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0201-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Feb 14, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Will Nediger
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 46s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Her 1994 memoir has the chapter "Desert Storm" : BARBARA BUSH
Barbara Bush (nee Pierce) is the wife of former President George H. W. Bush. The couple met at a Christmas dance in Andover, Massachusetts when Barbara was 16 years old. They married four years later in 1945 while the future president was home on leave from the US Navy. George Bush was torpedo bomber pilot who flew 58 combat missions during WWII.

16. Elementary education, briefly : RRR
Reading, ‘riting and rithmetic.

19. U.K. honours : OBES
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry in the UK that was established in 1917 by King George V. There are five classes within the order, which are in descending seniority:
- Knight Grand Cross (GBE)
- Knight Commander (KBE)
- Commander (CBE)
- Officer (OBE)
- Member (MBE)

24. Display options, briefly : LEDS
A Light Emitting Diode (LED) is a specialized form of semiconductor that when switched on releases photons (light). LEDs are getting more and more popular and have moved from use in electronic equipment to use as a replacement for the much less efficient tungsten light bulb. I replaced all of my tungsten Xmas lights last year and saved a lot on my electricity bill.

25. Serpent with a Zulu name : MAMBA
The mamba, and most famously the black mamba, is a highly venomous snake that used to be responsible for a great number of fatalities before anti-venoms became available. Mamba venom is a deadly mix of neurotoxins that attack the nervous system, and cardiotoxins that attack the heart so a bite, if left untreated, causes the lungs and the heart to shut down.

31. Use pumice on, perhaps : EXFOLIATE
Pumice is volcanic rock that is formed by lava cooling, but with bubbles in it due to water and carbon dioxide frothing out of the lava as it cools. Because of the frothy structure, pumice is relatively light and is a great thermal insulator. As such, it is used in construction to make insulating breeze blocks. Pumice may also float in water.

33. He wrote of a "vorpal blade" : CARROLL
“Vorpal blade” and “vorpal sword” are phrases used by Lewis Carroll in his nonsense poem “Jabberwocky”.

Here are the first two verses of “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll, probably the one poem that we all just loved learning to recite at school:
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

36. Member of the German Expressionist group Die Brücke : EMIL NOLDE
Emil Nolde was a German Expressionist painter. He was actually born Emil Hansen, near the village of Nolde in the Prussian Duchy of Schleswig in 1867. Hansen officially changed his name to Nolde on the occasion of his marriage in 1902.

“Die Brücke” (German for “the bridge”) was a group of expressionist artists that got together in 1905 in Dresden, Germany. Founding members of the group were Fritz Bleyl, Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff.

39. Exhibit explainer : DOCENT
Museum docents are people who serve as guides for visitors to their institutions, usually providing their services for free. The term “docent” comes from the Latin “docere” meaning “to teach”.

40. Strawberry, for one : EX-MET
Darryl Strawberry is a former Major League Baseball player who was very successful playing with the both the New York Mets and the New York Yankees. Strawberry’s success on the field was matched with a colorful reputation of the field. He was suspended by league in 1995 for the use of cocaine. I remember seeing him play at a minor league game in Syracuse around that time, as he worked his way back into the majors.

42. Tom Clancy's "Every ___ Tiger" : MAN A
Tom Clancy’s 1999 book "Every Man a Tiger" is a study of all aspects of command during Operation Desert Storm and Desert Shield.

43. Polaris or Procyon : F STAR
Stars are usually classified based on the color of the light that they emit. These classifications are, from hottest to coolest, O, B, A, F, G, K and M. One way to remember the order of these letters is to use the mnemonic “Oh, be a fine girl, kiss me”. The colors of these stars range from blue (class O) to red (class M). Our sun is class G, a yellow star, but I think we all know that …

Because the direction of the Earth's axis moves, albeit very slowly, the position of north relative to the stars changes over time. The bright star that we see in our lifetimes that is closest to true north is Polaris, and so we call Polaris the pole star. It is the brightest star in the constellation Ursa Minor.

Procyon is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Minor (“lesser dog”). Even though Procyon looks like a single star, it is actually a binary star system.

44. Persian language unit? : MEW
The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

47. "The Wizard of Oz" farmhand : ZEKE
Zeke was the farmworker played by Bert Lahr in 1939’s “The Wizard of Oz”. Zeke is the character who morphed into the Cowardly Lion in Dorothy’s dream.

48. Psychoanalyst Melanie : KLEIN
Melanie Klein was a British psychoanalyst who was born in Austria. Klein’s main field of study was child psychology.

49. Hometown of the mathematician Fibonacci : PISA
Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t "discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

50. Much like : A LA
The term “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

53. X or Y lead-in : GEN
The term “Generation X” originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

“Generation Y” is alternative term for the Millennial Generation. Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

54. Uno's alternative : OLIVE GARDEN
Olive Garden is a chain of Italian-American restaurants that has over 800 locations worldwide. The chain was originally established as part of General Mills. The current owners of the chain also operate Red Lobster restaurants. Apparently there are plans to co-located Olive Garden and Red Lobster eateries so that they have separate entries but share kitchens.

Down
2. Great Rift Valley port : AQABA
The coastal city of Aqaba is the only seaport in the country of Jordan. The city lies at the very northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba, which is off the Red Sea.

The Great Rift Valley is an imprecise geographical term that describes a trench that runs from northern Syria to central Mozambique in Africa.

4. Some 27-Down : BICS
Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

5. Prefix with culture : AVI-
The prefix “avi-” means “bird-related” as in “aviculture”, the breeding of birds.

8. Old Sony format : BETAMAX
The video standard known as VHS is more fully referred to as the Video Home System. VHS was one of many standards touted by various manufacturers in the seventies. The biggest rival to VHS was of course Betamax, but we all knew which of the two standards won the final round in that fight.

10. Cock-a-leekie eater : SCOT
Cock-a-leekie soup is a Scottish dish made from leeks and chicken stock that is thickened with barley. Die-hard cock-a-leekie aficionados include prunes in the list of ingredients.

13. Composer of several "Gnossiennes" : ERIK SATIE
The “Gnossiennes” is a set of seven piano pieces written by French composer Erik Satie.

Erik Satie was a French composer most famous for his beautiful composition, the three "Gymnopédies". I have tried so hard to appreciate other works by Satie but I find them so very different from the minimalist simplicity of the lyrical "Gymnopédies".

14. Man's name that sounds noble : ERLE
In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquess. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquess and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known simply as a countess.

23. "___ With the Long Neck" (Parmigianino painting) : MADONNA
Parmigianino is the name that is usually used for the Italian painter Girolamo Francesco maria Mazzola. “Parmigianino” translates as “the little one from Parma”.

24. Pro athlete in purple and gold : LA LAKER
The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

25. Cary's "Blonde Venus" co-star : MARLENE
"Blonde Venus" is a 1932 film starring Marlene Dietrich and Cary Grant.

26. Dispenser of Duff Beer : MOE
Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender in "The Simpson" animated TV show. I don't really care for "The Simpsons", but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the character ... him I like.

30. TV antiheroine for 41 years : ERICA KANE
Susan Lucci is perhaps the most famous actor associated with daytime soap operas, and was the highest paid actor in daytime television. Lucci was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award as Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series an incredible 21 times, for her portrayal of Erica Kane in “All My Children”.

45. Business fraudster Billie Sol ___ : ESTES
Billie Sol Estes was a businessman who went to jail for fraud several times in the sixties and seventies. The Estes cases hit the front pages because he was a business associate of future president Lyndon Johnson. In addition, Estes made claims that President Johnson was involved in the assassination of President Kennedy.

46. General who won 1794's Battle of Fallen Timbers : WAYNE
The Battle of Fallen Timbers was fought in 1794 between an alliance of Native American tribes and the US Army led by General “Mad Anthony” Wayne. The outcome was a decisive victory for the US and brought to a close the Northwest Indian War. This gave the United States control of the Northwest territory, land lying between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and the Great Lakes.

Mad Anthony Wayne was a US Army general during the Revolutionary War. Wayne’s military exploits and wild personality led to him being nicknamed “Mad”. The alter-ego of the superhero Batman is Bruce Wayne, a name that was chosen from Scottish king Robert the Bruce and Revolutionary War general Mad Anthony Wayne.

48. Severinsbrücke's city : KOLN
Severinsbrücke (Severin Bridge) is a bridge over the River Rhine in Koln (Cologne), Germany.

49. One may be fingered : PERP
"Perp" is short for perpetrator.

51. "Revolution" or "Hound Dog" starter : YOU
The Beatles song “Revolution” was written by John Lennon and was released in 1968 as a B-side to “Hey Jude”.
You say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
The Elvis Presley classic “Hound Dog” was a big hit, but his wasn’t the first version of the song to make it to number one in the charts. Presley released “Hound Dog” in 1956, but Big Mama Thornton had brought the song to the top spot back in 1953.
You ain't nothin' but a hound dog
cryin' all the time.

52. Port named after a U.S. president, informally : JAX
The port city of Jacksonville, Florida is the largest city by area in the contiguous United States (four cities in Alaska cover more land). Jacksonville was named in honor of President Andrew Jackson.
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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Her 1994 memoir has the chapter "Desert Storm" : BARBARA BUSH
12. Plant visitor : BEE
15. What watts and volt-amperes have : EQUIVALENCE
16. Elementary education, briefly : RRR
17. High interest? : FASCINATION
18. Choice for a portrait : OIL
19. U.K. honours : OBES
20. What you may open the door for : DRAFT
21. Aftermath : WAKE
22. Fun time : GAS
23. Toddler coddler : MOMMY
24. Display options, briefly : LEDS
25. Serpent with a Zulu name : MAMBA
26. Zany : MADCAP
28. On track to win : AHEAD
31. Use pumice on, perhaps : EXFOLIATE
33. He wrote of a "vorpal blade" : CARROLL
35. Gets to a seat, say : LEADS IN
36. Member of the German Expressionist group Die Brücke : EMIL NOLDE
38. Sky boxes? : KITES
39. Exhibit explainer : DOCENT
40. Strawberry, for one : EX-MET
42. Tom Clancy's "Every ___ Tiger" : MAN A
43. Polaris or Procyon : F STAR
44. Persian language unit? : MEW
47. "The Wizard of Oz" farmhand : ZEKE
48. Psychoanalyst Melanie : KLEIN
49. Hometown of the mathematician Fibonacci : PISA
50. Much like : A LA
51. Words accompanying a low bow : YOUR MAJESTY
53. X or Y lead-in : GEN
54. Uno's alternative : OLIVE GARDEN
55. Suzanne, e.g.: Abbr. : STE
56. Light insufficiently : UNDEREXPOSE

Down
1. Muddle : BEFOG
2. Great Rift Valley port : AQABA
3. Dodges : RUSES
4. Some 27-Down : BICS
5. Prefix with culture : AVI-
6. Like some inspections : RANDOM
7. Danger dinger : ALARM BELL
8. Old Sony format : BETAMAX
9. Come together : UNIFY
10. Cock-a-leekie eater : SCOT
11. Incubator : HEN
12. Sent out in waves? : BROADCAST
13. Composer of several "Gnossiennes" : ERIK SATIE
14. Man's name that sounds noble : ERLE
21. Cooperation exclamation : WE DID IT!
23. "___ With the Long Neck" (Parmigianino painting) : MADONNA
24. Pro athlete in purple and gold : LA LAKER
25. Cary's "Blonde Venus" co-star : MARLENE
26. Dispenser of Duff Beer : MOE
27. Desk set : PENS
28. Made no mistakes on : ACED
29. No breakfast for a vegan : HAM OMELET
30. TV antiheroine for 41 years : ERICA KANE
32. One whose shifts shift : FLEXTIMER
34. Development site : LOT
37. Warrant : DESERVE
41. Handle : MANAGE
43. Subject to change : FLUID
44. Screw up : MISDO
45. Business fraudster Billie Sol ___ : ESTES
46. General who won 1794's Battle of Fallen Timbers : WAYNE
47. Navigates a switchback, in part : ZAGS
48. Severinsbrücke's city : KOLN
49. One may be fingered : PERP
51. "Revolution" or "Hound Dog" starter : YOU
52. Port named after a U.S. president, informally : JAX


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0131-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 14, Friday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Chris A. McGlothlin
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 37m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … BEEK (Veek), LA HABANA (La Havana)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

16. Pixar, e.g. : ANIMATION STUDIO
Pixar Animation Studios started out as part of Lucasfilm in 1979, George Lucas’s production company. Lucas sold what was to become Pixar to Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 1986. Pixar produced its first feature film in 1995, the fabulous “Toy Story”, and followed up with a string of hits. The company was then sold to Walt Disney in 2006, when valued at $7.4 billion. That transaction resulted in Steve Jobs becoming the biggest shareholder in Walt Disney.

18. Some foreign friends : AMICI
“Amici” is the Italian word for "friends" (singular "amico").

19. Union ___: Abbr. : STA
There are quite a few railroad stations called "Union Station" in the US. This is because the generic "union station" is one built by two or more railroad companies acting in concert or "union", sharing tracks and facilities.

21. "Dawson's Creek" star James Van Der ___ : BEEK
James Van Der Beek is an actor known for playing Dawson Leery on the hit TV show “Dawson’s Creek”. Van Der Beek is also known for acting out Internet memes on his own website jamesvandermemes.tumblr.com.

A "meme" (short for "mineme") is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

25. ___ Toy Barn ("Toy Story 2" setting) : AL’S
"Toy Story 2" is a Pixar feature film that was released in 1999. The film was an even bigger hit than the original “Toy Story” and grossed just under $500 million.

28. A Kennedy : TED
Ted Kennedy was the youngest boy in the family that included his older brothers: Joseph Jr. (killed in action in WWII), John (assassinated) and Robert (assassinated). Ted went into the US Senate in 1962 in a special election held after his brother became US President. He remained in the Senate until he passed away in 2009, making Ted Kennedy the fourth-longest-serving Senator in history.

33. What Sports Illustrated's annual Swimsuit Issue has a lot of : AD PAGES
The first swimsuit issue of "Sports Illustrated" magazine was published in 1964, as a successful attempt to boost sales during the slow winter months.

42. Professional org. with a "healthy" balance sheet : AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

45. Musical instrument for a geisha : SAMISEN
A samisen is a traditional Japanese instrument, with three strings, vaguely like a banjo. The samisen is played with a plectrum that is called a bachi.

47. MASH unit : COT
The first Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) was deployed in August 1945. MASH units really came into the public consciousness after publication of the 1969 Richard Hooker novel “MASH”, which spawned the hit film and TV series that were both called “M*A*S*H”.

48. Pioneering map publisher William : RAND
Rand McNally is a company long associated with the city of Chicago. Its roots go back to 1856 when William Rand opened a printing shop in the city. Two years later he hired an Irish immigrant called Andrew McNally and the pair turned to printing tickets and timetables for the railroad industry. They diversified into "railroad guides" in 1870, a precursor of what was to be their big success, the road atlas. When automobile travel started to become significant, Rand and McNally turned their attention to roads and they published their first road map, of New York City in 1904. Rand and McNally really popularized the use of highway numbers, and indeed erected many roadside highway signs themselves, long before the state and federal authorities adopted the idea.

50. 1998 film in which Donny Osmond has a singing role : MULAN
“Mulan” is a 1998 animated feature film made by Walt Disney studios. The film is based on the Chinese legend of Hua Mulan, a woman who takes the place of her father in the army and serves with distinction for twelve years without reward. Disney's lead character was given the name Fa Mulan. Donny Osmond provided the singing voice for one of the lead characters, after which his sons remarked that he had finally made it in show business as he was in a Disney film.

54. Romanian capital : LEU
The currency of Romania is the leu (plural: lei), a word meaning "lion". The leu is also the name of the currency of neighboring Moldova. Romania joined the European Union in 2007, and had planned to join the Euro zone in 2014. This implementation date is in jeopardy as Romania struggles to meet economic goals set by the EU.

55. Albert's sitcom co-star : GABOR
The popular sitcom “Green Acres” originally aired from 1965 to 1971. The magnificent stars of the show were Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor, playing a couple who moved from New York City to a farm in the country. “Green Acres” was cancelled as part of CBS’s so called “rural purge”. In a move to attract younger audiences, shows were added to the schedule with more urban and contemporary themes. Classics like “The Beverly Hillbillies”, “Hee Haw” and “Mayberry R.F.D.” were dropped at the same time as “Green Acres”.

56. Numbats : BANDED ANTEATERS
The numbat, also called the banded anteater, is a protected marsupial species found in Western Australia. The numbat is actually the emblem of the state.

59. Washington report starter : I CANNOT TELL A LIE
The famous story about George Washington cutting down a cherry tree as a child has been shown to be fiction. He supposedly was confronted by his father after taking an axe to a tree and confessed with the words, “I’m sorry father, I cannot tell a lie”. Not true ...

Down
1. Caribbean capital, to locals : LA HABANA
“La Habana” is the Spanish name for the city of Havana, Cuba.

Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

2. Cloisonné, e.g. : ENAMELED
“Cloisonné” is an ancient technique that uses vitreous enamel to decorate metalwork. The technique involves the addition of metal compartments to the surface of the piece, made by soldering silver or gold wires that form the edges of each compartment. Vitreous enamels of various colors are then added to each compartment and the whole piece fired. “Cloison” is a French word meaning “compartment, partition”.

5. "Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate a Second Before Awakening" artist : DALI
The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it's a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

6. Tribe of Chief Shaumonekusse : OTO
Chief Shaumonekusse was a leader of the Otoe Native Americans in the early 1800s. Shaumonekusse travelled to Washington, D.C. in 1821 and met with President James Monroe.

7. It hangs around trees : TINSEL
The custom of decorating trees at Christmas seems to have originated in Renaissance Germany. Those first trees were placed in guildhalls and were decorated with sweets and candy for the apprentices and children. After the Protestant Reformation, the Christmas tree became an alternative in Protestant homes for the Roman Catholic Christmas cribs. The Christmas tree tradition was imported into Britain by the royal family because of its German heritage. That tradition spread from Britain into North America.

10. Grp. that's got your number? : SSA
A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

11. Texting ta-ta : TTYL
Talk to you later (TTYL)

12. Many Rwandans : HUTUS
Rwanda is a sovereign nation in central Africa that is populated by three groups: the Hutu, Tutsi (aka Watutsi) and Twa. The Tutsi are the second largest population of people in Rwanda, with the Hutu being the largest group. The bloody conflict that has existed between the Tutsi and Hutu peoples dates back to about 1880 when Catholic missionaries arrived in the region. The missionaries found that they had more success converting the Hutus than the Tutsi, and when the Germans occupied the area during WWI they confiscated Tutsi land and gave it to Hutu tribes in order to reward religious conversion. This injustice fuels fighting to this very day.

22. Practice test? : BAR EXAM
The legal profession is referred to as “the bar”. The term arose in medieval times when European courtrooms were divided into two with “barring” furniture, basically a wooden rail that separated the public from the participants in the trial.

26. Setting for "Ocean's 11" : VEGAS
“Ocean’s 11” is a great film from 1960, starring Frank Sinatra as Danny Ocean. The original storyline is updated for the excellent 2001 remake, with George Clooney playing the lead. In the 1960 movie, the love interest is a character called Beatrice Ocean, played by Angie Dickinson. In the 2001 version, the love interest gets a new name, Tess Ocean, and is played by Julia Roberts.

27. Actor Alain : DELON
Alain Delon is an award-winning French actor, once called "the male Brigitte Bardot". Delon hit the headlines in 1968 when one of his bodyguards was found shot in the head outside his home. Delon found himself held for questioning, but he was released and the crime was attributed to a Corsican crime family.

32. Home for E. B. White's Wilbur : STY
"Charlotte's Web" is a children's novel by author E. B. White. Charlotte is a barn spider, who manages to save the life of a pig named Wilbur. Wilbur is a pet pig, owned by the farmer's daughter, Fern Arable. The story also includes a gluttonous rat called Templeton who provides some light and comical moments.

36. "Live más" sloganeer : TACO BELL
Taco Bell was founded by a former US Marine, 25-year-old Glen Bell. His first restaurant was Bell’s Drive-In, located in Southern California. After opening that first establishment, Bell bought up some more restaurants including four named El Taco. He sold off the El Taco restaurants but used the name in part when he opened his first Taco Bell in 1962. Bell sold then sold franchises, with the 100th Taco Bell opening in 1967. The ex-Marine sold off the whole chain to PepsiCo in 1978, and I am guessing he made a pretty penny.

37. Classic song that begins "When my baby / When my baby smiles at me" : I GO TO RIO
“I Go to Rio” is a 1976 song written by Peter Allen and Adrienne Anderson that became the signature song for Allen.

Peter Allen was an Australian songwriter as well as an entertainer in his own right. He is famous for having won an Oscar for co-writing the song "Arthur's Theme" from the 1981 movie “Arthur”. Allen was married to the film’s female lead Liza Minnelli. After he and Minnelli divorced, Allen had a 14-year homosexual relationship with fashion model Gregory Connell.

38. "CSI" star William : PETERSEN
The actor William Petersen is best known for portraying forensic scientist Gil Grissom on the “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”. Petersen quit acting in the show after nine seasons, but continues as an executive producer.

42. Source of the word "admiral" : ARABIC
Our term “admiral” came into English via French, and is probably derived from the Saracen rank of “chief of the transport”, called “amir-ar-rahl” in Arabic.

43. One of two in a rumba : MARACA
Maracas are percussion instruments native to Latin America. They are constructed from a dried shell, like that of a coconut, to which a handle is attached. The shell is filled with dried seeds or beans, and shaken.

The rumba is a Cuban dance, with influences brought by African slaves and Spanish colonists. The name “rumba” comes from “rumbo”, the Spanish word for “party, spree”.

46. Prepares, as some mushrooms : SAUTES
“Sauté” is of course a French word. The literal translation from the French is “jumped” or “bounced”, a reference to the tossing of food while cooking it in a frying pan.

49. "If I ___ Have You" (2001 Best Original Song Oscar winner) : DIDN’T
"If I Didn't Have You" is a Randy Newman song that was performed by John Goodman and Billy Crystal over the closing credits for the 2001 animated feature “Monsters, Inc.” It won Newman an Oscar for Best Original Song that same year.

51. Kind of star : NATAL
A natal star is one associated with the time of one’s birth.

A natal horoscope or natal chart is an astrological map that is built around the exact time and location of an individual’s birth. The chart shows the position of the astrologically relevant celestial bodies at that time.

53. "Leading With My Chin" memoirist : LENO
Jay Leno was born James Leno in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson college and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website: www.jaylenosgarage.com.

57. Slip into : DON
One doffs one's hat, usually as a mark of respect. To doff is to take off, with "doff" being a contraction of "do off". The opposite of “doff” is “don” meaning “to put on”.

58. Grp. with the 1971 gold album "Pictures at an Exhibition" : ELP
Emerson, Lake and Palmer (ELP) were an English supergroup popular in the seventies. Keith Emerson had been successful with the Nice, Greg Lake with King Crimson, and Carl Palmer with Atomic Rooster. Given that all three performers had already achieved success prior the formation of the group, ELP is termed a "supergroup".
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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "No more wasting time!" : LET’S DO THIS THING!
16. Pixar, e.g. : ANIMATION STUDIO
17. Was just getting started : HAD A LONG WAY TO GO
18. Some foreign friends : AMICI
19. Union ___: Abbr. : STA
20. Breathers : LUNGS
21. "Dawson's Creek" star James Van Der ___ : BEEK
22. It's a state : BEING
24. Unduplicated : SOLE
25. ___ Toy Barn ("Toy Story 2" setting) : AL’S
26. Parked cars : VALETED
28. A Kennedy : TED
29. Fix : NEUTER
31. Makes a fuss over, with "on" : DOTES
33. What Sports Illustrated's annual Swimsuit Issue has a lot of : AD PAGES
35. Marker's mark maker : FELT TIP
39. Bottom line? : X-AXIS
41. Cruise : VOYAGE
42. Professional org. with a "healthy" balance sheet : AMA
45. Musical instrument for a geisha : SAMISEN
47. MASH unit : COT
48. Pioneering map publisher William : RAND
50. 1998 film in which Donny Osmond has a singing role : MULAN
51. One on the staff? : NOTE
52. Thin as ___ : A RAIL
54. Romanian capital : LEU
55. Albert's sitcom co-star : GABOR
56. Numbats : BANDED ANTEATERS
59. Washington report starter : I CANNOT TELL A LIE
60. Charm : CAST ONE’S SPELL ON

Down
1. Caribbean capital, to locals : LA HABANA
2. Cloisonné, e.g. : ENAMELED
3. Sets things straight : TIDIES UP
4. Trash talk : SMACK
5. "Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate a Second Before Awakening" artist : DALI
6. Tribe of Chief Shaumonekusse : OTO
7. It hangs around trees : TINSEL
8. Immobilized : HOGTIED
9. Needing : IN WANT OF
10. Grp. that's got your number? : SSA
11. Texting ta-ta : TTYL
12. Many Rwandans : HUTUS
13. Defensive reply : I DO NOT
14. Nitpick : NIGGLE
15. Gave a boost : GOOSED
22. Practice test? : BAR EXAM
23. Square things : GET EVEN
26. Setting for "Ocean's 11" : VEGAS
27. Actor Alain : DELON
30. Strain : TAX
32. Home for E. B. White's Wilbur : STY
34. Pose as : SIMULATE
36. "Live más" sloganeer : TACO BELL
37. Classic song that begins "When my baby / When my baby smiles at me" : I GO TO RIO
38. "CSI" star William : PETERSEN
40. Few of them were made after 1929 : SILENTS
42. Source of the word "admiral" : ARABIC
43. One of two in a rumba : MARACA
44. Pineapples: Sp. : ANANAS
46. Prepares, as some mushrooms : SAUTES
49. "If I ___ Have You" (2001 Best Original Song Oscar winner) : DIDN’T
51. Kind of star : NATAL
53. "Leading With My Chin" memoirist : LENO
55. Air force? : GALE
57. Slip into : DON
58. Grp. with the 1971 gold album "Pictures at an Exhibition" : ELP


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0130-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 14, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Red or Read … the circled square in today’s grid can be filled with either “EA” or “E”, giving us two different versions of the same-sounding riddle. Further down the grid we have the two answers to those two versions of the riddle:
17A. With 27-Across, an old riddle : WHAT'S BLACK, WHITE
27A. See 17-Across : AND READ ALL OVER?
49A. Answer to one spelling of the riddle : THIS NEWSPAPER

17A. With 27-Across, an old riddle : WHAT'S BLACK, WHITE
27A. See 17-Across : AND RED ALL OVER?
63A. Answer to another spelling of the riddle : A SUNBURNED PANDA
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 08m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. ___ Beach, city near San Luis Obispo : PISMO
Pismo Beach is a California city located just 15 miles south of San Luis Obispo. The name “Pismo” comes from a Native American word “pismu” meaning “tar”, a reference to tar springs that are located in nearby Price Canyon. The tar was used by the locals to caulk their canoes.

10. "It follows that ..." : ERGO
"Ergo" is the Latin word for "hence, therefore".

20. U.S. city known to some locals as Siqnazuaq : NOME
Nome, Alaska has over 3,500 residents, the majority of whom are Native American. The next largest ethnic group in Nome is the white population.

21. Girl's name that sounds like French for "she has it" : ELLA
The French for “she has it” is “elle l’a”, which sounds like the girls’ name “Ella”.

23. Starting words at many a sporting event? : O SAY
“O say can you see by the dawn's early light” us the opening line of “The Star Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key.

32. "To Kill a Mockingbird" author : LEE
Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" was first published in 1960. The book is a mainstay in English classes all around the world and is a great ambassador for American literature, I'd say.

33. One on probation, maybe : TYRO
A tyro (also tiro) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which "tiro" means "a recruit".

37. Key of Beethoven's Symphony No. 7: Abbr. : A-MAJ
If I had to name which of Beethoven’s symphonies I listen to most often, at the top of the list comes the 7th followed closely by the 9th, and then the 5th a little further down. But that four-note opening of the 5th … that is superb …

48. Kerfuffle : ADO
“Kerfuffle” comes from the Scottish “curfuffle”, with both words meaning “disruption”.

52. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
Apparently the song "Adia", co-written by Sarah McLachlan, was intended as an apology to her best friend ... for stealing her ex-boyfriend and then marrying him!

54. Author of the quote "I am not what you call a civilized man!" : VERNE
Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

59. Capital in 2004-05's Orange Revolution : KIEV
The Orange Revolution of 2004/2005 was a series of protests that followed a supposedly corrupt election in Ukraine. Largely as a result of the civil upheaval there was a revote, which international observers deemed to be fair. The result remained unchanged, with Viktor Yushchenko being elected Ukrainian president for another term.

67. Dark genre : NOIR
The expression "film noir" has French origins, but only in that it was coined by a French critic in describing a style of Hollywood film. The term, meaning "black film" in French, was first used by Nino Frank in 1946. Film noir often applies to a movie with a melodramatic plot and a private eye or detective at its center. Good examples would be "The Big Sleep" and "D.O.A".

68. Where Rosalind becomes Ganymede, in Shakespeare : ARDEN
The Forest of Arden is the setting for Shakespeare's "As You Like It". Even though there is a Forest of Arden surrounding Shakespeare's home town of Stratford-on-Avon, seeing as the play is set in France one has to assume that the "As You Like It" Arden is an Anglicization of the forested "Ardennes" region that stretches from Belgium into France,and that famously featured in WWII’s Battle of the Bulge.

The heroine of Shakespeare’s play “As You Like It” is Rosalind. Rosalind flees her uncle’s court in the guise of a man called Ganymede. She finds refuge in the Forest of Arden, and also finds love.

In the play “As You Like It”, there is a speech that yields one of the most-quoted phrases written by William Shakespeare, namely “all the world’s a stage”:
All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:

71. Detroit's county : WAYNE
The city of Detroit is known worldwide as the capital of the automotive industry. However, times have been hard in recent years and the city’s population dropped by about 25% from 2000 to 2010 as locals moved to the suburbs and beyond in search of work.

Down
2. Modern "methinks" : IMHO
In my humble opinion (IMHO)

3. Filter target : SPAM
Apparently the term "SPAM", used for unwanted email, is taken from a "Monty Python" sketch. In the sketch (which I've seen) the dialog is taken over by the word SPAM, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So "SPAM" is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a "Monty Python" sketch to describe an online phenomenon ...

4. Luminary in a late-night show? : METEOR
A shooting star is what we call the visible path of a meteoroid as is it enters the earth’s atmosphere. Almost all meteoroids burn up, but if one is large enough to survive and reach the ground, we call it a meteorite. The word “meteor” comes from the Greek “meteōros” meaning “high in the air”.

5. Has more than enough, briefly : ODS
Overdoses (ODs)

7. Russian river : URAL
The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

8. Special election : RECALL
A “recall election” is one in which an attempt is made by the voters to remove an incumbent before his or her term has ended. The most famous recall election here in California was the one that removed Governor Gray Davis in 2003. Davis was replaced by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.
.
10. Time-sensitive items : EPHEMERA
"Ephemera" was originally a medical term, used to describe a fever that only lasted a day. The use of the term was expanded in the 17th century to include insects that were "short-lived", and by end of the 18th century "ephemera" were any things of transitory existence.

12. Savvies : GETS
The term “savvy”, meaning “understanding”, comes from the French "savez-vous?" that translates as "do you know?"

27. One of the men on "Two and a Half Men" : ALAN
“Two and a Half Men” is a TV sitcom that is remarkably successful despite being fraught with controversy. The eighth season had to be suspended when the show’s star Charlie Sheen went into drug rehab and made disparaging comments about the show’s producers. Sheen was fired, and his role was taken over by a new character played by Ashton Kutcher. In 2012, Angus T. Jones who plays young Jake urged fans not to watch the show as it was “filth”. Jones had recently converted to the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and the show’s themes clashed with the church’s standards. Well, I enjoy the show ...

28. Fictional character who says "I am not what you call a civilized man!" : NEMO
In the 1954 movie version of "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea", Captain Nemo goes down with his ship. In the novel by Jules Verne the fate of Nemo and his crew isn't quite so cut and dry, although the inference is perhaps that they did indeed head for Davy Jones' Locker.

35. 'Bama, with "the" : TIDE
The athletic teams of the University of Alabama (“Bama”) are nicknamed the Crimson Tide, a reference to the team colors: crimson and white.

38. Artist Vermeer : JOHANNES
Johannes Vermeer was born in the city of Delft in 1632, and died there some 43 years later. I just love Vermeer's paintings, and his wonderful use of light. A great example of such a work is his "Girl with a Pearl Earring". If you haven't seen it, I thoroughly recommend the 2003 movie "Girl with a Pearl Earring" starring Scarlett Johansson as the girl in the painting, and Colin Firth as Vermeer. The movie is based on a novel of the same name by Tracy Chevalier, so it's all just a great story as opposed to a documentary. The way the movie is shot really reflects the qualities of a Vermeer work of art. And, my wife and i are planning on taking a peek at the original painting “Girl with a Pearl Earring” in a couple of weeks as it is visiting one of our galleries here in San Francisco.

40. Violet Crawley of "Downton Abbey," and others : DOWAGERS
Originally, a dowry was money that was set aside by a man for his wife and children, to be used in the event that he passed away. A widow who receives said money was known as a “dowager”. Over time, "dowry" became a term used for the money, goods or estate that a woman brought into a marriage.

Violet Crawley, Countess of Grantham is a marvelous character on the PBS hit show “Downton Abbey”. Lady Violet is played superbly by the great Dame Maggie Smith.

43. Elvis's "Viva Las Vegas," recordwise : SIDE-B
"Viva Las Vegas” is a 1963 song that was recorded by Elvis Presley for his film of the same name.

“Viva Las Vegas” is an Elvis Presley movie released in 1964, considered to be one of his best films. The good reception for the movie was at least in part due to the performance of the female lead, Ann-Margret.

44. Fed. stipend : SSI
Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is federal program that provides financial relief to persons with low incomes who are 65 or older, or who are blind or disabled. The SSI program is administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) even though the the Social Security trust fund is not used for the SSI payments. The SSI payments come out of general tax revenue.

47. Sch. near Albany, N.Y. : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt, namely “the Engineers”.

51. Site of the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations : ANKARA
Ankara is the second largest city in Turkey, after Istanbul (formerly Constantinople). After WWI, the Ottoman Empire had been defeated and the Allies occupied the Ottoman capital of Istanbul. The victors planned to break up most of Turkey, leaving native Turks just part of their country for their own. In the inevitable War of Independence that followed, the Turkish Nationalists used Ankara as their base. When the Nationalists emerged victorious, they declared Ankara the new capital of Turkey.

Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia. It is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe, and is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

54. Seductress : VAMP
A “vamp” (short for vampire) is a seductive woman.

55. Genesis man : ESAU
Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described, “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

56. Little sucker? : RUNT
Back around 1500. a runt was an old or decayed tree stump, and by the early 1600s "runt" was being used to describe animals that were similarly old and decayed. Ultimately "runt" came to mean the smallest and often sickest in a litter.

58. Blue dye source : ANIL
Anil is another name for the indigo plant, as well as the name for the blue indigo dye that is obtained from it. The color of anil is relatively close to navy blue.

60. May race, informally : INDY
The first Indy 500 race was held on Memorial Day in 1911. The winner that day was one Ray Harroun. Harroun had seen someone using a rear view mirror on a horse-drawn vehicle, and decided to fit one on his Marmon "Wasp" motor car. Supposedly that was the first ever use of a rear view mirror on a motor vehicle.

61. Genesis place : EDEN
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

64. Start for a Spanish count : UNO
“Uno” is Spanish for “one”.
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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___ Beach, city near San Luis Obispo : PISMO
6. Hide : BURY
10. "It follows that ..." : ERGO
14. Totally stoked : AMPED
15. Metro ___ : AREA
16. Naughty look, maybe : PEEK
17. With 27-Across, an old riddle : WHAT'S BLACK, WHITE
20. U.S. city known to some locals as Siqnazuaq : NOME
21. Girl's name that sounds like French for "she has it" : ELLA
22. Microscopic, informally : EENSY
23. Starting words at many a sporting event? : O SAY
25. Rich soil : LOAM
27. See 17-Across : AND READ/RED ALL OVER
32. "To Kill a Mockingbird" author : LEE
33. One on probation, maybe : TYRO
34. In this matter : HERETO
37. Key of Beethoven's Symphony No. 7: Abbr. : A-MAJ
39. Flop : DUD
41. What lemon adds to a dish, in food lingo : ACID
42. "I won't miss it" : NO LOSS
45. Take off : SOAR
48. Kerfuffle : ADO
49. Answer to one spelling of the riddle : THIS NEWSPAPER
52. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
53. Similar : AKIN
54. Author of the quote "I am not what you call a civilized man!" : VERNE
57. All the ___ : RAGE
59. Capital in 2004-05's Orange Revolution : KIEV
63. Answer to another spelling of the riddle : A SUNBURNED PANDA
66. Locks in the stable? : MANE
67. Dark genre : NOIR
68. Where Rosalind becomes Ganymede, in Shakespeare : ARDEN
69. Plunks (down) : PUTS
70. Head-turning night fliers : OWLS
71. Detroit's county : WAYNE

Down
1. Hostage : PAWN
2. Modern "methinks" : IMHO
3. Filter target : SPAM
4. Luminary in a late-night show? : METEOR
5. Has more than enough, briefly : ODS
6. Home is one corner in it : BALLYARD
7. Russian river : URAL
8. Special election : RECALL
9. Gab : YAK
10. Time-sensitive items : EPHEMERA
11. Santa's deer leader? : REIN-
12. Savvies : GETS
13. ___-dokey : OKEY
18. Like a rat's eyes : BEADY
19. Drive drunkenly, say : WEAVE
24. Box ___ : SEAT/SET
26. "Wow!" : OOH!
27. One of the men on "Two and a Half Men" : ALAN
28. Fictional character who says "I am not what you call a civilized man!" : NEMO
29. Handled, with "with" : DEALT
30. No-goodnik : LOUSE
31. Sports segment that often includes highlights : RECAP
35. 'Bama, with "the" : TIDE
36. Cleaner's target : ODOR
38. Artist Vermeer : JOHANNES
40. Violet Crawley of "Downton Abbey," and others : DOWAGERS
43. Elvis's "Viva Las Vegas," recordwise : SIDE-B
44. Fed. stipend : SSI
46. Established the price of : ASKED
47. Sch. near Albany, N.Y. : RPI
50. Constrained : NARROW
51. Site of the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations : ANKARA
54. Seductress : VAMP
55. Genesis man : ESAU
56. Little sucker? : RUNT
58. Blue dye source : ANIL
60. May race, informally : INDY
61. Genesis place : EDEN
62. Weather indicator : VANE
64. Start for a Spanish count : UNO
65. Manhandle : PAW


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0129-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jan 14, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Michael Black
THEME: Acronym Included … today’s themed answers are all names of famous men, with circled letters giving us an acronym that is associated with that man:
20A. A general and his country : ULYSSES S GRANT (includes “USA”)
37A. A hoops great and his league : ELGIN BAYLOR (includes “NBA”)
44A. A comic and his former show : ADAM SANDLER (includes “SNL”)
59A. A president and his conflict : WOODROW WILSON (includes “WWI”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 07m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Part of una casa : SALA
A room (sala) is a division (división) of a house (casa), in Spanish.

10. Compressed pic, of a sort : JPEG
The JPEG file format was created by the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), hence the name.

An image file on a computer can be compressed so that it takes up less space. Some time the compression is "lossless" meaning even though the file is compressed, and data it is discarded, the image still looks the same. One example of data that can be discarded without loss of quality, is to not bother recording the color information of pixels that are the same color as others. Just saying "this pixel is the same is that one" takes up less space. One can compress files even more if one allows loss of quality. One well known compression algorithm that is "lossy" is the jpeg (also “.jpg”) format. The person compressing the file can decide how much quality will suffer in jpeg format, with larger files being of higher quality than the smaller ones.

16. Brewery fixture : OAST
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an "oast house".

20. A general and his country : ULYSSES S GRANT (includes “USA”)
Ulysses S. Grant had been a career soldier when he was elected as the 18th president of the US, and had risen to commander of all the Union armies by the end of the Civil War. Grant served two nonconsecutive terms as president, and also made a failed bid for a third term. Grant’s reputation was tarnished by his apparent tolerance of corruption in his administration. On the other hand, Grant worked hard to protect African Americans during Reconstruction after the Civil War, and pursued peaceful relations with Native Americans.

24. Title for a J.D. holder : ESQ
The title "esquire" is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, "esquire" is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

The law degree abbreviated to J.D. stands for Juris Doctor.

32. Remove, as a corsage : UNPIN
“Corsage” is a word we imported from French in the late 15th century. Back then we used it to mean “the size of the body”. By the early 1800s a corsage was a bodice, or the body of a woman’s dress. At the beginning of the 20th century, the French term “bouquet de corsage” was being used for a “bouquet worn on the bodice”, and this has been shortened simply to “corsage”.

34. Trigram on rotary phones : PRS
A trigram is a group of three letters or symbols.

37. A hoops great and his league : ELGIN BAYLOR (includes “NBA”)
Elgin Baylor is a retired NBA player and a former NBA general manager. Baylor spent 22 years as GM for the LA Clippers.

40. Cake similar to a Yodel : HO HO
Ho Hos snack cakes were first produced in San Francisco in 1967; not the best thing to come out of the sixties I'd say ...

42. Battle zone of 1956 and 1967 : SINAI
The Sinai Peninsula is in the eastern part of Egypt, the triangular peninsula bounded by the Mediterranean to the north and the Red Sea to the south. It is the only part of Egypt that lies in Asia as opposed to Africa. The eastern land border of the peninsula is shared with Israel, and Israel occupied the Sinai during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Six Day War of 1967.

43. Baja resort area : CABO
Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

44. A comic and his former show : ADAM SANDLER (includes “SNL”)
Adam Sandler's big break was with "Saturday Night Live" (SNL). He then went on to make several successful movies and has his own movie and television production company. Personally, I am not a fan of Adam Sandler, nor his movies ...

47. Kobe cash : YEN
The Korean Won, the Chinese Yuan, and the Japanese Yen (all of which are Asian currencies) take their names from the Chinese written character that represents "round shape".

Kobe is a city on the island of Honshu in Japan, and yes, basketball star Kobe Bryant is named after the Japanese city. The city of Kobe is perhaps most famous for its beef.

51. Brian who's a self-professed "nonmusician" : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:
I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

55. Harem wear : VEILS
"Harem" is a Turkish word, derived from the Arabic for "forbidden place". Traditionally a harem was the female quarters in a household in which a man had more than one wife. Not only wives (and concubines) would use the harem, but also young children and other female relatives. The main point was that no men were allowed in the area.

59. A president and his conflict : WOODROW WILSON (includes “WWI”)
President Woodrow Wilson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919. He was so honored in recognition of his efforts to promote peace around the world, and in particular for the leading role he played in setting up the League of Nations after WWI (despite his failure to gain support for the organization from the US Congress).

64. Mazar of "Entourage" : DEBI
Debi Mazar plays Shauna Roberts on the HBO series "Entourage". You might have seen her on "Dancing with the Stars" a while back, although she didn't do so well and was eliminated in the third week.

70. Away from the wind : ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

71. Like candy corn's texture : WAXY
Candy corn is a candy that is seen mainly around Halloween in North America. Candy corn is made to look like kernels of corn, with a yellow base, orange center and white tip. The original candy corn was created by the Wunderle Candy Company in Philadelphia in the 1880s.

72. Woman's golf garment : SKORT
Skorts are a hybrid between shorts and a skirt.

73. Motorola phone brand : RAZR
RAZR is a line of flip phones introduced by Motorola in 2004.

Down
1. Immunizing fluid : SERUM
Blood serum is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

2. Whac-___ (carnival game) : A-MOLE
The Whac-A-Mole arcade game was invented in 1976. Players use a mallet to force five plastic moles back into their holes. Whacking the moles can be so frustrating that we sometimes use the term “Whac-a-mole” to describe a repetitive and futile task.

3. Benghazi's land : LIBYA
Benghazi is the second largest city in Libya, after the capital Tripoli. It is a port city, lying on the Mediterranean Sea.

4. Bikini atoll trials, informally : A-TESTS
The testing of US nuclear weapons by the US at Bikini Atoll in the middle of 1946 went by the codename "Operation Crossroads". The tests used A-bombs and were designed to measure the effect of blasts on navy vessels. There were three tests planned, but the third had to be cancelled as the Navy couldn't decontaminate the ships used in the second test.

6. New Haven collegians : ELIS
Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

Yale is the private Ivy League school located in New Haven, Connecticut. Yale was founded in 1701, making it the third-oldest, higher education establishment in the country (after Harvard, and William and Mary).

7. Fruity candy since 1945 : DOTS
Dots are a brand of gum drops that were introduced to the market in 1945. Dots are produced by Tootsie Roll Industries in Chicago, at a rate of four billion dots per year.

10. W.C. : JOHN
The use of "john" as a slang term for a toilet is peculiar to North America. "John" probably comes from the older slang term of "jack" or "jakes" that had been around since the 16th century. In Ireland, in cruder moments, we still refer to a toilet as "the jacks".

12. Psychic's "gift," for short : ESP
Extrasensory Perception (ESP)

13. Classic muscle car : GTO
The acronym GTO stands for Gran Turismo Omologato.

21. 1/1 title word : SYNE
The song "Auld Lang Syne" is a staple at New Year's Eve, the words of which were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

22. With 18-Across, an old term for brandy : AQUA
18. See 22-Down : VITAE
“Aqua vitae” is Latin for “water of life”. The original use of the term was for a concentrated solution of ethanol. Over time aqua vitae became the term used for distilled spirits and particularly wine. “Water of life” translates into Scots Gaelic as “uisge-beatha” and into Irish as “uisce beatha”. These terms give rise to our modern word “whiskey”.

26. Weeper of myth : NIOBE
In Greek mythology, when her children were killed, Niobe fled to Mt. Sipylus where she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is in fact a Niobe's Rock on Mt. Sipylus that resembles a female face, and so is known as "The Weeping Rock".

27. Scandalous company with a tilted-E logo : ENRON
After all the trials following the exposure of fraud at Enron, several of the key players ended up in jail. Andrew Fastow was the Chief Financial Officer. He plea-bargained and received ten years without parole, and became the key witness in the trials of others. Even Fastow's wife was involved and she was sentenced to one year for helping her husband hide money. Jeffrey Skilling (ex-CEO) was sentenced to 24 years and 4 months. Kenneth Lay (CEO) died in 2006 after he had been found guilty but before he could be sentenced. The accounting firm Arthur Andersen was found guilty of obstruction of justice for shredding thousands of pertinent documents and deleting emails and files (a decision that the Supreme Court later overturned on a technicality). But still, Arthur Andersen collapsed under the weight of the scandal and 85,000 people lost their jobs (despite only a handful being directly involved with Enron).

29. Joy Adamson's big cat : ELSA
The life story of Elsa the lion was told by game warden Joy Adamson, who had a very close relationship with the lioness from when Elsa was orphaned as a young cub. Adamson wrote the book "Born Free" about Elsa, and then "Living Free" which tells the story of Elsa and her three lion cubs. In the 1966 film based on "Born Free", Adamson is played by the talented actress Virginia McKenna.

33. View from Ft. Lee, N.J. : NYC
Fort Lee is a US Army post in Virginia. Fort Lee started out as Camp Lee not long after the US entered WWI in 1917. The camp was of course named after the Confederate Civil War General Robert E. Lee.

35. "The Kiss" sculptor : RODIN
"The Kiss" is a beautiful sculpture created in 1889 by Auguste Rodin. I've had the privilege of standing beside the original, life-size marble work on a few occasions as it is housed in the Rodin Museum, my favorite of all museums in Paris. The Musée Rodin is very special in that the building and garden that hold all of the works were Rodin's actual home and studio. Well worth a visit if you make it to Paris ...

38. Simba's mate : NALA
In "The Lion King", Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba.

39. Jessica of "7th Heaven" : BIEL
Jessica Biel is an actress who was known by television audiences Mary Camden on “7th Heaven”. Biel's first film role was playing Peter Fonda’s granddaughter in “Ulee’s Gold”. Biel’s husband is singer and actor Justin Timberlake.

41. Kipling's "Follow Me ___" : ‘OME
“Follow Me ‘ome” is a poem by Rudyard Kipling.

Rudyard Kipling was a British poet and writer famous for his tales of the British Raj, the rule of the British Empire in India. Kipling was actually born in Bombay, but returned with his family to England when he was very young. After being educated in England, he returned to India and from there traveled the world. Kipling’s most famous works are the stories “The Jungle Book”, “Just So Stories”, “The Man Who Would Be King”, and the poems “Mandalay”, “Gunga Din” and “If-”.

45. 1988 N.L. Rookie of the Year Chris : SABO
Chris Sabo is a former third baseman who played for the Reds, Orioles, White Sox and Cardinals.

46. Noted first name in raga : RAVI
Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous virtuoso (to us Westerners) from the world of Indian classical music, and was noted for his sitar playing. Also, Shankar was the father of the beautiful pop singer Norah Jones.

Raga isn't really a type of music, but has been described as the "tonal framework" in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

50. San Diego-area horse-racing venue : DEL MAR
Del Mar translates into English as "of the sea" aptly enough. Also aptly enough, this upscale beach town started out as a purpose-built resort developed for the rich and famous, back in 1885. Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball had a house there for many years, as did Burt Bacharach. Skateboarder Tony Hawks grew up in Del Mar.

56. Sicilia, per esempio : ISOLA
In Italian, Sicily (Sicilia) for example (per esempio) is an island (isola).

57. "J to tha L-O!" artist : LOPEZ
J.Lo is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. "J.Lo" is also the title of her second studio album, released in 2001.

58. Smile like Snidely Whiplash : SNEER
Dudley Do-Right appeared on the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show, a cartoon that appeared on television in a couple of different versions from 1959-1964. Dudley was a bungling Mountie who struggled with his nemesis, the evil Snidely Whiplash, while pursuing the romantic intentions of Nell Fenwick (who always seemed to prefer Dudley’s horse!).

60. In need of a shampoo, say : OILY
Back in the 1760s, the verb “shampoo” was an Anglo-Indian word meaning “to massage”. A century later we started to shampoo our hair.

61. German Expressionist ___ Dix : OTTO
Otto Dix was a German painter and printmaker. Dix fought in the military in WWI and was profoundly affected by his experiences. Many of his artistic works reflected those experiences.

63. Order in the court : WRIT
A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in written form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

65. Bambi's aunt : ENA
The 1942 Disney classic "Bambi" is based on a book written by Felix Salten called "Bambi, A Life in the Woods". There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi's mother is shot by hunters.
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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Part of una casa : SALA
5. Totally disgusted : FED UP
10. Compressed pic, of a sort : JPEG
14. Let off : EMIT
15. Brief concession : I LOSE
16. Brewery fixture : OAST
17. Spa wear : ROBE
18. See 22-Down : VITAE
19. Hospital sticker : HYPO
20. A general and his country : ULYSSES S GRANT (includes “USA”)
23. Loaded with substance : MEATY
24. Title for a J.D. holder : ESQ
25. Impossible point total in American pro football : ONE
28. Clandestine sort : SNEAK
32. Remove, as a corsage : UNPIN
34. Trigram on rotary phones : PRS
37. A hoops great and his league : ELGIN BAYLOR (includes “NBA”)
40. Cake similar to a Yodel : HO HO
42. Battle zone of 1956 and 1967 : SINAI
43. Baja resort area : CABO
44. A comic and his former show : ADAM SANDLER (includes “SNL”)
47. Kobe cash : YEN
48. Cassette half : SIDE A
49. Soup alternative : SALAD
51. Brian who's a self-professed "nonmusician" : ENO
52. Part of a bridle : BIT
55. Harem wear : VEILS
59. A president and his conflict : WOODROW WILSON (includes “WWI”)
64. Mazar of "Entourage" : DEBI
66. What "-phage" means : EATER
67. Wear a long face : MOPE
68. ___ ether : ENOL
69. Final part of most Broadway musicals : ACT II
70. Away from the wind : ALEE
71. Like candy corn's texture : WAXY
72. Woman's golf garment : SKORT
73. Motorola phone brand : RAZR

Down
1. Immunizing fluid : SERUM
2. Whac-___ (carnival game) : A-MOLE
3. Benghazi's land : LIBYA
4. Bikini atoll trials, informally : A-TESTS
5. Word after "take" or "give me" : FIVE
6. New Haven collegians : ELIS
7. Fruity candy since 1945 : DOTS
8. Grammarian's concern : USAGE
9. Exerters of pressure, maybe : PEERS
10. W.C. : JOHN
11. Ante up : PAY TO PLAY
12. Psychic's "gift," for short : ESP
13. Classic muscle car : GTO
21. 1/1 title word : SYNE
22. With 18-Across, an old term for brandy : AQUA
26. Weeper of myth : NIOBE
27. Scandalous company with a tilted-E logo : ENRON
29. Joy Adamson's big cat : ELSA
30. Opposed to, in dialect : AGIN
31. Classifications : KINDS
33. View from Ft. Lee, N.J. : NYC
34. Thumb-sucking, e.g. : PHASE
35. "The Kiss" sculptor : RODIN
36. Spar with nobody : SHADOW BOX
38. Simba's mate : NALA
39. Jessica of "7th Heaven" : BIEL
41. Kipling's "Follow Me ___" : ‘OME
45. 1988 N.L. Rookie of the Year Chris : SABO
46. Noted first name in raga : RAVI
50. San Diego-area horse-racing venue : DEL MAR
53. Bits of creativity : IDEAS
54. Follow, as a U.P.S. shipment : TRACK
56. Sicilia, per esempio : ISOLA
57. "J to tha L-O!" artist : LOPEZ
58. Smile like Snidely Whiplash : SNEER
60. In need of a shampoo, say : OILY
61. German Expressionist ___ Dix : OTTO
62. Small dam : WEIR
63. Order in the court : WRIT
64. It might get your feet wet : DEW
65. Bambi's aunt : ENA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0128-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jan 14, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Stillman
THEME: Plus Bo Sound … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a well-known phrase with the letters BO added:
20A. Celebration dance after a goal? : SOCCER MAMBO (“soccer mom” & “bo”)
57A. Punched out a Disney elephant? : STRUCK DUMBO (“struck dumb” & “bo”)
11D. Aerobics done to Chubby Checker music? : TWIST TAE BO (“twist tie” & “bo”)
29D. Give a hobbit a ring? : PHONE BILBO (“phone bill” & “bo”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 08m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. One of the Smurfs : PAPA
The Smurfs are little blue men created by a Belgian cartoonist in 1958. The Smurfs became famous in the US when Hanna-Barbera used them in a children's cartoon series. The characters are largely a group of males. The original lineup included just one "Smurfette", who is wooed by almost all of the boy Smurfs. Later, another female was introduced into the mix called Sassette, and still later along came Granny Smurf.

15. Father of Ham : NOAH
According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

16. Monastery wear : COWLS
A cowl is a long garment with a hood that is primarily worn by monks in the the Christian tradition.

17. ___ rock : ACID
Acid rock is a musical genre, a subset of psychedelic rock. The term comes from the influence of the drug LSD (acid) on some compositions in the early days.

20. Celebration dance after a goal? : SOCCER MAMBO (“soccer mom” & “bo”)
The form of music and dance known as mambo developed in Cuba. “Mambo” means “conversation with the gods” in Kikongo, a language spoken by slaves taken to Cuba from Central Africa.

23. Sr.'s challenge : SAT
Today the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the acronym SAT.

24. "Stop!" : AVAST!
"Avast" is a nautical term used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch "hou vast" meaning "hold fast".

25. Oodles : A LOT
It's thought that the term "oodles", meaning “a lot”, comes from "kit and caboodle".

27. Combat engineer : SAPPER
A “sapper” is a soldier whose job is to perform engineering duties, such as building bridges and laying minefields. The term “sapper” comes from the verb “to sap” meaning “to lay a trench”. “To sap” comes into English via French, from the Latin “sappa” meaning “spade”.

37. Part of a drum kit : SNARE
Snare drums are so called because they have a set of wire strands (called snares) stretched across the bottom surface of the drum. When the drum is struck, the snares vibrate against the bottom drumhead producing a unique sound.

38. Many millennia : AEON
Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:
- supereon
- eon (also “aeon”)
- era
- period
- epoch
- age

45. E.M.T.'s cry before using a defibrillator : CLEAR
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

47. Network that airs the Soul Train Music Awards : BET
Black Entertainment Television (BET)

The Soul Train Music Awards are presented annually for the best performances by African American entertainers. The awards take their name from the “Soul Train” musical variety show that rain for 35 years starting in 1971.

53. Goddess of the hunt : DIANA
Diana was the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. The Greek equivalent of Diana was the goddess Artemis. According to Roman mythology, Diana was the twin brother of Apollo, and the daughter of Jupiter and Latona.

55. Letter before omega : PSI
The Greek letter psi is the one that looks a bit like a trident or a pitchfork.

Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet and is the one that looks like a horseshoe. The word "omega" literally means "great O" (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron meaning "little O" (O-micron).

57. Punched out a Disney elephant? : STRUCK DUMBO (“struck dumb” & “bo”)
The 1941 Disney animated film “Dumbo” was made a year after the feature called “Fantasia” was released. “Dumbo” was largely a commercial venture. The film was made quickly and released in theaters as soon as possible, the idea being to recoup the financial losses incurred by “Fantasia”.

64. Slender reed : OBOE
The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name "oboe" comes from the French "hautbois" which means "high wood". When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you'll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an "A". The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe's "A".

65. It may be checked, in more ways than one : COAT
One might check one’s check-pattern coat at the door for temporary safekeeping.

66. "Fiddler on the Roof" character : RABBI
The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Aleichem about Tevye, a milkman living in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. "Fiddler on the Roof" had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

68. Politico Gary : HART
Gary Hart was serving as US Senator for the state of Colorado when he first ran for the Democratic nomination for president, in 1984. He made a second bid for the nomination in 1988. In the 1988 campaign, the polls showed that Hart was leading the pack when it came to light that he was having an extra-marital affair with actress and model Donna Rice. There was a famous photograph that surfaced at the time, showing Rice on Hart’s knee while the pair were in Bimini about the aptly named motor yacht “Monkey Business”.

69. Impassive : STOIC
Zeno of Citium was a Greek philosopher famous for teaching at the Stoa Poikile, the "Painted Porch", located on the north side of the Ancient Agora of Athens. Because of the location of his classes, his philosophy became known as stoicism (from "stoa", the word for "porch"). And yes, we get our adjective "stoic" from the same root.

Down
4. Like the Marx Brothers : MADCAP
The five Marx Brothers were born to "Minnie" and "Frenchy" Marx in New York City. The more famous older boys were Chico, Harpo and Groucho. Zeppo was the youngest brother, and he appeared in the early Marx Brothers movies. The fifth son was called Gummo, and he decided to pursue a different career off the stage.

5. Like some vision : INFRARED
At either end of the visible light spectrum are the invisible forms of radiation known as infrared (IR) light and ultraviolet (UV) light. IR light lies just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum, and UV light lie just below the violet end.

7. Gold standard : KARAT
A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

8. Its appearance is deceiving : SHAM
A sham is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens a sham is also imitation and fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

9. Torahs, for example : SCROLLS
The word "Torah" best translates as "teaching", I am told.

11. Aerobics done to Chubby Checker music? : TWIST TAE BO (“twist tie” & “bo”)
Tae Bo isn't an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of "taekwondo" and "boxing".

The Twist is a dance that was born in the sixties, and was inspired by the Chubby Checker hit of 1960 called “The Twist”. Chubby Checker sang the song live in front of a crowd in Deland, Florida in October 2012. About 40,000 people danced along to the music, setting a new Guinness World Record for the most people “twisting” at the same time.

Ernest Evans was given the nickname "Chubby" by his boss at a produce market where he worked after school. When he went to make a recording for "American Bandstand" as Ernest Evans, Dick Clark's wife asked what his friends called him. When she heard "Chubby", she compared his name to that of "Fats" Domino. She then joked that "Checker" might be a better choice than Evans, given that Fats used "Domino". And so, Chubby Checker was born.

12. Forearm bone : ULNA
The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm. The bones in the forearm are the radius and ulna. “Ulna” is the Latin word for “elbow”, and “radius” is Latin for “ray”.

22. Like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, religiously: Abbr. : BAP
Baptist (Bap.)

President Jimmy Carter is a graduate of the US Naval Academy. Carter served in the Navy on surface ships and submarines, and chose to pursue a career in the submarine service as he was interested in nuclear power and believed it had a great future in submarine design. As a result, he became an expert in nuclear propulsion. In 1952, the Navy sent the young Carter to the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada to lead the US effort to shutdown the reactor after an accident and partial meltdown of a reactor core. He and his team had to be lowered into the leaking reactor core for mechanical disassembly, staying there for only seconds at a time to minimise exposure to radiation. Decades later as US President, it was this experience that influenced Carter's decision not to complete the development of the neutron bomb.

President Bill Clinton was born not as a Clinton, but as William Jefferson Blythe. Bill's father was killed in a car accident just three months before he was born. His mother remarried a few years later, to Roger Clinton. Bill didn't formally adopt the Clinton name until he was fourteen years old, although he used it as he was growing up.

27. Real mix-up : SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that's the "polite" version!). As you might imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

29. Give a hobbit a ring? : PHONE BILBO (“phone bill” & “bo”)
Bilbo Baggins is the main character in J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel "The Hobbit", and a supporting character in Tolkien’s "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

32. Raid targets : PESTS
Raid insecticide has been killing bugs since 1956.

36. Rank above maj. : COL
Our word “colonel” ultimately derives from the Latin “columna” meaning “pillar, column”.

41. One known for talking back? : PARAKEET
Parakeets are a group of bird species that are small parrots. The most common type of parakeet that we see in pet stores is the budgerigar.

49. Channel with the catchword "Drama" : TNT
TNT stands for Turner Network Television. The TNT cable channel made a big splash in the eighties when it started to broadcast old MGM movies that had been "colorized", not something that was a big hit with the public. In recent years, the TNT programming lineup is touted with the tagline "We Know Drama", and includes shows like "Judging Amy", "ER" and "Cold Case".

51. South American cowboy : GAUCHO
A “gaucho” is someone who lives in the South American pampas, the fertile lowlands in the southeast of South America. The term “gaucho” is also used as the equivalent of our “cowboy”.

53. Home of the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building : DUBAI
Burj Khalifa is a spectacular skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It is the tallest man-made structure in the world, and has been so since the completion of its exterior in 2009. The space in the building came onto the market at a really bad time, during the global financial crisis. The building was part of a US$20 billion development of downtown Dubai that was backed by the city government which had to go looking for a bailout from the neighboring city of Abu Dhabi. The tower was given the name Burj Khalifa at the last minute, apparently as a nod to the UAE president Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan who helped to broker the bailout.

58. Cinnabon purchase : ROLL
Cinnabon is a chain of stores that sell baked goods. The first Cinnabon store opened in 1985 in a suburb of Seattle Washington.

60. Former baseball commissioner Giamatti : BART
Bart Giamatti was the President of Yale University from 1978 to 1986. He was also the Commissioner of Major League Baseball for a few months in 1989 after having served as National League President from 1986 to 1989.

61. Comics canine : OTTO
Sgt. Snorkel (“Sarge”) is Beetle Bailey's nemesis in the cartoon strip that bears his name. Snorkel has a dog called Otto that he dresses up to look just like himself. Otto started off as a regular dog, but artist Mort Walker decide to draw him more like his owner, and soon Otto became a big hit.

63. Kimono sash : OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

The lovely Japanese kimono is a garment worn by men, women and children. The word “kimono” translates simply as “thing to wear”, with “ki” meaning “wear” and “mono” meaning “thing”.
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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Stern's opposite : STEM
5. Varieties : ILKS
9. Exercise unit : SIT-UP
14. One of the Smurfs : PAPA
15. Father of Ham : NOAH
16. Monastery wear : COWLS
17. ___ rock : ACID
18. Fit ___ king : FOR A
19. Archaeological site : RUINS
20. Celebration dance after a goal? : SOCCER MAMBO (“soccer mom” & “bo”)
23. Sr.'s challenge : SAT
24. "Stop!" : AVAST!
25. Oodles : A LOT
27. Combat engineer : SAPPER
30. Separated, as a couple : SPLIT UP
33. Degree in math? : NTH
34. Get through to : REACH
37. Part of a drum kit : SNARE
38. Many millennia : AEON
40. Sag : DROOP
42. They're tapped : KEGS
43. Like many traffic violators in court : FINED
45. E.M.T.'s cry before using a defibrillator : CLEAR
47. Network that airs the Soul Train Music Awards : BET
48. Find, as at an archaeological site : UNEARTH
50. Hardships : RIGORS
52. Stuff in a muffin : BRAN
53. Goddess of the hunt : DIANA
55. Letter before omega : PSI
57. Punched out a Disney elephant? : STRUCK DUMBO (“struck dumb” & “bo”)
62. Ration out : ALLOT
64. Slender reed : OBOE
65. It may be checked, in more ways than one : COAT
66. "Fiddler on the Roof" character : RABBI
67. Rural route : LANE
68. Politico Gary : HART
69. Impassive : STOIC
70. It's just one thing after another : LIST
71. Not duped by : ONTO

Down
1. Relaxing spots : SPAS
2. Crunchy sandwich : TACO
3. Vast : EPIC
4. Like the Marx Brothers : MADCAP
5. Like some vision : INFRARED
6. Tapestry-making aids : LOOMS
7. Gold standard : KARAT
8. Its appearance is deceiving : SHAM
9. Torahs, for example : SCROLLS
10. Marker letters : IOU
11. Aerobics done to Chubby Checker music? : TWIST TAE BO (“twist tie” & “bo”)
12. Forearm bone : ULNA
13. Head-turner : PSST!
21. Eternally : EVER
22. Like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, religiously: Abbr. : BAP
26. Farm sound : OINK
27. Real mix-up : SNAFU
28. Didn't go anywhere for dinner : ATE IN
29. Give a hobbit a ring? : PHONE BILBO (“phone bill” & “bo”)
30. It's about a foot : SHOE
31. Prompter : URGER
32. Raid targets : PESTS
35. Eyebrow shape : ARCH
36. Rank above maj. : COL
39. In the vicinity : NEAR
41. One known for talking back? : PARAKEET
44. Extreme, as measures : DRASTIC
46. Orange exterior : RIND
49. Channel with the catchword "Drama" : TNT
51. South American cowboy : GAUCHO
53. Home of the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building : DUBAI
54. Desktop pictures : ICONS
55. Fours on a course, often : PARS
56. Thin strip : SLAT
58. Cinnabon purchase : ROLL
59. Haunted house sound : MOAN
60. Former baseball commissioner Giamatti : BART
61. Comics canine : OTTO
63. Kimono sash : OBI


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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