and peanut : OILSEEDS
53. Former center of Los Angeles : O’NEAL
54. Affirmative action : NOD
55. Listen here : EAR
58. Coastline feature : RIA
62. Start of an apology : MEA
64. PC component : CRT
66. Mug : PUSS
67. Alley org. : PBA
68. F.D.R.'s Scottie : FALA
71. "There's always next time!" : OH WELL!
74. Initials, in a way : OKS
78. Bang-up : A-ONE
79. Almost stop with the head facing the wind, as a ship : LIE TO
80. Blooming business? : FTD
81. 1967 war locale : SINAI
84. Subway line : EAT FRESH
89. Executes : DOES
90. Bagel toppers : SESAMES
91. Good to have around : HANDY
93. Pitched right over the plate : IN THERE
95. Work on the docks : STEEVE
96. Hottie : EYEFUL
97. Ring leader? : TORERO
98. Something to get over : HUMP
99. Had for a meal : FED ON
100. Discontinued gas brand : AMOCO
101. Signed : INKED
102. Govt. security : T-BILL
103. "Me, too!" : SO AM I!
104. Law man : MOSES
105. Fall setting : EDEN
107. Closing act? : SALE
111. Part of a winning combination : TAC
112. Ring org. : WBA
113. Discophile's collection : LPS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

2 comments :

Anonymous said...

terrible. it wasn't even tom cruise who said "show me the money," it was cuba gooding, jr.

Anonymous said...

Watch the movie again. Both Cruise and Gooding say this line.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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