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Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

0301-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Mar 14, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood & J.A.S.A. Crossword Class
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 51m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … ATAVIST (atomist!), K THX BYE (K TTY BYE), ASHANTI (Ostanti), VEX (mey!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. 1987 #1 hit with the line "Yo no soy marinero, soy capitán" : LA BAMBA
“La Bamba” is a folk song from Veracruz, Mexico that became a huge hit for Ritchie Valens in 1958. The most notable cover version of the Valens hit was recorded by Los Lobos in 1987 as the title track of 1987 movie “La Bamba”.

8. Throwback : ATAVIST
An atavism is an evolutionary throwback, the reappearance of a trait that disappeared in prior generations. One example of an atavism would be a vestigial tail that might be found on some newborn babies.

15. Samsung Galaxy Note rival : IPAD AIR
The iPad Air is Apple’s 5th-generation table computer. The Air is just 7.5 mm thick, and is 22% lighter than the iPad 2.

16. Go-ahead for un hombre : SI, SENOR
In Spanish, a man (un hombre) might say “yes, sir” (si, senor).

17. Forward to some followers : RETWEET
Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). But, I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

19. Where Melville's Billy Budd went : ASEA
"Billy Budd" is a novella by American author Herman Melville. However, Melville didn’t actually finish “Billy Budd” before he died in 1891.

20. Hubble sighting : NEBULA
In astronomical terms a nebula is a cloud of dust and ionized gases (“nebula” is the Latin for “cloud”). Many nebulae form as gases collapse in on themselves under the influence of enormous gravitational forces. Ultimately these collapses can result in the creation of new stars.

The famous Hubble Space Telescope was installed in orbit by the Space Shuttle Discovery in 1990. The telescope was named for the astronomer Edwin Hubble, the man who changed our view of the universe by postulating that the universe is expanding.

22. Jesse Jackson, for one: Abbr. : REV
Rev. Jesse Jackson is a civil rights activist and Baptist minister from Greenville, South Carolina. Jackson twice ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination for US president, in 1984 and 1988.

24. Like some double-deckers : OPEN-TOP
We use the term “bus” for a mode of transportation, an abbreviated form of the original “omnibus”. We imported “omnibus” via French from Latin, in which language it means “for all”. The idea is that an omnibus is a “carriage for all”.

28. One's own worst critic? : SUPER-EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

32. Put off : TABLE
These "tabling" and "shelving" idioms drive me crazy, because they are always misused. If a topic is shelved, it is set aside. If a topic is tabled, it is brought "off the shelf" and put “on the table” for discussion. But, maybe it's just me ...

38. Four roods : ACRE
At one time, an acre was defined as the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day. This was more precisely defined as a strip of land “one furrow long” (i.e. one furlong) and one furlong wide. The length of one furlong was equal to 10 chains, or 40 rods. A area of one furlong times 10 rods was one rood.

40. Pawnbroker, in slang : UNCLE
The tradition sign outside a pawnbroker’s shop consists of three balls. This symbol dates back to the Middle Ages, where it was used on coats of arms as a sign of monetary success. The running joke is that the three balls mean “two to one, you won’t get your stuff back”.

41. Travel safety grp. : SADD
Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) was founded in Massachusetts in 1981. SADD’s aim is to prevent road traffic accidents by urging students to avoid potentially destructive decisions (such as driving under the influence of alcohol).

42. Modern device seen on a bridge : GOOGLE GLASS
Google Glass is a computer that one can wear, just like a pair of spectacles. In terms of hardware, Glass has a camera, a touchpad and a microphone. There has been a lot of discussion back and forth about Google Glass. The new technology has a lot of fans, but there are also many who have concerns about the use of Glass to invade someone’s privacy.

45. L.A. law figure : ITO
Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read the book that's Clark wrote about the trial called "Without a Doubt", and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as "Marcia", while addressing the men on both sides of the case as "Mister".

52. Beats by ___ (brand of audio equipment) : DRE
Beats by Dre is a brand of audio products that was founded by rapper Dr. Dre.

Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

59. Sack dress? : PAJAMAS
One might wear pajamas when one hits the sack, heads for bed.

Our word "pajamas" comes to us from the Indian subcontinent, where "pai jamahs" were loose fitting pants tied at the waist and worn at night by locals and ultimately by the Europeans living there. And "pajamas" is another of those words that I had to learn to spell differently when I came to America. In the British Isles the spelling is "pyjamas".

63. Dish often served with a tamarind sauce : PAD THAI
The delicious dish called Pad Thai is a meld of stir-fried rice noodles with tamarind juice, red chili pepper plus a mix of vegetables and possibly tofu, meat or fish. It is usually topped with crushed peanuts, coriander and lime. The name "Pad Thai" translates as "fried Thai style".

The fruit of the tamarind tree is a little sour to be eaten raw, but it is used a lot in savory dishes. Famously, tamarind is a component of Worcestershire sauce.

66. Carrier with a pink logo : T-MOBILE
I use a pay-as-you-go phone from T-Mobile, which cost me $45 for calls and text, for the whole of last year …

Down
1. Turkey tip? : LIRA
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

2. Burlesques : APES
“Burlesque” came into English from French, although the word is rooted in the Italian “burla”, the word for a joke, or mockery. A burlesque is work of literature, drama or music that is intended to amuse and cause laughter. Burlesques in the US took on a variety show format and were popular in the US from the 1860s. Over time, the variety acts started to include female striptease, and the term “burlesque” has come to be mainly associated with such entertainment. The derivative verb “to burlesque” means “to imitate mockingly”.

4. Norton AntiVirus target : ADWARE
Norton Antivirus software is produced by Symantec. The Norton brand name originated with Peter Norton Computing, a company that Symantec acquired in 1990. Peter Norton’s most famous product was Norton Utilities, and he never produced an antivirus application. Symantec decided to use the respected Norton brand for the antivirus product that it developed and introduced in 1991.

5. Tina Turner's real middle name : MAE
Tina Turner is actually a stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the "Queen of Rock 'n' Roll". Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

6. Welcome message to international travelers : BIENVENUE
“Bienvenue” is French for “welcome”.

7. Danza, e.g. : ARTE
In Spanish, dance (danza) is an art (arte).

8. Invite to one's penthouse : ASK UP
Originally, the term “penthouse” was used to describe a modest building attached to a main structure. In fact, in centuries past, the manger in which Jesus was born was often referred to as a penthouse. The modern, more luxurious connotation dates back to the early twenties.

10. Ghanaian region known for gold and cocoa : ASHANTI
The Ashanti region of south Ghana is the most populous of the ten administrative regions of the country, as it is home to the nation’s capital of Kumasi. Ashanti’s economy is driven by the production of gold bars and cocoa.

12. Having five sharps : IN B
The musical key signature of B major has five sharps.

13. ___ milk : SOY
What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink "soya milk".

14. III, in Rome : TRE
In Italian, tre (three) precedes quattro (four).

Ancient Rome went through three distinct periods. From 753 to 509 BC, Rome was a kingdom, founded by the legendary Romulus. The Roman Republic lasted from 509 to 27 BC. The Republic started with the overthrow of the last monarch, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, and replacement by two elected consuls who were advised by a senate. The Republic evolved over time, but came to an end when Octavian expanded his power and declared himself “First Citizen”, and effectively became Rome’s first Emperor and took the name Caesar Augustus. The Western Roman Empire collapsed in the 5th century. The Eastern Roman Empire survived as the Byzantine Empire that was centered on Constantinople.

23. They make quick admissions decisions, for short : ERS
Emergency room (ER)

25. Ink : TATS
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo".

28. They sometimes lead to runs : SNAGS
A “snag” is a pull or a tear in a fabric. A snag, particularly in stockings, might lead to a run.

30. Italian brewer since 1846 : PERONI
The Peroni Brewery is based in Rome, although it was founded in Vigevano in Lombardy in 1846. Outside of Italy, Peroni is particularly popular in the UK.

31. Blood members, e.g. : GANG
The Bloods are a street gang that was founded in Los Angeles and now has a presence right across the country. There is even documented evidence that the Bloods have active members in the US military. The Bloods were founded in opposition to their main rival gang, the Crips.

36. Spirit : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

37. Emmy category, informally : BEST DRAMA
The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars in the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of "Emmy" is a softened version of the word "immy", the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

39. Food brand originally called Froffles : EGGO
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg's. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name "Eggo" was chosen to promote the "egginess" of the batter. "Eggo" replaced the original name chosen, which was "Froffles", created by melding "frozen" and "waffles".

56. ___ Drive, thoroughfare by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington : OHIO
The Lincoln Memorial is my favorite place to visit in the whole of Washington D.C. The memorial was designed by Henry Bacon, and the sculptor of the magnificent statue of President Lincoln was Daniel Chester French. I spent a wonderful afternoon not too long ago touring the workshop and home of French, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. The workshop is stunning, with miniature studies for his magnus opus, the Lincoln Statue, as well as many other beautiful works.

57. Modern posting locale : WALL
That would be posting on a Facebook Wall.

59. .doc alternative : .PDF
Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

60. Bird: Prefix : AVI-
The prefix “avi-” means “bird-related” as in “aviculture”, the breeding of birds.

61. The Clintons' degs. : JDS
The law degree abbreviated to J.D. stands for Juris Doctor.

President Bill Clinton was born not as a Clinton, but as William Jefferson Blythe. Bill's father was killed in a car accident just three months before he was born. His mother remarried a few years later, to Roger Clinton. Bill didn't formally adopt the Clinton name until he was fourteen years old, although he used it as he was growing up.

HIllary Rodham was born in Chicago, Illinois to Hugh Rodham (a businessman in the textile industry) and Dorothy Howell (a homemaker). Hillary was raised in a conservative home, and she campaigned for Republican candidate Barry Goldwater in the 1964 US presidential election. The following year, she served as president of the Young Republicans at Wellesley College. Our former First Lady left the Republican Party expressing disappointment at what she witnessed at the 1968 Republican National Convention in Miami, citing “veiled” racist messages prevalent at that time.

62. Cousin of "verdammt" : ACH
The German exclamation "ach!" is usually translated into English as "oh!"

The German expletive “verdammt” translates as “damn”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 1987 #1 hit with the line "Yo no soy marinero, soy capitán" : LA BAMBA
8. Throwback : ATAVIST
15. Samsung Galaxy Note rival : IPAD AIR
16. Go-ahead for un hombre : SI, SENOR
17. Forward to some followers : RETWEET
18. Curt chat closing : K THX BYE
19. Where Melville's Billy Budd went : ASEA
20. Hubble sighting : NEBULA
22. Jesse Jackson, for one: Abbr. : REV
24. Like some double-deckers : OPEN-TOP
28. One's own worst critic? : SUPER-EGO
32. Put off : TABLE
34. Dayton-to-Toledo dir. : NNE
35. Subjected to venomous attacks? : SNAKEBITTEN
38. Four roods : ACRE
40. Pawnbroker, in slang : UNCLE
41. Travel safety grp. : SADD
42. Modern device seen on a bridge : GOOGLE GLASS
45. L.A. law figure : ITO
46. Take a little hair off, maybe : SINGE
47. To date : UNTIL NOW
49. Den delivery : LION CUB
52. Beats by ___ (brand of audio equipment) : DRE
53. One picking up speed, say? : SENSOR
55. They're game : FOWL
59. Sack dress? : PAJAMAS
63. Dish often served with a tamarind sauce : PAD THAI
65. Disc protector : DVD CASE
66. Carrier with a pink logo : T-MOBILE
67. Like some stockings : FISHNET
68. If it's repeated, it's nothing new : SAME OLD

Down
1. Turkey tip? : LIRA
2. Burlesques : APES
3. Moderate : BATE
4. Norton AntiVirus target : ADWARE
5. Tina Turner's real middle name : MAE
6. Welcome message to international travelers : BIENVENUE
7. Danza, e.g. : ARTE
8. Invite to one's penthouse : ASK UP
9. Proof of purchase : TITLE
10. Ghanaian region known for gold and cocoa : ASHANTI
11. Needle or nettle : VEX
12. Having five sharps : IN B
13. ___ milk : SOY
14. III, in Rome : TRE
21. Novel groups? : BOOK CLUBS
23. They make quick admissions decisions, for short : ERS
25. Ink : TATS
26. Come by : OBTAIN
27. Openly admitted, as in court : PLED TO
28. They sometimes lead to runs : SNAGS
29. Straighten out : UNCOIL
30. Italian brewer since 1846 : PERONI
31. Blood members, e.g. : GANG
33. Fund : ENDOW
36. Spirit : ELAN
37. Emmy category, informally : BEST DRAMA
39. Food brand originally called Froffles : EGGO
43. Photog : LENSMAN
44. Cry with a salute : SIR!
48. Ignored : LEFT BE
50. Fade out : CEASE
51. Like loose stones : UNSET
54. Decides : OPTS
56. ___ Drive, thoroughfare by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington : OHIO
57. Modern posting locale : WALL
58. Produced stories : LIED
59. .doc alternative : .PDF
60. Bird: Prefix : AVI-
61. The Clintons' degs. : JDS
62. Cousin of "verdammt" : ACH
64. Suffix with official or fan : -DOM


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0228-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 14, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Martin Ashwood-Smith
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 36m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Modern-day locale of ancient Nineveh : IRAQ
Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city on the eastern bank of the Tigris River in modern-day Iraq. The ruins of the city are located just on the other side of the river from the Iraqi city of Mosul. At one time, Nineveh was the largest city in the world.

11. Exceeds the speed limit? : ODS
“Speed” is a slang name for some stimulant drugs, especially amphetamine or methamphetamine.

15. Company with an Energy Boost line : ADIDAS
The brand name Adidas dates back to when Adolf "Adi" Dassler started making his own sports shoes in his mother's laundry room in Bavaria after returning from WWI. With his brother, Adi founded Dassler shoes. The companies big break came in 1936 at the Berlin Olympics, when Adi persuaded American sprinter Jesse Owens to use his shoes, and with the success of Jesse Owens came success for the fledgling shoe company. After WWII the brothers split, acrimoniously. Adi's brother, Ru-dolf Da-ssler, formed "Ruda" shoes (later to become Puma), and Adi Das-sler formed "Adidas".

16. Minim : JOT
“Minim” and “jot” are terms used to describe a small portion.

22. Bouillabaisse seasoning : THYME
In Ancient Greece, thyme was burned as incense and used in baths as it was believed to be a source of courage.

Bouillabaisse is a traditional seafood stew that originated in the port city of Marseille on the Mediterranean coast of France.

26. Mitochondrion-made material, briefly : ATP
Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a chemical used in the body to transfer energy for cell-to-cell. One of the main uses of ATP is to shorten muscles, so that they can do work.

Mitochondria are structures found in most living cells. Some called cellular power plants, mitochondria generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the body’s source of chemical energy.

27. Back, to a shellback : AFT
Shellbacks are veteran sailors, specifically sailors who have crossed the equator one or more times.

38. What a tropical tourist definitely doesn't want to bring home : MALARIA PARASITE
Malaria is a disease passed onto humans by mosquitoes. As a result of the disease, a parasite invades human red blood cells and multiplies causing fever and possibly coma or death. Over 750,000 people died from malaria in 2009, out of 225 million cases reported.

41. Some Windows systems : NTS
Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7; they're all based on the Windows NT operating system. There is a common perception that Windows NT (WNT) takes its name from VMS, an earlier operating system developed by Digital Equipment Corporation. "WNT" is what's called a "Caesar cypher" of "VMS", as you just augment the letters of VMS alphabetically by one to arrive at WNT. Bill Gates disputes this derivation of the name, and in a 1998 interview stated that the NT originally stood for N-Ten and that the marketing folks at Microsoft revised history by changing it to "New Technology".

42. Shakespeare sonnet mentioning Philomel's mournful hymns : CII
Philomela (also “Philomel”) is a figure from Greek mythology known as the ‘princess of Athens”. Philomel is a tragic figure, a woman who was raped by the sister’s husband and transforms into a nightingale. Based on the myth, the song of the nightingale is often portrayed as a sorrowful lament. Philomela appears several times in Shakespearean works, including his plays “Titus Andronicus” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, and his Sonnet 102 “My love is strengthened, though more week in seeming”.

43. Title for Liszt : ABBE
Franz Liszt was a composer and pianist from Hungary active in the 1800s. As a pianist, Liszt was a true virtuoso, and was regarded by most in his day as the greatest player of all time. In 1859, Liszt’s 20-year old son died, and then three years later his daughter passed away. These events led to him taking up residence in a monastery outside room. He was ordained in 1865, after which he was often referred to as Abbé Liszt.

52. Text with Numbers : TORAH
The Book of Numbers in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles relates much of the journey of Moses and the Israelites from Egypt to the promised land. The title comes from the numbering of the people that is described in the beginning of the book.

55. Carlito's way : VIA
“Via” is Italian for “by, way”.

58. First name in popular shorts : WALT
Walt Disney (born “Walter Elias Disney”) was one of five children, the son of Elias and Flora Disney. Elias was an Irish Canadian, and Flora was from Ohio.

59. Bond bit : ION
Some chemical bonds are formed between ions.

60. Coors Field player : ROCKIE
Coors Field in Denver is home to the Colorado Rockies MLB team. Coors Field used to give up the most home runs in the league, due to low air density and dry air at Denver’s high elevation. The number of home runs has dropped dramatically since 2002 when officials began to store ball games in a high-humidity environment.

64. Salk Institute architect Louis : KAHN
Louis Kahn was a celebrated architect based in Philadelphia. Among his list of works is the Yale University Art Gallery and the First Unitarian Church in Rochester, New York.

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California was founded in 1960 by Jonas Salk, the virologist who developed the polio vaccine.

Jonas Salk was an American medical researcher, famous for developing the first safe polio vaccine. In the fifties, especially after the 1952 epidemic, polio was the biggest health fear in the US because it killed thousands, left even more with disabilities and most of the victims were children. The situation was dire and the authorities immediately quarantined the family of any polio victim, and that quarantine was so strict that in many cases the families were not even permitted to attend the funeral of a family member who died from the disease.

Down
1. From Galway, say : IRISH
Galway is a city on the west coast of Ireland, the fourth most populous city in the country (after Dublin, Cork and Limerick).

4. Last thing seen by a proof reader? : QED
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin "quod erat demonstrandum" meaning "that which was to be demonstrated".

5. Some Wall Street contracts : CALL OPTIONS
In the world of stock trading, a “call” or “call option” is type of financial contract. The buyer of a call option purchases the right, without obligation, to buy a particular commodity from the seller before a specified date (the expiration date) at a specified price (the strike price).

7. Exist abroad? : VIVRE
“Vivre” is French for “to live”.

10. Squad cmdr. : SSGT
Staff sergeant (SSgt)

11. R&B group with the 1972 hit "Back Stabbers," with "the" : O'JAYS
The O’Jays are an R&B group from Canton, Ohio. They came together in 1963 as a band of five singers and are still performing today, although now only as a trio. The band took the name of the O’Jays as a tribute to a radio disk jockey called Eddie O’Jay who was big in Cleveland at the time. The biggest hit for the O’Jays is “Love Train”, released in 1972.

12. Proselytizers push it : DOGMA
Proselytism is attempting to convert someone from one religion or opinion to another.

A dogma is a set of beliefs, with the plural being “dogmata” (or "dogmas", if you're not a pedant like me!)

27. Singer who's a Backstreet Boy's brother : AARON CARTER
Aaron Carter is a singer who became a pre-teen and teen idol about a decade ago. As successful as he was, he had to declare bankruptcy in 2013.

28. Sir James Galway, e.g. : FLAUTIST
James Galway is Ireland’s most famous flute player. Born in Belfast, Galways now lives in Switzerland.

29. Dodgers' foes : T-MEN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T is for Treasury).

30. Hindu hero : RAMA
In the Hindu tradition, the god known as Vishnu has seven different avatars i.e. incarnations or manifestations. Rama is the seventh of these avatars.

31. Legions : A LOT
The word “legion” can be used to mean “a large number”.

32. Suffix with Edward : -IANA
Edwardiana is a material related to the Edwardian era.

The Edwardian era in the UK started with the death of Queen Victoria in 1901 and the succession to the throne of her son, King Edward VII. The period was known for increased interest in women’s suffrage and continued industrial development. The era ended with the death of the king in 1910, and was soon followed by the catastrophe that was the First World War.

33. It's around 6 on the Mohs scale : OPAL
The Mohs scale of mineral hardness was developed in 1812 by Friedrich Mohs. Basically Mohs took minerals and scratched them with other minerals. In this way he was able to determine which minerals were hardest (most scratch resistant) and which softest.

34. "The Lion King" lion : NALA
In "The Lion King", Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba.

The highly successful stage musical "The Lion King" started out life as a 1994 animated feature film of the same name from the Disney studio. The film is the highest earning traditionally-animated feature of all time. The animated film "Finding Nemo" has made more money, but it was created using computer animation.

37. Philatelic goals : SETS
Stamp collectors (philatelists) might purchase a whole pane of stamps.

“Philately” is the more formal name given to the practice of collecting postage stamps. The term “philately” was coined (in French, as “philatélie) in 1864 by French collector Georges Herpin. He came up with it from the Greek “phil-” meaning “loving” and “ateleia” meaning “exemption from tax”. Apparently “exemption from tax” was the closest thing Herpin could find to “postage stamp”.

43. When the first dogwatch ends : AT SIX
In the traditional watch system at sea, the crew is divided into two “teams”, often called the port and starboard watches. Each watch works for four hours and then rests for four hours, works again for four hours and rests etc. As there are six 4-hour periods (also called watches, to confuse!) in every day, and six is an even number, the period from midnight to 4am would have to be stood by the same crew members. As this is the watch that is considered undesirable to many, then a system was devised to rotate responsibilities for fairness. The “dogwatch” is the 4-hour period between 4pm and 8pm and it was split into two 2-hour periods, the first dogwatch and second dogwatch. This resulted in a complement of seven watches in every 24-hour period, an odd number. Consequently, the team attending a particular watch in a day, is replaced by the opposite team on the next day.

44. It's not a cheap shot : BOTOX
Botulinum toxin is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The toxin is a protein that can cause botulism, an extremely dangerous illness in humans and animals. Botulinum toxin is sold under the trade name Botox. Botox is used therapeutically and in cosmetic applications to weaken muscles, perhaps muscles that are in uncontrollable spasm. The cosmetic application involves the paralyzing of facial muscles in order to eliminate or reduce wrinkles, at least for a few months.

45. Bombers' locale : BRONX
The New York Yankees baseball team has the nickname “the Bronx Bombers”. The nickname reflects where the team plays (the Bronx) and the team’s reputation for hitting (bombers).

46. Spelunker's aid : TORCH
Spelunking is an American term for caving, although the word has Latin roots ("spelunca" is the Latin for "cave"). The term originated in the 1940s in New England when it was adopted by a group of men who explored caves in the area.

48. City with major avenues named Cincinnati and Columbus : XENIA
Xenia, Ohio is in effect a suburb of Dayton. The name "Xenia" is the Greek word for "hospitality". In terms of population, Xenia is the largest city in the US with a name beginning with the letter X.

49. First name among socialites : IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald's marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in 1990.

50. It means nothing : ZILCH
We use the term “zilch” to mean “nothing”. Our current usage evolved in the sixties, before which the term was used to describe “meaningless speech”. There was a comic character called Mr. Zilch in the 1930s in “Ballyhoo” magazine. Mr. Zilch’s name probably came from the American college slang “Joe Zilch” that was used in the early 1900s for “an insignificant person”.

53. Mann's man : HERR
In Germany, a “Mr.” (Herr) is married to a “Mrs.” (Frau).

Thomas Mann was a German novelist whose most famous work is probably his novella "Death in Venice", originally published in German in 1912 as "Der Tod in Venedig". The story was famously adapted for the big screen in 1971, in a movie starring Dirk Bogarde.

58. Thai pan : WOK
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Modern-day locale of ancient Nineveh : IRAQ
5. People down under? : CAVERS
11. Exceeds the speed limit? : ODS
14. Exceed the speed limit, maybe : RACE
15. Company with an Energy Boost line : ADIDAS
16. Minim : JOT
17. Terse admission : I DID
18. It'll keep a roof over your head : LIVING WAGE
20. Fall, in a way : SIN
21. Like a good lookout : ALERT
22. Bouillabaisse seasoning : THYME
23. They soar at the opera : HIGH NOTES
25. When to do a pressing job : ASAP
26. Mitochondrion-made material, briefly : ATP
27. Back, to a shellback : AFT
29. Investments since 1975 : TRADITIONAL IRAS
38. What a tropical tourist definitely doesn't want to bring home : MALARIA PARASITE
39. It helps you let go : EMOTIONAL OUTLET
40. Many of them play at the Olympics : NATIONAL ANTHEMS
41. Some Windows systems : NTS
42. Shakespeare sonnet mentioning Philomel's mournful hymns : CII
43. Title for Liszt : ABBE
46. Gigantic : TEXAS-SIZE
52. Text with Numbers : TORAH
54. Patent : OVERT
55. Carlito's way : VIA
56. Street view : STOREFRONT
58. First name in popular shorts : WALT
59. Bond bit : ION
60. Coors Field player : ROCKIE
61. Almost never : ONCE
62. Really dirty : XXX
63. Try again : REHEAR
64. Salk Institute architect Louis : KAHN

Down
1. From Galway, say : IRISH
2. Cuts into a pizza, often : RADII
3. Sailing through : ACING
4. Last thing seen by a proof reader? : QED
5. Some Wall Street contracts : CALL OPTIONS
6. Go on ___ : A DIET
7. Exist abroad? : VIVRE
8. Applies polish to? : EDITS
9. Flew : RAN
10. Squad cmdr. : SSGT
11. R&B group with the 1972 hit "Back Stabbers," with "the" : O'JAYS
12. Proselytizers push it : DOGMA
13. Pickle, e.g. : STEEP
19. Finder's query : WHAT IS THIS?
21. Like some helmets and shields : ANTI-RIOT
24. Couldn't hit pitches : HAD A TIN EAR
27. Singer who's a Backstreet Boy's brother : AARON CARTER
28. Sir James Galway, e.g. : FLAUTIST
29. Dodgers' foes : T-MEN
30. Hindu hero : RAMA
31. Legions : A LOT
32. Suffix with Edward : -IANA
33. It's around 6 on the Mohs scale : OPAL
34. "The Lion King" lion : NALA
35. Get to : RILE
36. "Let me ___!" : AT ‘EM
37. Philatelic goals : SETS
43. When the first dogwatch ends : AT SIX
44. It's not a cheap shot : BOTOX
45. Bombers' locale : BRONX
46. Spelunker's aid : TORCH
47. Conjure : EVOKE
48. City with major avenues named Cincinnati and Columbus : XENIA
49. First name among socialites : IVANA
50. It means nothing : ZILCH
51. All gone : EATEN
53. Mann's man : HERR
57. Ill-wisher : FOE
58. Thai pan : WOK


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0227-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 14, Thursday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Stanley Newman
THEME: Bar Sign … the themed answers give us the text that might be seen on a (whimsical) sign at a neighborhood bar:
15A. Sign at a neighborhood bar, part 1 : DON'T TALK ABOUT
24A. Part 2 of the sign : YOURSELF - WE
48A. Part 3 of the sign : WILL DO THAT
58A. End of the sign : AFTER YOU LEAVE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Orville Wright or Neil Armstrong : OHIOAN
Wilbur was the older of the two Wright brothers, and he was born in 1867 in Millville, Indiana. By the time that Orville was born in 1871, the family was living in Dayton, Ohio. The Wrights spent a few years of their youth back in Richmond, Indiana, before settling in Dayton for the rest of their lives. The brothers both died in Dayton; Wilbur in 1912 and Orville in 1948.

Neil Armstrong was the most private of individuals. You didn't often see him giving interviews, unlike so many of the more approachable astronauts of the Apollo space program. His famous, "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind" statement; that was something that he came up with himself while Apollo 11 was making its way to the moon.

14. ___ Avenue (Mets' community website) : AMAZIN’
There is an online community of New York Mets fans called Amazin’ Avenue (at AmazinAvenue.com). Presumably the website is named for the Amazin’ Mets, the 1969 team that won the World Series.

18. Server of Duff Beer to Homer Simpson : MOE
Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender in "The Simpson" animated TV show. I don't really care for "The Simpsons", but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the character ... him I like.

19. Dry Idea alternative : ARRID
Arrid is an antiperspirant deodorant brand introduced in the thirties. Slogans associated with Arrid have been "Don't be half-safe - use Arrid to be sure", "Stress stinks! Arrid works!" and "Get a little closer".

Dry Idea is a range of personal care products that is now produced by the Dial Corporation. One of Dry Idea’s more famous taglines is “Never let them see you sweat”.

33. Play a round : GOLF
There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

35. General Motors subsidiary : OPEL
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we'd say "estate car" in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

37. Artist known as either Jean or Hans : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

40. Gatsby-era hairstyles : BOBS
A "bob cut" is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s a "bob" was the name given to a horse's tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their "mop tops", with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women's hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it ...

"The Great Gatsby" is the 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, that tells of the prosperous life of Jay Gatsby during the Roaring 20s. Gatsby develops an obsessive love for Daisy Fay Buchanan, a girl he met while serving during WWI, and meets again some years later after he has improved his social standing.

42. Some Coleridge colleagues : ODISTS
Samuel Taylor Coleridge was a pioneer for the Romantic Movement in England, along with his friend William Wordsworth. Coleridge’s most famous works are “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “Kubla Khan”, my wife’s favorite poem.

52. Alliance HQ'd near the White House : OAS
The Organization of American States (OAS) has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. All the independent states in the Americas are members of the group except Honduras, which had its membership suspended after the country's 2009 coup.

53. Key molecule for protein synthesis : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

55. Adams of "American Hustle" : AMY
Amy Adams is an American actress. although she was actually born in Vicenza, Italy. My favorite film of hers so far is the outstanding "Julie & Julia" in which she acted alongside Meryl Streep. I highly recommend this truly delightful movie.

"American Hustle" is a 2013 movie with a plotline that is loosely based on the famous FBI ABSCAM sting of the late seventies and early eighties. The film stars Christian Bale and Amy Adams as two con artists who are forced to work with an FBI agent played by Bradley Cooper.

The FBI set up a sting operation in 1978, eventually targeting corruption within Congress. Central to the "scam" was a front company called "Abdul Enterprises, Ltd", giving the whole operation the nickname "Abscam". At the end of the say, one senator and five House members were convicted of bribery and conspiracy. Kraim Abdul Rahman was the fictional sheik that gave "his" name to the front company.

61. Epicurean explorer : FOODIE
An epicure is a gourmet, one who appreciates fine food and drink in particular. The term is derived from the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus.

62. "Anything Goes" composer : PORTER
"Anything Goes" is a musical by Cole Porter, and tells of the goings on aboard an ocean liner sailing from New York to London. Some of the famous songs from the show are "Anything Goes", "You're the Top", "I Get a Kick Out of You" as well as "The Gypsy in Me".

Cole Porter was a little unusual amongst his peers in that he was one of the few successful songwriters who wrote both lyrics and musics for his compositions. Porter was seriously injured in a riding accident when in his forties and was left disabled and in pain. Despite this, he continued to work and produced his most successful work after the accident.

63. U.S.O. Care Package recipients : TROOPS
The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of FDR "to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces". A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

Down
3. "Hit 'em where they ___" : AIN'T
The phrase “Keep your eye clear, and hit ‘em where they ain’t” is advice that was first given by professional baseball player Willie Keeler. Keeler played from 1892 to 1910, mainly for the Baltimore Orioles, Brooklyn Superbas and New York Highlanders.

6. Hardest substance in the human body : ENAMEL
Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

8. Org. offering group practice membership : AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

9. Ring of rebels : CABAL
A cabal is a small group of secret plotters, perhaps scheming against a government or an individual.

10. Columbus stopping point of 1493 : AZORES
The Azores is an archipelago of nine volcanic islands in the North Atlantic lying about 1,000 miles west of Portugal. The Azores are an autonomous region belonging to Portugal.

Christopher Columbus made four voyages of discovery to the Americas. The first voyage, of 1492-1493, took Columbus and his crew to several islands in the Caribbean including Cuba. His return to Europe was via the Azores, specifically the island of Santa Maria.

11. Active when the sun shines : DIURNAL
A diurnal animal is active during the day, whereas a nocturnal animal is active at night.

17. Pre-Columbian civilization : MAYA
The Maya civilization held sway in Central America and Mexico from about 350 AD until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.

The pre-Columbian era is that period in the history of the Americas before the Europeans really made their presence known. “Pre-Columbian” implies “before 1492, before the voyages of Christopher Columbus”.

25. Many a tune in "The Sting" : RAG
Ragtime music was at the height of it popularity in the early 1900s. It takes its name from its characteristic "ragged" rhythms. The most famous ragtime composer was Scott Joplin, who had a big hit with his "Maple Leaf Rag" when it was published in 1899. He followed that up with a string of hits, including the "Pine Apple Rag" (sic). Ragtime fell out of favor about 1917 when the public turned to jazz. It had a resurgence in the forties when jazz musicians started to include ragtime tunes in their repertoires. But it was the 1973 movie "The Sting" that brought the true revival, as the hit soundtrack included numerous ragtime tunes by Scott Joplin, including the celebrated "The Entertainer" originally published in 1902.

"The Entertainer" is a piano rag from the very early 1900s that was written by Scott Joplin. "The Entertainer" regained its popularity in the 1970s when it was chosen as the theme music for the marvelous film “The Sting”. The ragtime score in “The Sting” was a bit of an anachronism, as the popularity of ragtime music had waned by the 1930s, the era in which the film was set.

34. Patriot Act enforcer : FBI
The USA PATRIOT Act was signed into law in 2001 soon after the September 11th terrorist attacks. The name of the act is actually an acronym, standing for “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism”.

37. Locale of three Summer Olympics : ASIA
So far three Summer Olympics have been held in Asia:
- Tokyo, Japan in 1964
- Seoul, South Korea in 1988
- Beijing, China in 2008

44. Suede source : TANNERY
Leather is of course made from animal skins. When the flesh, fat and hair is removed from the skin and it is dried, the resulting product is called “rawhide”. An additional treatment of the skin with chemicals that permanently alter the protein structure of the skin is called “tanning”, and the resulting product is “leather”.

Suede is leather made from the underside of the skin, mainly from a lamb. As such it is very soft, although not as durable as leather made from the exterior skin. The soft leather was, and is still used for making gloves. Back in 1859 these gloves were called "gants de Suede" in France, or "gloves of Sweden". So, the name "suede" comes from the French word for Sweden.

51. Belief : CREDO
“Credo” is the Latin word for "I believe", and we use it in English as an alternate for “creed”.

57. "In time we ___ that which we often fear": Shak. : HATE
"In time we hate that which we often fear" is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “Antony and Cleopatra”.

"Antony and Cleopatra" is one of William Shakespeare's tragedies, telling the story of the relationship between Mark Antony and Cleopatra after the death of Julius Caesar.

59. Cut in the direction of the grain : RIP
In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special rip saw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

60. Christie's offering : LOT
Christie’s is an auction house based in London, the largest auction house in the world. The business was founded in 1766 by James Christie.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pretty hard to find : SCARCE
7. Front : FACADE
13. Orville Wright or Neil Armstrong : OHIOAN
14. ___ Avenue (Mets' community website) : AMAZIN’
15. Sign at a neighborhood bar, part 1 : DON'T TALK ABOUT
17. Spars : MASTS
18. Server of Duff Beer to Homer Simpson : MOE
19. Dry Idea alternative : ARRID
21. Big, clumsy guy : APE
22. Indeed : YEA
23. Quite a bit : PLENTY
24. Part 2 of the sign : YOURSELF - WE
28. Crowd drawer, often : SALE
29. Severely consternate : APPALL
30. Go up, up, up : SOAR
32. Made the first move : LED
33. Play a round : GOLF
35. General Motors subsidiary : OPEL
37. Artist known as either Jean or Hans : ARP
40. Gatsby-era hairstyles : BOBS
42. Some Coleridge colleagues : ODISTS
46. Accommodate, as passengers : SEAT
48. Part 3 of the sign : WILL DO THAT
50. Folly : IDIOCY
52. Alliance HQ'd near the White House : OAS
53. Key molecule for protein synthesis : RNA
54. Fire : ARDOR
55. Adams of "American Hustle" : AMY
56. Prone to beefing : WHINY
58. End of the sign : AFTER YOU LEAVE
61. Epicurean explorer : FOODIE
62. "Anything Goes" composer : PORTER
63. U.S.O. Care Package recipients : TROOPS
64. Coldly determined : STEELY

Down
1. Redundant-sounding refreshment : SODA POP
2. Formed, as schoolyard teams, say : CHOSE UP
3. "Hit 'em where they ___" : AIN'T
4. Turns bad : ROTS
5. Subject of many a viral video : CAT
6. Hardest substance in the human body : ENAMEL
7. Forgery : FAKE
8. Org. offering group practice membership : AMA
9. Ring of rebels : CABAL
10. Columbus stopping point of 1493 : AZORES
11. Active when the sun shines : DIURNAL
12. Provide, as a right : ENTITLE
16. Slacks off : LOAFS
17. Pre-Columbian civilization : MAYA
20. Like some blonds : DYED
22. Blond : YELLOWY
23. Staple of Chinese cuisine : PEA PODS
25. Many a tune in "The Sting" : RAG
26. Challenging employer for a maid : SLOB
27. Seek to espouse : WOO
31. Second version : REDO
34. Patriot Act enforcer : FBI
36. Fiction course, for short : LIT
37. Locale of three Summer Olympics : ASIA
38. Second version : REDRAFT
39. Purchased : PAID FOR
41. Time-stretching effect : SLO-MO
43. Contract : SHRIVEL
44. Suede source : TANNERY
45. Canine command : STAY
47. Overdone : TOO TOO
49. Easy hoops shots : LAYUPS
51. Belief : CREDO
55. All those in favor : AYES
56. Used to be : WERE
57. "In time we ___ that which we often fear": Shak. : HATE
59. Cut in the direction of the grain : RIP
60. Christie's offering : LOT


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0226-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Feb 14, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ruth B.Margolin
THEME: Ist Added … each of today’s themed answers is a well known phrase with a “-IST” suffix added:
17A. Journalists covering abstract art? : CUBIST REPORTERS (from “cub reporters”)
26A. Help from a jerk? : POMPOUS ASSIST (from “pompous ass”)
44A. Canned tuna without mayo? : STARKIST NAKED (from “stark naked”)
58A. Narcoleptics with string instruments? : SLEEPER CELLISTS (from “sleeper cells”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Fare in "blankets" : PIGS
“Pigs in a blanket” are usually hot dogs that have been wrapped and cooked in some kind of dough. Over in Scotland, the same dish is called a “kilted sausage”.

5. Do the Wright thing? : AVIATE
Wilbur was the older of the two Wright brothers, and he was born in 1867 in Millville, Indiana. By the time that the younger Orville was born in 1871, the family was living in Dayton, Ohio. The Wrights spent a few years of their youth back in Richmond, Indiana, before settling in Dayton for the rest of their lives. The brothers both died in Dayton; Wilbur in 1912 and Orville in 1948.

14. In a frenzy : AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

15. Bahamas cruise stop : NASSAU
Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, used to be called Charles Town. After having been burnt to the ground by the Spanish in 1684, it was rebuilt and named Nassau in honor of King William III of England, a Dutchman from the House of Orange-Nassau (aka William of Orange). Nassau is a favored location for the James Bond series of movies. The city and surroundings feature in "Thunderball", "Never Say Never Again", "Casino Royale" and "For Your Eyes Only".

16. South American cruise stop, for short : RIO
Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as "January River". The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Years Day in 1502.

17. Journalists covering abstract art? : CUBIST REPORTERS (from “cub reporters”)
In the art movement known as Cubism, objects which are the subject of a painting are broken up and reassembled in an abstract form. The pioneers of the Cubist movement were Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque.

20. Coriander, for one : SPICE
What we know here in North America as cilantro is called coriander in the UK and other parts of the world. “Cilantro” is the Spanish name for the herb.

22. Hill staffers : AIDES
Washington D.C.’s designer Pierre L’Enfant chose the crest of hill as the site for the future “Congress House”. He called the location “Jenkins Hill” and “Jenkins Heights”. Earlier records show the name as “New Troy”. Today we call it “Capitol Hill”.

23. "Mob Wives" star Big ___ : ANG
The reality show called “Mob Wives” follows the lives of several women on Staten Island, New York after their fathers or husbands are arrested for Mafia-related crimes.

34. Like steak tartare : RAW
What we now call steak tartare was first served in French restaurants in the early 1900s, and back then was called steak à l'Americaine, would you believe? It was basically raw, seasoned beef mixed with egg yolk. A later version of l'Americaine, without the egg yolk and with tartar sauce served on the side, was called steak tartare. Over time the two versions became one, and the steak tartare moniker won out. By the way, if you order steak tartare in Switzerland, I believe you are served horse meat.

37. Letters on a radial : PSI
Pounds per square inch (PSI)

Radial tires (actually “radial-ply tires) are so called because the cord plies embedded in the rubber are arranged radially from the centre of the tire. This means that the plies are at right angles to the direction of travel. In older tires the plies were criss-crossed over each other, at angles of 60 and -60 degrees from the direction of travel. Such tires are called “cross-ply” or “bias” tires.

38. Sheer curtain fabric : VOILE
Voile is a soft and sheer fabric usually made from cotton that is often used as a window treatment. Voile curtains are similar to net curtains and may be used as mosquito nets, for example. Aptly enough, "voile" is the French word for "veil".

41. Typists' copies, once : CARBONS
I wonder do the kids of today know that "cc" stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle?

44. Canned tuna without mayo? : STARKIST NAKED (from “stark naked”)
StarKist is a brand of tuna that uses Charlie the Tuna as its cartoon mascot.

47. The Scourge of God : ATTILA
In his day, Attila the Hun was the most feared enemy of the Roman Empire, until he died in 453 AD. Attila was the leader of the Hunnic Empire of central Europe and was famous for invading much of the continent. However, he never directly attacked Rome. Attila was called “Attila, Flagelum Dei”, Latin for “Attila, Scourge of God”.

51. Shell carries it : GAS
Royal Dutch Shell is the largest energy company in the world and is headquartered in the Hague, in the Netherlands. The company was formed in 1907 with the merger of the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company and Shell Transport and Trading company of the UK. The two companies merged in order to compete globally with the biggest US oil company of the day, John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil. Shell Oil Company is a US-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell that is headquartered in Houston, Texas.

54. Jump the shark, e.g. : IDIOM
The phrase “jumping the shark” has been used since 1977 to describe the moment in the life of a TV show when it starts to decline in popularity. The expression comes from a scene in the hit sitcom “Happy Days” when the character Fonzie gets on waterskis and is seen to literally jump over a shark. “Happy Days” never recovered.

58. Narcoleptics with string instruments? : SLEEPER CELLISTS (from “sleeper cells”)
A “sleeper cell” is a group of covert agents who lie dormant until ordered into action.

62. Holding-hands-in-the-dark event : SEANCE
"Séance" is a French word meaning "sitting".

64. Mike Tyson facial feature, for short : TAT
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo".

The boxer Mike Tyson has said some pretty graphic things about his opponents. For example:
- About Lennox Lewis, "My main objective is to be professional but to kill him."
- To Razor Ruddock, "I'm gonna make you my girlfriend."
- About Tyrell Biggs, "He was screaming like my wife."

65. Guinness Book superlative : OLDEST
"The Guinness Book of World Records" holds some records of its own. It is the best-selling, copyrighted series of books of all time and is one of the books most often stolen from public libraries! The book was first published in 1954 by two twins, Norris and Ross McWhirter. The McWhirter twins found themselves with a smash hit, and eventually became very famous in Britain hosting a TV show based on world records.

Down
1. "Super" campaign orgs. : PACS
A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent-expenditure only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

3. Desert that occasionally gets snow : GOBI
The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called "Green Wall of China".

5. Hobby farm denizen : ANT
Nowadays we use “denizen” to mean simply a resident, but historically a denizen was an immigrant to whom certain rights had been granted, something like today’s "resident alien".

10. "1984" superstate : EURASIA
The action in George Orwell's 1949 novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four" takes place in the intercontinental super-state of Oceania. Orwell also created two other super-states, Eurasia and Eastasia.

George Orwell’s famous novel actually has the title “Nineteen Eighty-Four” (as opposed to "1984"), with the date spelled out.

13. Bob who directed "Cabaret" : FOSSE
Bob Fosse won more Tony Awards for choreography than anyone else, a grand total of eight. He also won an Oscar for Best Director for his 1972 movie "Cabaret", even beating out the formidable Francis Ford Coppola who was nominated that same year for "The Godfather".

18. Mister in a sombrero : SENOR
In English we think of a sombrero as a wide-brimmed hat, but in Spanish “sombrero” is the word for any hat. “Sombrero” is derived from “sombra” meaning “shade”.

24. Compadre of Castro : GUEVARA
Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Argentina, and in 1948 he started to study medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. While at school he satisfied his need to "see the world" by taking two long journeys around South America, the story of which are told in Guevara's memoir later published as "The Motorcycle Diaries". While travelling, Guevara was moved by the plight of the people he saw and their working conditions and what he viewed as capitalistic exploitation. In Mexico City he met brothers Raul and Fidel Castro and was persuaded to join their cause, the overthrow of the US-backed government in Cuba. He rose to second-in-command among the Cuban insurgents, and when Castro came to power Guevara was influential in repelling the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing Soviet nuclear missiles to the island. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to continue his work as a revolutionary. He was captured by Bolivian forces in 1967, and was executed. Fidel Castro led the public mourning of Guevara's death, and soon the revolutionary was an icon for many left-wing movements around the world.

26. World leader with an eponymous "mobile" : POPE
The “Popemobile” is actually a whole fleet of vehicles used since the days of Pope John Paul II. The popemobiles used on foreign visits are often manufactured locally and then stay in the country after the visit has been concluded. The British-built popemobile used for a 2006 visit to the UK was ultimately sold for over $70,000 at auction.

29. Picnic utensil : SPORK
“Spork” is the more common name for the utensil that is a hybrid between a spoon and a fork. It is less commonly referred to as a "foon".

30. It's best when it's airtight : ALIBI
"Alibi" is the Latin word for "elsewhere" as in, "I claim that I was 'elsewhere' when the crime was committed ... I have an 'alibi'".

31. Towers on farms : SILOS
Silo is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English, originally coming from the Greek word "siros" that described a pit in which one kept grain.

41. Harry Belafonte genre : CALYPSO
The musical style of calypso originated in Trinidad and Tobago, but there seems to be some debate about which influences were most important in developing the genre. It is generally agreed that the music was imported by African slaves from their homeland, but others emphasize influences of the medieval French troubadours. To me it sounds more African in nature. The popularity of calypso took off when it was first recorded in 1912, and it spread around the world in the thirties and forties. It reached its pinnacle with the release of the famous "Banana Boat Song" by Harry Belafonte.

48. Tornado Alley city : TULSA
Tulsa is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma (after Oklahoma City). Tulsa started out as a settlement established by the Loachapoka and Creek Native American tribes in 1836. These early settlers called their new home “Tallasi” meaning “old town”, and this name morphed into “Tulsa” that we use today.

Tornado Alley has no precisely defined area, but generally lies between the Rockies and the Appalachians. It is of course the area in the US where tornadoes occur most frequently.

51. Mortarboard tosser : GRAD
Mortarboards, or square academic caps, are associated with school graduations all over the world, although traditions do differ. For example in Ireland (where I come from), mortarboards are only worn by female graduates.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fare in "blankets" : PIGS
5. Do the Wright thing? : AVIATE
11. Half-___ (coffee order) : CAF
14. In a frenzy : AMOK
15. Bahamas cruise stop : NASSAU
16. South American cruise stop, for short : RIO
17. Journalists covering abstract art? : CUBIST REPORTERS (from “cub reporters”)
20. Coriander, for one : SPICE
21. Cry with a fist pump : YES!
22. Hill staffers : AIDES
23. "Mob Wives" star Big ___ : ANG
25. Aim high : ASPIRE
26. Help from a jerk? : POMPOUS ASSIST (from “pompous ass”)
32. "... cup ___ cone?" : OR A
33. Model plane, e.g. : REPLICA
34. Like steak tartare : RAW
37. Letters on a radial : PSI
38. Sheer curtain fabric : VOILE
39. Medium for short-lived sculptures : ICE
40. Ages and ages : EON
41. Typists' copies, once : CARBONS
43. ___-devil : SHE
44. Canned tuna without mayo? : STARKIST NAKED (from “stark naked”)
47. The Scourge of God : ATTILA
49. Like one texting :-( : SAD
50. Ill-humored : SURLY
51. Shell carries it : GAS
54. Jump the shark, e.g. : IDIOM
58. Narcoleptics with string instruments? : SLEEPER CELLISTS (from “sleeper cells”)
61. Toledo-to-Pittsburgh dir. : ESE
62. Holding-hands-in-the-dark event : SEANCE
63. Gutter problem : CLOG
64. Mike Tyson facial feature, for short : TAT
65. Guinness Book superlative : OLDEST
66. Equipment miniature golf players don't need : TEES

Down
1. "Super" campaign orgs. : PACS
2. "You can stop trying to wake me now!" : I’M UP!
3. Desert that occasionally gets snow : GOBI
4. Winter topper : SKI CAP
5. Hobby farm denizen : ANT
6. "Results may ___" : VARY
7. "Oh, O.K." : I SEE
8. Hieroglyphics creatures : ASPS
9. Chinese "way" : TAO
10. "1984" superstate : EURASIA
11. One unable to get a loan, say : CREDIT RISK
12. TV station, e.g. : AIRER
13. Bob who directed "Cabaret" : FOSSE
18. Mister in a sombrero : SENOR
19. They're often off the books : TIPS
24. Compadre of Castro : GUEVARA
25. Mountaineering attempts : ASCENTS
26. World leader with an eponymous "mobile" : POPE
27. Guesstimate words : OR SO
28. Where to find the only stoplight in a small town, typically : MAIN STREET
29. Picnic utensil : SPORK
30. It's best when it's airtight : ALIBI
31. Towers on farms : SILOS
35. Hurt : ACHE
36. Pull up dandelions and crab grass : WEED
41. Harry Belafonte genre : CALYPSO
42. It carries a shell : SNAIL
45. Flooring option : TILE
46. One needing detox : ADDICT
47. It's a plus : ASSET
48. Tornado Alley city : TULSA
51. Mortarboard tosser : GRAD
52. ___ cream : ACNE
53. Jiffies : SECS
55. Castaway site : ISLE
56. Siouan speaker : OTOE
57. Txts, e.g. : MSGS
59. Symbol of slipperiness : EEL
60. Net judge's call : LET


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0225-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Feb 14, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Matthew E. Paronto & Jeff Chen
THEME: Crosswordese … each of today’s themed clues is a word often described as “crosswordese”, an answer that appears frequently in a crossword grid. The clues might also be described as "crosswordese" (in a punny sort of way - "crossword Es") in that each of them begins with a letter E:
20A. EPEE : FENCING BLADE
28A. ETUI : NEEDLE CASE
39A. ERNE : SEABIRD
47A. EMIR : ARAB LEADER
55A. What this puzzle's capitalized clues are, both by definition and pun : CROSSWORDESE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Where Matisses hang in N.Y.C. : MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

Henri Matisse was a French artist renowned for his contribution to modern art. In his early career, Matisse was classed as a "fauve", one of the group of artists known as the "wild beasts" who emphasized strong color over realism in their works. He was a lifelong friend of Pablo Picasso, and the two were considered to be good-natured rivals so their works are often compared. One major difference between their individual portfolios is that Picasso tended to paint from his imagination, whereas Matisse tended to use nature as his inspiration.

9. Sacred Egyptian bird : IBIS
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. "Ibis" is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one "ibis" or two "ibises", and then again one has a flock of "ibis". And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two "ibises" you would have two "ibides"!

15. Paper quantity : REAM
A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a "short ream".

16. Madrid tidbit : TAPA
"Tapa" is the Spanish word for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

Madrid is the largest city in Spain and the capital. Madrid is located very close to the geographical center of the country. It is the third-largest city in the European Union (after London and Paris). People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

17. John known as the "Teflon Don" : GOTTI
John Gotti was the boss of the Gambino crime family from 1985. Gotti was known as the Teflon Don and took over leadership of the family from Paul Castellano when he was gunned down, allegedly on Gotti's orders. Gotti remained head of the New York family until he was sentenced to life in prison in 1992. Gotti died of throat cancer after ten years behind bars.

26. Asian-American basketball sensation Jeremy : LIN
Jeremy Lin is a professional basketball player with the Houston Rockets. Lin is the first American of Chinese descent to play in the NBA.

28. ETUI : NEEDLE CASE
An etui is an ornamental case used to hold small items, in particular sewing needles. We imported both the case design and the word "etui" from France. The French also have a modern usage of "etui", using the term to depict a case for carrying CDs.

38. Tomato and lettuce pickers' org. : UFW
The UFW is the United Farm Workers of America, a labor union formed by the merger of the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC), and the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) that was led by Mexican American labor leader Cesar Chavez.

39. ERNE : SEABIRD
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

43. Computer-connecting system, for short : LAN
You may have a Local Area Network (LAN) in your house. If you've got a PC and a router or switch, likely attached to some modem, then you have a LAN.

51. Barack's re-election opponent : MITT
Mitt Romney was born Willard Mitt Romney in 1947 in Detroit, Michigan. Romney’s parents named him after J. Willard Marriott (the hotel magnate) who was the father’s best friend, and after Milton “Mitt” Romney who was the father’s cousin and quarterback for the Chicago Bears.

President Obama’s first name, Barack, is Swahili with roots in an old Arabic word meaning “blessed”. Barack was the President’s father’s name. President Obama's middle name is Hussein, an Arabic word meaning “good” or “handsome one”. Hussein was the name of the President’s grandfather on the paternal side. His surname, Obama, doesn’t really have a translation, but is a common name among the Luo tribe of Kenya.

55. What this puzzle's capitalized clues are, both by definition and pun : CROSSWORDESE
Words described as “crosswordese” are those that are found frequently as answers in crosswords, but which do not appear nearly so often in everyday speech.

60. Jupiter, to the Greeks : ZEUS
In Greek mythology, Zeus was the ruler of the gods of Mount Olympus. He was also the god of the sky and thunder. The Roman equivalent of Zeus was Jupiter.

61. Relative of a bassoon : OBOE
The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name "oboe" comes from the French "hautbois" which means "high wood". When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you'll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an "A". The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe's "A".

Our modern bassoon first appeared in the 1800s and has had a place in the concert orchestra ever since.

62. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Thomas : ISIAH
Isiah Thomas played his whole professional basketball-playing career with the Detroit Pistons, and he is now the head coach with Florida International University's Golden Panthers. When you're out shopping for popcorn, keep an eye out for the Dale & Thomas brand, as it's co-owned by Isiah Thomas.

66. Actress Hathaway : ANNE
The actress Anne Hathaway is a favorite of mine, I must say. She starred in “The Devil Wears Prada” in 2006 and in 2007’s “Becoming Jane”, a film I particularly enjoyed.

70. Putin put-down? : NYET
"Nyet" is Russian for "no", and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

Vladimir Putin became acting President of Russia at the very end of 1999 when Boris Yeltsin resigned. Putin was elected in his own right in 2000, re-elected in 2004, and then ran up against a term limit in 2008. In 2008 Putin was appointed by his successor, President Dmitry Medvedev, to the position of Prime Minister. Putin is a controversial figure, inside and outside Russia. On the one hand he led the country out of an economic crisis into a period of stability and relative prosperity. On the other hand he has been associated with government corruption and accused of allowing private concerns to have undue influence on government actions.

Down
1. Abbr. on Chinese menus : MSG
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn't be in our food ...

2. Lennon's love : ONO
John Lennon and Yoko Ono had a very public honeymoon in a hotels in Amsterdam and then Montreal, when they staged their famous "bed-in" for peace. In answering questions from reporters Lennon found himself often repeating the words "give peace a chance". While still in bed, he composed his famous song "Give Peace a Chance" and even made the original recording of the song in the Montreal hotel room, with reporters present, and with a whole bunch of friends. The song was released later in 1969 and became a smash hit.

5. Seer : ORACLE
In Ancient Greece and Rome, an oracle was someone believed inspired by the gods to give wise counsel. The word "oracle" derives from the Latin "orare" meaning "to speak", which is the same root for our word "orator".

8. What can take your breath away in L.A.? : SMOG
"Smog" is of course a portmanteau word formed by melding "smoke" and "fog". The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s.

9. Bold alternative : ITALIC
Italic type leans to the right. The style is known as "italic" because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

10. Fountain treat with cherries on top : BANANA SPLIT
The banana split was created in Latrobe, Pennsylvania in 1904. This particular sundae was the idea of David Stickler, a young apprentice pharmacist at the Tassel Pharmacy’s soda fountain.

12. Fill to excess : SATE
"Sate" is a variant of the earlier word "satiate". Both can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

14. Chicken ___ : KIEV
Chicken Kiev may indeed be a Ukrainian dish, named for the capital city of Kiev. It is a boneless chicken breast rolled around garlic, herbs and butter, breaded and deep fried. It was my Dad’s favorite …

21. Diarist Anaïs : NIN
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

23. Bond girl Andress : URSULA
The actress Ursula Andress was quite the sex symbol in the sixties, famously playing Honey Ryder in the first James Bond movie “Dr. No”. Andress was born in Switzerland and is fluent in English, French, Italian, German and her native Swiss-German.

29. Many a Persian Gulf war correspondent : EMBED
Although journalists have been directly reporting from the front lines in military conflicts for some time, the term “embedded journalism” only came into fashion during the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. A formal arrangement was made between the US Military and hundreds of reporters allowing the journalists to travel with military units and, under pre-ordained conditions, report directly from those units. Some say that the arrangement was mutually beneficial. On the one hand the journalists had relatively little to worry about in terms of transportation and travel through combat zones. On the other hand, the military had better control over what did and did not get reported.

30. It makes MADD mad : DUI
In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offence than a DWI.

Candice Lightner lost her 13-year-old child to a drunk driver in 1980. Soon after, Lightner formed the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

31. Photocopier setting: Abbr. : LTR
Like so many things it seems, our paper sizes here in North America don't conform with the standards in the rest of the world. ISO standard sizes used elsewhere have some logic behind them in that the ratio of width to length is usually one to the square root of two. This mathematical relationship means that when you cut a piece of paper in two each half preserves the aspect ratio of the original, which can be useful in making reduced or enlarged copies of documents. Our standard size of "letter" (8.5 x 11 inches) was determined in 1980 by the Reagan administration to be the official paper size for the US government. Prior to this, the "legal" size (8.5 x 14 inches) had been the standard, since 1921.

33. Yanks living abroad, e.g. : EXPATS
The term “Yankee” originated back in the 1600s when Dutch settlers used to called English colonists “Jankes”, a disparaging term meaning “Little Johns”.

35. Sacred songs : PSALMS
The Greek word "psalmoi" originally meant "songs sung to a harp", and gave us the word "psalms".

41. Pie ___ mode : A LA
In French, "à la mode" simply means "fashionable". In America, the term has come to describe a way of serving pie, usually with ice cream, or as I recall from when I lived in Upstate New York, with cheese.

46. Overused plot device in soaps : AMNESIA
As almost everyone knows, the original soap operas were radio dramas back in the fifties. Given the structure of society back then, the daytime broadcasts were aimed at housewives working in the home. For some reason the sponsors of those radio shows, and the television shows that followed, were soap manufacturers like Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive and Lever Brothers. And that's how the "soap" opera got its name ...

50. Riddle-me-___ : REE
There's an old English nursery rhyme that goes:
Riddle-me riddle-me riddle-me-ree,
Perhaps you can tell what this riddle may be:
As deep as a house, as round as a cup,
And all the king's horses can't draw it up.
And the answer is ... a well!

54. Yard sale caveat : AS IS
A caveat is a warning or a qualification. “Caveat” is the Latin for “let him beware”.

55. Peter the Great or Ivan the Terrible : CZAR
The term czar (also tsar) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. "Czar" is derived from the word "Caesar", which was synonymous with "emperor" at that time.

Peter the Great was perhaps the most successful of the Romanov tsars, famous for modernizing Russia and expanding the country's sphere of influence, creating the Russian Empire. He ruled from 1682 until his death in 1725.

The Grand Prince of Moscow, Ivan IV, became known as Ivan the Terrible. The name "terrible" is a translation from Russian, and perhaps creates the wrong impression about the man. The Russian word is "Grozny", which is more akin to "strict" and "powerful" rather than "cruel" or "abominable".

56. Clinton attorney general Janet : RENO
Janet Reno was Attorney General of the US from 1993 to 2001. Reno was the person to hold the office second longest, and was our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Thereafter she retired from public life.

63. Holiday ___ : INN
The first Holiday Inn hotel was opened in 1952. The name for the hotel chain was inspired by the 1942 movie “Holiday Inn” starring Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Where Matisses hang in N.Y.C. : MOMA
5. Sun and moon, poetically : ORBS
9. Sacred Egyptian bird : IBIS
13. Sarcasm, informally : SNARK
15. Paper quantity : REAM
16. Madrid tidbit : TAPA
17. John known as the "Teflon Don" : GOTTI
18. Big do : AFRO
19. Med. student course : ANAT
20. EPEE : FENCING BLADE
23. Discourteous : UNCIVIL
26. Asian-American basketball sensation Jeremy : LIN
27. "Let's ___!" : ROLL
28. ETUI : NEEDLE CASE
34. Foot-pound? : STOMP
36. Remote button : MUTE
37. Driver's license datum : SEX
38. Tomato and lettuce pickers' org. : UFW
39. ERNE : SEABIRD
42. Energy : PEP
43. Computer-connecting system, for short : LAN
44. Wheel connector : AXLE
45. Tortilla chip dip : SALSA
47. EMIR : ARAB LEADER
51. Barack's re-election opponent : MITT
52. Pirate's quaff : RUM
53. Makeshift shelters : LEAN-TOS
55. What this puzzle's capitalized clues are, both by definition and pun : CROSSWORDESE
60. Jupiter, to the Greeks : ZEUS
61. Relative of a bassoon : OBOE
62. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Thomas : ISIAH
66. Actress Hathaway : ANNE
67. Guns, as an engine : REVS
68. Burn a bit : SINGE
69. Reels' counterparts : RODS
70. Putin put-down? : NYET
71. Once more : ANEW

Down
1. Abbr. on Chinese menus : MSG
2. Lennon's love : ONO
3. Gymnast's surface : MAT
4. Highbrow theater screening : ART FILM
5. Seer : ORACLE
6. New mortgage deal, informally : REFI
7. Place for an owl : BARN
8. What can take your breath away in L.A.? : SMOG
9. Bold alternative : ITALIC
10. Fountain treat with cherries on top : BANANA SPLIT
11. Apple tablet : IPAD
12. Fill to excess : SATE
14. Chicken ___ : KIEV
21. Diarist Anaïs : NIN
22. Runs, as a color : BLEEDS
23. Bond girl Andress : URSULA
24. Relatively near : NOT FAR
25. Be a goof : CLOWN AROUND
29. Many a Persian Gulf war correspondent : EMBED
30. It makes MADD mad : DUI
31. Photocopier setting: Abbr. : LTR
32. Takes care of : SEES TO
33. Yanks living abroad, e.g. : EXPATS
35. Sacred songs : PSALMS
40. Computer file extension : EXE
41. Pie ___ mode : A LA
46. Overused plot device in soaps : AMNESIA
48. Hearty kisses : BUSSES
49. Firstborn : ELDEST
50. Riddle-me-___ : REE
54. Yard sale caveat : AS IS
55. Peter the Great or Ivan the Terrible : CZAR
56. Clinton attorney general Janet : RENO
57. Threadbare : WORN
58. Follow orders : OBEY
59. Wander about : ROVE
63. Holiday ___ : INN
64. Grow long in the tooth : AGE
65. Chop : HEW


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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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