Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

0401-14 New York Times Crosswords Answers 1 Apr 14, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew Reynolds
THEME: Heads or Tails … today’s crossword is what’s called a Schrödinger puzzle, as either of the answers HEADS or TAILS can work at 37-across. Similarly, the letters H or T can go in each of the five circled squares. I’ve shown all circled letter as T with the central answer as TAILS:
17A. With 56-Across, common format for a wager : BEST THREE
56A. See 17-Across : OUT OF FIVE

37A. Winner of the wager in 17-/56-Across, depending on how you fill the circled squares in this puzzle : HEADS or TAILS

19A. Suffix with cartoon : -ISH or -IST
21A. Clobbers : BASHES or BASTES
24A. Bring down : HUMBLE or TUMBLE
46A. Blast : HOOT or TOOT
3D. Sudden outburst : GUSH or GUST
11D. It may be landed with a hook : FISH or FIST
24D. Bit of color : HINT or TINT
37D. Improves, in a way : HONES or TONES
46D. Plague : HAUNT or TAUNT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Award-winning 2012 film about a fake film : ARGO
“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I saw “Argo” recently and recommend it highly, although I found the scenes of religious fervor pretty frightening …

5. Game with a 32-card deck : SKAT
When I was a teenager in Ireland, I had a friend with a German father. The father taught us the game of Skat, and what a great game it is. Skat originated in Germany in the 1800s and is to this day the most popular card game in the country. I haven't played it in decades, but would love to play it again ...

9. AK-47, e.g. : RIFLE
The AK-47 rifle is also known as the “Kalashnikov”, after the guns inventor Mikhail Kalashnikov. The AK-47 first saw service with the Soviet Army, starting in 1948.

16. The Hunter constellation : ORION
The very recognizable constellation of Orion is of course named after the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion's "right shoulder", the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don't want to miss that ...

20. Marijuana plant : HEMP
Hemp is a hardy, fast-growing plant that has many uses mainly due to the strength of the fibers in the plant's stalks. Hemp is used to make rope, paper and textiles. There is of course a variety of hemp that is grown to make drugs, most famously cannabis.

22. The "E" of Q.E.D. : ERAT
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin "quod erat demonstrandum" meaning "that which was to be demonstrated".

28. Sun-Maid dried fruit : RAISIN
The Sun-Maid brand of raisins belongs to a cooperative of raisin growers in California. The cooperative was founded in 1912, and the famous Sun-Maid girl shown on each container of raisins was actually a seeder and packer called Lorraine Collett who worked for one of the members of the cooperative.

31. Princeton and Yale : IVIES
The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

32. Peak in Greek myth : MT IDA
There are two peaks called Mount Ida that are sacred according to Greek mythology. Mount Ida in Crete is the island's highest point, and is where one can find the cave in which Zeus was reared. Mount Ida in Asia Minor (located in modern-day Turkey) is where Ganymede was swept up by Zeus in the form of an eagle that took him to Olympus where he served as cupbearer to the gods.

37. Winner of the wager in 17-/56-Across, depending on how you fill the circled squares in this puzzle : HEADS or TAILS
The two sides of a coin are known as the “obverse” and the “reverse”. The obverse is commonly referred to as “heads”, as it often depicts someone’s head. The reverse is commonly called “tails”, as it is the opposite “heads”.

38. Old Italian money : LIRA
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

39. Upsilon preceder : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

Upsilon is the Greek letter that gives rise to our English “Y”.

40. Nick who was named People's Sexiest Man Alive in 1992 : NOLTE
The actor Nick Nolte got his first big break playing opposite Jacqueline Bisset and Robert Shaw in “The Deep”, released in 1976. Prior to that he had worked as a model, and in fact appeared in a magazine advertisement for Clairol in 1972 alongside fellow model, Sigourney Weaver.

“People” magazine is noted for its annual special editions with features such as “Best & Worst Dressed” and “Sexiest Man Alive”. The “Sexiest Man Alive” edition now appears at the end of November each year. The first choice for “Sexiest Man” was Mel Gibson, in 1985. The 2013 choice was singer-songwriter Adam Levine.

41. ___ Python : MONTY
The zany comedy show called “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” was first aired in 1969 on the BBC. The show ran for four seasons and finished up soon after John Cleese decided to leave the team and move onto other projects.

42. AT&T competitor : SPRINT
The modern Sprint Corporation, a giant in the telecommunications industry, can trace its roots back to the Brown Telephone Company which was founded in 1899. C.L. and Jacob Brown created their company to provide a telephone service to the rural parts around the city of Abilene, Kansas.

51. German automaker : AUDI
The Audi name has an interesting history. The Horch company was founded by August Horch in 1909. Early in the life of the new company, Horch was forced out of his own business. He set up a new enterprise and continued to use his own name as a brand. The old company sued him for using the Horch name so a meeting was held to choose something new. Horch's young son was studying Latin in the room where the meeting was taking place. He pointed out that "Horch" was German for "hear" and he suggested "Audi" as a replacement, the Latin for "listen".

55. Opera singer in an opera : TOSCA
Unlike so many operas, Puccini’s "Tosca" was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. "Tosca" is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America, although I've only seen it once myself.

58. Remove, as a boutonniere : UNPIN
A boutonnière is a flower worn by men in the lapel of a jacket, in the buttonhole. In fact, sometimes a boutonnière is referred to as a “buttonhole”, which is the translation from French.

59. Not using Obamacare, say : UNINSURED
The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”.

61. GPS recommendations: Abbr. : RTES
Routes (rtes.)

Global Positioning System (GPS)

62. Number of holes in a half-round of golf : NINE
There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

Down
1. Prefix with -dextrous : AMBI-
Someone who is ambidextrous can write with both hands or use both hands with equal ease. A fairly literal translation of “ambidextrous” is “right-handed on both sides” as “dexter” is Latin for “right-handed”.

2. Caviars : ROES
“Caviar” is the roe of a large fish that has been salted and seasoned, and especially the roe of a sturgeon. Beluga caviar comes from the beluga sturgeon, found primarily in the Caspian Sea. It is the most expensive type of caviar in the world. 8 ounces of US-farmed beluga caviar can be purchased through Amazon.com for just over $850, in case you're feeling peckish ...

4. German direction : OST
“Ost” is German for “east”.

6. "Instant ___!" (John Lennon hit) : KARMA
“Instant Karma!” is a John Lennon song that he released in 1970. The song contains a line starting with “We all shine on …”, which Stephen King used as inspiration for the title of his 1977 novel “The Shining”.

8. Mao ___-tung : TSE
Mao Zedong (also “Mao Tse-tung”) was born on December 16, 1893 in the Hunan Province of China. As Mao was the son of a peasant farmer, his prospects for education were limited. Indeed he left school at age 13 to work on the family farm but did eventually get to secondary school in Changsha, the provincial capital. In the years following, Mao continued his education in Beijing and actually turned down an opportunity to study in France.

9. Bucharest's land : ROMANIA
The city of Bucharest has been the capital of Romania since 1862. A native of the city is known as a “Bucharester”.

10. Eye parts : IRISES
The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

12. It may have gold in them thar hills : LODE
A lode is a metal ore deposit that's found between two layers of rock or in a fissure.

13. Officer on TV's "The Dukes of Hazzard" : ENOS
Enos Strate (played by Sonny Shroyer) was the small-town deputy in the television sitcom “The Dukes of Hazzard”, and the success of his character merited a follow-on show. The spinoff "Enos" only ran for 18 episodes though.

15. Roosevelt and Kennedy : ETHELS
Ethel Roosevelt Derby was the youngest child of President Theodore Roosevelt.

Ethel Kennedy is the widow of Robert F. Kennedy. Ethel was a roommate with Jean Kennedy, and through Jean met her brother Robert. Robert and Ethel had ten children together, with an eleventh child sadly arriving after Robert’s assassination in 1968.

21. Abacus row : BEADS
The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

25. Eye parts : UVEAS
The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball.

30. Robb Stark's realm in "Game of Thrones," with "the" : NORTH
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that was adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually made in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

33. Part of retribution, in a phrase : TAT
Tit for tat

38. "Skip to My ___" : LOU
“Skip to My Lou” is a children’s dance that can also be used at a barn dance as an icebreaker. Couples dance to the tune, with an extra male in the middle of the group. The odd man “steals” a lady with whom to dance, leaving her partner to find another. The word “lou” is the Scottish for “love”.

40. Penn State's ___ Lions : NITTANY
The athletic teams of Pennsylvania State University (PSU) are called the Nittany Lions, or in the case of the female teams, the Lady Lions. The Nittany Lion was introduced as a mascot way back in 1904 and is modeled after mountain lions that used to roam Mount Nittany located near the school's campus.

44. Genetic sequence groups : CODONS
Proteins are synthesised in the body from amino acids, which are linked together in specific sequences that are determined by the genetic code. The language of the code is sequence of nucleotides. The nucleotides are arranged in groups of three called “codons”, with each codon determining a specific amino acid.

49. Dunce cap shape : CONE
John Duns Scotus was a theologian and scholar in the Middle Ages, responsible for many writings that were used as textbooks in British universities of the day. New ideas developed during the English Renaissance, but Duns Scotus and his followers resisted the changes. The word "dunse" came into use as a way of ridiculing those refusing to learn anything new, a precursor to our modern usage of "dunce".

50. Channel with postgame analysis : ESPN
ESPN is the Entertainment Sports Programming Network, a cable network that broadcasts sports programming 24 hours a day. ESPN was launched back in 1979.

52. Apple genius? : SIRI
Siri is software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri not so long ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. By the way, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

56. The "O" of S O S, supposedly : OUR
The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are also mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

57. Band with the 2012 #1 hit "We Are Young" : FUN
Fun is a band from New York City. Never heard of them ...

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Award-winning 2012 film about a fake film : ARGO
5. Game with a 32-card deck : SKAT
9. AK-47, e.g. : RIFLE
14. Desktops' desktop accessories : MOUSE PADS
16. The Hunter constellation : ORION
17. With 56-Across, common format for a wager : BEST THREE
18. Handle wrongly : MISDO
19. Suffix with cartoon : -ISH or -IST
20. Marijuana plant : HEMP
21. Clobbers : BASHES or BASTES
22. The "E" of Q.E.D. : ERAT
23. Opposite of WSW : ENE
24. Bring down : HUMBLE or TUMBLE
28. Sun-Maid dried fruit : RAISIN
31. Princeton and Yale : IVIES
32. Peak in Greek myth : MT IDA
34. Holder of corn kernels : COB
36. Queue cue : NEXT!
37. Winner of the wager in 17-/56-Across, depending on how you fill the circled squares in this puzzle : HEADS or TAILS
38. Old Italian money : LIRA
39. Upsilon preceder : TAU
40. Nick who was named People's Sexiest Man Alive in 1992 : NOLTE
41. ___ Python : MONTY
42. AT&T competitor : SPRINT
44. Throat clearers : COUGHS
45. Had a bite : ATE
46. Blast : HOOT or TOOT
48. What scratch-and-sniff stickers emit : SCENTS
51. German automaker : AUDI
52. Jiffy : SEC
55. Opera singer in an opera : TOSCA
56. See 17-Across : OUT OF FIVE
58. Remove, as a boutonniere : UNPIN
59. Not using Obamacare, say : UNINSURED
60. Like some straws : BENDY
61. GPS recommendations: Abbr. : RTES
62. Number of holes in a half-round of golf : NINE

Down
Down
1. Prefix with -dextrous : AMBI-
2. Caviars : ROES
3. Sudden outburst : GUSH or GUST
4. German direction : OST
5. Globe : SPHERE
6. "Instant ___!" (John Lennon hit) : KARMA
7. Highly capable : ADEPT
8. Mao ___-tung : TSE
9. Bucharest's land : ROMANIA
10. Eye parts : IRISES
11. It may be landed with a hook : FISH or FIST
12. It may have gold in them thar hills : LODE
13. Officer on TV's "The Dukes of Hazzard" : ENOS
15. Roosevelt and Kennedy : ETHELS
21. Abacus row : BEADS
24. Bit of color : HINT or TINT
25. Eye parts : UVEAS
26. Shuffle : MIX UP
27. Wager : BET
28. Antagonize : RIDE
29. It might read "Happy Birthday!" : ICING
30. Robb Stark's realm in "Game of Thrones," with "the" : NORTH
32. Diner menu item : MELT
33. Part of retribution, in a phrase : TAT
35. Howls at the moon : BAYS
37. Improves, in a way : HONES or TONES
38. "Skip to My ___" : LOU
40. Penn State's ___ Lions : NITTANY
41. Recurring themes : MOTIFS
43. Nasty-smelling : RANCID
44. Genetic sequence groups : CODONS
46. Plague : HAUNT or TAUNT
47. Certain navel : OUTIE
48. Concert souvenir : STUB
49. Dunce cap shape : CONE
50. Channel with postgame analysis : ESPN
52. Apple genius? : SIRI
53. Equitable : EVEN
54. Surrender : CEDE
56. The "O" of S O S, supposedly : OUR
57. Band with the 2012 #1 hit "We Are Young" : FUN


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0331-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 14, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Robert Cirillo
THEME: Ma & Pa … the first word in each of today’s themed answers starts with MA and the last word starts with PA:
16A. *Where Romeo and Juliet meet : MASQUERADE PARTY
24A. *Often-seedy establishment : MASSAGE PARLOR
42A. *1978 #1 Donna Summer hit that covered a 1968 #2 hit by Richard Harris : MACARTHUR PARK
56A. *New Orleans event with floats : MARDI GRAS PARADE

35A. Rural couple ... or what the respective halves of the answers to the four starred clues start with : MA AND PA
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Droid : BOT
A bot is computer program that is designed to imitate human behavior. It might “crawl” around the Web doing searches for example, or it might participate in discussions in chat rooms by giving pre-programmed responses.

“Droid” id short for “android” and is used to describe a robot that resembles a human. The Latin word “androides” was used in English in the 18th century to mean “like a man”. Science fiction writers introduced us to “android” in the early 1950s.

14. Triangular chip : DORITO
Doritos are a brand of flavored tortilla chips launched in 1964. The name "Doritos" means "little bits of gold" in Spanish.

15. I.R.S. filing time: Abbr. : APR
April 15th wasn’t always Tax Day in the US. The deadline for returns was March 1st from 1913-18, when it was moved to March 15th. Tax Day has been April 15th since 1955.

16. *Where Romeo and Juliet meet : MASQUERADE PARTY
William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is all about the love between the two title characters, which is forbidden as the pair come from two families who are sworn enemies. Early in the play, Romeo (a Montague) sneaks into a masquerade ball being held by the Capulets in the hope of meeting a Capulet girl named Rosaline. Instead, he meets and falls for Juliet, also a Capulet. Tragedy ensues …

19. Dick, to Liz, twice : EX-HUSBAND
Elizabeth Taylor married eight times, to seven husbands. Those marriages were to:
- Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, the young hotel heir
- Michael Wilding, the English actor
- Mike Todd, the film and stage producer
- Eddie Fisher, the singer
- Richard Burton (twice), the Welsh actor
- John Warner, who went on to become a US Senator for Virginia
- Larry Fortensky, a construction worker who Taylor met at the Betty Ford Clinic

20. Hank Aaron finished his career with 2,297 of them, in brief : RBIS
The great Hank Aaron (Hammerin' Hank) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

29. Brad of "Moneyball" : PITT
Brad Pitt’s first major role was playing the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston, and he now lives with Angelina Jolie.

Billy Beane is the general manager of the Oakland Athletics baseball team. Michael Lewis wrote his book “Moneyball” about the way Billy Beane built his team by bringing on board players who were “undervalued”, getting the maximum benefit from his limited payroll budget. I must admit I know nothing about baseball, but I thoroughly enjoyed reading “Moneyball”, and the film adaptation with Brad Pitt playing Beane.

31. Antlered animal : ELK
The elk (also known as the wapiti) is the one of the largest species of deer in the world, with only the moose being bigger. Early European settlers were familiar with the smaller red deer back in their homelands, so when they saw the "huge" wapiti they assumed it was a moose, and incorrectly gave it the European name for a moose, namely "elk". The more correct name for the beast is "wapiti", which means "white rump" in Shawnee. It's all very confusing ...

34. Kerfuffle : ADO
“Kerfuffle” comes from the Scottish “curfuffle”, with both words meaning “disruption”.

38. Gift that may be presented with an "Aloha!" : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

39. ___ Lingus : AER
Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn't that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with "Aer Lingus" being a phonetic spelling of the Irish "aer-loingeas" meaning "air fleet". These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland's oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.

41. Actor Arkin : ALAN
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in "Little Miss Sunshine" from 2006, a movie that I just did not understand ...

42. *1978 #1 Donna Summer hit that covered a 1968 #2 hit by Richard Harris : MACARTHUR PARK
"MacArthur Park" is a song by Jimmy Webb that was first recorded by actor Richard Harris, in 1969. Donna Summer released an equally successful disco version of the song in 1978. Webb was inspired to write it by the relationship and breakup that he had with a former girlfriend. The couple occasionally met for lunch in MacArthur Park in Los Angeles.

Donna Summer is known as "The Queen of Disco", with great hits like "Love to Love You, Baby", "I Feel Love" and "Hot Stuff". In the late sixties and early seventies, LaDonna Gaines (her real name) lived and worked in Germany. There she met and married an Austrian actor called Helmuth Sommer. They divorced not long after the marriage, but Donna kept his family name, just changing the "o" to "u" to give her the stage name of "Donna Summer".

Richard Harris was an actor from Limerick in Ireland. Harris was quite a rugby player in his day, and indeed his first major film role was playing a rugby league football player in 1963’s “This Sporting Life”. Late in his career, Harris played Professor Dumbledore in the first two “Harry Potter” films, and passed away before the whole series of films could be made.

47. Pop artist Johns : JASPER
Jasper Johns is a contemporary artist from Augusta, Georgia. Johns’ most famous work is called “Flag”, which he created two years after being discharged from the US Army, in 1954. “Flag” is a representation of the “Stars and Stripes” made with paint and a collage of newsprint.

50. Together, musically : A DUE
“A due” is a musical term meaning "together", and literally translates from Italian as "by two".

51. The handle of the Big Dipper is its tail : URSA MAJOR
The arrangement of seven stars known as the Big Dipper is made up of the seven brightest stars in the constellation Ursa Major, also known as the Great Bear.

56. *New Orleans event with floats : MARDI GRAS PARADE
“Mardi Gras” translates from French as “Fat Tuesday”, and gets its name from the practice of eating rich foods on the eve of the fasting season known as Lent. Lent starts on the next day, called Ash Wednesday.

60. Car famously available in any color, as long as it was black : MODEL T
The Ford Model T was the first really affordable car that was offered for sale, and it was produced from 1908 to 1927. It was the Model T that ushered in the era of assembly line production, which greatly cut down the cost of manufacture. The engine was designed to run on petrol, kerosene or even ethanol. Famously, the Model T was known colloquially as the “Tin Lizzie”.

63. Drunkard : SOUSE
The word "souse" dates back to the 14th century and means "to pickle, steep in vinegar". In the early 1600s the usage was applied to someone "pickled" in booze, a drunkard.

Down
2. Big-screen format : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo '67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

4. Official investigation : INQUEST
An inquest is a judicial inquiry, particularly one into the cause of someone’s death.

5. "Ars Poetica" poet : HORACE
One of Ancient Rome's leading lyric poets was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, or "Horace" as we tend to know him.

The full name of Horace's work is "Ars Poetica, Epistula ad Pisones" (The Art of Poetry, Letters to Piso). The work describes the technical aspects of poetry in Ancient Rome, and the term "ars poetica" has come to mean the poetry of that period.

6. Tehran's land : IRAN
Tehran is the capital of Iran and is the largest city in the Middle East, with a population of about 8.5 million. Iran has been around an awful long time and Tehran is actually the country's 31st national capital.

7. N.B.A. player-turned-coach Jason : KIDD
Jason Kidd was a point guard playing in the NBA. He finished his career with the New York Knicks, and is now the head coach with the Brooklyn Nets.

8. Summer in France : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France.

10. 1968 Jane Fonda sci-fi film : BARBARELLA
“Barbarella” is a cult classic 1968 film that was directed by Roger Vadim. Vadim’s wife at the time was Jane Fonda, and she plays the title character.

Jane Fonda is of course the daughter of Henry Fonda, sister of Peter Fonda, and aunt of Bridget Fonda, making the Fondas quite the acting family. Jane Fonda had many memorable screen performances, but is equally memorable for her anti-war activism. Most famously she was outspoken against the Vietnam War, going so far as to visit North Vietnam during the height of the conflict in 1972, posing for photographs and making radio broadcasts denouncing American leaders as "war criminals". For her stance, Fonda earned the nickname "Hanoi Jane".

12. Meeting at a no-tell motel : TRYST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

17. Org. that rates meat "Choice" or "Prime" : USDA
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) classifies meat into eight different grades:
- Prime
- Choice
- Select
- Standard
- Commercial
- Utility
- Cutter
- Canner

18. West Coast gas chain : ARCO
ARCO stands for the Atlantic Richfield Company. One of ARCO's claims to fame is that it is responsible for the nation's largest Superfund site. Mining and smelting in the area around Butte, Montana polluted the region's water and soil, and ARCO have agreed to pay $187 million to help clean up the area.

23. "Born Free" lioness : ELSA
The life story of Elsa the lion was told by game warden Joy Adamson, who had a very close relationship with the lioness from when Elsa was orphaned as a young cub. Adamson wrote the book "Born Free" about Elsa, and then "Living Free" which tells the story of Elsa and her three lion cubs. In the 1966 film based on "Born Free", Adamson is played by the talented actress Virginia McKenna.

24. FIlm-rating grp. : MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film-rating system (R, PG-17, G etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

27. ___ noir (red wine) : PINOT
The Pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The Pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California Pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful, wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of Pinot, and go rent the DVD…

32. Shakespearean king : LEAR
Shakespeare was inspired to write his famous drama “King Lear” by the legend of "Leir of Britain", the story of a mythological Celtic king.

35. Attacker repellent : MACE
Mace is actually a brand name, originally introduced by Lake Erie Chemical when they started to manufacture "Chemical Mace", with the name being a play on the club-like weapon from days of old. Mace was originally a form of tear gas, but Mace today uses a formula that is actually a pepper spray.

46. "___ Lama Ding Dong" (1961 hit) : RAMA
"Rama Lama Ding Dong" was a hit in 1961, although it had been released in 1957 under the erroneous title "Lama Rama Ding Dong" and didn't quite make it. The song was recorded by the doo-wop group called the Edsels, named after the latest (and "doomed") Ford automobile. Before becoming the Edsels, the group was called the Essos, after the oil company.

47. King ___ Bible : JAMES
The King James Bible is a translation of the Christian Bible that was completed in 1611, during the reign of King James I of England, hence the name.

51. Language in Lahore : URDU
Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

Lahore is a large city in Pakistan, second in size only to Karachi. It is known as the Garden of the Mughals (or in English, Moguls) because of its association with the Mughal Empire. The Mughals ruled much of India from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

52. Actress Charlotte and explorer John : RAES
Charlotte Rae is an American actress, best known for playing the character Edna Garrett on two sitcoms from the seventies and eighties: "Diff'rent Strokes" and "The Facts of Life". Towards the end of the series, the Edna Garrett character operated her own gourmet food shop called “Edna’s Edibles”.

John Rae was a Scottish explorer, who took on the task of searching for the ill-fated Franklin Expedition of 1845. The Franklin Expedition was itself searching for the elusive Northwest Passage through the Arctic Ocean connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific. John Rae stirred up much controversy back in England when he reported evidence of cannibalism among the ill-fated Franklin explorers.

53. Jakarta's island : JAVA
Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is located on the northwest coast of the island of Java. The city’s name comes from “Jayakarta” meaning “complete victory”.

57. Chats online, for short : IMS
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Dress that falls between the knee and ankle : MIDI
5. Nature walks, e.g. : HIKES
10. Droid : BOT
13. Comment to a card dealer : I’M IN
14. Triangular chip : DORITO
15. I.R.S. filing time: Abbr. : APR
16. *Where Romeo and Juliet meet : MASQUERADE PARTY
19. Dick, to Liz, twice : EX-HUSBAND
20. Hank Aaron finished his career with 2,297 of them, in brief : RBIS
21. Schooling: Abbr. : EDUC
22. Pour, as wine from a bottle : DECANT
24. *Often-seedy establishment : MASSAGE PARLOR
29. Brad of "Moneyball" : PITT
30. Wedding vows : I DOS
31. Antlered animal : ELK
34. Kerfuffle : ADO
35. Rural couple ... or what the respective halves of the answers to the four starred clues start with : MA AND PA
38. Gift that may be presented with an "Aloha!" : LEI
39. ___ Lingus : AER
40. Bushy hairdo : AFRO
41. Actor Arkin : ALAN
42. *1978 #1 Donna Summer hit that covered a 1968 #2 hit by Richard Harris : MACARTHUR PARK
47. Pop artist Johns : JASPER
49. Take ___ (catch some Z's) : A NAP
50. Together, musically : A DUE
51. The handle of the Big Dipper is its tail : URSA MAJOR
56. *New Orleans event with floats : MARDI GRAS PARADE
59. Yolk's place : EGG
60. Car famously available in any color, as long as it was black : MODEL T
61. Like 2, 4, 6, 8 ... : EVEN
62. Visualize : SEE
63. Drunkard : SOUSE
64. Like this clue among all the Acrosses : LAST

Down
1. Silent performer : MIME
2. Big-screen format : IMAX
3. Food serving : DISH
4. Official investigation : INQUEST
5. "Ars Poetica" poet : HORACE
6. Tehran's land : IRAN
7. N.B.A. player-turned-coach Jason : KIDD
8. Summer in France : ETE
9. Soak (up) : SOP
10. 1968 Jane Fonda sci-fi film : BARBARELLA
11. Choose to participate : OPT IN
12. Meeting at a no-tell motel : TRYST
14. Fix, as a computer program : DEBUG
17. Org. that rates meat "Choice" or "Prime" : USDA
18. West Coast gas chain : ARCO
22. Plunge : DROP
23. "Born Free" lioness : ELSA
24. FIlm-rating grp. : MPAA
25. Adviser, for one : AIDE
26. Rise of seawater that might accompany a hurricane : STORM SURGE
27. ___ noir (red wine) : PINOT
28. Tack (on) : ADD
32. Shakespearean king : LEAR
33. Twist, as in a chain : KINK
35. Attacker repellent : MACE
36. Many miles off : AFAR
37. Opposite of "Dep." on a flight board : ARR
41. Clothing : APPAREL
43. Parroted : APED
44. Big inconvenience : HASSLE
45. Not fitting : UNAPT
46. "___ Lama Ding Dong" (1961 hit) : RAMA
47. King ___ Bible : JAMES
48. Proverb : ADAGE
51. Language in Lahore : URDU
52. Actress Charlotte and explorer John : RAES
53. Jakarta's island : JAVA
54. Poems by 5-Down : ODES
55. Landlord's income : RENT
57. Chats online, for short : IMS
58. When repeated, early baby sounds : GOO


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0330-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 14, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Musical Interpretation … today’s themed answers are titles of hit songs, but one needs to use an element of position of the answer in the grid to get at the full title:
28A. With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit? : THE CLOCK (“Rock around the Clock”)

37A. With 43-Across, 1973 Deep Purple hit? : SMOKE (“Smoke on the Water”)
43A. See 37-Across : THE WATER

66A. 1959 Dion and the Belmonts hit? : LO(A TEENAGER)VE (“A Teenager in Love”)

78A. 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit? : TIME TIME (“Time after Time”)

90D. 1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival hit? : NOOM DAB (“Bad Moon Rising”)

95D. With 89-Down, 1968 Tammy Wynette hit? : STAND (“Stand by Your Man”)
89D. See 95-Down : YOUR MAN
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 49s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Start of the United Negro College Fund slogan : A MIND …
The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a scholarship fund that was originally set up to address inequities in education resources for African Americans. The UNCF’s scholarships still go to mainly to African American students, but also to students of all ethnicities who attend historically black colleges and universities. The organization has been using the slogan “A mind is a TERRIBLE thing to waste” since 1972.

6. Old lab burners : ETNAS
“Etna” (after the volcano) is another name for a Bunsen Burner that is used in a laboratory.

11. Abbr. at the top of an email : BCC
A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

14. Something passed between the legs? : BATON
A baton might be passed between the legs of a relay race.

19. ___ Domingo : SANTO
Santo Domingo de Guzmán (often just “Santo Domingo”) is the capital city of the Dominican Republic. Christopher Columbus was the first European to visit what is now the Dominican Republic, in 1492. Four years later Christopher's younger brother, Bartholomew Columbus arrived, and founded Santo Domingo, making the city the oldest, continuously-inhabited European settlement in the Americas.

25. Like Neptune among the planets in the solar system : OUTERMOST
Neptune is the farthest planet from the Sun in our Solar System. The existence of Neptune was predicted as early as the 1820s by mathematics based on observations of the orbit of Uranus. The planet was actually observed in 1846.

26. ___ pro nobis : ORA
"Ora pro nobis" translates from Latin as "pray for us". It is a common term used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to "OPN".

27. Echelon : TIER
We use the word “echelon” (ech.) to describe a rank, particularly in the military. The term comes from French, in which language it has the same meaning, although the original meaning in Old French is “rung of a ladder”.

28. With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit? : THE CLOCK (“Rock Around the Clock”)
The famed rock & roll singer and songwriter Bill Haley started out his career as the frontman of Bill Haley and the Saddlemen, playing country and western music. The name was changed to Bill Haley and His Comets in 1952 as the band started performing rock & roll songs. The name "Comets" was imitative of the common mispronunciation of the famous Halley's comet (sometimes written incorrectly as "Haley's" comet). The group recorded "Rock Around the Clock" a year later, in 1953.

33. Hall-of-Famer Ralph : KINER
Ralph Kiner is a former Major League Baseball player. He has for decades been calling the games for the New York Mets from the broadcast booth.

35. Purveyor of the Doublicious sandwich : KFC
The famous "Colonel" of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame was Harland Sanders, an entrepreneur from Henryville, Indiana. Although not really a "Colonel", Sanders did indeed serve in the military. He enlisted in the Army as a private in 1906 at the age of 16, lying about his age. He spent the whole of his time in the Army as a soldier in Cuba. It was much later, in the 1930s, that Sanders went into the restaurant business making his specialty deep-fried chicken. By 1935 his reputation as a "character" had grown, so much so that Governor Ruby Laffoon of Kentucky gave Sanders the honorary title of "Kentucky Colonel". Later in the fifties, Sanders developed his trademark look with the white suit, string tie, mustache and goatee. When Sanders was 65 however, his business failed and in stepped Dave Thomas, the founder of Wendy's. Thomas simplified the Sanders menu, cutting it back from over a hundred items to just fried chicken and salads. That was enough to launch KFC into the fast food business. Sanders sold the US franchise in 1964 for just $2 million and moved to Canada to grow KFC north of the border. He died in 1980 and is buried in Louisville, Kentucky. The Colonel's secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices is indeed a trade secret. Apparently there is only one copy of the recipe, a handwritten piece of paper, written in pencil and signed by Colonel Sanders. Since 2009, the piece of paper has been locked in a computerized vault surrounded with motion detectors and security cameras.

36. ___ Webster, Twain's "celebrated jumping frog" : DAN’L
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” is a short story by Mark Twain, first published in 1865. It was this publication that launched Twain’s career as a writer as it brought him national attention. The title character is a frog that’s given the name “Dan’l Webster”.

37. With 43-Across, 1973 Deep Purple hit? : SMOKE (“Smoke on the Water”)
(43A. See 37-Across : THE WATER)
“Smoke on the Water” is a 1973 song released by the British rock group Deep Purple. The song is famous for its very recognizable central theme that is introduced as a guitar riff in the opening phrases. The song tells the true story of a casino burning down in Switzerland, an event that the band witnessed in 1971. The casino was in Montreux, and the “smoke on the water” was drifting over Lake Geneva.

39. Like Odin : NORSE
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin's wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term "Friday" (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin's son was Thor, and his name gave us the term "Thursday".

41. Sound engineer's knob : FADER
A fader is a knob (or usually a slider) that gradually increases or decreases the level of an audio signal. You’ll often see audio engineers at a performance or in a recording studio sliding buttons up and down. Those are faders.

53. "Eternally nameless" thing, in Eastern religion : TAO
The Chinese character "tao" translates as "path", but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

54. Bath accessories : LOOFAS
The loofah (also loofa, lufah and luffa, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that's very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

55. Dr Pepper alternative : MR PIBB
The soft drink on the market today called Pibb Xtra used to be known as Mr Pibb, and before that was called Peppo. Peppo was introduced in 1972 as a direct competitor to Dr Pepper.

58. Former Disney president Michael : OVITZ
Michael Ovitz was President of the Walt Disney Company from 1995-1997. He didn’t get on well with the company Chairman, Michael Eisner, so he was fired after just over a year. He was sent packing with a nice severance package though: $38m in cash and well over $100m in stock.

62. Olympic leap : TOE LOOP
A toe loop is a relatively simple jump in figure skating (not that I could do one!). In a toe loop, the skater uses the toe pick on the skate to lift off on a backward outside edge, landing on the same backward outside edge.

64. Ring Lardner's "Alibi ___" : IKE
“Alibi Ike" is a short story by Ring Lardner that was made into a romantic comedy film in 1935 starring Joe E. Brown and Olivia de Havilland. Brown plays the title character, a baseball player who is always making excuses, hence his nickname. “Alibi Ike" was actually the first film to be released featuring Olivia de Havilland.

66. 1959 Dion and the Belmonts hit? : LO(A TEENAGER)VE (“A Teenager in Love”)
Dion and the Belmonts were a vocal group from the fifties who had success in the late fifties. The four singers were from the Bronx in New York, with two living on Belmont Avenue, hence the name that was chosen. Perhaps the biggest hits for Dion and the Belmonts were “A Teenager in Love” and "Where or When".

72. Pond denizen : EFT
Newts wouldn't be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

73. Phil who played 65-Down : SILVERS
(65D. NCO of 1950s TV : SGT BILKO)
Master Sergeant Ernie Bilko was played by Phil Silvers in his TV show that aired in the fifties. "The Phil Silvers Show" was hugely successful in reruns in the British Isles, even more so than over here in the US.

78. 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit? : TIME TIME (“Time after Time”)
If you’ve ever heard Cyndi Lauper speaking, you’d know that she was from Queens, New York. She is the daughter of divorced parents, strongly influenced by a supportive mother. She was always a free spirit, and even as young teen in the mid-sixties she dyed her hair different colors and wore outlandish fashions. She was a young woman who wanted to “find herself”, and to that end she once spent two weeks alone in the woods up in Canada, well, just with her dog.

79. Memorable series in "Psycho" : STABS
The classic Alfred Hitchcock suspense film “Psycho” released in 1960 is based on a 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The Bloch novel in turn is loosely based on actual crimes committed by murderer and grave robber Ed Gein. When “Psycho” was making its initial run in theaters, latecomers were not granted admission, a policy instigated by Hitchcock himself. He felt that anyone missing the opening scenes would not enjoy the film.

82. The continents, e.g. : SEPTET
The seven continents, in order of size, are:
1. Asia
2. Africa
3. North America
4. South America
5. Antarctica
6. Europe
7. Australia

85. Kelly of morning TV : RIPA
When Kelly Ripa secured the co-host spot on morning television with Regis Philbin, she was still acting in "All My Children" in a role she had been playing for over ten years. After a year of holding down two jobs, she eventually gave up the acting job.

88. Rap sheet listing : PRIOR
A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

94. Rene of "Thor" : RUSSO
The lovely and very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

Thor is a superhero who was introduced to us by Marvel Comics in 1962. The character is of course based on the Norse god Thor, and comes complete with a magical hammer. Like so many comic book heroes it seems, Thor has made it to the big screen. Actor Chris Hemsworth played the role in the 2011 film “Thor” directed by the great Kenneth Branagh. Branagh must have needed the cash. Thor’s father Odin is played by Anthony Hopkins. He must have needed the cash too …

96. Thumbing-the-nose gesture : SNOOK
“Cocking a snook” in general means to show disrespect by making an insulting gesture, and in particular in our culture this can be to thumb one’s nose.

98. Challenge for F.D.R. : POLIO
Jonas Salk was an American medical researcher, famous for developing the first safe polio vaccine. In the fifties, especially after the 1952 epidemic, polio was the biggest health fear in the US because it killed thousands, left even more with disabilities and most of the victims were children. The situation was dire and the authorities immediately quarantined the family of any polio victim, and that quarantine was so strict that in many cases the families were not even permitted to attend the funeral of a family member who died from the disease.

Future president Franklin D. Roosevelt developed polio in 1921, when he was in his late thirties. He picked up the viral disease while on vacation in Campobello Island in Canada.

99. Mideast V.I.P. : AMIR
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

101. Meatless day in W.W. II: Abbr. : TUE
To help the war effort, the United States Food Administration (led by Herbert Hoover) introduced “Meatless Tuesdays” and “Wheatless Wednesdays” for the duration of WWI. Similar campaigns were revived during WWII. Wheatless Wednesdays have fallen by the wayside but Meatless Monday is very much in vogue these days as an attempt to improve the population’s health and help reduce global warming (less methane from fewer cows).

103. Some lawn mowers : TOROS
Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was started in 1914 to build tractor engines.

108. Bugs Bunny addressee : DOC
Bugs Bunny first said "What's up, Doc?" in the 1940 cartoon short "A Wild Hare", addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

109. Where to find screwdrivers and rusty nails : BARROOMS
The cocktail called a Screwdriver is a mix of fresh orange juice with vodka. Apparently the drink originated with a group of engineers in the late forties who used to spike small cans of orange juice with vodka, and then stir it in with their screwdrivers.

The cocktail called a Rusty Nail is a mixture of Drambuie and Scotch, usually served over ice. Without the ice the drink is sometimes called a Straight Up Nail. There is also a Canadian version of a Rusty Nail that uses rye whiskey instead of Scotch that's called a Donald Sutherland, after the celebrated Canadian actor.

114. Made bats : DRIVEN MAD
The expression "bats in the belfry" meaning "mad, crazy" conjures up images of bats flying around Gothic bell towers, but actually it's a relatively recent addition to our vernacular. The term is American in origin, and dates back only to the early 1900s. The concept is that someone who is "crazy", with wild ideas flying around his or her head, can be described as having bats (wild ideas) flying around the belfry (head). The terms "bats" and "batty" originated at the same time, and are clearly derivative.

116. Primer pair : DICK AND JANE
The “Dick and Jane” beginning reader series of books was originally written by William S. Gray and Zerna Sharp and first published in the 1930s. There are claims of plagiarism from an earlier pair of books published throughout the British Commonwealth that featured the characters Dick and Dora. Indeed, I grew up in the British Isles with “Dick and Dora”, and always assumed that “Dick and Jane” were somehow their American cousins!

121. More cool, in slang : ILLER
"Ill" is hip-hop slang, meaning sublime, singularly creative. Not how I use the word ...

122. French thinkers? : TETES
"Tête" is the French word for "head".

123. Wink's partner : NOD
A nod and a wink …

124. ___ State (Mountain West Conference team) : BOISE
The Famous Idaho Potato Bowl has been played annually at Boise State University since 1997. Prior to winning sponsorship from the Idaho Potato Commission, the game was known as the Humanitarian Bowl.

Down
2. Actress Tierney : MAURA
Maura Tierney is an actress from Boston, Massachusetts. Tierney is best known for playing Lisa Miller on television’s “NewsRadio” and Abby Lockhart on “ER”.

4. Some versions of Windows : NTS
Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7; they're all based on the Windows NT operating system. There is a common perception that Windows NT (WNT) takes its name from VMS, an earlier operating system developed by Digital Equipment Corporation. "WNT" is what's called a "Caesar cypher" of "VMS", as you just augment the letters of VMS alphabetically by one to arrive at WNT. Bill Gates disputes this derivation of the name, and in a 1998 interview stated that the NT originally stood for N-Ten and that the marketing folks at Microsoft revised history by changing it to "New Technology".

7. Back it up, in a way : TWERK
Twerking is a dancing move in which a woman (usually) shakes her hips up and down causing a lot of “wobbling”. It’s possible that “twerk” is a portmanteau of “twist” and “jerk”.

8. "Seduction of the Minotaur" author : NIN
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

11. Tea Partiers, e.g. : BLOC
The Tea Party Caucus in the US Congress is chaired by Minnesota Representative Michele Bachmann. The stated focus for the caucus is fiscal responsibility and limited government, while adhering to the groups interpretation of the US Constitution. Top contributors to the caucus are health professionals, retirees, the real estate industry as well as oil and gas interests.

12. Crack filler : CAULK
The term "caulk" comes from old Norman French "cauquer", and described the action of filling gaps with lime. “Caulk”has the same root as our word "chalk".

14. Medium for love letters? : BARK
Lovers really shouldn’t carve their initials into the bark of a tree, but it happens …

15. Card reader, for short : ATM
Automated teller machine (ATM)

17. ___ Scott Card, "Ender's Game" writer : ORSON
Orson Scott Card is a science fiction author (mainly). Card’s most famous work is his novel “Ender’s Game” first published in 1985. “Ender’s Game” was adapted into a movie and released in 2013, with a cast that includes Harrison Ford.

18. Competitor of ZzzQuil : NYTOL
Nytol is a brand name for the drug diphenhydramine which is primarily used as an antihistamine. The drug also has a strong hypnotic effect and is used by some people as a non-prescription sleep aid.

22. Label for 28-Across : DECCA
(28A. With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit? : THE CLOCK (“Rock Around the Clock”)
Decca Records started out in 1929 as a British record label. The US branch of Decca was opened up in 1934, but the UK and US entities went their separate ways starting in WWII.

24. Alaskan city : SITKA
The city of Sitka is located on Baranof Island and part of Chichagof Island in the Alaska Archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. Sitka used to be known as Redoubt Saint Michael and then New Archangel when it was ruled by the Russians. The current city name comes from a local term meaning “People on the Outside of Baranof Island”. Immediately after the purchase of Alaska by the US, Sitka served as the capital of the Alaska Territory until the seat of government was relocated north to Juneau.

29. Fake : ERSATZ
Something described as “ersatz” is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

32. Chef Lagasse : EMERIL
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander's Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous "Bam!" catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

36. No longer in fashion : DEMODE
“Démodé” is a French word meaning “no longer in fashion”.

38. Info for an airport greeter, for short : ETA
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

40. Victorian ___ : ERA
The Victorian era lasted the length of the Queen Victoria’s reign, from 1837 to 1901. The era was a period of great prosperity and growth, with the population of England and Wales doubling to over 30 million. Mind you, the population of Ireland halved during the same period, from 8 million to 4 million, largely due to the Great Famine.

43. The "T" of Mr. T : TERO
Mr. T's real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie "Rocky III". In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, "No, I don't hate Balboa, but I pity the fool". He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called "I Pity the Fool", and produced a motivational video called "Be Somebody ... or Be Somebody's Fool!".

48. Boss Tweed nemesis : NAST
William Magear Tweed was known as "Boss" Tweed. He was a 19th-century, American politician who led the Democratic Party machine in New York, headquartered in Tammany Hall. He was one of the most successful of the corrupt politicians of the day, siphoning from taxpayers (in today's money) billions of dollars. In 1871 he was arrested, and served time in jail. He was then rearrested on civil charges and served time in debtor's prison. He managed to escape to Spain, but was arrested once more and extradited to the United States. He died in jail in 1878.

Thomas Nast was an American caricaturist and cartoonist. Nast was the creator of the Republican Party elephant, the Democratic Party's donkey, Uncle Sam and the image of the plump and jocular Santa Claus that we use today. Thomas Nast drew some famous cartoons in which he depicted the Tammany Society as a vicious tiger that was killing democracy. Nast’s use of the tiger symbology caught on and was used by other cartoonists to harp at the society.

49. New York arrival of '77 : SST
Scheduled Concorde service to New York’s JFK airport from London and Paris started in 1977. Flight times were just under 3.5 hours, which compared to 8 hours for regular commercial jets of the day.

50. BBC std. : GMT
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the time at the Prime Meridian, the meridian that runs through Greenwich in London.

A meridian is a line of longitude, and the Prime Meridian is that line of longitude defined as 0 degrees. The Prime Meridian is also called the Greenwich Meridian as it passes through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich in southeast London. Of course the line of longitude that is used to represent 0 degrees is an arbitrary decision. 25 nations formally decided in 1884 to use the Greenwich Meridian as 0 degrees as it was already a popular choice. That is all except the French, who abstained from the vote and used the Paris Meridian as 0 degrees on French charts for several decades.

The marvelous British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is mainly funded by the UK government through a television licence fee that is levied annually on all households watching TV transmissions. Currently the fee is 145 UK pounds, about 230 US dollars.

52. Bank in need of support? : DIKE
A dike is an embankment usually made of earth and rock that is used to prevent floods.

54. Where "hello" is "sveiks" : LATVIA
Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics. People from Latvia are called Letts.

61. Hands on deck : TARS
A Jack Tar, or just "tar", was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor's various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing his clothes and using tar in his hair to slick down his ponytail.

63. Chicken ___ (Italian dish, informally) : PARM
Parmigiana is a dish from southern Italy. The original parmigiana was made with an aubergine filling, with cheese and tomato layers and then baked. Versions originating outside of Italy have replaced the aubergine with breaded cutlets of chicken or veal.

67. Former faddish exercise regimen : TAE BO
Tae Bo isn't an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of "taekwondo" and "boxing".

69. Oktoberfest quaff : BIER
“Bier” is the German word for "beer".

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I've been there twice, and it really is a great party ...

"Quaff" is both a verb and a noun. One quaffs (takes a hearty drink) of a quaff (a hearty drink).

70. John Locke, philosophically : EMPIRICIST
John Locke was the English philosopher who postulated that the mind is a blank slate (or "tabula rasa") when we are born, and that we fill that slate with our experiences and observations.

74. Brand of pickles : VLASIC
Apparently Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

76. Description on many eBay listings : RARE
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

77. The "s" in Awacs: Abbr. : SYS
When the British developed radar in WWII, they also came up with an airborne system which they actually deployed during the war. In 1944 the US Navy commissioned a similar system, and so launched the first American Airborne Early Warning (AEW) system, also before the war was over. The more modern term for the technology is Airborne Warning and Control System, AWACS for short.

79. Eastern religion : SHINTO
It is perhaps best not to describe Shinto as a religion, but more as a "spirituality of the Japanese people", a spirituality that encompasses folklore, history and mythology. Having said that, "Shinto" translates literally as "Way of the Gods". Most people in Japan who are described as practicing Shinto, also practice Buddhism.

80. Place for a mani-pedi : SPA
Manicure & pedicure (mani-pedi)

84. Graz's land: Abbr. : AUS
Graz is the second-largest city in Austria, after the capital Vienna. One of Graz’s sons is actor and former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. I used to work for a company headquartered in Graz and had the privilege of visiting that beautiful city several times …

90. 1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival hit? : NOOM DAB (“Bad Moon Rising”)
“Bad Moon Rising” is a song recorded by Creedence Clearwater Revival. Written by band member John Fogerty, the song was inspired by the composer watching the hurricane scene in the movie “The Devil and Daniel Webster”.

92. Quantum physics particle : BOSON
Particle physics is beyond me, but bosons are subatomic particles. They can be elementary, like for example photons, or composite, like mesons, which are composed of one quark and one antiquark. “Bosons” are named for the Indian physicist Satyendra Nath Bose who developed Bose-Einstein statistics along with Albert Einstein.

93. Rubber from Arabia? : ALADDIN
“Aladdin” is a famous tale in the “Arabian Nights”, also called “The Book of One Thousand and One Nights”. However, there is no evidence at all that the story was in the original collection. It is generally believed that one Antoine Galland introduced the tale when he translated the “Arabian Nights” into French in the early 1700s.

95. With 89-Down, 1968 Tammy Wynette hit? : STAND (“Stand by Your Man”)
(89A. See 95-Down : YOUR MAN)
“Stand by Your Man” is a song that was co-written and recorded by Tammy Wynette in 1968. “Stand by Your Man” was to become Wynette’s biggest hit by far.

97. "Twelfth Night" duke : ORSINO
The famous quotation about music being the food of love is from William Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night". The opening lines of the play, spoken by the love-smitten Duke Orsino, are:
If music be the food of love, play on,
Give me excess of it; that surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.

100. Inspector of crime fiction : MORSE
“Inspector Morse” is a series of detective novels penned by English crime writer Colin Dexter. The novels were adapted into a very successful television show that occasionally appears in the US on PBS. Morse is a very colorful character with a penchant for classical music, real ale and crosswords. So do I!!

102. One inspiring love of poetry? : ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of Lyric Poetry.

106. "Bonne ___!" : ANNEE
“Bonne année!” is French for “Happy New Year!”

117. Hollywood special FX : CGI
Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

“Effects” as in “special effects”, or “FX”.

118. "Selena" star, to her fans : J.LO
Singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez, known professionally simply as "Selena", was murdered in 1995 by the president of her own fan club at the height of her career. In a 1997 biopic about Selena's life, Jennifer Lopez played the title role.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Start of the United Negro College Fund slogan : A MIND ...
6. Old lab burners : ETNAS
11. Abbr. at the top of an email : BCC
14. Something passed between the legs? : BATON
19. ___ Domingo : SANTO
20. Now and again? : TWICE
21. Like an ode : LAUDATORY
23. Kind of farming : SUBSISTENCE
25. Like Neptune among the planets in the solar system : OUTERMOST
26. ___ pro nobis : ORA
27. Echelon : TIER
28. With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit? : THE CLOCK (“Rock Around the Clock”)
30. Sound of sweet nothings : COO
31. Having a beat : CADENT
33. Hall-of-Famer Ralph : KINER
35. Purveyor of the Doublicious sandwich : KFC
36. ___ Webster, Twain's "celebrated jumping frog" : DAN’L
37. With 43-Across, 1973 Deep Purple hit? : SMOKE (“Smoke on the Water”)
39. Like Odin : NORSE
41. Sound engineer's knob : FADER
43. See 37-Across : THE WATER
45. Brings in : EARNS
47. Some dreams : OMENS
50. Reverse, e.g. : GEAR
51. Dismissed : AXED
53. "Eternally nameless" thing, in Eastern religion : TAO
54. Bath accessories : LOOFAS
55. Dr Pepper alternative : MR PIBB
58. Former Disney president Michael : OVITZ
60. Dreamy romantic quality : STARDUST
62. Olympic leap : TOE LOOP
64. Ring Lardner's "Alibi ___" : IKE
65. It's put on before takeoff : SEAT BELT
66. 1959 Dion and the Belmonts hit? : LO(A TEENAGER)VE (“A Teenager in Love”)
69. Old mattress stuffing : BEDSTRAW
72. Pond denizen : EFT
73. Phil who played 65-Down : SILVERS
78. 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit? : TIME TIME (“Time after Time”)
79. Memorable series in "Psycho" : STABS
81. Dawn-to-dusk : ALL DAY
82. The continents, e.g. : SEPTET
83. "Phooey!" : BAH!
85. Kelly of morning TV : RIPA
87. Haughty affectation : AIRS
88. Rap sheet listing : PRIOR
89. Query at the start of a poker game : YOU IN?
91. Verbally assault : LAMBASTE
94. Rene of "Thor" : RUSSO
96. Thumbing-the-nose gesture : SNOOK
98. Challenge for F.D.R. : POLIO
99. Mideast V.I.P. : AMIR
101. Meatless day in W.W. II: Abbr. : TUE
103. Some lawn mowers : TOROS
105. Pertaining to religious rites : SACRAL
108. Bugs Bunny addressee : DOC
109. Where to find screwdrivers and rusty nails : BARROOMS
111. Like peas in ___ : A POD
113. Suffix with salt : -INE
114. Made bats : DRIVEN MAD
116. Primer pair : DICK AND JANE
119. Info on a magazine cover : ISSUE DATE
120. Real dear : ANGEL
121. More cool, in slang : ILLER
122. French thinkers? : TETES
123. Wink's partner : NOD
124. ___ State (Mountain West Conference team) : BOISE
125. Runners in the cold? : NOSES

Down
1. Org. : ASSOC
2. Actress Tierney : MAURA
3. Suffering : IN BAD SHAPE
4. Some versions of Windows : NTS
5. "Quit stalling!" : DO IT NOW!
6. Suffix with major : -ETTE
7. Back it up, in a way : TWERK
8. "Seduction of the Minotaur" author : NIN
9. Bank ID : ACCT NO
10. "Listen, pal!" : SEE HERE!
11. Tea Partiers, e.g. : BLOC
12. Crack filler : CAULK
13. Casual summer wear : CUTOFFS
14. Medium for love letters? : BARK
15. Card reader, for short : ATM
16. What fastidious people can't be : TOO CAREFUL
17. ___ Scott Card, "Ender's Game" writer : ORSON
18. Competitor of ZzzQuil : NYTOL
22. Label for 28-Across : DECCA
24. Alaskan city : SITKA
29. Fake : ERSATZ
32. Chef Lagasse : EMERIL
34. "To sum up ..." : IN REVIEW ...
36. No longer in fashion : DEMODE
38. Info for an airport greeter, for short : ETA
40. Victorian ___ : ERA
42. Summons, of a sort : DOORBELL
43. The "T" of Mr. T : TERO
44. Prefix with thermal : EXO-
46. "Long time ___" : NO SEE
48. Boss Tweed nemesis : NAST
49. New York arrival of '77 : SST
50. BBC std. : GMT
52. Bank in need of support? : DIKE
54. Where "hello" is "sveiks" : LATVIA
56. Reinforces : BOLSTERS
57. Muff a grounder : BOOT IT
59. Something you can believe : TENET
61. Hands on deck : TARS
63. Chicken ___ (Italian dish, informally) : PARM
65. NCO of 1950s TV : SGT BILKO
67. Former faddish exercise regimen : TAE BO
68. Way off : AFAR
69. Oktoberfest quaff : BIER
70. John Locke, philosophically : EMPIRICIST
71. Out-of-the-way way : DETOUR
74. Brand of pickles : VLASIC
75. Slanted writing : EDITORIALS
76. Description on many eBay listings : RARE
77. The "s" in Awacs: Abbr. : SYS
78. Dose meas. : TSP
79. Eastern religion : SHINTO
80. Place for a mani-pedi : SPA
84. Graz's land: Abbr. : AUS
86. Rev (up) : AMP
89. See 95-Down : YOUR MAN
90. 1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival hit? : NOOM DAB (“Bad Moon Rising”)
92. Quantum physics particle : BOSON
93. Rubber from Arabia? : ALADDIN
95. With 89-Down, 1968 Tammy Wynette hit? : STAND (“Stand by Your Man”)
97. "Twelfth Night" duke : ORSINO
99. "___ to the list" : ADD IT
100. Inspector of crime fiction : MORSE
102. One inspiring love of poetry? : ERATO
104. "___ alive!" : SAKES
106. "Bonne ___!" : ANNEE
107. Longing looks : LEERS
109. Some queens : BEES
110. Didn't stop in time, say : ODED
112. ___ ale : PALE
115. French scene : VUE
117. Hollywood special FX : CGI
118. "Selena" star, to her fans : J.LO


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0329-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Mar 14, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Barry C. Silk
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 44s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. It's made from an ear and put in the mouth : CORNCOB PIPE
Corncob pipes are made from cobs that have been dried for two years and are then hollowed out into the shape of a bowl. Famous smokers of corncob pipes were General Douglas MacArthur, Mark Twain, Norman Rockwell as well as Popeye and Frosty the Snowman.

12. Highlander's accessory : TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets"), but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of Robert Burns' poem "Tam O'Shanter".

15. 1967 hit by the Hollies : ON A CAROUSEL
The Hollies are a great pop group from Manchester in the north of England. The band formed in 1962 and had big hits in the late sixties and early seventies. The list of songs from the Hollies includes classics like “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother”, “Carrie Anne”, “Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress” and “The Air That I Breathe”.

17. Copied the page? : RAN AN ERRAND
The original pages were youths who were preparing to become knights.

18. They often land next to queens: Abbr. : KTS
It is believed that the game of chess originated in northwest India, evolving from a 6th-century game called "chaturanga", a Sanskrit word meaning "four divisions". These four (military) divisions were represented in the game:
- Infantry (now "pawns")
- Cavalry (now "knights")
- Elephants (now "bishops")
- Chariots (now "rooks")

19. Prefix with flop : GIGA-
The performance of a computer in carrying out scientific calculations is sometimes measured in “FLOPS”. FLOPS stands for “floating-point operations per second”.

20. They often land next to queens : DRONE BEES
Drone bees and ants are fertile males of the species, whose sole role in life seems to be to mate with a queen.

31. Enigmatic : SPHINXLIKE
“Sphinx” is actually a Greek word, meaning “the strangler” …

34. Nanny, in Nanjing : AMAH
"Amah" is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet it actually comes from the Portuguese "ama" meaning "nurse". Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

Nanjing is a city in eastern China that has been the nation’s capital several times. The name “Nanjing” means “southern capital”, whereas “Beijing” translates as “northern capital”.

41. Orphaned lion of literature : ELSA
The life story of Elsa the lion was told by game warden Joy Adamson, who had a very close relationship with the lioness from when Elsa was orphaned as a young cub. Adamson wrote the book "Born Free" about Elsa, and then "Living Free" which tells the story of Elsa and her three lion cubs. In the 1966 film based on "Born Free", Adamson is played by the talented actress Virginia McKenna.

42. Knit at a social function? : TEA COZY
I don’t know what I’d do without my tea cosy/cozy, said he sipping away …

43. Brownie alternative : TORTE
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

I moved to the US from Ireland in 1983, and it was quite a culture shock. Now, things have changed and Irish people are more exposed to American culture today, but back then I was in awe of so many things that were new to me. Blue cheese dressing, grocery stores open at midnight, brownies. Beer … not so much …

45. "Veep" airer : HBO
“Veep” is a political satire sitcom on HBO that is a remake of the British show “The Thick of It”. “Veep” is set in the office of a fictional Vice President of the United States played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

49. Smallest member of the Council of Europe : SAN MARINO
San Marino is a small enclave in northern Italy with an area of just under 25 square miles. It is the oldest sovereign state and constitutional republic in the world, and has the world’s oldest constitution (dating back to 1600). What is most impressive to me is that San Marino has no national debt and a budget surplus. One can only dream ...

The Council of Europe is an organization that was founded in 1949 and one that is totally separate from the European Union (EU). The Council of Europe promotes cooperation between all European countries, and not just those in the EU. The Council is headquartered in Strasbourg, France.

54. It's between Buda and Pest : DANUBE RIVER
The Danube is the second largest river in Europe (after the Volga), and actually flows through four European capitals (Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade and Bratislava).

Budapest is the capital city of Hungary. Today’s city was formed with the merging of three cities on the banks of the Danube river in 1873: Buda and Óbuda on the west bank, and Pest on the east bank.

58. Forum setting : ANCIENT ROME
The Roman forum was the public space in the middle of a city, taking it's name from the Latin word "forum" meaning "marketplace, town square".

59. 180 : UEY
U-turn (uey)

Down
1. Herder from Wales : CORGI
The Welsh corgi is a herding dog, and one of the oldest breeds in Britain. Corgis aren’t speedy enough to do their job by running around livestock like collies, and instead nip at the heels.

4. Bulldogs play in it: Abbr. : NCAA
The Yale Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Yale University. The Yale school mascot is “Handsome Dan”, the Yale bulldog.

5. 86 : CAN
“To 86” is American slang mean “to get rid of”. The term originated with Hollywood film crews who often used an 85 filter when shooting outdoors in daylight, to filter out UV radiation that can give a blue cast to film. A camera without a filter was said to have an “86 filter”, so that “to 86” meant to take something away.

8. Himalayan production : PURR
The Himalayan breed of cat has long hair and is identical to the Persian, but with blue eyes and different colors at the extreme points of its coat.

9. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan's greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki's best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

10. Ayn Rand, e.g. : PEN NAME
Ayn Rand was the pen name of Russian-American novelist Alisa Rosenbaum. Rand's two best known works are her novels "The Fountainhead" published in 1943 and "Atlas Shrugged" in 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, "Atlas Shrugged". This group called itself "The Collective", and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan.

21. Product of some decay : BETA RAY
Beta particles (the constituents of beta rays) are the products of decay of a radioactive element. Beta particles are high-energy electrons or positrons emitted from the nucleus of the decaying element.

23. O's is one more than N's : AT NO
The atomic number (at. no.) of oxygen (O) is 8, and of nitrogen (N) is 7.

The atomic number of an element is also called the proton number, and is the number of protons found in the nucleus of each atom of the element.

28. Locals call it the "Big O" : OKEECHOBEE
Lake Okeechobee is the largest freshwater lake in Florida, and the second largest freshwater lake contained completely within the 48 contiguous states (after Lake Michigan). It is a very shallow lake, perhaps more like a swamp, with an area about half the size of Rhode Island. Locals refer to Lake Okeechobee as “the Big O”.

31. End of a song often sung by inebriated people : SYNE
The song "Auld Lang Syne" is a staple at New Year's Eve, the words of which were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

33. Polar Bear Provincial Park borders it : HUDSON BAY
Hudson Bay in northern Canada is the second largest bay in the world, after the Bay of Bengal. Hudson Bay was named by English explorers after Henry Hudson who explored the area in 1610 on his ship “Discovery”. Hudson’s crew mutinied during that voyage and set Hudson and his officers adrift in a small boat. It is presumed that the castaways didn’t survive for very long.

Polar Bear Provincial Park lies way north in Ontario, right on the shore of Hudson bay. It is named for the hundreds of Polar Bears that migrate peacefully through the area.

37. Minestrone ingredient : ORZO
Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

Minestrone is a hearty Italian soup with a varying recipe, but usually including lots of vegetables in a vegetable broth with added pasta or rice. The term “minestrone” comes from the Italian “minestrare” meaning “to serve”.

48. Part of Che Guevara's attire : BERET
Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Argentina, and in 1948 he started to study medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. While at school he satisfied his need to "see the world" by taking two long journeys around South America, the story of which are told in Guevara's memoir later published as "The Motorcycle Diaries". While travelling, Guevara was moved by the plight of the people he saw and their working conditions and what he viewed as capitalistic exploitation. In Mexico City he met brothers Raul and Fidel Castro and was persuaded to join their cause, the overthrow of the US-backed government in Cuba. He rose to second-in-command among the Cuban insurgents, and when Castro came to power Guevara was influential in repelling the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing Soviet nuclear missiles to the island. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to continue his work as a revolutionary. He was captured by Bolivian forces in 1967, and was executed. Fidel Castro led the public mourning of Guevara's death, and soon the revolutionary was an icon for many left-wing movements around the world.

49. Junior in 12 Pro Bowls : SEAU
Junior Seau was an NFL linebacker, first playing for the San Diego Chargers and then the Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots. Sadly, Seau was found dead in his home in 2011, having committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest.

50. Highlander of old : INCA
The Inca Empire was known as the Tawantinsuyu, which translates as “land of the four quarters”. The Inca Empire was a federal organization having a central government that sat above four “suyu” or “quarters”, four administrative regions.

51. Period sans soleil : NUIT
In French, a period of the day without sun (sans soleil) is night (nuit).

52. Magazine fig. : CIRC
A magazine’s (mag’s) sales figures are referred to as its circulation (circ.).

55. Half of nine? : ENS
Half of the letters in the word “nine” are Ns (ens).

56. U.S.P.S. assignment : RTE
The US Postal Service (USPS) is a remarkable agency in many ways. For starters, the government's right and responsibility to establish the Post Office is specifically called out in Article One of the US constitution. Also, the first postmaster general was none other than Benjamin Franklin. And the USPS operates over 200,000 vehicles, which is the largest vehicle fleet in the world.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. It's made from an ear and put in the mouth : CORNCOB PIPE
12. Highlander's accessory : TAM
15. 1967 hit by the Hollies : ON A CAROUSEL
16. One may have a full body : ALE
17. Copied the page? : RAN AN ERRAND
18. They often land next to queens: Abbr. : KTS
19. Prefix with flop : GIGA-
20. They often land next to queens : DRONE BEES
22. Cross quality : IRE
23. Move a whole lot : AWE
25. Backward : AREAR
26. Fame : STARDOM
29. Spice stores? : TINS
31. Enigmatic : SPHINXLIKE
34. Nanny, in Nanjing : AMAH
35. Question after a surprising claim : YOU DO??!!
36. Party bowlful : ICE
37. Supply one's moving address? : ORATE
38. Network point : NODE
39. Now whole : INTEGRATED
41. Orphaned lion of literature : ELSA
42. Knit at a social function? : TEA COZY
43. Brownie alternative : TORTE
45. "Veep" airer : HBO
46. Pinch-hitter : SUB
49. Smallest member of the Council of Europe : SAN MARINO
52. See 7-Down : CASE
53. Withdraw : EBB
54. It's between Buda and Pest : DANUBE RIVER
57. After : A LA
58. Forum setting : ANCIENT ROME
59. 180 : UEY
60. Target of a spy : STATE SECRET

Down
1. Herder from Wales : CORGI
2. Live warning? : ON AIR
3. Voice lesson topic : RANGE
4. Bulldogs play in it: Abbr. : NCAA
5. 86 : CAN
6. Rush target : ORE
7. With 52-Across, something in a gray area : BORDERLINE
8. Himalayan production : PURR
9. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
10. Ayn Rand, e.g. : PEN NAME
11. Higher-up? : ELDER
12. Target : TAKE AIM AT
13. Every second : ALTERNATE
14. Jam : MESS
21. Product of some decay : BETA RAY
23. O's is one more than N's : AT NO
24. Comb composition : WAX
26. Like some pitches : SIDEARM
27. Orders : DICTA
28. Locals call it the "Big O" : OKEECHOBEE
30. Where spades may be laid down : SHED
31. End of a song often sung by inebriated people : SYNE
32. Shark's place : POOL TABLE
33. Polar Bear Provincial Park borders it : HUDSON BAY
37. Minestrone ingredient : ORZO
39. Repetitive : ITERANT
40. Bunch : GOB
44. Self-congratulatory cries : TADAS
46. Not just wolf down : SAVOR
47. "I'd love to help" : USE ME
48. Part of Che Guevara's attire : BERET
49. Junior in 12 Pro Bowls : SEAU
50. Highlander of old : INCA
51. Period sans soleil : NUIT
52. Magazine fig. : CIRC
55. Half of nine? : ENS
56. U.S.P.S. assignment : RTE


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive