Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

0601-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jun 14, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: Aladdin … today’s themed answers are common phrase with the letters AL added in (AL ADD IN)
23A. King's move? : CHANGE OF PALACE (from “change of pace”)
37A. Principles espoused during Women's History Month? : IDEALS OF MARCH (from “Ides of March”)
46A. Ability to walk a tightrope or swallow a sword? : CIRCUS TALENT (from “circus tent”)
66A. Dream for late sleepers? : A FAREWELL TO ALARMS (from “A Farewell to Arms”)
89A. Waterway leading to a SW German city? : CANAL OF WORMS (from “can of worms”)
95A. Slinky going down the stairs? : SPRING FALLING (from “Spring fling”)
118A. Dissertation on people's inherent spitefulness? : OF MALICE AND MEN (from “Of Mice and Men”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … UNIATE (Unaate), LIMINAL (laminal)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Something Pedro and Pablo might have? : SAN
“San Padro” and “San Pablo” are Spanish for “Saint Peter” and “Saint Paul”.

9. Coll. program : ROTC
The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school's curriculum.

19. Watts on a screen : NAOMI
Naomi Watts was born in the UK and moved to Australia when she was 14 years of age. It was in Australia that Watts got her break in television and movies. Probably her most acclaimed role was in the 2003 film “21 Grams” with Sean Penn and Benicio del Toro. Watts is best friends with fellow Australian actress Nicole Kidman.

22. One of a group of Eastern Christians : UNIATE
Prior to the 1960s, the word “Uniate” was commonly used to describe several Eastern Catholic Churches that are autonomous and self-governing, but are part of the Catholic Church as a whole. The term has fallen out of favor and is now considered by many to be offensive.

26. In fine fettle : HALE
"Hale" is an adjective meaning "healthy". Both the words "hale" and "healthy" derive from the the Old English "hal" meaning healthy.

27. Process of sorting injuries : TRIAGE
"Triage" is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on a battlefield. The term "triage" is French and means "a sorting".

34. Brooklyn squad : NETS
The NBA’s Brooklyn Nets until relatively recently were the New Jersey Nets based in Newark. Prior to 1977, the team was known as the New York Nets and played in various locations on Long Island. Ten years earlier, the Nets were called the New Jersey Americans and were headquartered in Teaneck, New Jersey.

35. The two sides of Pac-Man's mouth, say : RADII
The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero "Paku", known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

37. Principles espoused during Women's History Month? : IDEALS OF MARCH (from “Ides of March”)
Women’s HIstory Month is March in the US, coinciding with International Women’s Day on March 8th.

Julius Caesar was assassinated on the 15th (the ides) of March, 44 BC. He was attacked by a group of sixty people in the Roman Senate, and was stabbed 23 times. The first to strike a blow was Servilius Casca, who attacked Caesar from behind and stabbed him in the neck.

45. Coward from England : NOEL
Noel Coward was the most flamboyant of personalities, a playwright, composer and actor. Coward worked in a remarkable range of genres. He wrote the wonderfully airy play "Blithe Spirit", as well as the Oscar-winning WWII naval drama "In Which We Serve". A couple of his more famous songs, many of which he performed himself in cabaret, were "Mad Dogs and Englishmen" and "London Pride".

51. Land in the Golden Triangle : LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country's name is "Meuang Lao". The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of "Lao" entities united into one, the French added the "S" and so today we tend to use "Laos" instead of "Lao".

The “Golden Triangle” is the name given to one of the main opium-producing areas in Asia. The triangular area includes part of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand.

57. Soupçon : SMATTERING
Soupçon translates literally from French into English as "suspicion", and can be used in the sense that a "suspicion" of something is a just a hint, a crumb.

64. Soprano Sumac : YMA
Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano. Sumac had a notable vocal range of five octaves.

66. Dream for late sleepers? : A FAREWELL TO ALARMS (from “A Farewell to Arms”)
"A Farewell to Arms" is a somewhat autobiographical novel written by Ernest Hemingway, telling the story of an American ambulance driver serving with the Italian army during WWI. The most famous screen adaptation is probably the 1957 version starring Rock Hudson and Jennifer Jones.

74. Car antitheft aid, for short : VIN
Vehicle Identification Numbers (VINs) were introduced by the automotive industry in 1954.

86. Start to love? : ELL
The word “love” starts off with the letter L(“el” or “ell”).

89. Waterway leading to a SW German city? : CANAL OF WORMS (from “can of worms”)
Worms is a town on the Rhine River in southwest Germany. It is most famous perhaps for the general assembly (or Diet) that took place there in the 16th century.

A Diet was a general assembly of the estates of the former Holy Roman Empire. The most famous of these assemblies was the Diet of Worms, a 16th-century meeting that took place in the small town of Worms on the Rhine River in Germany. The main item on the agenda was discussion of the 95 theses of Martin Luther. Luther was summoned to the meeting, and there found to be guilty of heresy and so was subsequently excommunicated by the Pope.

92. Way to l'Île de la Cité : PONT
“Pont” is the French word for “bridge”.

There are two famous islands in the middle of the River Seine in Paris, one being the Île de la Cité, and the other Île Saint-Louis. Île de la Cité is the most renowned of the two, as it is home to the cathedral of Notre Dame.

93. Feature of many a Ludacris lyric : PUN
“Ludacris” is the stage name of rapper Christopher Bridges from Champaign, Illinois.

95. Slinky going down the stairs? : SPRING FALLING (from “Spring fling”)
The marvelous Slinky toy was invented in the early forties by a naval engineer called Richard James. James was developing springs for the navy that could stabilize sensitive instruments in rough seas. One day he accidentally knocked one of his experimental coils off a shelf and watched it "step" onto a stack of books, then onto a table and from there onto the floor where it recoiled itself very neatly. The Slinky was born ...

106. Postlarval : PUPAL
The larval and pupal are intermediate stages in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

107. Crimean conference locale : YALTA
The Yalta Conference was a wartime meeting between WWII leaders Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Held in February of 1945, the conference is most remembered for decisions made on the post-war organization of Europe. To a large extent, the three leaders made decisions carving up influence around the world that has had implications to this day.

115. Star burst : NOVA
A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

118. Dissertation on people's inherent spitefulness? : OF MALICE AND MEN (from “Of Mice and Men”)
"Of Mice and Men" is a novella written by American author John Steinbeck, published in 1937. The title comes from the famous poem by Robert Burns, "To a Mouse". The inspirational line from the poem is "The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men, gang aft tagley." Steinbeck actually wrote “Of Mice and Men” as a “novel-play”, intending that the line from the novel used as a script for a play. I actually saw the theatrical version on stage for the first time quite recently, and really enjoyed it.

122. Treasure Stater : MONTANAN
One of the unofficial nicknames for Montana is “the Treasure State”. It is so called because of its rich mineral reserves.

124. Some cheaters have them : TRYSTS
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

126. Drivers brake for it : ESS
I think the idea is that a driver will brake for an S-bend.

Down
2. "The ostrich roams the great ___. / Its mouth is wide, its neck is narra": Ogden Nash : SAHARA
The poet Ogden Nash is well known for his light and humorous verse. Try this one for size:
The ostrich roams the great Sahara.
Its mouth is wide, its neck is narra.
It has such long and lofty legs,
I'm glad it sits to lay its eggs.

7. 1966 title role reprised by Jude Law in 2004 : ALFIE
There have been two versions of the movie "Alfie". The original, and for my money the best, was made in 1966 with Michael Caine. The remake came out in 2004 and stars Jude Law in the title role. The theme song was performed by Cher in the 1966 movie, but it was Dionne Warwick's cover version from 1967 that was the most successful in the charts.

Jude Law is a wonderful English actor, and a big name in Hollywood these days. He makes a great romantic lead, witness his performance in “The Holiday” released in 2006, in which he starred opposite Cameron Diaz. He and Diaz were nominated by MTV for the best onscreen kiss that year!

10. South American tuber : OCA
The plant called an oca is also known as the New Zealand Yam. The tubers of the oca are used as a root vegetable.

14. Commercial version of crazy eights : UNO
In my youth I remember being taught a great card game, by a German acquaintance of mine, called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that's used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

15. In-between : LIMINAL
A “liminal” state or space is one that is “in-between”. It is like an adolescent: no longer a child but not yet an adult. The term comes from the Latin “limen” meaning “threshold”. The idea is that in a liminal state one is at the threshold, not quite there yet.

16. Cosmetician Estée : LAUDER
Estée Lauder was quite the successful businesswoman, with a reputation as a great salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called "Youth Dew". "Youth Dew" was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder's "perfume" into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That's quite a difference in sales volume ...

24. Letter between two others that rhyme with it : ETA
In the Greek alphabet, “eta” comes after “zeta” and before “theta”.

36. One who might stick his tongue out at you? : IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from an IR lamp to maintain body temperature.

39. Agosto or settembre : MESE
In Italian, the month (mese) might be August (agosto) or September (settembre).

41. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
"Up" is the tenth movie released by Pixar studios, featuring wonderful animation as one has come to expect from Pixar. It earned itself two Academy Awards. The main voice actor is Ed Asner, whose animated persona as Carl Fredricksen was created to resemble Spencer Tracy in his last film, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”.

43. Burns's refusal : NAE
Robert Burns is a cultural icon in Scotland and for Scots around the world. As a poet, Burns was a pioneer in the Romantic movement in the second half of the 18th century. One of his most famous works is the poem “Auld Lang Syne”, which has been set to the tune of a traditional Scottish folk song and is used to celebrate the New Year in the English-speaking world.

46. It's widely hailed as a convenient way to get around : CAB
A hansom cab is a very specific design of horse and buggy that was patented by Joseph Hansom in 1834 in England. The "cab" in the name is short for "cabriolet", a prior design of carriage on which the hansom was based. It's from "hansom cab" that we get our modern term "cab".

50. Organic compound : ENOL
An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, sort of part-alkene and part-alcohol. The term "enol" therefore, is a portmanteau of "alkene" and "alcohol".

51. Monastery resident : LAMA
"Lama" is a Tibetan word meaning "chief" or "high priest".

52. One parodied on "Portlandia" : HIPSTER
“Portlandia” is a satirical sketch show that is aired on the Independent Film Channel (IFC). The show is set in Portland, Oregon and takes its name from a statue called “Portlandia” which sits above the entrance to a building in downtown Portland. The statue is a copper repoussé work, and is second in size in the US only to the Statue of Liberty.

53. Fangorn Forest denizen : ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

58. Reason for glasses : MYOPIA
A myope is someone suffering from myopia, short-sightedness.

59. Captain Morgan and others : RUMS
The Captain Morgan brand of rum comes from Jamaica in the West Indies. It is named after the privateer from Wales, Sir Henry Morgan, who plied his trade in the Caribbean in the 17th century.

77. The ___ City (New Haven) : ELM
The city of New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1638 by Puritan immigrants from England. New Haven is home to Yale University. The city also initiated the first public tree planting program in the country. The large elms included in the program led to New Haven being called “the Elm City”.

78. Literary inits. : RLS
Robert Louis Stevenson was a Scottish author, famous for his novels “Treasure Island”, “Kidnapped” and “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”.

80. Nobel Prize subj. : ECON
The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded "in memory of Alfred Nobel". Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

82. Racing boat : SCULL
A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”.

84. Sandwich order, for short : BLT
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

90. Young Darth Vader's nickname : ANI
Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in all six of the "Star Wars" movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:
- Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
- Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
- Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
- Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
- Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
- Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor's evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after ...

91. Evergreen shrub : OLEANDER
The oleander shrub or tree is extremely toxic, especially to humans and dogs. That said, rodents and birds seem to be relatively insensitive to the toxic compounds found in the plant.

92. Thumbs' opposites : PINKIES
The use of "pinkie" or “pinky” for the little finger comes into English from "pinkje", the Dutch word for the same digit. Who knew?

96. Like Flatland : PLANAR
“Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions” is an 1884 novella by Edwin Abbott Abbott (yes, “Abbot Abbot”, as Edwin’s parents were both Abbotts, first cousins). “Flatland” is a story about a two-dimensional world in which women are line segments and mean polygons with various numbers of sides. To top it all off, the author published under the pen name “A Square”.

98. Composure : APLOMB
“Aplomb” is such a lovely word, meaning confidence and assurance. It is a French word that literally means "perpendicularity", or "on the plumb line". The idea is that someone with aplomb is poised, upright, balanced.

99. Spiral-horned antelope : NYALA
A nyala is an antelope from South Africa with spiral horns. “Nyala” is the Swahili name for the beast.

100. Mischievous girl : GAMINE
“Gamin” is a French word that we’ve imported into English. In both languages it means “street urchin”. The female form is “gamine”.

102. Social breakdown : ANOMIE
“Anomie” is social breakdown caused by the erosion of value and standards. The term comes to us via French from Greek. The root words are "a-" (without) "nomos" (law).

108. "American Graffiti" director : LUCAS
The iconic 1973 film "American Graffiti" was directed and co-written by George Lucas. The film cost $775,000 to make, and grossed over $200 million, making it one of the most profitable movies of all time. About 15% of the film’s cost was devoted to licensing the rights to play the songs chosen for the outstanding soundtrack.

114. Srs.' worries : SATS
Today the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the acronym SAT.

120. Its logo displays all Roy G. Biv except indigo : NBC
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) has had a number of different logos in its history, including the famous peacock with which we are familiar today. The first peacock logo was introduced in the early days of color television and was designed to illustrate how wonderful color television would be, so go buy one! (NBC was owned by RCA, and they had a vested interest in sales of color television sets).

“Roy G. Biv” is an acronym for the colors in a rainbow:
- Red
- Orange
- Yellow
- Green
- Blue
- Indigo
- Violet

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. To the same extent : AS FAR
6. Something Pedro and Pablo might have? : SAN
9. Coll. program : ROTC
13. Tug-of-war participant : PULLER
19. Watts on a screen : NAOMI
20. Like some desk work : CLERICAL
22. One of a group of Eastern Christians : UNIATE
23. King's move? : CHANGE OF PALACE (from “change of pace”)
25. Only what a person can take? : SO MUCH
26. In fine fettle : HALE
27. Process of sorting injuries : TRIAGE
28. Gets browner : TANS
30. Start of something big? : IDEA
31. Mineralogists' study : ORES
32. Anoint, archaically : ANELE
33. Like some French sauces : WINEY
34. Brooklyn squad : NETS
35. The two sides of Pac-Man's mouth, say : RADII
37. Principles espoused during Women's History Month? : IDEALS OF MARCH (from “Ides of March”)
40. Cry after a roller coaster ride, maybe : AGAIN!
44. Together : ONE
45. Coward from England : NOEL
46. Ability to walk a tightrope or swallow a sword? : CIRCUS TALENT (from “circus tent”)
51. Land in the Golden Triangle : LAOS
52. Part of a giggle : HEE
55. Pass with flying colors : ACE
56. Like the 10-Down : ANDEAN
57. Soupçon : SMATTERING
60. Olden : BYGONE
62. Finish (up) : MOP
64. Soprano Sumac : YMA
65. At the discretion of : UP TO
66. Dream for late sleepers? : A FAREWELL TO ALARMS (from “A Farewell to Arms”)
72. Identity : SELF
74. Car antitheft aid, for short : VIN
75. Informal way to say 87-Across : YUP
76. Sheen : LUSTER
79. Chooses beforehand : PRESELECTS
83. It's all tied up with the present : RIBBON
86. Start to love? : ELL
87. "Certainly" : YES
88. Collapse, with "out" : CONK
89. Waterway leading to a SW German city? : CANAL OF WORMS (from “can of worms”)
92. Way to l'Île de la Cité : PONT
93. Feature of many a Ludacris lyric : PUN
94. Add up : TOTAL
95. Slinky going down the stairs? : SPRING FALLING (from “Spring fling”)
101. Dough raiser : YEAST
105. Large family : CLAN
106. Postlarval : PUPAL
107. Crimean conference locale : YALTA
111. Over : ANEW
112. Captain, e.g. : RANK
113. Confederate : ALLY
114. Biblical book in two parts : SAMUEL
115. Star burst : NOVA
116. Neighbor of an 8-Down : INDIAN
118. Dissertation on people's inherent spitefulness? : OF MALICE AND MEN (from “Of Mice and Men”)
121. Chaperone, often : PARENT
122. Treasure Stater : MONTANAN
123. Human or alien : BEING
124. Some cheaters have them : TRYSTS
125. Frat members : BROS
126. Drivers brake for it : ESS
127. Pungent green : CRESS

Down
1. Hold down : ANCHOR
2. "The ostrich roams the great ___. / Its mouth is wide, its neck is narra": Ogden Nash : SAHARA
3. Gave birth on a farm, say : FOALED
4. Unlikely memoirist : AMNESIAC
5. Fix : RIG
6. Derision : SCORN
7. 1966 title role reprised by Jude Law in 2004 : ALFIE
8. Neighbor of a 116-Across : NEPALI
9. Inflame, with "up" : RILE
10. South American tuber : OCA
11. Touchy? : TACTILE
12. Tidies up : CLEANS
13. Not be bold : PUSSYFOOT
14. Commercial version of crazy eights : UNO
15. In-between : LIMINAL
16. Cosmetician Estée : LAUDER
17. And so on and so forth : ETC ETC
18. Go over and over : REHASH
21. Lost it : RAGED
24. Letter between two others that rhyme with it : ETA
29. Like some care : NEONATAL
33. Lacks : WANTS
36. One who might stick his tongue out at you? : IGUANA
38. Long time : EON
39. Agosto or settembre : MESE
41. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
42. "___ be my pleasure!" : IT’D
43. Burns's refusal : NAE
46. It's widely hailed as a convenient way to get around : CAB
47. Frozen over : ICY
48. Entertains : REGALES
49. Bemoan : LAMENT
50. Organic compound : ENOL
51. Monastery resident : LAMA
52. One parodied on "Portlandia" : HIPSTER
53. Fangorn Forest denizen : ENT
54. Inflatable thing : EGO
58. Reason for glasses : MYOPIA
59. Captain Morgan and others : RUMS
61. Does away with : OFFS
63. Layer : PLY
67. Action-packed : EVENTFUL
68. It has a light at one end : WICK
69. Roll of the dice, say : TURN
70. Up : ALOFT
71. Strip for a fashion show : RUNWAY
72. Secret collector : SPY
73. Before, poetically : ERE
77. The ___ City (New Haven) : ELM
78. Literary inits. : RLS
80. Nobel Prize subj. : ECON
81. Trousers : LONG PANTS
82. Racing boat : SCULL
84. Sandwich order, for short : BLT
85. Scary word : BOO
90. Young Darth Vader's nickname : ANI
91. Evergreen shrub : OLEANDER
92. Thumbs' opposites : PINKIES
93. Represent, sportswise : PLAY FOR
95. Lines at a theater? : SCRIPT
96. Like Flatland : PLANAR
97. Became less than a trickle : RAN DRY
98. Composure : APLOMB
99. Spiral-horned antelope : NYALA
100. Mischievous girl : GAMINE
102. Social breakdown : ANOMIE
103. Common dice rolls : SEVENS
104. Elements of some accents : TWANGS
108. "American Graffiti" director : LUCAS
109. Frigid temps : TEENS
110. Like : A LA
114. Srs.' worries : SATS
117. Colony member : ANT
119. Telephone trio : MNO
120. Its logo displays all Roy G. Biv except indigo : NBC


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0531-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 May 14, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: John Lampkin
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Foam item at a water park : POOL NOODLE
Pool noodles are foam flotation devices and much-loved swim-toys by kids who turn up in this house. The grumpy guy who owns the place (me) ends up throwing them out every winter, and new ones just keep turning up …

16. Coming up, to milady : ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

“Milady” is a term of address used for a noblewoman.

17. Follower of Roosevelt : ROUGH RIDER
The regiment known formally as the 1st US Volunteer Cavalry is more familiarly known as the Rough Riders. When Theodore Roosevelt was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the unit, it became known as “Roosevelt’s Rough Riders”.

18. Jordan's Mount ___, from which Jericho can be seen : NEBO
Mount Nebo is an elevated spot in Jordan that is mentioned in the Bible. According to the Book of Deuteronomy, Moses climbed Mount Nebo from the plains of Moab in order to see the Promised Land, the Land of Israel that he was destined never to enter. According to Christian and some Islamic traditions, Moses was buried on Mount Nebo.

20. Black hat : OUTLAW
In western movies and television, the bad guys tend to wear black hats, and the good guys wear white. At least that’s the perception ...

22. Sect in ancient Judea : ESSENES
The Essenes were a Jewish religious group, most noted these days perhaps as the writers of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered over a period of years, between 1947 and 1956, in eleven caves on the shores of the Dead Sea. The scrolls are believed to have been written by an ancient Jewish sect called the Essenes, although this has been called into question recently. Many of the texts are copies of writings from the Hebrew Bible.

24. E.R. units : CCS
Cubic centimeters (ccs)

26. Missouri city, informally : ST JOE
The city of Saint Joseph in Missouri was the westernmost point in the US that was accessible by rail after the Civil War. As such, it was a final stopping-off point as people headed out to the Wild West. The city takes its name from its founder, fur trader Joseph Robidoux. Robidoux apparently like things named after himself and his family, as eight of the main streets downtown were named after his children, and another was named for his second wife!

29. Knuckle-bruiser : MELEE
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means a "confused fight".

30. "Discreet Music" musician : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:
I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

31. Ludwig ___ van der Rohe : MIES
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was a German architect who was routinely referred to simply as "Mies". I am a philistine, I know, but Mies' buildings look very plain to me. However, he did come up with two far-from-plain sayings: "less is more" and "God is in the details".

35. Acoustic units : SONES
In the acoustic world, the "sone" was introduced in 1936 as a unit of perceived loudness.

36. Hunter of a 20-Across : POSSE
In the context of the Wild West, a “posse” is a group of people who aided a sheriff in enforcing the law. “Posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th-century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

39. "___ Nibelungenlied" : DAS
“(Das) Nibelungenlied” is an Germanic epic poem that dates back to about 1180 to 1210. Known in English as “The Song of the Nibelungs”, “Nibelungenlied” is the source material for Richard Wagner’s famous series of four operas “Der Ring des Nibelungen”.

41. Ephemeral : PASSING
"Ephemera" was originally a medical term, used to describe a fever that only lasted a day. The use of the term was expanded in the 17th century to include insects that were "short-lived", and by end of the 18th century "ephemera" were any things of transitory existence.

45. "Saving Fish From Drowning" author : AMY TAN
Amy Tan lives not too far from here, in Sausalito just north of San Francisco. Tan is an American writer of Chinese descent whose most successful work is "The Joy Luck Club". "The Joy Luck Club" was made into a movie produced by Oliver Stone in 1993. The novel and movie tell of four Chinese-American immigrant families in San Francisco who start the Joy Luck Club, a group playing Mahjong for money and eating delicious food.

"Saving Fish From Drowning" is a 2005 novel by Amy Tan about twelve American tourists traveling through China and Burma.

47. Mom on "Malcolm in the Middle" : LOIS
I've never actually sat down and watched the TV comedy "Malcolm in the Middle". It ran on Fox from 2000 to 2006. Malcolm was played by Frankie Muniz, who gave up acting to pursue a career in motor racing.

50. James of jazz : ETTA
Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song "At Last". Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

51. Hallmarks of Hallmark : SENTIMENTS
Hallmark produces more greeting cards in the US than any other company. The company was started by Joyce Clyde Hall in 1910, and by 1915 was known as Hall Brothers after his brother Rollie joined the enterprise. Rollie invented what we know today as “wrapping paper”, displacing the traditional use of colored tissue paper for wrapping gifts. The company took on the name “Hallmark” in 1928, taking the term for the symbol used by goldsmiths in London in the 1500s.

52. Old TV news partner of David : CHET
Chet Huntley was a newscaster who co-anchored “The Huntley-Brinkley Report” on NBC with David Brinkley from 1956 to 1970.

Down
2. Pluto and Bluto, e.g. : TOONS
The word “cartoon” was originally used for a “drawing on strong paper”, a durable drawing used as a model for another work. The term comes from the French word “carton” meaning “heavy paper, pasteboard”. Cartoons have been around a long time, with some of the most famous having being drawn by Leonardo da Vinci.

Pluto is Mickey Mouse's pet dog, as well as a star in his own right. Pluto is an unusual Disney character in that he is portrayed basically as a dog as opposed to a "humanized" version of a dog, as are the other Disney characters.

Bluto is the villain in the Popeye cartoon strip and has been around since 1932. Sometimes you will see Bluto go by the name Brutus, depending on the date of the publication. This "confusion" arose because there was an unfounded concern that the name "Bluto" was owned by someone else. Bluto, Brutus ... it's the same guy.

3. Debacles : ROUTS
A “debacle” is a disaster, and is a French word with the same meaning. In French, the term originally was used for the breaking up of ice on a river.

4. Some Prado hangings : EL GRECOS
"El Greco" ("the Greek", in Spanish) was the nickname of the artist whose real name was Domenikos Theotokopoulos. El Greco was born in Crete in 1541, and moved to Venice to study art when he was in his early twenties. A few years later he moved to the city of Toledo in central Spain, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.

The Museo del Prado is in Madrid, the capital of Spain, and has one of the finest art collections in the world. The gallery's most famous work is "Las Meninas" By Velazquez.

6. Conservative side : TORIES
“Tory” comes from the Irish word “tóraí” meaning “outlaw, robber”. The term “tory” was originally used for an Irish outlaw and later became a term of abuse for Irish rebels. At the end of the reign of King Charles II in Britain, there was a political divide with one side being called “Whigs” and the other “Tories”. Historically, the term “Tory” evolved to basically mean a supporter of the British monarchy, and today is used for a member of the British Conservative Party.

9. ___ Sainte-Croix : ILE
Saint Croix has been ruled by a number of countries, most recently the US. The first colonists were the Spanish, who named the island “Santa Cruz”. After Britain and the Netherlands, the French took over control of the island, and named it Saint Croix. Both Santa Cruz and Saint Croix can be translated into English as "Holy Cross".

11. Hymn leader : CANTOR
“Canto” is the Latin word for “singer”. In some Christian traditions, a “cantor” is the person assigned to lead the singing of ecclesiastical music.

12. They may be thrown out to audiences : ONE-LINERS
Maybe this is a two-liner:
I never wanted to believe that my Dad was stealing from his job as a road worker. But when I got home, all the signs were there.

13. Flip out : GO BANANAS
We use “bananas” today to mean “crazy”, but back in the 1930s the term was underworld slang for “sexually perverted”.

14. One left shaken? : SNOW GLOBE
It is believed that the first snow globes were introduced in France in the early 1800s. They were a development of glass paperweights that were already common, and were initially used to do the same job. Do you know who owns the biggest collection of snow globes in the world, over 8,000 of them? That would be the actor Corbin Bernsen of “LA Law” and “Psych” fame.

21. Lead role in the film known in France as "L'Or de la Vie" : ULEE
The movie “Ulee’s Gold” was released as "L'Or de la Vie" in French-speaking countries, which translates as “Life’s Gold”.

"Ulee's Gold" is a highly respected film from 1997 in which Peter Fonda plays the title role of Ulee. Ulee's "gold" is the honey that Ulee produces. It is a favorite role for Peter Fonda and he has shared that playing Ulee brought to mind his father, Henry Fonda, who himself kept a couple of hives. So if you see Peter Fonda in "Ulee's Gold" you're witnessing some characteristics that Peter saw in his father.

25. Some lap dogs : PEKES
The pekingese breed originated in China, as one might suspect from the name. Breeding practices have resulted in the the dog having many health problems, including breathing issues related to the "desirable" flat face. Standards have been changed in recent years, demanding an "evident muzzle" in an attempt to breed healthier dogs.

26. Class clown, e.g. : SMART ALEC
Apparently the original "smart Alec" was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

27. A woolly bear becomes one : TIGER MOTH
The tiger moth is a brightly-colored moth. The young tiger moth is a very hairy caterpillar known as a woolly bear or a woolly worm.

28. Springsteen, notably : JERSEYITE
Bruce Springsteen is a rock singer and songwriter, famously from New Jersey. A lot of Springsteen’s works are centered on his home state and the American heartland. His most famous album is “Born in the USA”, which was released in 1984. Springsteen lives in New Jersey, with his wife Patti Scialfa and their children.

32. Trysting site : LOVE NEST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

33. Dished : GOSSIPED
Apparently the verb “to dish” means to chat idly, to gossip.

35. Overseas deb: Abbr. : SRTA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

39. 1978 Broadway revue that opens with "Hot August Night" : DANCIN’
The 1978 musical revue “Dancin’” was Bob Fosse’s answer to the hit 1975 music “A Chorus Line”.

Bob Fosse won more Tony Awards for choreography than anyone else, a grand total of eight. He also won an Oscar for Best Director for his 1972 movie "Cabaret", even beating out the formidable Francis Ford Coppola who was nominated that same year for "The Godfather".

41. Rialto and others : PONTI
“Ponti” is Italian for “bridges”.

The Grand Canal is a large, S-shaped canal that traverses the city of Venice in Italy. For centuries there was only one bridge across the canal, the famed Rialto Bridge. Now there are four bridges in all, including a controversial structure that was opened to the public in 2008, the Ponte della Costituzione.

42. Cuckoo : INANE
Our word “inane” meaning silly or lacking substance comes from the Latin “inanitis” meaning “empty space”.

44. Big V, maybe : GEESE
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to "slipstream" a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when it gets fatigued. It's also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

46. Veronese's "The Wedding at ___" : CANA
Paolo Veronese was a Renaissance painter from the Italian city of Verona (hence his name “Veronese”). Veronese is most famous for his paintings “The Wedding at Cana” and “The Feast at the House of Levi”.

49. Bleu body : MER
In French, the sea (mer) is a blue (bleu) body.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Cause of an artery blockage : STREET FAIR
11. Some working parts : COGS
15. Foam item at a water park : POOL NOODLE
16. Coming up, to milady : ANON
17. Follower of Roosevelt : ROUGH RIDER
18. Jordan's Mount ___, from which Jericho can be seen : NEBO
19. Innards : ENTRAILS
20. Black hat : OUTLAW
22. Sect in ancient Judea : ESSENES
23. Lacking backing : SOLOING
24. E.R. units : CCS
25. Protective, in a way : PATERNAL
26. Missouri city, informally : ST JOE
29. Knuckle-bruiser : MELEE
30. "Discreet Music" musician : ENO
31. Ludwig ___ van der Rohe : MIES
32. "In" : LIKED
33. Seizure : GRAB
34. Field of fields?: Abbr. : AGR
35. Acoustic units : SONES
36. Hunter of a 20-Across : POSSE
37. Standbys : RESERVES
39. "___ Nibelungenlied" : DAS
40. Like hospital patients and much lumber : TREATED
41. Ephemeral : PASSING
45. "Saving Fish From Drowning" author : AMY TAN
46. Carry on : CONTINUE
47. Mom on "Malcolm in the Middle" : LOIS
48. Free : EMANCIPATE
50. James of jazz : ETTA
51. Hallmarks of Hallmark : SENTIMENTS
52. Old TV news partner of David : CHET
53. Visual expertise : TRAINED EYE

Down
1. Tear : SPREE
2. Pluto and Bluto, e.g. : TOONS
3. Debacles : ROUTS
4. Some Prado hangings : EL GRECOS
5. Intensify : ENHANCE
6. Conservative side : TORIES
7. Some candy wrappers : FOILS
8. Interjects : ADDS
9. ___ Sainte-Croix : ILE
10. Established in a new place, as a shrub : REROOTED
11. Hymn leader : CANTOR
12. They may be thrown out to audiences : ONE-LINERS
13. Flip out : GO BANANAS
14. One left shaken? : SNOW GLOBE
21. Lead role in the film known in France as "L'Or de la Vie" : ULEE
23. Brokers' goal : SALES
25. Some lap dogs : PEKES
26. Class clown, e.g. : SMART ALEC
27. A woolly bear becomes one : TIGER MOTH
28. Springsteen, notably : JERSEYITE
29. Like diamonds and gold : MINED
32. Trysting site : LOVE NEST
33. Dished : GOSSIPED
35. Overseas deb: Abbr. : SRTA
36. Hobby : PASTIME
38. Distresses : EATS AT
39. 1978 Broadway revue that opens with "Hot August Night" : DANCIN’
41. Rialto and others : PONTI
42. Cuckoo : INANE
43. Cuckoo : NUTTY
44. Big V, maybe : GEESE
46. Veronese's "The Wedding at ___" : CANA
49. Bleu body : MER


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0530-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 May 14, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: James Mulhern
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 50s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Any of the three authors of "Pull My Daisy" : BEAT POET
The group of American writers known as the Beat Generation first came to prominence at a poetry reading at the Six Gallery in San Francisco in October of 1955. Five young poets presented their work that day:
- Allen Ginsberg
- Philip Lamantia
- Michael McClure
- Gary Snider
- Philip Whalen

“Pull My Daisy” is a poem that was co-authored in the late forties by Beat Poets Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassidy. The poets used an unusual technique to write the piece. One person wrote the first line, and another wrote the second, another the third etc. When writing a specific line, the responsible poet was only shown the preceding line.

9. They produce minimal distortion : HI-FIS
Hi-fi systems were introduced in the late forties, and is audio equipment designed to give a much higher quality reproduction of sound than cheaper systems available up to that point. “Hi-fi” of course stands for “high fidelity”.

16. Monomer of proteins, informally : AMINO
Amino acids are essential to life in many ways, not least of which is their use as the building blocks of proteins.

17. Elicit a "T.M.I." : OVERSHARE
Too much information! (TMI)

18. Like about 30% of 51-Across, belief-wise : HINDU
Hinduism is the world’s third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam.

20. 1,000-pound weight units : KIPS
The unit of force called a “kip” is equal to 1,000 pounds-force. The name “kip” is a melding of “kilo” and “pound”, and so is sometimes referred to as a “kilopound”.

22. Rugby-to-Reading dir. : SSE
Rugby is a town in County Warwickshire, England. It is a market town, and is also home to the famous Rugby School, one of the oldest private schools in the country. The school gave its name to the sport of rugby, as the laws of the game were first published by three boys at Rugby School in 1845.

Reading is the county town of Berkshire in England. It is a major railroad junction, and the site of a renowned monastery and a prison. Reading Prison was where American actor Stacy Keach spent 6 months in 1984, convicted of smuggling cocaine into the UK.

23. Novel title character called "My sin, my soul" : LOLITA
Vladimir Nabokov's novel "Lolita" has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man's obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl. Although "Lolita" is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. "Lolita" became the first book since "Gone with the Wind" to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

28. Light on TV or Broadway : JUDITH
The actress Judith Light is perhaps best known for playing the female lead in the sitcom “Who’s the Boss” opposite Tony Danza.

31. Star of Bombay, e.g. : SAPPHIRE
The Star of Bombay is a huge sapphire that was mined in Sri Lanka, with a weight of 182 carats. The gemstone was given as a gift to actress Mary Pickford by her husband Douglas Fairbanks. Pickford left the Star of Bombay in her will to the Smithsonian Institute, where it can be seen today. The British gin called Bombay Sapphire is named for the stone.

33. Cousin of cumin and coriander : ANISE
Liquorice (also licorice) and aniseed have similar flavors, but they come from unrelated plants. The liquorice plant is a legume like a bean, and the sweet flavor is an extract from the roots. The flavor mainly comes from an ether compound called anethole, the same substance that gives the distinctive flavor to anise. The seedpods of the anise plant are what we know as "aniseed". The anise seeds themselves are usually ground to release the flavor.

Cumin is a flowering plant native to the region stretching from the eastern Mediterranean to East India. Cumin spice is made from the dried seeds and is the second most common spice used in the world (only black pepper is more popular). Cumin is particularly associated with Indian cuisine and is a key ingredient in curry powder. Lovely stuff ...

What we know here in North America as cilantro is called coriander in the UK and other parts of the world. “Cilantro” is the Spanish name for the herb.

40. Award with a Best Upset category : ESPY
The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

41. Its flag includes an image of a nutmeg clove : GRENADA
Grenada is an island nation in the British Commonwealth (or Commonwealth Realm, as it now called). When President Reagan ordered the invasion of Grenada in 1983 after a pro-communist coup, the UK’s Queen Elizabeth II and her government were not amused …

44. À gogo : GALORE
The term “à gogo” is French in origin, in which language it means “in abundance”.

45. Prefix with pressure or point : ACU-
Acupressure and acupuncture are related alternative medical techniques. Both aim to clear blockages in the flow of life energy through the body’s meridians. The treatment is given by stimulating “acupoints’ in the body, by applying pressure in the case of acupressure, and by applying needles in the case of acupuncture.

48. "Our Gang" girl : DARLA
Alfalfa's love interest in "Our Gang" was Darla, whose real name was Darla Hood. Hood became quite a successful singer after she grew out of her "Our Gang" role.

51. Its flag includes an image of a cocoa pod : FIJI
The island nation of Fiji is an archipelago in the South Pacific made up of over 330 islands, 110 of which are inhabited. Fiji was occupied by the British for over a century and finally gained its independence in 1970.

52. Old Brown Dog and others : ALES
Old Brown Dog Ale is a beer made by the Smuttynose Brewing Company in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

53. Old pitcher of milk? : ELSIE
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World's Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer's Glue.

56. Budget alternative : ALAMO
The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun intended!) into the market by popularizing the idea of "unlimited mileage".

58. DuPont development of 1935 : NYLON
The polymer known as “nylon” was developed by Dupont in the 1930s. The first application was as bristles in toothbrushes, in 1938. The second application became more famous, for women’s stockings starting in 1940, stockings that came to be known as “nylons”. The polymer was developed as a replacement for silk, which was to become in short supply during WWII.

59. Subject that includes women's suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment : HERSTORY
“Herstory” is history that emphasizes the role of woman. It is “her-story” as opposed to “his-tory”.

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was written by the American suffragist leader, Alice Paul. Although Paul was successful in her campaign to get passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution (guaranteeing voting rights regardless of sex), her 1923 Equal Rights Amendment didn't make it to the Senate floor until 1972. The amendment was passed by the Senate, and then headed to the state legislatures for the required ratification. 38 states had to approve the legislation for the amendment to be adopted, but only 35 states voted in favor before the deadline. So the amendment is still pending, although about half of the fifty states have adopted the ERA into their state constitutions.

Down
3. Best New Artist Grammy winner of 2008 : ADELE
Thanks to a kind comment from a blog reader (below), I can point out that Adele actually won her Best New Artist Grammy in 2009, and not 2008 as stated in the clue.

Adele is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older.

5. Ovid's foot : PES
The Latin word for “foot” is “pes”, the genitive singular of which is “pedis”. “Pedis” evolved into the suffix -pede, as in centipede and millipede.

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets, Horace and Virgil.

6. Midwest city named for a Menominee chief : OSHKOSH
Oshkosh is a city in east-central Wisconsin that was named for Chief Oshkosh of the Menominee Native American people. The word “oshkosh” means “the claw” in the Ojibwe language.

7. Potential virus sources : EMAILS
A computer virus has characteristics very similar to a virus found in nature. It is a small computer program that can copy itself and can infect another host (computer).

8. Bone preservation locations : TAR PITS
A tar pit is an unusual geological feature, leakage of bitumen from below ground to the earth’s surface creating a pool of natural asphalt. One of the most famous of these occurrences is the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles.

The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It's well worth a visit if you are in town …

12. "Imagine" Grammy winner of 2010 : INDIA.ARIE
India.Arie is an American soul and R&B singer, born India Arie Simpson.

13. County seat on the St. Joseph River : SOUTH BEND
The city of South Bend, Indiana is located on the St. Joseph River. The actual location is on the most southerly bend of the river, hence the name “South Bend”.

15. Beverage brand portmanteau : NESTEA
Nestea is a brand of iced tea made by Nestlé. “Nestea” is a portmanteau of “Nestlé” and “tea”.

24. Twitter, Facebook or Instagram : APP
Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). But, I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

This blog has a Facebook page. Facebook users can click on the “Like” button at the top-right of this blog page to start receiving daily convenient Facebook links to that day’s (and the previous day’s) crossword solutions, including the syndicated puzzle. Those links turn up just seconds after I publish each new post here. Enjoy!

Instagram is a photo-sharing application, one that is extremely popular I hear. Instagram was started in San Francisco in 2010. Facebook purchased Instagram two years later, paying $1 billion. The billion-dollar Instagram had just 13 employees at the time …

27. Major cocoa exporter : GHANA
The name "Ghana" means "warrior king" in the local language. The British established a colony they called Gold Coast in 1874, later to become Ghana, as part of the scramble by Europeans to settle as much of Africa as they could. One of Ghana's most famous sons is Kofi Annan, the diplomat that served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007.

28. Oscar nominee for playing Cal Trask : JAMES DEAN
James Dean played the character Cal Trask in the 1955 movie “East of Eden”.

In his short life, James Dean starred in three great movies: "East of Eden", "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Giant", for which he received two posthumous Best Actor Oscar nominations (the only person to do so). On a fateful day in September 1955, Dean set off in Porsche for a race in Salinas, California. While driving to the race he was given a speeding ticket. Two hours later Dean was involved in a near head-on collision and was pronounced dead on arrival at a hospital in Paso Robles, California.

32. What "ruined the angels," per Ralph Waldo Emerson : PRIDE
Here is a verse from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s 1847 poem “The Sphinx” …
Pride ruined the angels,
Their shame them restores;
Lurks the joy that is sweetest
In stings of remorse.
Have I a lover
Who is noble and free?--
I would he were nobler
Than to love me.

Ralph Waldo Emerson was an essayist and poet who was active in the mid-1800s. Most of the essays that Emerson wrote were composed originally as lectures and then revised for print.

37. One of Time magazine's cover "Peacemakers" : ARAFAT
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

38. Wily temptress : DELILAH
Delilah is a Biblical figure, the wife of Samson. Delilah was engaged by the Philistines to betray her husband by determining the secret of his great strength. Samson lied to his wife three times, but on the fourth asking he told his wife the truth, that he did not cut his hair. Delilah then convinced Samson to shear his locks and so allowed him to be captured by his enemies. Over the centuries, it has been usual to depict Delilah actually cutting off her husband’s hair, but the Bible actually says that she persuaded Samson to do the job himself.

39. Jason, for one : MARINER
Jason is a hero from Greek mythology, most noted for leading the quest for the Golden Fleece. The Golden Fleece is the fleece of the gold-haired winged ram. For his quest, Jason assembles a group of heroes who were given the name Argonauts, as they journeyed on the ship called the "Argo". The vessel was called the "Argo" in honor of the ship's builder, a man named Argus.

45. Co-worker of Kennedy starting in 2006 : ALITO
Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy of the US Supreme Court was appointed by President Reagan in 1988. Although Justice Kennedy’s decisions are viewed as largely conservative, after Sandra Day O'Connor has retired he has been considered by many as the "swing vote" on the court.

49. Wheels of fortune? : LIMO
The word "limousine" actually derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a "limousine". Well, that's how the story goes anyway ...

50. Unit in a geology book : AEON
Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:
- supereon
- eon (also “aeon”)
- era
- period
- epoch
- age

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Any of the three authors of "Pull My Daisy" : BEAT POET
9. They produce minimal distortion : HI-FIS
14. He may have many lines memorized : LADIES’ MAN
16. Monomer of proteins, informally : AMINO
17. Elicit a "T.M.I." : OVERSHARE
18. Like about 30% of 51-Across, belief-wise : HINDU
19. Head of communications? : TELE-
20. 1,000-pound weight units : KIPS
21. Suffered a face-plant : ATE IT
22. Rugby-to-Reading dir. : SSE
23. Novel title character called "My sin, my soul" : LOLITA
25. Cry of contempt : PAH!
26. Trip : MISSTEP
27. Appeal to : GRAB
28. Light on TV or Broadway : JUDITH
31. Star of Bombay, e.g. : SAPPHIRE
33. Cousin of cumin and coriander : ANISE
34. Arrested : RAN IN
35. Riveting piece, perhaps : MUST-READ
39. Nickeled-and-dimed? : MINTED
40. Award with a Best Upset category : ESPY
41. Its flag includes an image of a nutmeg clove : GRENADA
43. Appeal formally : SUE
44. À gogo : GALORE
45. Prefix with pressure or point : ACU-
48. "Our Gang" girl : DARLA
51. Its flag includes an image of a cocoa pod : FIJI
52. Old Brown Dog and others : ALES
53. Old pitcher of milk? : ELSIE
54. Next to : ALONGSIDE
56. Budget alternative : ALAMO
57. Try : TAKE A STAB
58. DuPont development of 1935 : NYLON
59. Subject that includes women's suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment : HERSTORY

Down
1. Stains : BLOTS
2. Homebuilders' projections : EAVES
3. Best New Artist Grammy winner of 2008 : ADELE
4. One needing pressure to perform well : TIRE
5. Ovid's foot : PES
6. Midwest city named for a Menominee chief : OSHKOSH
7. Potential virus sources : EMAILS
8. Bone preservation locations : TAR PITS
9. Reaction to a card : HAHA
10. Tag statement : I’M IT
11. Often-overlooked details : FINE PRINT
12. "Imagine" Grammy winner of 2010 : INDIA.ARIE
13. County seat on the St. Joseph River : SOUTH BEND
15. Beverage brand portmanteau : NESTEA
23. Engine measure : LITER
24. Twitter, Facebook or Instagram : APP
26. Like areas around waterfalls : MISTY
27. Major cocoa exporter : GHANA
28. Oscar nominee for playing Cal Trask : JAMES DEAN
29. Very, very : UNUSUALLY
30. Opposite of aggregation : DISPERSAL
32. What "ruined the angels," per Ralph Waldo Emerson : PRIDE
36. Prod : EGG
37. One of Time magazine's cover "Peacemakers" : ARAFAT
38. Wily temptress : DELILAH
39. Jason, for one : MARINER
42. "For real" : NO JOKE
45. Co-worker of Kennedy starting in 2006 : ALITO
46. Cigar box material : CEDAR
47. Words before a date : USE BY
49. Wheels of fortune? : LIMO
50. Unit in a geology book : AEON
52. ___ supt. : ASST
55. Juice : GAS


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0529-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 May 14, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Anna Shechtman
THEME: # # # # … we have the symbol “#” as a clue four times in today’s puzzle, and each answer is something that "#" might represent. And I think I can see something like a “#” symbol drawn with the black squares in the grid:
20A. #1 : TIC-TAC-TOE BOARD
33A. #2 : POUND SIGN
43A. #3 : SPACE MARK
52A. #4 : TWITTER HASHTAG
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 37s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Some Summer Olympics gear : EPEES
The épée that is used in today’s sport fencing is derived from the old French dueling sword. In fact, the the sport of épée fencing is very similar to the dualing of the 19th century. The word “épée” translates from French as “sword”.

10. "Spider-Man" girl : GWEN
Gwen Stacy is one of the two women in the life of Spider-Man/Peter Parker. Gwen was Peter Parker’s first love, until he transferred his affections to Mary Jane Watson.

14. Stone, e.g. : UNIT
We’ve used pounds and stones in Ireland for all my life. However, they no longer have any “official” status in the country, as we’ve made the conversion to the metric system. Having said that, many folks still tend to measure body weight in stones and pounds. One stone is equal to fourteen pounds.

15. "The Alchemist" novelist ___ Coelho : PAULO
Paulo Coelho is a novelist and lyricist from Brazil. He wrote the novel called “The Alchemist” in 1987, one of the biggest selling books in history. It is also the most translated book written by any living author, and is available in 71 languages.

16. Facetious words of understanding : AH SO
The slang term “ah so” is used in American English to mean “I see”. The term derives from the Japanese expression “Ah so desu ka” meaning “Oh, that’s how it is”.

17. Backdrop for the final scene of Antonioni's "L'Avventura" : ETNA
Michelangelo Antonioni was a film director from Italy. Antonioni’s most famous movies are the trilogy “L’Avventura” (1960), “La Notte” (1961) and “Eclipse” (1962). He died in 2007, coincidentally on the same day that famed director Ingmar Bergman also passed away.

18. How some legal proceedings are conducted : IN REM
"In rem" translates from Latin as "in a thing". In a lawsuit, an action is described as "in rem" if it is directed against some property. This would be the case if someone disputes ownership of a piece of land, for example. An action "in personam" on the other hand, is directed against a specific individual.

19. Apocryphal beast : YETI
A yeti is a beast of legend, also called an abominable snowman. "Yeti" is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

20. #1 : TIC-TAC-TOE BOARD
When I was growing up in Ireland we played "noughts and crosses" ... our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

23. Comic ___ (typeface) : SANS
Comic Sans MS is a font that looks a bit like that used in old comic books. Comic Sans was released by Microsoft in 1994. If you live in the Netherlands, you are lucky enough to enjoy Comic Sans Day on the first Friday of July each year.

24. Seaside bird : ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

28. New York City's ___ Galerie : NEUE
The Neue Galerie is in New York City in the “Museum Mile”, a section of 5th Avenue noted for its collection of museum and galleries. The Neue Galerie (“New Gallery” in German) is famous for its collection of Austrian and German Expressionist art.

33. #2 : POUND SIGN
The “#” symbol is usually referred to as the “number sign”, but here in the US the name “pound sign” is very common as well.

36. Sleep with, in slang : SHTUP
The verb “shtup” is Yiddish meaning “to push, shove”. Back in the fifties, “shtup” was used in English to mean “to annoy”. Its contemporary meaning is more crude, “to have sexual intercourse with”.

37. Simpleton : RUBE
A “rube” is person lacking sophistication, often described as "a country bumpkin". The term derives from the masculine name “Reuben”, which was considered back in the early 1800s to be a typical name used in rural areas.

38. Afflictions known technically as hordeola : STYES
A stye is a bacterial infection of the sebaceous glands at the base of the eyelashes, and is also known as a hordeolum.

43. #3 : SPACE MARK
A space mark (#) is a symbol used by a proofreader to indicate that a space needs to be inserted, say between two words that have run together.

47. Mode of transportación : TREN
In Spanish, one form of transportation (transportación) is a train (tren).

49. Genesis' "man of the field" : ESAU
Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins "the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)". As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father's wealth (it was his "birthright"). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a "mess of pottage" (a meal of lentils).

52. #4 : TWITTER HASHTAG
A hashtag is word preceded by the symbol #. Hashtags are big these days because of Twitter, a microblogging service that I will never understand …

59. Something that's on the record? : PRIOR
A prior offense might be listed on a police record.

60. Where Macbeth, Malcolm and Duncan are buried : IONA
Although the small island of Iona lies just off the west coast of Scotland, it was the site of a monastery built in the Middle Ages by a monk from Ireland names Colm Cille (also known as Columba). Colm Cille and his followers were sent into exile from the Irish mainland and settled in Iona, as at that time the island was part of an Irish kingdom. This monastery in Iona expanded its influence over the decades and founded other institutions all over Ireland and Great Britain. It is believed that the famous Book of Kells may have been written, or at least started, at the monastery on Iona. Iona is also the burial site for Macbeth, King of Scotland who was immortalized in Shakespeare’s fictional account of the king’s life.

61. Aoki of the P.G.A. : ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan's greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki's best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

62. Things twins share : UTERI
The Latin "uterus" translates as both "womb" and "belly". The Latin word was derived from the Greek "hystera" also meaning womb, which gives us the words "hysterectomy", and "hysterical".

63. TV greaser, with "the" : FONZ
Fonzie is a character in the sitcom “Happy Days” that was originally aired from 1974 to 1984. The Fonz was written as a secondary character, but eventually took over the show. Fonzie is of course played by Henry Winkler.

64. FiveThirtyEight owner : ESPN
FiveThirtyEight is a website that publishes compiled polling date during election cycles. The site takes its name from from the total number of electors in the US electoral college. FiveThirtyEight has been owned by ESPN since 2013. One has to wonder how that fits with the rest of the ESPN portfolio …

65. Complete: Prefix : TELEO-
The prefix “teleo-” is used to mean “end” or “complete”. The term comes from the Greek “télos” meaning “end”, and “téleios” meaning “complete”.

Down
1. 1965's "I Got You Babe," e.g. : DUET
“I Got You Babe” is a duet that was released in 1965 by Sonny & Cher. The lyrics and music for the song were written by Sonny Bono himself.

3. Brass section? : ZINC
Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc. Compare this with bronze, an alloy of copper and tin. Copper and bronze are often mistaken for each other.

4. Solide and liquide : ETATS
In French, two states (états) of matter are solid (solide) and liquid (liquide).

6. Hillary Clinton wardrobe staples : PANTSUITS
When Hillary Rodham Clinton was appointed US Secretary of State, she became the first former First Lady to serve in a president’s cabinet. Hillary met her husband, President Bill Clinton, when the two were studying at Yale law school.

7. Start to pop? : EURO-
Europop is a genre of pop music that is mainly associated with Sweden, but also applies to several other European countries. The most famous group associated with the genre is ABBA.

8. Gen. Robert ___ : E LEE
Robert E. Lee is renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state. During the Civil War, Lee’s men referred to him affectionately as “Marse Robert”, with “marse” being slang for “master”.

10. "It's Raining Men," for one : GAY ANTHEM
"It's Raining Men" has been labeled as a dance anthem, gay anthem and a classic female anthem, but whatever anthem you relate to, it's a fun song. It sounds very "disco", and was indeed written in the late disco era. The Disco Divas like Donna Summer passed on it so it was only in the early eighties that it surfaced, recorded by the one-hit wonder act called the Weather Girls. Geri Halliwell came out with a version in 2001, the version that I actually prefer largely because of it's featured on the soundtrack of the movie "Bridget Jones's Diary".

12. Abbr. on a historic building : ESTD
Established (estd.)

21. ___ E (TV channel) : A AND
The A&E television network used to be a favorite of mine, with the "A&E" standing for "arts and entertainment". A&E started out airing a lot of the old classic dramas, as well as biographies and arts programs. Now there seems to be more reality TV, with one of the flagship programs being "Dog the Bounty Hunter". A slight change of direction I'd say ...

25. Media icon with an eponymous Starbucks beverage : OPRAH
Starbucks are now selling Teavana Oprah Chai Tea, the formulation of which was overseen by Oprah Winfrey. It is a black tea that is infused with cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves.

27. It might pop in the post office : BUBBLE WRAP
Bubble wrap was invented in 1957 in an abortive attempt to make a 3-dimensional wall covering. The result was a material that wasn’t suitable as a “wallpaper” but that did make a great packing material. And don’t forget the last Monday of every January … that’s Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day.

29. Memphis's home : EGYPT
Memphis was an ancient city on the River Nile. The ruins of Memphis are located just south of Cairo, Egypt. It was a magnificent city that eventually failed due to the economic success of the city of Alexandria, located further down the river and right on the Mediterranean coast.

31. More than quirky : OUTRE
The word "outré" comes to us from French, as you might imagine, derived from the verb "outrer" meaning "to overdo, exaggerate". "Outrer" is also the ultimate root of our word "outrage".

34. Writer with the most combined Tony and Oscar nominations : NEIL SIMON
Neil Simon is one of my favorite playwrights. Simon has written over thirty plays and about thirty screenplays. He has received more nominations for Oscars and Tony Awards than any other writer. My favorite play penned by Simon has to be "Brighton Beach Memoirs", but the list of his great stage works seems endless and includes "Barefoot in the Park", "The Odd Couple", "Sweet Charity", "Plaza Suite", "California Suite", "Biloxi Blues" and "The Goodbye Girl".

35. Littoral : NEARSHORE
The adjective “littoral” means “pertaining to the shore”. The littoral zone of a seashore is the region between the limits of high and low tides.

44. Genesis grandson : ENOS
Enos was the son of Seth and the grandson of Adam and Eve.

53. Romain de Tirtoff's pseudonym : ERTE
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T."

54. Cambodian currency : RIEL
The Cambodian riel was first introduced in 1953, and was taken out of circulation by the Khmer Rouge in 1975 when they completely abolished money on taking control of the country. After the Vietnamese invasion of 1978, money was reintroduced and the Cambodian people are still using the "second" riel.

56. ___ Bradstreet, America's first published poet : ANNE
Anne Bradstreet was a poetess who was the wife of Simon Bradstreet, a governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Anne was the first poet in the British North American colonies to have her works published.

57. The Sphinx's is "blank and pitiless as the sun," per Yeats : GAZE
“The Second Coming” is a 1919 poem by Irish poet W. B. Yeats. Here are some lines from the second verse:
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.

Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for "inspired poetry" that gave "expression to a whole nation". Yeats was Ireland's first Nobel laureate.

58. Outdated cry : FIE!
"Fie!" and "ptui!" are both exclamations of disgust.

Share today's solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Knock silly : DAZE
5. Some Summer Olympics gear : EPEES
10. "Spider-Man" girl : GWEN
14. Stone, e.g. : UNIT
15. "The Alchemist" novelist ___ Coelho : PAULO
16. Facetious words of understanding : AH SO
17. Backdrop for the final scene of Antonioni's "L'Avventura" : ETNA
18. How some legal proceedings are conducted : IN REM
19. Apocryphal beast : YETI
20. #1 : TIC-TAC-TOE BOARD
23. Comic ___ (typeface) : SANS
24. Seaside bird : ERNE
25. Revolutionary body? : ORB
28. New York City's ___ Galerie : NEUE
30. Odds, e.g. : RATIOS
33. #2 : POUND SIGN
36. Sleep with, in slang : SHTUP
37. Simpleton : RUBE
38. Afflictions known technically as hordeola : STYES
40. This, to Tomás : ESTO
41. Comparably sized : AS BIG
43. #3 : SPACE MARK
45. "Not in a million years!" : HELL NO!
47. Mode of transportación : TREN
48. Shape of a timeout signal : TEE
49. Genesis' "man of the field" : ESAU
50. Symbol of softness : SNOW
52. #4 : TWITTER HASHTAG
58. Waiting room distribution : FORM
59. Something that's on the record? : PRIOR
60. Where Macbeth, Malcolm and Duncan are buried : IONA
61. Aoki of the P.G.A. : ISAO
62. Things twins share : UTERI
63. TV greaser, with "the" : FONZ
64. FiveThirtyEight owner : ESPN
65. Complete: Prefix : TELEO-
66. Get out of town : FLEE

Down
1. 1965's "I Got You Babe," e.g. : DUET
2. "No" voter : ANTI
3. Brass section? : ZINC
4. Solide and liquide : ETATS
5. Condition of being awesome, in modern slang : EPICNESS
6. Hillary Clinton wardrobe staples : PANTSUITS
7. Start to pop? : EURO-
8. Gen. Robert ___ : E LEE
9. Like many works in minor keys : SOMBER
10. "It's Raining Men," for one : GAY ANTHEM
11. The place to be : WHERE IT’S AT
12. Abbr. on a historic building : ESTD
13. "___ insist!" : NO I
21. ___ E (TV channel) : A AND
22. "___ my dad would say ..." : OR AS
25. Media icon with an eponymous Starbucks beverage : OPRAH
26. Shake, maybe : ROUSE
27. It might pop in the post office : BUBBLE WRAP
29. Memphis's home : EGYPT
31. More than quirky : OUTRE
32. Held forth : SPOKE
34. Writer with the most combined Tony and Oscar nominations : NEIL SIMON
35. Littoral : NEARSHORE
39. Sequence of events : SCENARIO
42. Tiny irritant : GNAT
44. Genesis grandson : ENOS
46. Yield : OUTPUT
51. Swing and miss : WHIFF
52. Chuck : TOSS
53. Romain de Tirtoff's pseudonym : ERTE
54. Cambodian currency : RIEL
55. One being used : TOOL
56. ___ Bradstreet, America's first published poet : ANNE
57. The Sphinx's is "blank and pitiless as the sun," per Yeats : GAZE
58. Outdated cry : FIE!


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive