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0501-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 May 14, Thursday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Brandon Hensley
THEME: Alien Abduction of Cattle … we have a rebus puzzle today, with a twist. Several squares contain the letters ET, and joining those squares together outlines a flying saucer. Under the flying saucer we have a square containing the letters COW, indicative of the cattle that have purportedly been abducted by aliens:
1A. With 6-Across, subject of an eerie rural legend ... illustrated by connecting nine identically filled squares in this puzzle with a closed line : ALIEN
6A. See 1-Across : ABDUCTION
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. With 6-Across, subject of an eerie rural legend ... illustrated by connecting nine identically filled squares in this puzzle with a closed line : ALIEN
6. See 1-Across : ABDUCTION
In some circles, it is suggested that individuals have been abducted by aliens, It has also been suggested that the phenomenon is linked to the mutilation of cattle, or that cattle have also been abducted.

15. Member of the chordophone family : VIOLA
Musical instruments that produce sounds through the vibration of strings can be described collectively as “chordophones”. Examples are violins, violas, guitars and pianos.

17. Whizzes : GENII
“Genii” is the plural of “genius”.

A “genius” is a person with exceptional intellect or talent. In Roman mythology a genius was something divine to be found in any person, place or thing. In particular, doors and gates each had their own genius that acted as a guardian spirit.

18. Far south? : ANTARCTIC
Lines of latitude are the imaginary horizontal lines surrounding the planet. The most "important" lines of latitude are, from north to south:
- Arctic Circle
- Tropic of Cancer
- Equator
- Tropic of Capricorn
- Antarctic Circle

19. Site of many hangings : CLOSET
In old French a “clos” was an enclosure, with the diminutive form “closet” describing a small enclosure or private room. Over time this evolved into our modern usage, to describe a cabinet or cupboard.

21. Some Spanish zoo exhibits : OSOS
In Spanish, "osa" is a female bear, and "oso" is a male.

22. Some glass paperweights : PRISMS
When light passes through a prism, it is split up (“disperses”) into differing wavelengths. It then becomes clear that white light is actually a mixture of different colors, which show up as beautiful spectra.

24. Tolkien's Prancing Pony, e.g. : INN
The Prancing Pony is an inn at the center of the village of Bree in Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings”.

J. R. R. (John Ronald Reuel) Tolkien was an English author, best known by far for his fantasy novels "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings". Although Tolkien lived in England and was a professor at Oxford, he served for many years as an external examiner at my old school, University College Dublin in Ireland.

27. Not believe in spirits? : TEETOTAL
Teetotalism is the practice of abstaining from alcohol. The teetotalism movement started in England in the 1800s.

32. Viscosity symbols : ETAS
A viscous liquid might be described as “thick”, and a more viscous liquid is thicker, less likely to flow.

36. Any of the Four Noble Truths : TENET
The central doctrine of the Buddhist tradition is known as the Four Noble Truths. Those four tenets are:
- There is suffering
- Suffering has a cause
- Suffering can cease
- There is a path out of suffering

39. Confident, ambitious, loyal sort, supposedly : LEO
Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 13 to August 23 are Leos.

40. Guillotine targets : TETES
"Tête" is the French word for "head".

The guillotine is a device for executing people by decapitating them. The guillotine is most associated with France where it was used most notably and extensively during the French Revolution. The guillotine was used as the standard method of execution in France right up until 1981 when capital punishment was finally abolished.

41. "Cómo" follower : ESTA
“Cómo estas?” is Spanish for “how are you?”

42. Purchase on delta.com, e.g. : E-TICKET
Delta was the world's largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta's roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

44. M.D. grp. : HMO
Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

51. Mother who appeared on two covers of Time : TERESA
Mother Teresa was born in 1910 in the city that is now called Skopje, the capital of Macedonia. At birth she was given the names Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu ("Gonxha" means "little flower" in Albanian). She left home at the age of 18 and joined the Sisters of Loreto, and headed to Loreto Abbey in Rathfarnham in Dublin, Ireland in order to learn English. Her goal was to teach in India, and English was the language used there for instruction by the nuns. After Mother Teresa passed away in 1997 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II, a step on the road to canonization. In order for her to be beatified there had to be documented evidence of a miracle that was performed due to her intercession. The miracle in question was the healing of a tumor in the abdomen of a woman due to the application of a locket containing a picture of Mother Teresa. Documentation of a second miracle is required for her to be declared a saint.

52. Former Saudi king : FAHD
King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud was the head of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia until he passed away in 2005. King Fahd was somewhat of a titular head of state since 1995 when he suffered a stroke. In his heyday, the king was fond of a luxurious lifestyle, especially when outside of the kingdom. His 482 ft yacht sported two swimming pools, a garden, a hospital with two operating rooms, and four Stinger missiles. His personal Boeing 747 aircraft even had its own fountain.

59. Ethyl acetate, e.g. : ESTER
Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol.

Ethyl acetate is an ester made by reacting ethanol with acetic acid. It is a common solvent found in things like nail polish removers and glues. As I recall from my long-gone days in a lab, ethyl acetate has a very nice fruity smell.

64. Currency worth about 1/36 of a dollar : RUBLE
The ruble (also “rouble”) is the unit of currency in Russia, as well as several other countries of the former Soviet Union. One ruble is divided into one hundred kopecks.

Down
5. Tool used with a hammer : NAIL SET
A nail set is a type of punch that is used to drive the head of a nail flush or below the surface of a piece of wood.

7. Intelligence researcher Alfred : BINET
The original Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale for scoring IQ tests was developed by French psychologist Alfred Binet and his student Theodore Simon. The scale was revised in 1916 by Lewis M. Terman, a psychologist at Stanford University, resulting in the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale.

8. Chemical restricted by the Stockholm Convention : DDT
DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don't forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book "Silent Spring", suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

13. Mayberry town drunk : OTIS
Otis Campbell is the town drunk on the sitcom “The Andy Griffith Show”, and was played by actor Hal Smith. The Campbell character was dropped in the late sixties as sponsors became concerned about being associated with heavy drinking.

14. Foreign policy grp. : NSC
The National Security Council (NSC) was created by President Harry S. Truman in 1947. The NSC is chaired by the sitting president and meets in the White House Situation Room.

20. Polynesian term for an island hopper : OMOO
Herman Melville mined his own experiences when writing his novels. Melville sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1841 on a whaler heading into the Pacific Ocean (a source for "Moby Dick"). Melville ended up deserting his ship 18 months later and lived with natives on a South Pacific Island for three weeks (a source for "Typee"). He picked up another whaler and headed for Hawaii, where he joined the crew of a US navy frigate that was bound for Boston (a source for "Omoo").

25. Wedding announcement word : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

26. Like Seattle vis-à-vis Phoenix : WETTER
The average annual rainfall in Seattle is 36.2 inches, and in Phoenix is 8.0 inches.

28. Baseball great who had a career batting 1-Down of .304 : OTT
(1D. Batting fig. : AVG)

At 5' 9", Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don't think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

30. Weakness : ANEMIA
The term “anemia” (or “anaemia” as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning "lack of blood". Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition.

34. "Mutiny on the Bounty" captain : BLIGH
William Bligh was a senior officer in the Royal Navy who was famously captain of the HMS Bounty when her crew mutinied. As I found out in my last trip back to Ireland, late in his life Bligh charted and mapped Dublin Bay and designed the important North Bull Wall that sits at the mouth of the River Liffey and entrance to Dublin Port.

Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote "Mutiny on the ‘Bounty'", based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the "Bounty Trilogy". The three books are:
1. "Mutiny on the 'Bounty'", the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
2. "Men Against the Sea", the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
3. "Pitcairn's Island", a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

35. Intl. trade org. : EEC
The European Economic Community (EEC) was also called "the Common Market". The EEC was a NAFTA-like structure that was eventually absorbed into today's European Union.

38. Charter ___, symbol on the Connecticut state quarter : OAK
The oak depicted on the Connecticut quarter is the Charter Oak. The tree earned its name from the legend that the original Royal Charter for the colony was hidden in a cavity of the tree for a while. The tree no longer exists, as it went down in a storm in the early 1800s.

42. Noted stratovolcano : ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. The third of the trio is Stromboli.

51. Goods stolen by the Knave of Hearts : TARTS
“The Queen of Hearts” is a poem that dates back to 1782. The poem starts out:
The Queen of Hearts
She made some tarts,
All on a summer's day;
The Knave of Hearts
He stole those tarts,
And took them clean away.

The King of Hearts
Called for the tarts,
And beat the knave full sore;
The Knave of Hearts
Brought back the tarts,
And vowed he'd steal no more.

52. "Lincoln" : FIVE
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe” or a “Lincoln”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

53. An integral can compute it : AREA
Remember doing calculus at school, and all those derivatives and integrals? Well, you probably also remember that an integral calculates the area under a curve (for example).

54. Munich mister : HERR
In Germany, a “Mr.” (Herr) is married to a “Mrs.” (Frau).

Munich is the capital of the German state of Bavaria, and is the third largest city in the country (after Berlin and Hamburg). The city is called “München” in German, a term that derives from the Old German word for “by the monks’ place”, which is a reference to the monks of the Benedictine order who founded the city in 1158.

56. Waistcoat item : FOB
A fob is attached to another object to make access to it easier. And so a key fob is a chain attached to a key so that it can be retrieved easily. There are also watch fobs, of course.

57. Rose in the music world : AXL
Axl Rose is the lead vocalist of the American rock band, Guns N' Roses.

Guns N' Roses is a hard rock band founded in 1985 that is still going strong. The group was pulled together by Axl Rose, the lead vocalist. The lead-guitar player back then was Tracii Guns, and it was the combination of Axl and Tracii's "family" names that led to the band being called Guns N' Roses.

58. Texas has a big one : TEE
The word “Texas” has a big “tee”, an uppercase letter T.

60. Not yet on the sked : TBA
Something not yet on the schedule (sked) is to be advised (TBA).

61. Loop takers : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

The historic commercial center of Chicago is known as the Loop. One theory is that the “loop” got its name from the cable loops in the city’s old cable car system.

62. Band with the 1991 hit "Shiny Happy People" : REM
R.E.M. was a rock band from Athens, Georgia formed in 1980. The name “R.E.M.” was chosen randomly from a dictionary, apparently.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. With 6-Across, subject of an eerie rural legend ... illustrated by connecting nine identically filled squares in this puzzle with a closed line : ALIEN
6. See 1-Across : ABDUCTION
15. Member of the chordophone family : VIOLA
16. Bisectors pass through them : MIDPOINTS
17. Whizzes : GENII
18. Far south? : ANTARCTIC
19. Site of many hangings : CLOSET
21. Some Spanish zoo exhibits : OSOS
22. Some glass paperweights : PRISMS
24. Tolkien's Prancing Pony, e.g. : INN
26. Texted, say : WROTE TO
27. Not believe in spirits? : TEETOTAL
32. Viscosity symbols : ETAS
33. Big, big, big : OBESE
36. Any of the Four Noble Truths : TENET
37. Join with : TIE TO
39. Confident, ambitious, loyal sort, supposedly : LEO
40. Guillotine targets : TETES
41. "Cómo" follower : ESTA
42. Purchase on delta.com, e.g. : E-TICKET
44. M.D. grp. : HMO
45. Raising a stink? : REEKING
47. Focus (on) : HOME IN
50. "I'd rather not" : NAH
51. Mother who appeared on two covers of Time : TERESA
52. Former Saudi king : FAHD
55. Some runners : COWARDS
56. One feeling warm on the inside? : FIRE EATER
59. Ethyl acetate, e.g. : ESTER
63. Push too far : OVEREXERT
64. Currency worth about 1/36 of a dollar : RUBLE
65. Clean-shaven : BEARDLESS
66. Fit : SPASM

Down
1. Batting fig. : AVG
2. Fiction : LIE
3. It's charged : ION
4. Call up : ELICIT
5. Tool used with a hammer : NAIL SET
6. Accumulate : AMASS
7. Intelligence researcher Alfred : BINET
8. Chemical restricted by the Stockholm Convention : DDT
9. ___ tree : UP A
10. Ornamental headpiece : CORONET
11. Nerves may cause them : TICS
12. Loving : INTO
13. Mayberry town drunk : OTIS
14. Foreign policy grp. : NSC
20. Polynesian term for an island hopper : OMOO
22. Some positive reinforcement : PRAISE
23. Flower-shaped decoration : ROSETTE
24. "No worries" : IT'S OK
25. Wedding announcement word : NEE
26. Like Seattle vis-à-vis Phoenix : WETTER
28. Baseball great who had a career batting 1-Down of .304 : OTT
29. Gets choppers : TEETHES
30. Weakness : ANEMIA
31. Pretends : LETS ON
34. "Mutiny on the Bounty" captain : BLIGH
35. Intl. trade org. : EEC
38. Charter ___, symbol on the Connecticut state quarter : OAK
42. Noted stratovolcano : ETNA
43. Heavens : ETHER
46. "Absolutely!" : INDEED!
48. They may be barked : ORDERS
49. Goof : MESS UP
51. Goods stolen by the Knave of Hearts : TARTS
52. "Lincoln" : FIVE
53. An integral can compute it : AREA
54. Munich mister : HERR
55. Reacts fearfully : COWERS
56. Waistcoat item : FOB
57. Rose in the music world : AXL
58. Texas has a big one : TEE
60. Not yet on the sked : TBA
61. Loop takers : ELS
62. Band with the 1991 hit "Shiny Happy People" : REM


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0430-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 14, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Mac vs. PC … today’s themed answers each contain either of the letter strings “MAC” or “PC”. Also, in each case, the MAC string crosses the PC string, sharing the letter C:
16A. Bada Bing!, on "The Sopranos" : STRIP CLUB
5D. Colorful parrots : MACAWS

21A. Loud kisses : SMACKS
10D. Movies, TV, hit songs, etc. : POP CULTURE

48A. Antiriot spray : MACE
28D. Hairpin, e.g. : SHARP CURVE

61A. Winning advantage : TRUMP CARD
44D. Poison ___ : SUMAC

37A. Epic battle in technology ... or a hint to four crossings in this puzzle : MAC VS PC
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Gate posting, for short : ETA
Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

14. Ketchup is one : SAUCE
The term “ketchup” may be of Chinese origin. One suggestion is that the name comes from “kôe-chiap”, meaning the brine of pickled fish. The name may also come from the Chinese “jyutping”, meaning “tomato sauce”.

15. Aimée of "La Dolce Vita" : ANOUK
Anouk Aimée is a French film actress. Aimée's most famous film outside of France is probably the internationally successful 1966 French hit "A Man and a Woman", in which she played the female lead.

The title of the celebrated 1960 Federico Fellini film "La Dolce Vita" translates from Italian as "The Good Life". There is a character in the film called Paparazzo who is a news photographer. It is this character who gives us our word "Paparazzi", a term used for photographers who make careers out of taking candid shots of celebrities.

16. Bada Bing!, on "The Sopranos" : STRIP CLUB
The Bada Bing! was a strip club owned by the mob in the HBO show “The Sopranos”. The “real” Bada Bing!, the club used for the location shoots, is the Satin Dolls go-go bar in Lodi, New Jersey.

20. Puzzlers' direction: Abbr. : ACR
Across (acr.)

22. Sitcom set at a Vermont inn : NEWHART
“Newhart” is a very entertaining sitcom starring Bob Newhart and Mary Frann as innkeepers in rural Vermont. The show is remembered by many for its last episode, which aired in 1990. In that final episode, Bob Newhart wakes up in bed and suggests that the whole of the show’s eight-year run was just a dream. He is lying beside actress Suzanne Pleshette who played his wife in the earlier sitcom “The Bob Newhart Show”. Very, very clever …

29. Like Ogden Nash's verse : DROLL
The poet Ogden Nash is well known for his light and humorous verse. Try this one for size:
The one-L lama,
He's a priest.
The two-L llama,
He's a beast.
And I would bet
A silk pajama
There isn't any
Three-L lllama.

31. Milo of "Ulysses" : O'SHEA
Milo O'Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from "Romeo and Juliet" to "The West Wing". Sadly, O’Shea passed away in 2013 in New York City.

Regular readers will know that I am unashamedly supportive of my native Irish culture, but I have to tell you that I can't handle the works of James Joyce. I have spent many a fine day traipsing around Ireland learning about his life, but I have yet to appreciate one of his books. To me, his life is more absorbing than his writing. Having said that, "Ulysses" is an interesting novel in that it chronicles just one ordinary day in the life of a Dubliner named Leopold Bloom. There's a huge celebration of "Ulysses" in Dublin every year on June 16th, called Bloomsday. The festivities vary from readings and performances of the storyline, to good old pub crawls. “Ulysses” was made into a film of the same name in 1967 starring Milo O’Shea.

32. Player of the hot-tempered Corleone : CAAN
James Caan is an actor from the Bronx in New York City. Caan is noted for his appearances in some very big movies such as “The Godfather”, “Misery”, “A Bridge Too Far”, “Rollerball” and more recently “Elf”. Caan is quite the sportsman. He plays golf with an 8 handicap, and is a 6-Dan Black Belt Master of Gosoku Karate.

Mario Puzo created Corleone Mafia family in his 1969 novel "The Godfather". The head of the family is Vito Corleone (whose birth name was Vito Andolini), a native of Corleone in Sicily. He was given the name Corleone by immigration officers at Ellis Island.

36. Peeples of "Fame" : NIA
Actress Nia Peeples played the character Nicole Chapman in the TV series "Fame".

40. G.I. morale booster : USO
The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of FDR "to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces". A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

41. Locale for a hammer : EAR
The middle ear is the portion of the ear immediately behind the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called the ossicles, the three smallest bones in the human body. The ossicles' job is to transmit sound from the outer ear to the inner ear. The shape of the bones gives rise to their common names: the hammer, anvil and stirrup.

45. "Going Rogue" author : PALIN
When John McCain selected Sarah Palin as candidate for Vice President in the 2008 presidential election, she became the first Alaskan to go on the national ticket for a major party. She also became the first woman nominated for Vice President by the Republicans.

47. Like Muddy Waters's music : BLUESY
Muddy Waters was a musician from Mississippi who was nicknamed the “father of modern Chicago blues”.

48. Antiriot spray : MACE
“Mace” is actually a brand name, originally introduced by Lake Erie Chemical when they started to manufacture "Chemical Mace", with the name being a play on the club-like weapon from days of old. Mace was originally a form of tear gas, but Mace today uses a formula that is actually a pepper spray.

53. Online music source : ITUNES
iTunes is a very, very successful software application from Apple. It's basically a media player that works on platforms like the iPad, iPhone and iPod. Of course it connects seamlessly to the iTunes Store, where you can spend all kinds of money.

55. "The signature of civilizations," per Beverly Sills : ART
Beverly Sills was an operatic soprano from Brooklyn, New York. Sills retired from singing in 1980 to become the general manager of the New York City Opera. She later became Chairman of the Lincoln Center and the Metropolitan opera.

56. Dark purple fruit : ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

60. "Two Women" star, 1960 : LOREN
(64A. Award for 60-Across for her role in "Two Women" : OSCAR)
Sophia Loren certainly has earned her exalted position in the world of movies. In 1962 Loren won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film "Two Women", the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. She received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in "Marriage Italian-Style", another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

63. Singer who's the subject of Carl Perkins's "The Whole World Misses You" : ELVIS
“"The Whole World Misses You (We Miss You Elvis)” is a song about Elvis Presley that was recorded by Carl Perkins.

Carl Perkins was a rockabilly singer who was so influential in the genre that he was known as the King of Rockabilly. Perkins’ most famous recording was “Blue Suede Shoes” in 1955, which was famously covered by Elvis Presley the following year.

65. Flying Cloud of autodom : REO
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom E. Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

Down
2. Palindromic man's name : OTTO
The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:
- Able was I ere I saw Elba
- A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
- Madam, I'm Adam
One of my favorite words is "Aibohphobia", although it doesn't appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. "Aibohphobia" is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix "-phobia".

3. "Fierce working-class domestic goddess" of a sitcom : BARR
The comedienne Roseanne Barr is perhaps best known as the star of her own sitcom called “Roseanne” in which she played the character Roseanne Conner. In 2012 Barr unsuccessfully vied for the Green Party’s nomination for US President. She didn’t give up though, and was successful in winning the nomination of the Peace and Freedom Party. In the 2012 presidential election she earned over 60,000 votes, and placed sixth in the list of candidates.

4. AOL, for many : ISP
Internet service provider (ISP)

5. Colorful parrots : MACAWS
Macaws are beautifully colored birds of native to Central and South America, and are actually a type of parrot. Most species of macaw are now endangered, with several having become extinct in recent decades. The main threats are deforestation and illegal trapping and trafficking of exotic birds.

7. Honda line : ACURA
Acura is a division of the Honda Motor Company, and is Honda's luxury brand. Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

8. Ball belle : DEB
Deb is short for "debutante", which translates from French as "female beginner".

11. Lira spenders : TURKS
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

12. Wee bit : SKOSH
"Skosh" is a slang term meaning "a little bit", originally military slang that came out of the Korean War. "Skosh" derives from the Japanese word "sukoshi" which translates as "few, little, some".

23. Fabergé coating : ENAMEL
Fabergé eggs are beautiful jeweled eggs made by the House of Fabergé from 1885 to 1917. The tradition of fabricating the eggs started when Tsar Alexander III commissioned Fabergé to create a jeweled egg for his wife in 1885. After this, the House of Fabergé produced more and more elaborate designs, year after year.

24. Nutritional figs. : RDAS
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs)

27. Home to most 11-Down : ASIA
Turkey is a country that straddles the border between the continents of Europe and Asia. Even though most of Turkey lies geographically in Asia, in recent decades the country has been strengthening its ties with its European neighbors. Turkey is a member of NATO and is well on the way to becoming a member of the European Union.

32. Rx-dispensing chain : CVS
The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for Consumer Value Stores, although these days the company uses the acronym to denote Convenience, Value and Service.

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol "Rx" that's used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter's blessing to help a patient recover.

38. Seed covers : ARILS
The casing surrounding many seeds is called the aril, and it may be quite fleshy. This fruit-like characteristic makes it desirable as a food and aids in the dispersion of the seeds.

44. Poison ___ : SUMAC
Sumacs are a group of flowering shrubs and small trees that includes Poison oak, Poison ivy and Poison sumac. Nasty stuff!

46. Post-Trojan War epic : AENEID
"The Aeneid" is Virgil's epic poem that tells of the journey of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy to become the ancestor of all Romans. “The Aeneid” begins with the words “Arma virumque cano …”, which translates as “I sing of arms and of a man …”

47. Superhero ally of Commissioner Gordon : BATMAN
Batman and Robin are unique among their superhero compatriots in that they have no special powers, just a whole load of cool gadgets.

48. Marathon markers : MILES
The marathon is run over 26 miles and 385 yards, and of course commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens. The actual distance run today was decided in 1921, and matches the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway.

49. Coral ring : ATOLL
An atoll is a coral island that is shaped in a ring and enclosing a lagoon. There is still some debate as to how an atoll forms, but a theory proposed by Charles Darwin while on his famous voyage aboard HMS Beagle still holds sway. Basically an atoll was once a volcanic island that had subsided and fallen into the sea. The coastline of the island is home to coral growth which persists even as the island continues to subside internal to the circling coral reef.

51. Break down, in a way : PARSE
The verb "to parse" means "to state the parts of speech in a sentence". "Parse" comes from the Latin word "pars" meaning "part".

52. ___ Wayne, a.k.a. 47-Down : BRUCE
Bruce Wayne is the secret identity of Batman in the comic series created by DC Comics. The first name of Bruce was chosen as a homage to the Scottish king and heroic figure, Robert the Bruce. The family name was a nod to "Mad Anthony" Wayne, the US Army general and statesman who rose to prominence in the Revolutionary War.

54. U.S.N.A. grad: Abbr. : ENS
Ensign (ens.)

The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is located in Annapolis, Maryland. The USNA was founded in 1845 and educates officers for both the US Navy and the US Marine Corps. The motto of the USNA is “Ex Scientia Tridens”, which translates as “From Knowledge, Sea Power”.

57. Be a nag : CARP
The word "carp" used to mean simply "talk" back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian "karpa" meaning "to brag". A century later the Latin word "carpere" meaning "to slander" influenced the use of "carp" so that it came to mean "find fault with".

59. Heathen's figurine : IDOL
Our term “heathen” comes from an Old English word meaning “neither Christian nor Jewish”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Unruly bunch : MOB
4. [Grr-r-r] : I’M MAD!
9. Pulls (out) : OPTS
13. Gate posting, for short : ETA
14. Ketchup is one : SAUCE
15. Aimée of "La Dolce Vita" : ANOUK
16. Bada Bing!, on "The Sopranos" : STRIP CLUB
18. Copy, for short : REPRO
19. Part of a car alarm, maybe : HORN
20. Puzzlers' direction: Abbr. : ACR
21. Loud kisses : SMACKS
22. Sitcom set at a Vermont inn : NEWHART
25. Like a well-kept lawn : LUSH
26. Ewers' mates : BASINS
29. Like Ogden Nash's verse : DROLL
31. Milo of "Ulysses" : O'SHEA
32. Player of the hot-tempered Corleone : CAAN
33. Rubber ducky's spot : TUB
36. Peeples of "Fame" : NIA
37. Epic battle in technology ... or a hint to four crossings in this puzzle : MAC VS PC
40. G.I. morale booster : USO
41. Locale for a hammer : EAR
42. "-zoic" periods : ERAS
43. Comparable to a beet? : AS RED
45. "Going Rogue" author : PALIN
47. Like Muddy Waters's music : BLUESY
48. Antiriot spray : MACE
50. Stick in a purse, maybe : LIP BALM
53. Online music source : ITUNES
55. "The signature of civilizations," per Beverly Sills : ART
56. Dark purple fruit : ACAI
60. "Two Women" star, 1960 : LOREN
61. Winning advantage : TRUMP CARD
63. Singer who's the subject of Carl Perkins's "The Whole World Misses You" : ELVIS
64. Award for 60-Across for her role in "Two Women" : OSCAR
65. Flying Cloud of autodom : REO
66. Large item in Santa's bag, maybe : SLED
67. Pint-size : TEENY
68. Close one : PAL

Down
1. Fit nicely : MESH
2. Palindromic man's name : OTTO
3. "Fierce working-class domestic goddess" of a sitcom : BARR
4. AOL, for many : ISP
5. Colorful parrots : MACAWS
6. Garden ground cover : MULCH
7. Honda line : ACURA
8. Ball belle : DEB
9. Early tie score : ONE-ALL
10. Movies, TV, hit songs, etc. : POP CULTURE
11. Lira spenders : TURKS
12. Wee bit : SKOSH
15. Escort's offer : ARM
17. Belly button type : INNIE
21. Subway handful : STRAP
23. Fabergé coating : ENAMEL
24. Nutritional figs. : RDAS
26. Doggie bag item : BONE
27. Home to most 11-Down : ASIA
28. Hairpin, e.g. : SHARP CURVE
30. At the ready : ON CALL
32. Rx-dispensing chain : CVS
34. Draws upon : USES
35. Soul mate? : BODY
38. Seed covers : ARILS
39. "Ple-e-ease?" : CAN I?
44. Poison ___ : SUMAC
46. Post-Trojan War epic : AENEID
47. Superhero ally of Commissioner Gordon : BATMAN
48. Marathon markers : MILES
49. Coral ring : ATOLL
51. Break down, in a way : PARSE
52. ___ Wayne, a.k.a. 47-Down : BRUCE
54. U.S.N.A. grad: Abbr. : ENS
57. Be a nag : CARP
58. Field : AREA
59. Heathen's figurine : IDOL
61. Rug rat : TOT
62. Be nosy : PRY


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0429-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 14, Tuesday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jules P. Markey
THEME: Newspaper Columns … today’s themed answers all in the down direction i.e. they are in COLUMNS. Also, each answer starts with the name of a newspaper, making the answers NEWSPAPER COLUMNS:
3D. Multiplication aid : TIMES TABLE CHART (a “Times” column)
7D. Mail holders : POST OFFICE BOXES (a “Post” column)
9D. Ardent beachgoer : SUN WORSHIPER (a “Sun” column)
21D. Basketball showman : GLOBETROTTER (a “Globe” column)

11D. Place to express an opinion ... or a literal description of 3-, 7-, 9- and 21-Down? : NEWSPAPER COLUMN
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 35s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Cocoon contents : PUPA
The pupa is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are: embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

14. Man's Brest friend? : AMIE
A male friend in France is "un ami", and a female friend is "une amie".

Brest is a port city in northwest France, and is the second largest military port in the country. Brest was an important base for German U-boats during WWII when France was occupied by the Nazis. Brest is the most westerly city in the whole country.

16. In ___ (unborn) : UTERO
"In utero" is a Latin term meaning "in the uterus". The Latin "uterus" translates as both "womb" and "belly". The Latin word was derived from the Greek "hystera" also meaning womb, which gives us the words "hysterectomy", and "hysterical".

17. Agatha Christie title : DAME
Not only did Agatha Christie write a fabulous collection of murder-mystery stories, she also wrote romances, but under the pen name Mary Westmacott. I’ve read almost all of Christie's 66 detective novels, but I must admit, not one of her romance novels.

18. "Parade ___!" : REST
The military parade command “Parade Rest!” is similar to the command “Stand at Ease!” The only difference is that when given the “Stand at Ease!” command a soldier must turn the head to look at whoever is addressing him or her.

23. Trash : DIS
“Dis” is a slang term meaning “insult” that originated in the eighties, and is a shortened form of "disrespect” or "dismiss".

24. 2014 TV retiree : LENO
Jay Leno was born James Leno in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson college and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website: www.jaylenosgarage.com.

26. ___ Ski Valley, N.M. : TAOS
Taos Ski Valley is a resort village in New Mexico, founded in 1955. About twelve families live there, making up thirty or so households and a population of about 60 people. It is said to very much resemble a Swiss village, and even includes an elected village council.

28. Jamie of old TV : FARR
Actor Jamie Farr is best known for playing the cross-dressing Max Klinger in the sitcom ”M*A*S*H”. Although Farr landed a role in the 1955 movie “Blackboard Jungle”, his career didn’t really take off until he started appearing regularly on “The Red Skelton Show”. Years later he managed to get a one-episode appearance in ”M*A*S*H”, and his character and performance was received so well that he became a regular on the show. Farr actually did serve in the US Army in Korea, although it was after hostilities had ended. The dog tags that Farr wore when filming ”M*A*S*H” were the one's he actually wore while serving in the military.

30. ___ carte : A LA
On a restaurant menu, items that are "à la carte" are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked "table d'hôte" (also called "prix fixe") is a fixed-price menu with limited choice.

33. Brand in a bathroom cabinet : ORAL-B
The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first "model" was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

36. Wrinkly-faced dog : PUG
The pug is a breed of dog of Chinese origin. Our current family pet is a boxer/pug cross, a good-looking mutt!

37. Russian money : RUBLE
The ruble (also “rouble”) is the unit of currency in Russia, as well as several other countries of the former Soviet Union. One ruble is divided into one hundred kopecks.

38. Fell for an April fool, say : BIT
OK, I’ll bite …

April Fool's Day is celebrated on April 1st in the western world. In the US (and Ireland) one can make practical jokes all day long if one wants. But in the UK there is a noon deadline. Anyone pranking after midday is called an "April Fool".

39. Prefix with glyphic : HIERO-
Hieroglyphs are pictorial symbols used in some writing systems.

41. Unagi, in sushi : EEL
Unagi is the Japanese word for freshwater eel, and unadon is the Japanese word for "eel bowl". Unadon is actually a contraction of "unagi no kabayaki" (grilled eel) and "donburi" (rice bowl dish).

47. Indonesia joined it in 1962 ... and left in 2008 : OPEC
OPEC was created in 1960, with Indonesia joining the organization in 1962. Indonesia left OPEC in 2008 as the country was no longer able to meet the assigned production quota and had actually become a net importer of oil.

48. Be too sweet : CLOY
“To cloy” is to cause distaste by oversupplying something that would otherwise be pleasant, especially something with a sweet taste.

50. Auger : BORE
An auger is a drill, a boring tool.

52. Mexican mama bear : OSA
In Spanish, "osa" is a female bear, and "oso" is a male.

55. Drum kit part : HI-HAT
In a drum kit, a hi-hat is that pairing of cymbals that sits on a stand and is played by using a foot pedal. The top cymbal is raised and lowered by the foot, hence creating a crashing sound.

60. Rink jump : AXEL
An Axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. It was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

64. Word said just before opening the eyes : AMEN
The word “amen” is translated as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

65. Nitroglycerin, e.g. : ESTER
Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol.

Nitroglycerin (also known as “nitro”) is a very unstable, oily, colorless liquid. It is usually used as the explosive ingredient in a stabilized product like dynamite or cordite. Nitroglycerin is also used medically, as a vasodilator. Right after it hits the bloodstream is causes the blood vessels to dilate to that the heart has less work to do. I had occasion to take it a couple of times, and boy, what a speedy and fundamental effect it has.

66. In ___ (actually) : ESSE
The Latin term "in esse" is used to mean "actually existing", and translates as "in being".

Down
1. Feeling "been there, done that," say : JADED
Our term “jaded”, meaning tired and feeling a little “ho-hum”, comes from the noun “jade” which in the 14th century was an old, worn-out horse.

2. One of the five basic tastes : UMAMI
Umami is one of the five basic tastes, along with sweet, sour, bitter and salty. “Umami” is a Japanese word used to describe "a pleasant savory taste”. Umami was proposed as a basic taste in 1908, but it wasn’t until 1985 that the scientific community finally accepted it as such.

6. Phila. school : UPENN
The University of Pennsylvania (Penn or UPenn) was founded in 1740 by by Benjamin Franklin. Penn was the first school in the country to offer both graduate and undergraduate courses.

8. Sources of formic acid : ANTS
Most nettle species have stinging hairs that secrete formic acid. This formic acid is the same chemical that is found in the venom injected with a bee or ant sting. The Latin word for ant is "formica" and gives its name to the acid.

12. Part of Q.E.D. : ERAT
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin "quod erat demonstrandum" meaning "that which was to be demonstrated".

21. Basketball showman : GLOBETROTTER
The Harlem Globetrotter exhibition basketball team was founded in 1927 in Chicago, where the original players grew up and went to high school. The team had moved to Harlem, New York by 1929 as Harlem was regarded as the hub of African-American culture at that time.

29. Prado works : ARTE
The Museo del Prado is in Madrid, the capital of Spain, and has one of the finest art collections in the world. The gallery's most famous work is "Las Meninas" By Velazquez.

33. Cookie that's kosher : OREO
The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

35. Share a border : ABUT
"Abut" comes from the Old French word "abouter" meaning "join end to end".

49. Hope in Hollywood : LANGE
The actress Hope Lange is probably best known for playing Selena Cross in the 1957 film “Peyton Place”, a role for which she was Oscar-nominated. Lange also played Mrs. Muir in the TV show “The Ghost & Mrs. Muir” that aired from 1968 to 1970.

56. Composer Charles : IVES
Charles Ives was one of the great classical composers, probably the first American to be so recognized. Sadly, his work largely went unsung (pun intended!) during his lifetime, and was really only accepted into the performed repertoire after his death in 1954.

57. ___ Verde Islands : CAPE
The Republic of Cape Verde is an island nation in the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Africa. The country takes its name from Cap-Vert, a peninsula in Senegal and the most westerly point on the continent. Cape Verde was an uninhabited group of islands when it was colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th century.

58. Palm fruit : ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sticks (out) : JUTS
5. Cocoon contents : PUPA
9. More balanced : SANER
14. Man's Brest friend? : AMIE
15. Atop : UPON
16. In ___ (unborn) : UTERO
17. Agatha Christie title : DAME
18. "Parade ___!" : REST
19. Inexperienced in : NEW AT
20. Ones coming into view : EMERGENTS
22. Trash : WASTE
23. Trash : DIS
24. 2014 TV retiree : LENO
25. Splendor : POMP
26. ___ Ski Valley, N.M. : TAOS
28. Jamie of old TV : FARR
30. ___ carte : A LA
33. Brand in a bathroom cabinet : ORAL-B
35. Big dos : AFROS
36. Wrinkly-faced dog : PUG
37. Russian money : RUBLE
38. Fell for an April fool, say : BIT
39. Prefix with glyphic : HIERO-
41. Unagi, in sushi : EEL
42. Stay in the fight? : TRUCE
44. Kind of verb: Abbr. : IRREG
45. Suffix with verb- : OSE
46. Miles per hour, e.g. : RATE
47. Indonesia joined it in 1962 ... and left in 2008 : OPEC
48. Be too sweet : CLOY
50. Auger : BORE
52. Mexican mama bear : OSA
55. Drum kit part : HI-HAT
57. Some work clothes : COVERALLS
59. Before: Fr. : AVANT
60. Rink jump : AXEL
61. Sticks in the rec room : CUES
62. Brink : VERGE
63. Writes indelibly : PENS
64. Word said just before opening the eyes : AMEN
65. Nitroglycerin, e.g. : ESTER
66. In ___ (actually) : ESSE
67. Writes indelibly : INKS

Down
1. Feeling "been there, done that," say : JADED
2. One of the five basic tastes : UMAMI
3. Multiplication aid : TIMES TABLE CHART
4. Reader of tea leaves, e.g. : SEER
5. Makes smoothies, e.g. : PUREES
6. Phila. school : UPENN
7. Mail holders : POST OFFICE BOXES
8. Sources of formic acid : ANTS
9. Ardent beachgoer : SUN WORSHIPER
10. Elite group : A-TEAM
11. Place to express an opinion ... or a literal description of 3-, 7-, 9- and 21-Down? : NEWSPAPER COLUMN
12. Part of Q.E.D. : ERAT
13. Memorization : ROTE
21. Basketball showman : GLOBETROTTER
25. See 27-Down : PRO
27. With 25-Down, football star : ALL
29. Prado works : ARTE
31. Tackle item : LURE
32. On the edge of one's seat : AGOG
33. Cookie that's kosher : OREO
34. Laments : RUES
35. Share a border : ABUT
40. Wrath : IRE
43. Beam : RAY
47. Ominous end of a threat : OR ELSE!
49. Hope in Hollywood : LANGE
51. Places to put one's dough : OVENS
53. Aerodynamic : SLEEK
54. Federations: Abbr. : ASSNS
55. Eat : HAVE
56. Composer Charles : IVES
57. ___ Verde Islands : CAPE
58. Palm fruit : ACAI


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0428-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 14, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jim Modney
THEME: Body Doubles … today’s themed answers are well-known phrases, in Spanish and English, that twice mention a part of the body:
17A. Direct, as competition : HEAD-TO-HEAD
25A. 17-Across, literally: Fr. : TETE-A-TETE
48A. 58-Across, literally: Sp. : MANO A MANO
58A. Direct, as combat : HAND-TO-HAND

35A. Star stand-ins ... or a hint to 17-, 25, 48- and 58-Across? : BODY DOUBLES
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 4m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Protein-rich food : TOFU
Tofu is another name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that ... bean that has "curdled". Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it ...

5. Brand of instant coffee : SANKA
The first successful process for removing caffeine from coffee involved steaming the beans in salt water, and then extracting the caffeine using benzene (a potent carcinogen) as a solvent. Coffee processed this way was sold as Sanka here in the US. There are other processes used these days, and let's hope they are safer ...

10. Titles for attorneys: Abbr. : ESQS
The title "esquire" is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, "esquire" is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

15. ___ terrier (dog breed) : CAIRN
The Cairn Terrier breed of dog originated in the Highlands of Scotland. The breed is named for the original task given to the dog,rooting out rats and other rodents from man-made piles of stones called cairns.

19. Bankrupt : RUIN
Our word “bankruptcy” comes from the Italian “banca rotta”, which translates as “broken bench”. This etymology may stem from the practice of breaking the bench or counter of moneychanger’s place of business in order to signify insolvency.

21. "___ Your Enthusiasm" : CURB
“Curb Your Enthusiasm” is an improv comedy show aired by HBO that was created and stars Larry David, the creator of “Seinfeld”. As an aside, Larry David sat a few feet from me at the next table in a Los Angeles restaurant not so long ago. I have such a huge claim to fame …

25. 17-Across, literally: Fr. : TETE-A-TETE
A “tête-à-tête” is a one-on-one meeting, literally “head-to-head” in French.

28. Co. bigwig : CEO
Chief executive officer (CEO)

31. Italian ice cream : GELATO
Gelato is the Italian version of American ice cream, differing in that it has a lower butterfat content than its US counterpart.

34. Sneakers since 1916 : KEDS
Keds is a brand name of athletic shoe first introduced in 1916 by US Rubber. The shoe was originally marketed as a rubber-soled, canvas-topped sneaker.

38. ___ .45 : COLT
The Colt Single Action Army is a revolver that is better known as the “Colt .45”. It was the standard military service revolver for the US Army from 1873 to 1892. The Colt .45 is also known as the “Gun that Won the West”.

40. Sleek fabric : SATEEN
Sateen is a cotton fabric, with a weave that is "four over, one under" meaning that most of the threads come to the surface giving it a softer feel.

45. Wide mouth : MAW
“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

48. 58-Across, literally: Sp. : MANO A MANO
“Mano a mano” is Spanish for “hand-to-hand”, and is used to mean “face-to-face”.

51. Japanese cartoon art : ANIME
Anime is cartoon animation in the style of Japanese Manga comic books.

The Japanese word "manga" means "whimsical pictures" and is an apt term to describe the Japanese style of comic book. Manga publications are more diverse than American comic books and have a larger audience. Manga cover many subjects including romance, sports, business, horror, and mystery.

53. Roush of the Baseball Hall of Fame : EDD
Edd Roush was a big hitter who played Major League Baseball, starting in 1913 for the Chicago White Sox. He jumped ship to the Federal League in 1914, a league set up to compete with the already well-established National and American Leagues. The upstart league only lasted a couple of seasons. When Edd Roush passed away in 1988 at the age of 94, he was the last surviving player from the short-lived Federal League.

54. "Avatar" race : NA’VI
In the James Cameron epic “Avatar”, the “blue people” are the Na’vi, the indigenous species that lives on the lush moon called Pandora. The main Na’vi character featuring in the film is the female Neytiri. According to Cameron, Neytiri was inspired by the Raquel Welch character in the movie “Fantastic Voyage” and the comic book character Vampirella.

55. Filched : STOLEN
“Filch” is a slang term for “steal”.

56. Crosby, Stills, ___ & Young : NASH
Graham Nash is a singer-songwriter from England. Nash is famous as one of the founders of the Hollies, and as a member of the supergroup Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

The supergroup Crosby, Stills & Nash (CSN) is made up of David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. The band can grow to "CSNY" when the trio is joined by Neil Young. Fans have been known to call the act “C, S, N and sometimes Y”, a play on the expression that names all the vowels, "A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y".

60. Redding of R&B : OTIS
Otis Redding is often referred to as the "King of Soul", and what a voice he had. Like so many of the greats in the world of popular music it seems, Redding was killed in a plane crash, in 1967 when he was just 26 years old. Just three days earlier he had recorded what was to be his biggest hit, "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay".

61. Winter pear : ANJOU
The Anjou pear is a cultivar of the European Pear. The Anjou pear is thought to have originated in Belgium or France (Anjou is a province in the Loire Valley of western France).

62. Memorial Day race, informally : INDY
The first Indy 500 race was held on Memorial Day in 1911. The winner that day was one Ray Harroun. Harroun had seen someone using a rear view mirror on a horse-drawn vehicle, and decided to fit one on his Marmon "Wasp" motor car. Supposedly that was the first ever use of a rear view mirror on a motor vehicle.

Down
1. Polynesian paradise : TAHITI
Captain Cook landed in Tahiti in 1769, although he wasn't the first European to do so. But Cook's visit to Tahiti was the most significant in that it heralded a whole spate of European visitors, who brought with them prostitution, venereal disease and alcohol. Paradoxically, they also brought Christianity. Included among the subsequent visitors was the famous HMS Bounty under the charge of Captain Bligh.

5. Many a person whose name starts "Mc-" : SCOT
The prefixes “Mc-” and “Mac-” found in Scottish and Irish names can be translated as “son of”.

8. "Sauer" hot dog topping : KRAUT
"Sauerkraut" translates from German as "sour herb" or "sour cabbage". During WWI, sauerkraut producers changes its name in order to distance their product from the "enemy". They called it "Liberty cabbage".

9. Newswoman Mitchell : ANDREA
Andrea Mitchell is a TV journalist who works for NBC News. Mitchell is married to former Federal Reserve Chairman alan Greenspan.

29. English cathedral town : ELY
Ely Cathedral is a famous and beautiful church in the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire. There is a Gothic door on the north face of the cathedral that was designed by Sir Christopher Wren, the man famous as the architect of St. Paul's Cathedral in London. Christopher Wren had a personal link to the church, as his uncle was the Bishop of Ely.

32. "Ode ___ Nightingale" : TO A
“Ode to a Nightingale” was one of the so-called “1819 Odes” written by the poet John Keats, a collection that included famous poems such as “Ode on Melancholy”, "Ode on Grecian Urn” and “Ode to Psyche”.

37. In a smooth, flowing manner, in music : LEGATO
Legato is a musical direction, signifying that long and continuous notes should be played very smoothly. The opposite of legato is staccato, notes played in a disconnected form.

45. Certain Pepperidge Farm cookie : MILANO
Before the Milano, Pepperidge Farm produced what they called the Naples cookie, a vanilla wafer with chocolate on top. But, this lovely morsel had problems when stored or transported in a warm environment as the cookies stuck to each other, The solution was to put the filling between two wafers, and the Milano cookie was born.

47. Hamburger chain that offers the Baconator : WENDY’S
Famously, the Wendy’s chain of fast food restaurants was founded by Dave Thomas, in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. Dave named his establishment after his fourth child: Melina Lou “Wendy” Thomas.

49. ___-garde : AVANT
People described as being avant-garde are especially innovative. "Avant-garde" is French for “advance guard”.

50. Masked Japanese fighter : NINJA
The ninjas were around in Japan at the time of the samurai, but were a very different type of warrior. The ninjas were covert operatives, specializing in the use of stealth to accomplish their missions. As they were a secretive cadre they took on a mystical reputation with the public, who believed they had the ability to become invisible or perhaps walk on water.

57. F.D.R.'s successor : HST
The initial “S” in the middle of the name Harry S. Truman (HST) doesn’t stand for anything. The future-president was named “Harry” in honor of his mother’s brother Harrison “Harry” Young. The initial “S” was chosen in honor of young Harry’s two grandfathers: Anderson S-hipp Truman and S-olomon Young.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) was the only child of Sara Delano and James Roosevelt Sr. The Delano family history in America goes back to the pilgrim Philippe de Lannoy, an immigrant of Flemish descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. The family name "de Lannoy" was anglicized here in the US, to "Delano".

59. "___ we now our gay apparel" : DON
The music for “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “tra-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Protein-rich food : TOFU
5. Brand of instant coffee : SANKA
10. Titles for attorneys: Abbr. : ESQS
14. Mimicked : APED
15. ___ terrier (dog breed) : CAIRN
16. Here: Sp. : A QUI
17. Direct, as competition : HEAD-TO-HEAD
19. Bankrupt : RUIN
20. Newspaper advertising flier, e.g. : INSERT
21. "___ Your Enthusiasm" : CURB
23. Snakelike fish : EEL
24. Four: Prefix : TETRA-
25. 17-Across, literally: Fr. : TETE-A-TETE
27. Driver's licenses and such, for short : IDS
28. Co. bigwig : CEO
30. Flabbergasts : AMAZES
31. Italian ice cream : GELATO
34. Sneakers since 1916 : KEDS
35. Star stand-ins ... or a hint to 17-, 25, 48- and 58-Across? : BODY DOUBLES
38. ___ .45 : COLT
40. Sleek fabric : SATEEN
41. Combination punch : ONE-TWO
44. M.A. or M.B.A.: Abbr. : DEG
45. Wide mouth : MAW
48. 58-Across, literally: Sp. : MANO A MANO
51. Japanese cartoon art : ANIME
53. Roush of the Baseball Hall of Fame : EDD
54. "Avatar" race : NA’VI
55. Filched : STOLEN
56. Crosby, Stills, ___ & Young : NASH
58. Direct, as combat : HAND-TO-HAND
60. Redding of R&B : OTIS
61. Winter pear : ANJOU
62. Memorial Day race, informally : INDY
63. Traveled : WENT
64. What a witness takes at a trial : STAND
65. Hurl : TOSS

Down
1. Polynesian paradise : TAHITI
2. Made the first bid : OPENED
3. Eats grandly : FEASTS
4. What a milking machine connects to : UDDER
5. Many a person whose name starts "Mc-" : SCOT
6. Reaction to a cold drink on a hot day : AAH!
7. Aunt's girl : NIECE
8. "Sauer" hot dog topping : KRAUT
9. Newswoman Mitchell : ANDREA
10. ___-piercing : EAR
11. Hugs tightly : SQUEEZES
12. Shushed : QUIETED
13. Immaculate : SINLESS
18. Followed back to its source, as a phone call : TRACED
22. Collision sound : BAM!
25. Ones with warts and all? : TOADS
26. No longer available : TAKEN
29. English cathedral town : ELY
31. Reached : GOT TO
32. "Ode ___ Nightingale" : TO A
33. Best in competition : OUTDO
35. Is inconspicuous, say : BLENDS IN
36. Honey maker : BEE
37. In a smooth, flowing manner, in music : LEGATO
38. "Don't be absurd!" : COME NOW!
39. Out with one's sweetie : ON A DATE
42. Pale : WAN
43. Plains Indians : OMAHAS
45. Certain Pepperidge Farm cookie : MILANO
46. Changes, as the Constitution : AMENDS
47. Hamburger chain that offers the Baconator : WENDY’S
49. ___-garde : AVANT
50. Masked Japanese fighter : NINJA
52. Perfect, as a pitcher's game : NO-HIT
55. Hunky guy : STUD
57. F.D.R.'s successor : HST
59. "___ we now our gay apparel" : DON


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0427-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Apr 14, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Lampkin
THEME: Predictable Partings … each of today’s themed answers is how a member of a certain profession might make his or her parting, in a “punny” sort of way, giving us a well-known phrase:
23A. The paparazzo ... : WAS GONE IN A FLASH
35A. The demolitionist ... : BLEW THE JOINT
55A. The civil engineer ... : HIT THE ROAD
60A. The lingerie manufacturer ... : SLIPPED AWAY
69A. The chicken farmer ... : FLEW THE COOP
74A. The sound technician ... : MADE TRACKS
92A. The film director ... : QUIT THE SCENE
108A. The soda jerk ... : RAN LICKETY-SPLIT
15D. The ecdysiast ... : TOOK OFF
17D. The percussionist ... : BEAT IT
84D. The van driver ... : MOVED ON
89D. The paper doll maker ... : CUT OUT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … FOIL (fool); NEIL (Neol!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Bayonets, say : STABS
A bayonet is a blade that is attached to the muzzle end of a rifle. It’s thought that the term derives from the French city of Bayonne in Gascony where perhaps bayonets were first made.

19. "That Old Black Magic" composer : ARLEN
"That Old Black Magic" is a song written by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The song has been recorded by many artists over the decades, but was first released by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra in 1942.

20. Bit of riding gear : CROP
A riding crop is a type of whip, one without a long lash.

21. Big acronym in energy : OPEC
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded in 1960 at a conference held in Baghdad, Iraq that was attended by Iraq, Kuwait, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Nine more countries joined the alliance soon after, and OPEC set up headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and then Vienna, Austria in 1965. The basic aim of OPEC was to wrench control of oil prices from the oil companies and to put it in the hands of the sovereign states that own the natural resource.

22. Actress Parker : POSEY
Parker Posey is an American actress who has earned the nickname "Queen of the Indies" due to her success in several indie movies. She did miss out on one mainstream role though, as she was edged out by Jennifer Aniston to play Rachel on "Friends".

23. The paparazzo ... : WAS GONE IN A FLASH
Paparazzi are photojournalists who specialize in taking candid shots of celebrities. The name comes from the famous Fellini movie, “La Dolce Vita”. One of the characters in the film is a news photographer called Paparazzo.

26. Día de San Valentín flowers : ROSAS
In Spanish, a gift of roses (rosas) might be given on the 14th of February (14 de febrero), Saint Valentine's Day (Día de San Valentín).

Saint Valentine’s Day was chosen by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saints' day was dropped by the Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

30. "Santa Baby" singer : KITT
Eartha Kitt sure did have a unique voice and singing style. Her rendition of "Santa Baby" has to be one of the most distinctive and memorable recordings in the popular repertoire. Some of you will no doubt remember Eartha playing Catwoman on the final series of the TV show "Batman".

31. New York City's ___ River : EAST
The East River is a strait in New York City connecting Upper New York Bay to Long Island Sound, separating Manhattan Island from Long Island. As it connects to Long Island Sound, the East River was once known as the Sound River.

33. Division in biology : MITOSIS
Mitosis is the process by which the complement of chromosomes in a cell nucleus replicates and then divides into two identical sets of new chromosomes. Mitosis is followed by division of the cell itself, resulting in two identical cells. Meiosis is a special type of cell division that results in reproductive cells that have half the full complement of chromosomes. The reproductive cells join together, with one cell coming from each parent, to form a new cell with a full complement of chromosomes. That new cell develops into offspring that have characteristics of both parents.

42. Roll in a disaster supply kit : DUCT TAPE
What we tend to call “duct” tape today was originally known as “duck” tape. In its first form, duck tape was rubber-based adhesive applied to a duck cloth backing, hence the name. Cotton duck cloth is a canvas-like material, a plain woven cotton fabric. The name “duck” comes from the Dutch “doek” meaning “linen canvas”. Duck tape started to known as “duct tape” in the fifties, as it was commonly used to wrap air ducts in the construction industry.

44. Christmas wrapper? : ELF
Our word “oaf”, meaning a stupid or clumsy person, comes from the Old Norse word “elf” meaning “silly person”. Our word “elf” has the same root. On the other side of the Atlantic, the plural of “elf” is “elves”, and in some dictionaries the plural of “oaf” is written as “oaves”.

49. U.P.S. driver assignments: Abbr. : RTES
United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky.

57. Grab (onto) : GLOM
“Glom” is a slang term meaning “steal”, although it can also be used to mean “latch onto” when used as “glom onto”. The term probably comes from the Scots word “glam” meaning “to snatch at”.

58. One heading to the cape? : TORO
In Spanish, the bull (el toro) might be charging at a bullfight.

59. Kitchen tool : RICER
A potato ricer is a kitchen tool used to force potato through small holes that are about the diameter of a grain of rice. It usually looks like a large garlic press.

60. The lingerie manufacturer ... : SLIPPED AWAY
"Lingerie" is a French term, but as used in France it just means any underwear, worn by either males or females. In English we use "lingerie" to describe alluring underclothing worn by women. The term "lingerie" comes into English via the French word "linge" meaning "washables", and ultimately from the Latin "linum", meaning "linen". We tend not to pronounce the word correctly in English, either here in the US or across the other side of the Atlantic. The French pronunciation is more like "lan-zher-ee", as opposed to "lon-zher-ay" (American) and "lon-zher-ee" (British).

66. Emulate Harry Connick Jr. : CROON
Harry Connick, Jr. is one of those singers that has made a successful move into the world of acting. He had a recurring role on the sitcom “Will & Grace” from 2002 to 2006, playing Grace’s husband Dr. Leo Markus. His first acting job was in the excellent 1990 movie “Memphis Belle”, in which he did a great job playing a tail gunner with a peppy sense of humor. He played a similar role in 1996’s “Independence Day”.

68. ___ City, 1939 film locale : EMERALD
The Emerald City is of course the capital of the Land of Oz in L. Frank Baum’s series of “Oz” novels.

The movie “The Wizard of Oz” is full of irony. The Scarecrow wants to be intelligent and discovers he is already very smart. The Tin Man wants to be able to love and finds out that he already has a heart. The Lion thinks he is a coward but turns out to be fearless. And the big reveal is that the Wizard of Oz, who is positioned as all-powerful, is actually just a bumbling and eccentric old man.

71. "___ around around around around" (repeated line in Dion and the Belmonts' "The Wanderer") : I ROAM
The 1961 hit “The Wanderer” was recorded by the singer Dion. The backing group for the recording was uncredited, but was actually a vocal group called the Del-Satins. Dion had sung with the Belmonts, but went solo in 1960.

79. Scale part : SOL
Do re mi fa sol la ti do …

80. "The Jungle Book" bear : BALOO
"The Jungle Book" by Rudyard Kipling was originally published in 1894 and is a collection of adventure stories or fables featuring the animals of the jungle and a young boy called Mowgli. Baloo is a sloth bear who teaches the cubs of a wolf pack the Law of the Jungle. His most challenging pupil however is no lupine, but the man-cub Mowgli.

83. Fund for a third party : ESCROW
One type of escrow account is held by a trusted third party for two parties who have some contractual arrangement, an arrangement that is often in dispute. The third party only releases the funds when both parties have fulfilled their contractual obligations.

88. Dubai's federation: Abbr. : UAE
Dubai is one of the seven Emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy.

99. Magazine founder Eric : UTNE
The "Utne Reader" is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The "Utne Reader" was founded in 1984, with "Utne" being the family name of the couple that started the publication.

108. The soda jerk ... : RAN LICKETY-SPLIT
“Lickety-split” is the latest in a line of terms that derived from the word “lick”, which was used in the sense of a “fast sprint in a race” back in the early 1800s. From “lick” there evolved “licketie”, “lickety-click”, “lickety-cut” and finally “lickety-split”, all just colorful ways to say “fast”.

The banana split was created in Latrobe, Pennsylvania in 1904. This particular sundae was the idea of David Stickler, a young apprentice pharmacist at the Tassel Pharmacy’s soda fountain.

In the halcyon days of yore, a "soda jerk" was usually a young person whose main job was to serve ice cream sodas in a drugstore. The server would "jerk" the handle on the soda fountain to dispense the soda water, giving the job its distinctive name.

113. Comic's sidekick : FOIL
A “foil” is a person who enhances another by providing contrast, as in a “straight man” to a comic. This usage of “foil” comes from the practice of placing a metal foil at the back of a gem to make it shine more brightly.

114. Free-for-all : MELEE
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means a "confused fight".

115. Trial figure : STENO
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

116. Houston pro, informally : ‘STRO
The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city's long association with the US space program.

Down
2. Roman "of wrath" : IRAE
"Dies Irae" is Latin for "Day of Wrath". It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

3. "Lohengrin" lady : ELSA
"Lohengrin" is a very popular opera by Richard Wagner, first performed in 1850. Many arias from "Lohengrin" are staples on "Opera's Greatest Hits" collections.

5. Winter vehicle : SNO-CAT
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All "snowcats" are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

7. Xeric : ARID
A location described as “xeric” is extremely dry, arid. The Greek prefix “xero-” means “dry, withered”.

8. Commercial tiger's name : TONY
Tony the Tiger has been the mascot of Frosted Flakes cereal since the product’s introduction in 1951. As Tony would say, “They’re Gr-r-reat!” Well, I thought they were when I was a lot younger ...

9. Oil spill-monitoring org. : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency(EPA)

10. Cornmeal dish : POLENTA
Polenta is a porridge made from finely ground corn. The term “polenta” is Italian.

14. Origin of a stream: Abbr. : SPR
A stream often originates as a spring (spr.), I guess …

15. The ecdysiast ... : TOOK OFF
An “ecdysiast” is a striptease artist. The term was coined by the writer H. L. Mencken in 1940 at the request of burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee. She wanted a word for her profession that had more dignity. The term comes from the Greek “ecdysis” meaning “to molt”.

16. Birthplace of the Franciscan order : ASSISI
The Italian town of Assisi is in Umbria. Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

St. Francis founded the Franciscan religious order in Assisi in 1208. He died in 1226, and was declared a saint just two years later in 1228. Construction of the Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi started immediately after the canonization, and finished 25 years later. The Basilica is now a United Nations World Heritage Site.

24. Poet who wrote "So Thomas Edison / Never drank his medicine" : NASH
The poet Ogden Nash is well known for his light and humorous verse. Try this one for size:
So Thomas Edison
Never drank his medicine;
So Blackstone and Hoyle
Refused cod-liver oil;
So Sir Thomas Malory
Never heard of a calory;
So the Earl of Lennox
Murdered Rizzio without the aid of vitamins or calisthenox;
So Socrates and Plato
Ate dessert without finishing their potato;
So spinach was too spinachy
For Leonardo da Vinaci;
Well, it's all immaterial,
So eat your nice cereal,
And if you want to name your ration,
First go get a reputation.

35. "St. John Passion" composer : BACH
During the Baroque Period, many composers composed musical settings for the story of the Passion of Christ. Bach himself wrote four or five, although only two survive today. One is the "St. John Passion", but the most famous and most often performed is the "St. Matthew Passion".

36. Actress Taylor of "Mystic Pizza" : LILI
The actress Lili Taylor had supporting roles in films like "Mystic Pizza", "The Haunting" and "Rudy", and she had a recurring role in the HBO series "Six Feet Under".

"Mystic Pizza" is a coming-of-age film released in 1988. Included in the cast are Annabeth Gish and Julia Roberts. If you watch closely, you’ll also see Matt Damon speaking his first line in a movie. The title refers to the name of a pizza restaurant located in Mystic, Connecticut.

37. Quod ___ faciendum : ERAT
“Quod erat faciendum” (QEF) is similar to the phrase “quod erat demonstrandum” (QED), both of which were used by Euclid in his theorems. “Quod erat faciendum” means “what was to have been done”, and is used at the end of a proposition that was not intended as a proof, but rather as a construction.

40. Monk's grooves : BEBOP
Thelonious Monk was a jazz pianist and composer, the second-most recorded jazz composer after the great Duke Ellington. That’s a pretty impressive statistic given that Ellington wrote more than 1,000 songs, whereas Monk only wrote about 70. Monk was a pioneer in the development of the jazz style called “bebop”, which gained popularity in the 1940s.

43. "America by Heart" author, 2010 : PALIN
"America by Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith and Flag” is the second book by Sarah Palin, released in 2010 following the success of “Going Rogue: An American Life” that was published the prior year.

47. Polo, e.g. : SHIRT
René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. And then the “golf shirt” is basically the same thing.

51. Current amount : AMPERE
The unit of electric current is the ampere, abbreviated correctly to "A" rather than "amp". It is named after French physicist André-Marie Ampère, one of the main scientists responsible for the discovery of electromagnetism.

54. William who played Hopalong Cassidy : BOYD
In the original stories written by Clarence E. Mulford in the early 1900s, Hopalong Cassidy was a bit of a brute, not at all like the heroic character who appeared on the silver screen and television. The role of Hopalong Cassidy was famously played by William Boyd, a role that he made his own by playing it in an incredible series of 66 (!) movies.

57. Mop's commercial partner : GLO
Mop & Glo!

58. Place for a touchdown : TARMAC
An airplane taxis on the tarmac at an airport.

“Tarmac” and “macadam” is of course short for "tarmacadam". In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as "macadam". Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The "tar-penetration macadam" is the basis of what we now call Tarmac.

60. Bribe : SOP
Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, "to give a sop to Cerberus", which means to give someone a bribe, or pay someone off. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

61. Hardly be deadpan : EMOTE
The term "deadpan", slang for an impassive expression, comes from dead (expressionless) and pan (slang for "face").

63. Pratt Institute degs. : MFAS
The Pratt Institute is an art college in Brooklyn, New York. The school started out as an engineering college in 1887, founded by oil industry pioneer Charles Pratt. However, the engineering program was dropped in 1993 due to small enrolment numbers.

64. Bunch of stuff : OLIO
Olio is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish "olla", the clay pot used for cooking.

65. Dickens orphan : NELL
"The Old Curiosity Shop" by Charles Dickens tells the story of little 14-year-old Nell Trent and her grandfather who live in the Old Curiosity Shop in London. If you visit London, there actually is an "Old Curiosity Shop", in Westminster. It is an establishment selling odds and ends, old curiosities, and is believed to have been the inspiration for the shop in the Dickens story. The building has been around since the 1500s, but the name "The Old Curiosity Shop" was added after the book was published.

67. Baseball great Campanella : ROY
Roy Campanella was a Major League Baseball player considered by many to have been one of the greatest catchers the game has ever seen. Campanella played for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the forties and fifties and was a pioneer in breaking the color barrier as he started out playing in the Negro Leagues. Sadly, he was paralyzed in a car accident when in his late thirties and so his career was tragically cut short.

71. PIN part: Abbr. : IDENT
Personal identification number (PIN)

76. Mötley ___ : CRUE
Mötley Crüe is an American rock band, from Los Angeles. They've been around since 1981, co-founded by the famous drummer Tommy Lee. Tommy Lee is also known for his two celebrated marriages, the first with Heather Locklear and the second with Pamela Anderson. The name “Mötley Crüe” was chosen as someone once described the band members as a “motley looking crew”. The spelling was made to look a little more exotic, with the umlauts added over the “o” and “u” one day, as the band were drinking bottles of "Löwenbräu" beer!

77. Paradox to be meditated on : KOAN
The concept of the “koan” appears in the Zen Buddhist tradition. A koan is a story, question or perhaps a statement that is used as an aid to meditation. It often takes the form of a problem or riddle that has no logical solution and is intended to help the meditator break free of reason and develop intuition.

78. "Little ___' Pea" : SWEE
Originally Popeye used the nickname "Swee'pea" to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye's doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him "Swee'Pea".

80. Hindu part of Indonesia : BALI
Bali is the most important tourist destination in Indonesia and is an island lying east of Java. The island is home to the majority of Indonesia’s Hindu population.

82. Tutti-___ : FRUTTI
The adjective “tutti-frutti” describes a prepared confection that has a combination of fruit flavors. “Tutti frutti” is Italian for “all fruits”.

90. Baroque : ORNATE
The ornate artistic style known as the Baroque began around 1590 in Italy. The era is sometimes divided into:
- Early Baroque (1590-1625)
- High Baroque (1625-1660)
- Late Baroque (1660-1725)
The Late Baroque is sometimes also called Rococo, and merged with the Rococo era that succeeded the Baroque.

91. Some canapé picks : SWORDS
I guess the reference is to the tiny plastic “swords” that are used to skewer pieces of food together, an alternative to toothpicks.

A canapé is a finger food, usually small enough to eat in just one bite. In French, "canapé" is actually the word for a couch or a sofa. The name was given to the snack as the original "canapés" were savories served on toasted or stale bread that supposedly resembled a tiny "couch".

97. Big boo-boo : BONER
"Boner" is one of those words that I just don't like because it can be used offensively. The term can be used to mean a faux pas, an error.

102. Religious figure: Var. : IKON
“Ikon” is a variant spelling of “icon”.

103. Simon of Broadway : NEIL
Neil Simon is one of my favorite playwrights. Simon has written over thirty plays and about thirty screenplays. He has received more nominations for Oscars and Tony Awards than any other writer. My favorite play penned by Simon has to be "Brighton Beach Memoirs", but the list of his great stage works seems endless and includes "Barefoot in the Park", "The Odd Couple", "Sweet Charity", "Plaza Suite", "California Suite", "Biloxi Blues" and "The Goodbye Girl".

105. Victory, to Wagner : SIEG
The Nazi salute was usually accompanied by the words, "Heil Hitler!" ("Hail Hitler!"), "Heil, mein Führer!" ("Hail, my leader!") or often "Sieg Heil!" ("Hail victory!").

Richard Wagner was born in the Jewish quarter of Leipzig in 1813. Decades later, Wagner became known not only for writing magnificent music, but for his anti-semitic views and writings.

107. Hit show sign : SRO
Standing room only (SRO)

109. Fiscal exec : CFO
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Docks : PIERS
6. Fill : SATE
10. Where auto racers retire? : PITS
14. Bayonets, say : STABS
19. "That Old Black Magic" composer : ARLEN
20. Bit of riding gear : CROP
21. Big acronym in energy : OPEC
22. Actress Parker : POSEY
23. The paparazzo ... : WAS GONE IN A FLASH
26. Día de San Valentín flowers : ROSAS
27. Catchy pop ditties : EAR CANDY
28. Back from vacation, say : RESTED
30. "Santa Baby" singer : KITT
31. New York City's ___ River : EAST
32. Bad points : CONS
33. Division in biology : MITOSIS
35. The demolitionist ... : BLEW THE JOINT
40. Fund-raising event : BENEFIT
41. Simple tune : AIR
42. Roll in a disaster supply kit : DUCT TAPE
44. Christmas wrapper? : ELF
45. High-toned : CLASSY
49. U.P.S. driver assignments: Abbr. : RTES
50. Knock down a peg : ABASE
52. Knock over : ROB
55. The civil engineer ... : HIT THE ROAD
57. Grab (onto) : GLOM
58. One heading to the cape? : TORO
59. Kitchen tool : RICER
60. The lingerie manufacturer ... : SLIPPED AWAY
63. Queen, e.g. : MONARCH
66. Emulate Harry Connick Jr. : CROON
68. ___ City, 1939 film locale : EMERALD
69. The chicken farmer ... : FLEW THE COOP
71. "___ around around around around" (repeated line in Dion and the Belmonts' "The Wanderer") : I ROAM
72. Suffers : AILS
73. Supporting force : ALLY
74. The sound technician ... : MADE TRACKS
79. Scale part : SOL
80. "The Jungle Book" bear : BALOO
82. Gala : FETE
83. Fund for a third party : ESCROW
84. "Whew!" : MAN!
85. Faultless : UNERRING
88. Dubai's federation: Abbr. : UAE
89. Maximally hip : COOLEST
92. The film director ... : QUIT THE SCENE
96. Range of understanding : PURVIEW
97. Prankster's patsy : BUTT
98. Between continents, say : ASEA
99. Magazine founder Eric : UTNE
100. Execute perfectly : DO TO A T
102. Motivates : INSPIRES
106. Some hibernators : TOADS
108. The soda jerk ... : RAN LICKETY-SPLIT
111. Instruct : TUTOR
112. Twosome : DUET
113. Comic's sidekick : FOIL
114. Free-for-all : MELEE
115. Trial figure : STENO
116. Houston pro, informally : ‘STRO
117. Just : ONLY
118. Showplace? : STAGE

Down
1. Pet door opener : PAW
2. Roman "of wrath" : IRAE
3. "Lohengrin" lady : ELSA
4. Greened up, perhaps : REGREW
5. Winter vehicle : SNO-CAT
6. Like many candles : SCENTED
7. Xeric : ARID
8. Commercial tiger's name : TONY
9. Oil spill-monitoring org. : EPA
10. Cornmeal dish : POLENTA
11. "Not for me" : I PASS
12. Trial : TEST
13. Word with color or rhyme : SCHEME
14. Origin of a stream: Abbr. : SPR
15. The ecdysiast ... : TOOK OFF
16. Birthplace of the Franciscan order : ASSISI
17. The percussionist ... : BEAT IT
18. Operating procedures: Abbr. : SYSTS
24. Poet who wrote "So Thomas Edison / Never drank his medicine" : NASH
25. Leads, as a band : FRONTS
29. More than snacks : DINES
32. In a footnote, say : CITED
34. Prefix with -port : TELE-
35. "St. John Passion" composer : BACH
36. Actress Taylor of "Mystic Pizza" : LILI
37. Quod ___ faciendum : ERAT
38. Panel member : JUROR
39. Twice tetra- : OCTA-
40. Monk's grooves : BEBOP
43. "America by Heart" author, 2010 : PALIN
46. Drawn things : STRAWS
47. Polo, e.g. : SHIRT
48. Exclamation said before sticking out the tongue : YECCH!
51. Current amount : AMPERE
52. Prime seating area : ROW A
53. Kind of tradition : ORAL
54. William who played Hopalong Cassidy : BOYD
56. Mend after further injury : REHEAL
57. Mop's commercial partner : GLO
58. Place for a touchdown : TARMAC
60. Bribe : SOP
61. Hardly be deadpan : EMOTE
62. Little angels : DEARS
63. Pratt Institute degs. : MFAS
64. Bunch of stuff : OLIO
65. Dickens orphan : NELL
66. Two points : COLON
67. Baseball great Campanella : ROY
70. Political muscle : CLOUT
71. PIN part: Abbr. : IDENT
74. Basis for promotion : MERIT
75. Going ___ : AT IT
76. Mötley ___ : CRUE
77. Paradox to be meditated on : KOAN
78. "Little ___' Pea" : SWEE
80. Hindu part of Indonesia : BALI
81. Have ___ for : A NEED
82. Tutti-___ : FRUTTI
84. The van driver ... : MOVED ON
86. Capable of handling : EQUAL TO
87. Horrifying : GHASTLY
89. The paper doll maker ... : CUT OUT
90. Baroque : ORNATE
91. Some canapé picks : SWORDS
93. Spot : ESPY
94. Tremors : SEISMS
95. Cover completely : CARPET
96. Short strokes : PUTTS
97. Big boo-boo : BONER
101. Not relaxed : TAUT
102. Religious figure: Var. : IKON
103. Simon of Broadway : NEIL
104. That señorita : ELLA
105. Victory, to Wagner : SIEG
107. Hit show sign : SRO
109. Fiscal exec : CFO
110. One may have a ball at the country club : TEE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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