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0701-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jul 14, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: Don’t Start the Song … each of today’s themed answers is a song title, and each starts with the word DON’T:
18A. Appeal from Elvis, 1956 : DON’T BE CRUEL
25A. Reassurance from the Beach Boys, 1964 : DON'T WORRY BABY
39A. Encouragement from Journey, 1981 : DON'T STOP BELIEVIN’
52A. Plea from the Human League, 1982 : DON’T YOU WANT ME
64A. Reproach from the Buckinghams, 1967 : DON’T YOU CARE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 37s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Dead as a doornail : KAPUT
“Kaput” is a familiar term meaning “incapacitated, destroyed”, and comes to us from French (via German). The original word "capot" means "not having won a single trick" in the French card game called Piquet.

11. Marble ___ (London landmark) : ARCH
The London landmark known as Marble Arch is located, rather oddly I’ve always thought, on a traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street and Park Lane. The arch was completed in 1833, with a design inspired by the Arch of Constantine in Rome (which also inspired the more famous “Arc de Triomphe” in Paris). It was originally located in front of Buckingham Palace, where it was used as the ceremonial state entrance. The arch was moved to its current location to make room for renovations to Buckingham Palace that were ordered by Queen Victoria. There are three small rooms inside of the arch, and these were used as a police station for over a hundred years.

15. Justice Kagan : ELENA
Elena Kagan was the Solicitor General of the United States who replaced Justice John Paul Stevens on the US Supreme Court. That made Justice Kagan the fourth female US Supreme Court justice (there have been 108 men!). I hear she is a fan of Jane Austen, and used to reread "Pride and Prejudice" once a year. Not a bad thing to do, I'd say ...

17. Oscar winner Sorvino : MIRA
Mira Sorvino is an American actress, winner of an Oscar for her supporting role in the 1995 Woody Allen movie "Mighty Aphrodite". Sorvino also played a title role opposite Lisa Kudrow in the very forgettable "Romy and Michele's High School Reunion".

18. Appeal from Elvis, 1956 : DON’T BE CRUEL
“Don’t Be Cruel” was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. “Don’t Be Cruel” was released as an A-side, but the B-side turned out to be more successful, a tune called “Hound Dog” ...

21. Prom attendee, typically : SENIOR
A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them "formals" over in Ireland). The term "prom" is short for "promenade", the name given to a type of dance or ball.

24. Clock-setting std. : GMT
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the time at the Prime Meridian, the meridian that runs through Greenwich in London.

A meridian is a line of longitude, and the Prime Meridian is that line of longitude defined as 0 degrees. The Prime Meridian is also called the Greenwich Meridian as it passes through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich in southeast London. Of course the line of longitude that is used to represent 0 degrees is an arbitrary decision. 25 nations formally decided in 1884 to use the Greenwich Meridian as 0 degrees as it was already a popular choice. That is all except the French, who abstained from the vote and used the Paris Meridian as 0 degrees on French charts for several decades.

25. Reassurance from the Beach Boys, 1964 : DON'T WORRY BABY
The 1964 Beach Boys song “Don’t Worry Baby” was released in 1965 as the B-side to the band’s first number-one hit, “I Get Around”.

29. "If you haven't seen ___, you haven't seen New York" (old ad slogan) : MACY’S
The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early New York stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

32. Tennis star Mandlikova : HANA
Hana Mandlikova is a former professional tennis star from Czechoslovakia. Mandlikova won four Grand Slam titles and then retired in 1990, at the ripe old age of 28.

33. Rapper ___ Wayne : LIL
Here’s yet another rapper (oh, joy!). Lil Wayne's real name is ... Dwayne Carter, Jr.

34. Financial adviser's recommendation, in brief : IRA
IRA Individual retirement account (IRA)

35. ___ Paul (classic guitar) : LES
Les Paul was a guitarist, songwriter and inventor. When he was 33 years old, Paul was involved in a near-fatal car crash that left his right arm and elbow shattered. Surgeons offered him the choice of amputation or a rebuilding of the limb that would leave him unable to bend his elbow. He told them to set his arm at just under 90 degrees so that he could at least hold his guitar and perhaps play it.

39. Encouragement from Journey, 1981 : DON'T STOP BELIEVIN’
I suppose Journey’s 1981 hit “Don’t Stop Believin’” might be termed a rock anthem. Famously, it was used in the final scene of the final episode of HBO’s “The Sopranos”, and soon after made it higher in the charts in the UK than it had on its original release, and was to become the top-selling catalog track sold in the iTunes store.

45. "Modern Family" network : ABC
“Modern Family” is a marvelous television show shown on ABC since 2009. The show’s format is that of a “mockumentary”, with the cast often addressing the camera directly. In that respect “Modern Family” resembles two other excellent shows: “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation”, both of which might also be described a “mockumentaries”.

46. Business monthly : INC
“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

47. Bob Marley's "___ Love" : ONE
“One Love” is a classic reggae song from 1977 recorded by Bob Marley and the Wailers. A ska version of “One Love” had been released by the Wailers as early as 1965, but it is the 1977 release that we all remember, I am sure.

48. Movie that introduced the line "Bond, James Bond" : DR NO
"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. No and Fu Manchu.

52. Plea from the Human League, 1982 : DON’T YOU WANT ME
“Don’t You Want Me” was the biggest hit for the British group called the Human League, released in 1981 in the UK.

57. ___ mater : ALMA
The literal translation for the Latin term "alma mater" is "nourishing mother". “Alma mater” was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one's alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one's last place of education.

64. Reproach from the Buckinghams, 1967 : DON’T YOU CARE
“Don’t You Care” is a 1967 song released by the Buckinghams that made it to number six in the charts.

The Buckinghams are a band from Chicago. The Buckinghams’ big year was 1967 when they had four hits, including the chart-topper “Kind of a Drag”.

67. Capri or Wight : ISLE
The island of Capri off the coast of Southern Italy has been a tourist resort since the days of ancient Rome. Capri is home to the famous Blue Grotto, a sea cave that is illuminated with sunlight that's colored blue as it passes through the seawater into the cave.

The Isle of Wight is the largest island in England, and lies about five miles off the south coast of the country.

71. Divisions politiques : ETATS
In French, a state (état) is a political division (division politique).

Down
1. Sneaker brand : KEDS
Keds is a brand name of athletic shoe first introduced in 1916 by US Rubber. The shoe was originally marketed as a rubber-soled, canvas-topped sneaker.

2. Sunburn relief : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

3. School founded by Ben Franklin : PENN
The University of Pennsylvania (Penn or UPenn) was founded in 1740 by by Benjamin Franklin. Penn was the first school in the country to offer both graduate and undergraduate courses.

The noted polymath Benjamin Franklin was one of the US’s Founding Fathers. Franklin was born into a working class family in Boston in 1706. He went on to invent the lightning rod and bifocals. He became the first US Ambassador to France, the US’s Postmaster General and the Governor of Pennsylvania. He played the violin, the harp and the guitar and composed a string quartet. He was also an accomplished chess player, the first to be known by name in the American colonies. The list of the Benjamin Franklin’s accomplishments seems to be endless …

5. Iconoclasts break them : TABOOS
Iconoclasm is the deliberate destruction of society's icons, either religious or cultural. The term applies more to a rebellious action from within a society, as opposed to an act by external forces invading another culture. As such, the term "iconoclast" has come to have a broader meaning, describing anyone who stands up against established convention.

6. Jaguars' grp. : AFC
The Jacksonville Jaguars have been in the NFL since 1995, and play in the American Football Conference (AFC).

7. ___ favor : POR
“Por favor” is Spanish for "please".

8. Mass of crystallized magma : PLUTON
Pluton is a body of igneous rock that formed underground by the consolidation of magma. The name “pluton” comes from Pluto, the ruler of the underworld in classical mythology.

9. ___ del Fuego : TIERRA
Tierra del Fuego is an archipelago off the southern tip of South America and is the location of the famed Cape Horn. Tierra del Fuego was discovered by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. He saw native fires on land as he passed by and originally called the location "Land of Smoke" This was later changed to "Land of Fire", or "Tierra del Fuego" in Spanish.

10. Certain renewable : SOLAR
Solar panels make use of what's known as the photovoltaic effect. We all learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around inside the material creating a difference in voltage.

11. "I love," in Latin : AMO
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

12. Game similar to hide-and-seek : RINGALEVIO
Ringolevio is a children’s game similar to hide-and-seek that originated in New York City. The game has been around since the early 1900s. We knew the same game as “Relievio” back in Ireland, which I believe is the name used in Canada.

13. Part of a path left by Hansel and Gretel : CRUMB
"Hansel and Gretel" is a Germanic fairy tale found in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. It tells of two siblings, Hansel and Gretel, the children of a woodcutter. The youngsters are abandoned in a forest at the behest of an evil stepmother. Clever Hansel hears of the plan and leaves a trail of pebbles so that he and his sister can find their way home, which they do. But the children are abandoned again and this time leave a trail of breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, the crumbs are eaten by birds and so the children do indeed become lost. But eventually they do all live happily ever after ...

19. Seaside eagle : ERN
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

23. Vietnam War locale : MY LAI
The My Lai Massacre took place in the Vietnamese village of that name in March, 1968. After an investigation it was determined that at least 347 unarmed civilians, mostly women, children and elderly people, were murdered by a unit of US soldiers. It was also revealed that gang rapes and torture took place during the massacre. At least three servicemen tried to halt the killing, but they were vastly outnumbered by those participating. About two years after the massacre, 26 men were charged with crimes, but only one man was convicted. William Calley was found guilty of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment and hard labor. President Nixon stepped in the day after Calley was sentenced and ordered him transferred from Leavenworth prison and placed under house arrest pending appeal. On appeal the life sentence was reduced to 20 years, and this was further cut to 10 years as an act of clemency by the Secretary of the Army. Calley was released after serving three years in total.

26. Kojak's first name : THEO
“Kojak” is a fun police drama that had an original run on TV from 1973 to 1978. The title character was NYPD Detective Lieutenant Theo Kojak, played by Telly Savalas. Famously, Kojak sucks away on lollipops as he tries to quit cigarettes. Kojak is assisted in his cases by Sergeant “Fatso” Stavros, a character played by George Savalas, Telly’s younger brother.

30. Elvis's middle name : ARON
Elvis Aron Presley was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So though born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

35. Classic Ford : LTD
There has been a lot of speculation about what the acronym LTD stands for in the car model known as "Ford LTD". Many say it stands for Luxury Trim Decor, and others that it is an abbreviation for "limited". Although the car was produced in Australia with the acronym meaning Lincoln Type Design, it seems LTD was originally chosen as just three meaningless letters that sound well together.

36. Doting affection, briefly : TLC
Tender loving care (TLC)

42. Eric who played Nero in 2009's "Star Trek" : BANA
Eric Bana is an Australian actor who enjoyed a successful career in his home country before breaking into Hollywood playing an American Delta Force sergeant in "Black Hawk Down". A couple of years later he played the lead in Ang Lee's 2003 movie "The Hulk", the role of Dr Bruce Banner. More recently he played the Romulan villain Nero, in the 2009 "Star Trek" movie.

48. Groucho foil Margaret ___ : DUMONT
Margaret Dumont was an actress who became very familiar in Marx Brothers’ movies, always playing the woman who Groucho made fun of. Groucho became so fond of her that he said she was “practically the fifth Marx brother”. In turn, Dumont always referred to Groucho as “Julie”, as Julius was Groucho’s real name.

49. African country known as the Land of a Thousand Hills : RWANDA
Rwanda is a sovereign nation in central Africa that is populated by three groups: the Hutu, Tutsi (aka Watutsi) and Twa. The Tutsi are the second largest population of people in Rwanda, with the Hutu being the largest group. The bloody conflict that has existed between the Tutsi and Hutu peoples dates back to about 1880 when Catholic missionaries arrived in the region. The missionaries found that they had more success converting the Hutus than the Tutsi, and when the Germans occupied the area during WWI they confiscated Tutsi land and gave it to Hutu tribes in order to reward religious conversion. This injustice fuels fighting to this very day.

54. Almost any doo-wop song : OLDIE
Doo-wop developed in the 1940s and can be described as a vocal-based R&B music. Even though the style has been around since the forties, the name doo-wop wasn't introduced until the early sixties.

59. Sailors : TARS
A Jack Tar, or just "tar", was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor's various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing his clothes and using tar in his hair to slick down his ponytail.

61. Some jeans : LEES
The Lee company famous for making jeans was formed in 1889, by one Henry David Lee in Salina, Kansas.

63. Brooks who has won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony : MEL
Mel Brooks' real name is Melvin Kaminsky. Brooks is one of very few entertainers (there are only ten) who has won the "Showbiz Award Grand Slam" i.e. an Oscar, Tony, Grammy and Emmy. He is in good company, as the list also includes the likes of Richard Rogers, Sir John Gielgud, Marvin Hamlisch and Audrey Hepburn.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Dead as a doornail : KAPUT
6. Listings in a daily planner: Abbr. : APPTS
11. Marble ___ (London landmark) : ARCH
15. Justice Kagan : ELENA
16. Book leaf : FOLIO
17. Oscar winner Sorvino : MIRA
18. Appeal from Elvis, 1956 : DON’T BE CRUEL
20. Burden of proof : ONUS
21. Prom attendee, typically : SENIOR
22. Mine vehicle : TRAM
24. Clock-setting std. : GMT
25. Reassurance from the Beach Boys, 1964 : DON'T WORRY BABY
29. "If you haven't seen ___, you haven't seen New York" (old ad slogan) : MACY’S
32. Tennis star Mandlikova : HANA
33. Rapper ___ Wayne : LIL
34. Financial adviser's recommendation, in brief : IRA
35. ___ Paul (classic guitar) : LES
36. Start liking : TAKE TO
39. Encouragement from Journey, 1981 : DON'T STOP BELIEVIN’
44. Impoverished : IN NEED
45. "Modern Family" network : ABC
46. Business monthly : INC
47. Bob Marley's "___ Love" : ONE
48. Movie that introduced the line "Bond, James Bond" : DR NO
50. Went up : AROSE
52. Plea from the Human League, 1982 : DON’T YOU WANT ME
56. Decline : EBB
57. ___ mater : ALMA
58. Young travelers' crash site : HOSTEL
62. Ray of light : BEAM
64. Reproach from the Buckinghams, 1967 : DON’T YOU CARE
67. Capri or Wight : ISLE
68. Art house film, often : INDIE
69. Ward attendant : NURSE
70. Relate : TELL
71. Divisions politiques : ETATS
72. Quizzes : TESTS

Down
1. Sneaker brand : KEDS
2. Sunburn relief : ALOE
3. School founded by Ben Franklin : PENN
4. Not neat : UNTIDY
5. Iconoclasts break them : TABOOS
6. Jaguars' grp. : AFC
7. ___ favor : POR
8. Mass of crystallized magma : PLUTON
9. ___ del Fuego : TIERRA
10. Certain renewable : SOLAR
11. "I love," in Latin : AMO
12. Game similar to hide-and-seek : RINGALEVIO
13. Part of a path left by Hansel and Gretel : CRUMB
14. Done in a rush : HASTY
19. Seaside eagle : ERN
23. Vietnam War locale : MY LAI
26. Kojak's first name : THEO
27. Insect with a stinger : WASP
28. Ten-speed, e.g. : BIKE
29. Skirt hemmed at the calf : MIDI
30. Elvis's middle name : ARON
31. Dive done with the arms around the knees : CANNONBALL
35. Classic Ford : LTD
36. Doting affection, briefly : TLC
37. Quaint food containers : TINS
38. Formerly : ONCE
40. Collapsible shelter : TENT
41. "It's been real!" : SEE YA!
42. Eric who played Nero in 2009's "Star Trek" : BANA
43. Black, to poets : EBON
48. Groucho foil Margaret ___ : DUMONT
49. African country known as the Land of a Thousand Hills : RWANDA
50. Bill line : AMOUNT
51. Save from danger : RESCUE
52. ___ card : DEBIT
53. Very heavy : OBESE
54. Almost any doo-wop song : OLDIE
55. However, for short : THO’
59. Sailors : TARS
60. Formerly, in the past : ERST
61. Some jeans : LEES
63. Brooks who has won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony : MEL
65. Small bird : TIT
66. "I'm game" : YES


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0630-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jun 14, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Vowel-Sound Progression … today’s themed answers end with a FL- vowel sound progression:
17A. Celebrity chef and host of the Food Network's "Boy Meets Grill" : BOBBY FLAY
25A. Theme music for TV's "The Dating Game" : SPANISH FLEA
39A. Insect that causes sleeping sickness : TSETSE FLY
55A. It's typically slow during rush hour : TRAFFIC FLOW
66A. Dismissive term for chronic fatigue syndrome : YUPPIE FLU
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 4m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Airline to the Holy Land : EL AL
El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies”.

14. N.Y.C. institution with works of Warhol and Dalí : MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

Andy Warhol went through a period of painting iconic American products, including Coca-Cola bottles and Campbell's tomato soup cans. In 1964 he participated in a gallery show called "The American Supermarket". Along with other pop artists he contributed works including a painting of a can of Campbell's tomato soup. He priced the painting at $1,500, and sold autographed cans of soup for $6 a piece.

The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it's a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

15. Italian currency before the euro : LIRA
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

17. Celebrity chef and host of the Food Network's "Boy Meets Grill" : BOBBY FLAY
Bobby Flay is a celebrity chef who has hosted several shows on the Food Network. Flay is also an Iron Chef on the show “Iron Chef America”, which also airs on the Food Network.

19. Crooks, to cops : PERPS
Perpetrator (perp.)

20. Licorice flavoring : ANISE
Liquorice (also licorice) and aniseed have similar flavors, but they come from unrelated plants. The liquorice plant is a legume like a bean, and the sweet flavor is an extract from the roots. The flavor mainly comes from an ether compound called anethole, the same substance that gives the distinctive flavor to anise. The seedpods of the anise plant are what we know as "aniseed". The anise seeds themselves are usually ground to release the flavor.

23. AOL or EarthLink: Abbr. : ISP
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP's network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs. I'd go with cable if I were you, if it's available in your area ...

The iconic phrase “You’ve got mail” was first used by AOL in 1989. The greeting was recorded by voice actor Elwood Edwards. Edwards has parlayed his gig with AOL into some other work. He appears in an episode of “The Simpsons” as a doctor who says the line “You’ve got leprosy”. Edwards also worked as a weatherman for a while and got to use the line “You’ve got hail” …

EarthLink is an IT services company. One service offered by EarthLink is internet access, which it provides to about a million consumers.

25. Theme music for TV's "The Dating Game" : SPANISH FLEA
“Spanish Flea” is a song from the sixties that was composed by Julius Wechter with lyrics by his wife Cissy Wechter. The song is best-known as an instrumental, a number one hit for Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass in 1965. “Spanish Flea” was also used as the theme tune for “The Dating Game” TV show that aired from the sixties through the nineties.

30. Majority of the contestants on "The Dating Game" : MEN
Most episodes of TV’s “The Dating Game” featured a bachelorette questioning three bachelors, after which she would select one young man to go out with on a date. A lot of famous people appeared on the show, before they became celebrities. It can be fun to check video clips of their appearances on YouTube. A good list to start with includes Farrah Fawcett, Suzanne Sommers, LIndsay Wagner, Tom Selleck, Lee Majors, the Carpenters, Andy Kaufman, Steve Martin, Burt Reynolds, John Ritter, Phil Hartman, Arnold Schwarzenegger. A more sinister appearance was made by serial killer Rodney Alcala while he was in the middle of his killing spree, but after he had been convicted of rape.

33. Bygone jets, informally : SSTS
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Concorde was developed and produced under an Anglo-French treaty by France’s Aérospatiale and the UK’s British Aircraft Corporation (BAC). Concordes were mainly operated by Air France and British Airways, with both companies buying the planes with substantial subsidies from the French and British governments.

39. Insect that causes sleeping sickness : TSETSE FLY
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name "tsetse" comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as "fly". Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as "sleeping sickness". Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

42. Actor Davis : OSSIE
Ossie Davis was a very successful African-American actor, but also a director, poet, playwright and social activist. One of Davis’s better known performances was in the 1993 movie “Grumpy Old Men”, in which he played the owner of the bait shop by the lake.

45. "The Thin Man" pooch : ASTA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb "The Thin Man" series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called "Skippy". Skippy was also the dog in "Bringing up Baby" with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of "The Thin Man" films.

“The Thin Man” is a detective novel written by Dashiell Hammett that was first published in the magazine “Redbook” in 1934. Hammett never wrote a sequel to his story, but it spawned a wonderful, wonderful series of “The Thin Man” films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. “The Thin Man” was the last novel that Hammett wrote.

46. ___ tape : DUCT
What we tend to call “duct” tape today was originally known as “duck” tape. In its first form, duck tape was rubber-based adhesive applied to a duck cloth backing, hence the name. Cotton duck cloth is a canvas-like material, a plain woven cotton fabric. The name “duck” comes from the Dutch “doek” meaning “linen canvas”. Duck tape started to known as “duct tape” in the fifties, as it was commonly used to wrap air ducts in the construction industry.

50. Proverbial place for bats : BELFRY
The expression "bats in the belfry" meaning "mad, crazy" conjures up images of bats flying around Gothic bell towers, but actually it's a relatively recent addition to our vernacular. The term is American in origin, and dates back only to the early 1900s. The concept is that someone who is "crazy", with wild ideas flying around his or her head, can be described as having bats (wild ideas) flying around the belfry (head). The terms "bats" and "batty" originated at the same time, and are clearly derivative.

52. Biblical boat : ARK
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah's life-preserver during the flood.

58. Hosp. triage areas : ERS
Emergency rooms (ERs)

"Triage" is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on a battlefield. The term "triage" is French and means "a sorting".

59. Stimpy's TV pal : REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” is an animated television show that ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. The title characters are Marland "Ren" Höek, a scrawny Chihuahua, and Stimpson J. Cat, a rotund Manx cat. Not my cup of tea ...

61. Jackson 5 hairstyles : AFROS
The Jackson 5 singing group was originally made up of brothers Tito, Jackie, Jermaine, Marlon and Michael.

66. Dismissive term for chronic fatigue syndrome : YUPPIE FLU
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder in which the patient exhibits persistent fatigue over a period of months, and that fatigue is not significantly relieved by rest. One pejorative name for the condition is “yuppie flu”.

The term “yuppie” first appeared in the 1980s and is short for “young urban professional”. Yuppies are generally regarded as upper middle class or upper class men and women in their twenties or thirties.

70. Grand ___ (auto race) : PRIX
Even though the term is used in many competitions, I think that we most associate “Grand Prix” with the series of Formula One motor races. These Formula One Grand Prix races trace their roots back to organized automobile road races from one French town to the next that date back to 1894. “Grand Prix” translates from French as “grand, big prize.”

71. Remove, to an editor : DELE
"Dele" is the editorial instruction to delete something from a document, and is often written in red.

72. Dashing Flynn of old films : ERROL
Errol Flynn was born 1909 in Tasmania, Australia where he was raised. In his twenties, Flynn lived in the UK where he pursued his acting career. Around the same time he starred in an Australian film "In the Wake of the Bounty" and then appeared in a British film "Murder at Monte Carlo". It was in the latter film that he was noticed by Warner Brothers who brought him to America. Flynn's non-American heritage shone through even while he was living the American dream in California. He regularly played cricket, along with his friend David Niven, in the Hollywood Cricket Club.

74. Adriatic and others : SEAS
The Adriatic is the sea separating Italy from the Balkans.

Down
1. Mummifies, e.g. : EMBALMS
We use the term “mummy” for a dead body that has been embalmed in preparation for burial, especially if done so by the ancient Egyptians. The term “mummy” comes from the Persian word “mumiyah” meaning “embalmed body”.

11. ___ in Manila (Ali/Frazier fight) : THRILLA
Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier had three memorable fights. The first was billed as the "Fight of the Century" and took place in 1971 in Madison Square Garden. It was a fight between two great boxers, both of whom were undefeated up till that point. Frazier won in a unanimous decision after fifteen rounds. A couple of years later, in 1973, Frazier lost his title to George Foreman. Ali and Frazier had a non-title rematch in 1974, with Ali coming out ahead this time, also in a unanimous decision. Later that year, Ali grabbed back the World Heavyweight Title in "The Rumble in the Jungle", the famous "rope-a-dope" fight against George Foreman. That set the stage for the third and final fight between Ali and Frazier, "The Thrilla in Manila". Ali won the early rounds, but Frazier made a comeback in the middle of the fight. Ali took control at the end of the bout, so much so that Frazier wasn't able to come out of his corner for the 15th and final round. He couldn't come out of his corner because both of his eyes were swollen shut, giving Ali a victory due to a technical knockout (TKO).

13. Kitchen scourers : SOS PADS
S.O.S is a brand name of scouring pads made from steel wool impregnated with soap. The product was invented as a giveaway by an aluminum pot salesman in San Francisco called Ed Cox. His wife gave it the name "S.O.S" as an acronym for "Save Our Saucepans". Note the punctuation! There is no period after the last S, and that is deliberate. When Cox went to register the trademark, he found that "S.O.S." could not be a trademark because it was used as an international distress signal. So he dropped the period after the last S, and I hope made a lot of money for himself and his wife.

18. Tues. vis-à-vis Wed. : YEST
Yesterday (yest.)

22. Handbag monogram : YSL
Yves Saint-Laurent was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from prison, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story ...

26. Brazilian soccer legend : PELE
Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world's greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil.

27. Singer Baker with the 1988 hit "Giving You the Best That I Got" : ANITA
Anita Baker is an R&B and soul singer who was raised in Detroit, Michigan. Baker’s most successful song is the Grammy-winning “Sweet Love” released in 1986.

29. "Pretty Boy" of crime : FLOYD
Charles Arthur Floyd was a bank robber who got a lot of press coverage for his crimes in the 1930s. In one robbery, Floyd was described by one of his victims as "a mere boy - a pretty boy with apple cheeks", words that supposedly earned him the moniker "Pretty Boy". Just like his contemporary, Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd hated his nickname.

36. Author's submissions: Abbr. : MSS
Manuscript (MS)

40. Feudal peasant : SERF
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. "Serf" comes from the Latin "servus", meaning "slave".

41. Casino card game : FARO
Faro is a card game somewhat akin to Baccarat that was popular in England and France in the 18th century. Faro made it to the Old West, where it became a favorite of Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp. The origin of the name "Faro" is unclear. One popular theory is that Faro is a contraction of ‘pharaoh’ given that Egyptian motifs used to be common on playing cards of the period. There’s another theory involving the usual suspects: Irish immigrants and famines …

48. Flower part : COROLLA
The corolla of a flower is its collection of petals viewed as a unit. “Corolla” is Latin for “small garland”.

49. Kleenexes : TISSUES
Even though Kleenex is sometimes used today as a generic term for a tissue, Kleenex is a brand name owned by Kimberley-Clark. Kleenex facial tissues came about after WW1. The material used in the tissue had been developed as a replacement for cotton that was in high demand as surgical tissue during the war. The material developed was called "Cellucotton" and was used in gas mask filters. It was first sold as a facial tissue under the name Kleenex in 1924.

53. "The Bridge on the River ___" : KWAI
The river referred to in the movie (and novel) "The Bridge on the River Kwai" is actually called the Khwae Yai River, and is in western Thailand. The original novel by Pierre Boulle was published in French in 1952, and the wonderful movie released in 1957. Both tell the story of construction of part of the Burma Railway and a bridge over the river, using prisoners of war as laborers. The film stars William Holden, Alec Guinness and Jack Hawkins.

62. G-men : FEDS
The nickname “G-men” is short for "Government Men" and refers to agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

64. "If you ask me," in chat rooms : IMO
In my opinion (IMO)

65. Internet connection inits. : DSL
The acronym “DSL” originally stood for Digital Subscriber Loop, but is now accepted to mean (Asymmetric) Digital Subscriber Line. DSL is the technology that allows Internet service be delivered down the same telephone line as voice service, by separating the two into different frequency signals.

67. "Great Expectations" boy : PIP
The novel "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens is written in the first person, through the eyes of the hero of the piece. a young orphan boy called Pip.

68. Stores for G.I.'s : PXS
A PX is a Post Exchange, a retail store operating on a US Army Base. The equivalent store on an Air Force Base is called a Base Exchange (BX). At a Navy installation it's a Navy Exchange (NEX), at a Marine Corps installation it's a Marine Corps Exchange (MCX) and at a Coast Guard Installation it's a CGX.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Airline to the Holy Land : EL AL
5. Finishes : ENDS
9. Baseball gloves : MITTS
14. N.Y.C. institution with works of Warhol and Dalí : MOMA
15. Italian currency before the euro : LIRA
16. Sound muffled by a handkerchief : ACHOO!
17. Celebrity chef and host of the Food Network's "Boy Meets Grill" : BOBBY FLAY
19. Crooks, to cops : PERPS
20. Licorice flavoring : ANISE
21. For what reason? : WHY?
23. AOL or EarthLink: Abbr. : ISP
24. Tell tall tales : LIE
25. Theme music for TV's "The Dating Game" : SPANISH FLEA
30. Majority of the contestants on "The Dating Game" : MEN
31. Equivalent of a Roman X : TEN
32. Pacified : LULLED
33. Bygone jets, informally : SSTS
35. Like a wet noodle : LIMP
38. Byways : ROADS
39. Insect that causes sleeping sickness : TSETSE FLY
42. Actor Davis : OSSIE
45. "The Thin Man" pooch : ASTA
46. ___ tape : DUCT
50. Proverbial place for bats : BELFRY
52. Biblical boat : ARK
54. "___ hear" : SO I
55. It's typically slow during rush hour : TRAFFIC FLOW
58. Hosp. triage areas : ERS
59. Stimpy's TV pal : REN
60. One who plays for pay : PRO
61. Jackson 5 hairstyles : AFROS
63. Disentangled : UNDID
66. Dismissive term for chronic fatigue syndrome : YUPPIE FLU
69. Judges to be : DEEMS
70. Grand ___ (auto race) : PRIX
71. Remove, to an editor : DELE
72. Dashing Flynn of old films : ERROL
73. Sugar amts. : TSPS
74. Adriatic and others : SEAS

Down
1. Mummifies, e.g. : EMBALMS
2. Fruitcakes : LOONIES
3. Surrounding, as sound : AMBIENT
4. Experiment sites : LABS
5. Santa's little helper : ELF
6. Nothing : NIL
7. Sketched : DRAWN
8. Give an informal greeting : SAY HI
9. Poster with a "You are here" label : MAP
10. Rink surface : ICE
11. ___ in Manila (Ali/Frazier fight) : THRILLA
12. Favorite entrant in a tournament : TOP SEED
13. Kitchen scourers : SOS PADS
18. Tues. vis-à-vis Wed. : YEST
22. Handbag monogram : YSL
26. Brazilian soccer legend : PELE
27. Singer Baker with the 1988 hit "Giving You the Best That I Got" : ANITA
28. Throw : HURL
29. "Pretty Boy" of crime : FLOYD
34. Completely unlike a wet noodle : STIFF
36. Author's submissions: Abbr. : MSS
37. Flower part : PETAL
40. Feudal peasant : SERF
41. Casino card game : FARO
42. Stick out : OBTRUDE
43. More calm : SERENER
44. Spoken slur : SLANDER
47. Charge for entering a park, e.g. : USER FEE
48. Flower part : COROLLA
49. Kleenexes : TISSUES
51. Pup's cry : YIP
53. "The Bridge on the River ___" : KWAI
56. Burial vault : CRYPT
57. On all ___ (crawling, say) : FOURS
62. G-men : FEDS
64. "If you ask me," in chat rooms : IMO
65. Internet connection inits. : DSL
67. "Great Expectations" boy : PIP
68. Stores for G.I.'s : PXS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0629-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jun 14, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Byron Walden
THEME: Downright Tricky … today’s themed answers all start in DOWN direction, and them make a RIGHT turn in thegrid so that we end up with an EL-shape. Also, each themed answer is made up of three words, starting with the letters CID:
8D. Lament about modern men : CHIVALRY IS D/EAD
13D. Pachelbel classic, familiarly : CANON I/N D
32D. Major African humanitarian concern of the 2000s : CRISIS IN DAR/FUR
38D. Like the contents of many attics : COVERED IN/ DUST
50D. 1982 holiday country hit by Alabama : CHRISTMAS IN/ DIXIE
71D. "Right away, boss" : CONSIDER IT D/ONE

108D. Spanish hero whose 113-Down is represented enigmatically six times in this puzzle : EL CID
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

20. "From Here to Eternity" setting : OAHU
"From Here to Eternity" is a 1953 film adaptation of a James Jones novel of the same name. The main characters in the story are three soldiers stationed in Hawaii in the days prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. The soldiers are played by Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift and Frank Sinatra. Deborah Kerr and Donna Reed play the love interests. The film (and novel) title is a quotation from the 1892 poem “Gentlemen-Rankers” by Rudyard Kipling:
We're poor little lambs who've lost our way,
Baa! Baa! Baa!
We're little black sheep who've gone astray,
Baa—aa—aa!
Gentlemen-rankers out on the spree,
Damned from here to Eternity,
God ha' mercy on such as we,
Baa! Yah! Bah!

21. Stage-diving locale : MOSH PIT
Moshing (also “slam dancing”) is the pushing and shoving that takes place in the audience at a concert (usually a punk or heavy metal concert). The area directly in front of the stage is known as the mosh pit. When a performer does a "stage dive" it is into (or I suppose "onto") the mosh pit. It doesn't sound like fun to me. Injuries are commonplace in the mosh pit, and deaths are not unknown.

24. Stoker of fear? : BRAM
Bram Stoker was an Irish author whose real given name was Abraham (shortened to “Bram”). Stoker is most famous for his Gothic novel “Dracula”, first published in 1897.

26. Lay ___ : AN EGG
Apparently the expression “to lay an egg”, meaning “to perform or play really badly” comes from the resemblance of the number 0 to an egg. One laying an egg scores zero.

27. Politician with a like button? : IKE
“I Like Ike” was a political slogan that originated with the grassroots movement to get Dwight D. Eisenhower to run for president in the 1952 presidential election.

30. Minnesota player, familiarly : VIKE
The Minnesota Vikings joined the NFL as an expansion team in 1960. Founded in Minnesota, the team’s name reflects the location’s reputation a center of Scandinavian American culture.

31. Microwaveable snack : HOT POCKET
Hot Pockets were introduced in the seventies by brothers David and Paul Merage. Hot Pockets are microwaveable turnovers filled with cheese, meat or vegetables.

33. Dress that drapes : SARI
The item of clothing called a "sari" (also "saree") is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that's a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

35. Highly desirable to Uncle Sam? : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word "Samland" for "America" in intelligence communiques.

42. Lean meat source : EMU
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an "Emu War" in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the "invading force". The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of "war", the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

44. Shortstop-turned-ESPN analyst Garciaparra : NOMAR
Nomar Garciaparra is one of only thirteen players to have hit two grand slams during a single game in the Majors. He accomplished the feat in 1999 for the Boston Red Sox against the Seattle Mariners.

46. Stylebook concern : USAGE
A “style manual” is a favorite reference book of mine, one that sets the standards for writing and design of documents. That said, it’s sad how often I have to refer to “The Chicago Manual of Style”.

49. Area with XY coordinates? : MAN CAVE
In most mammalian species, including man, females have two identical sex chromosomes (XX), and males two distinct sex chromosomes (XY). As a result it is the males who determine the sex of the offspring. However, in birds it’s the opposite, so females determine the sex of the chicks.

58. Stay inactive over the summer : ESTIVATE
“Estivation” is a process of hibernation in some animal species that takes place during the summer months. Hibernation is often associated with low temperatures, whereas estivation is a strategy to avoid activity during high temperature.

60. Paris street : RUE
“Rue” is the French word for “street”.

62. Moderator of the first Obama/McCain and Obama/Romney debates : LEHRER
Jim Lehrer is a former news anchor with PBS for the “PBS Newshour” show. Lehrer is also associated with presidential debates and has moderated 12 such events.

64. Early Chinese dynasty : HSIA
The Xia (also “Hsia”) Dynasty was the first Chinese Dynasty, lasting from about 2070 to 1600 BCE.

65. Graph's x-coordinate : ABSCISSA
When something is plotted on a graph with x- and y-coordinates, the x-coordinate is called the abscissa, and the y-coordinate is the ordinate.

75. Son of Aphrodite : EROS
Eros was the Greek god of love, the Greek counterpart of the Roman god Cupid.

82. "The Education of a Golfer" autobiographer : SAM SNEAD
Sam Snead was probably the most successful golfer never to win a US Open title, as he won a record 82 PGA Tour events. He did win seven majors, but never the US Open. He was also quite the showman. He once hit the scoreboard at Wrigley Field stadium with a golf ball, by teeing off from home plate.

86. Hollywood and Bollywood, e.g. : FILM INDUSTRIES
Bollywood is the informal name given to the huge film industry based in Mumbai in India. The term "Bollywood" is a melding of "Bombay", the old name for Mumbai, and of course "Hollywood".

89. Material in the hats of Buckingham Palace guards : BEAR FUR
The British Grenadier Guards started wearing bearskin hats following the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. The hat is made from the fur of the Canadian black bear, with an entire skin being used to make just one hat. The use of bearskin by the UK military has been controversial for a couple of decades now and seems to be fading out due to ethical concerns.

Buckingham Palace is a stately home that, since the days of Queen Victoria, has been the official residence of the British monarch. Buckingham Palace was originally a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703, hence the name.

95. Grp. battling consumer fraud : BBB
The Better Business Bureau is a private concern (nope, it is not a government agency), founded in 1912. It operates like a franchise, with local BBB's managed independently but operating to a "corporate" set of guidelines.

96. 1980s video game spinoff : MS PAC-MAN
The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero "Paku", known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

100. Drag staple : PADDED BRA
The etymology of the term "drag", as used in the transvestite world, seems to be unclear. It perhaps relates to the tendency of a transvestite's skirts to drag along the ground in days of old (although why they just didn't hitch up their skirts is beyond me!).

103. Et ___ : ALII
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact "et al." can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

107. Connecticut Ivy : YALE
Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

109. Southern grocery chain : WINN-DIXIE
The Winn-Dixie supermarket chain started out as a family concern, growing from a general store in Burley, Idaho in 1914. When the family business was big enough, it took a controlling interest in a chain of stores called Winn-Lovett in 1939. Using the name Winn-Lovett, the company continued to grow and in 1955 bought the Dixie Home chain of stores. At that point the name changed to Winn-Dixie. The original family name? That was Davis ...

111. Harry Potter mark : SCAR
Author J. K.Rowling’s famous character Harry Potter has a lightning-shaped scar on his forehead, the result of an attack on his life as a baby by the Dark wizard Lord Voldemort.

115. Agents' org. : FBI
What we know today as the FBI was set up in 1908 as the BOI, the Bureau of Investigation. The name was changed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1935. The Bureau was set up at the behest of President Theodore Roosevelt. President Roosevelt was largely moved to do so after the 1901 assassination of President McKinley, as there was a perception that anarchists were threatening law and order. The FBI’s motto uses the organization’s acronym, and is “Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity”.

117. Post-Weimar period : NAZI ERA
At the end of WWI, the imperial government of Germany was overthrown in the German Revolution of November 1918. Just under a year later, a new constitution was adopted by a national assembly in the city of Weimar. The resulting Weimar Republic lasted until German democracy collapsed in the early 1930s and the Nazi Party came to power.

119. Terrace farming pioneers : INCA
The Inca people emerged as a tribe around the 12th century, in what today is southern Peru. The Incas developed a vast empire over the next 300 years, extending along most of the western side of South America. The Empire of course fell to the Spanish, finally dissolving in 1572 with the execution of Tupac Amaru, the last Incan Emperor.

121. "Walk Away ___" (1966 hit) : RENEE
“Walk Away Renée” is a hit song by the band called The Left Banke, released in 1966. It was composed by the band’s keyboard player, Michael Brown, when he was just 16-years-old.

122. "Absolutely Fabulous," e.g. : BRITCOM
“Absolutely Fabulous” (sometimes shortened to "Ab Fab") is a cult-classic sitcom produced by the BBC. The two stars of the show are Jennifer Saunders (Edina Monsoon) and Joanna Lumley (Patsy Stone).

123. "JAG" spinoff : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon.

125. Beyond piqued : ANGRY
Our term "pique" meaning a "fit of ill feeling" is a French word meaning a "prick, sting, irritation".

127. H.S. proficiency exams : GEDS
The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of five tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

Down
1. ___ salad : COBB
Ty Cobb's first cousin, Robert H. Cobb, owned the Brown Derby chain of restaurants. One of his regular customers was the famous Sid Grauman, who ran Grauman's Chinese Theater. Late one night, Grauman asked for a snack, and Cobb came up with a chopped salad simply made from ingredients he happened to have in the refrigerator. Grauman liked it so much that continued to request it, and the Cobb salad was born.

4. Quince, e.g. : NUMERO
In Spanish, fifteen (quince) is a number (numero).

7. Subj. of a thought experiment : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

11. C4H10O : ETHER
Ethers are a whole class of organic compounds, but in the vernacular “ether” is specifically diethyl ether. Diethyl ether was once very popular as a general anesthetic.

13. Pachelbel classic, familiarly : CANON IN D
Johann Pachelbel was a composer from Germany active in the Baroque Era. Pachelbel’s music was very popular during his own lifetime, and today his best-known work is his “Canon in D”. which has become one of the most popular choices during modern wedding ceremonies.

14. When Tatum O'Neal won her Oscar : AGE TEN
Tatum O'Neal is the youngest actress to win a "competitive" Oscar. She won the Best Supporting Actress Award in 1974 when she was just 10 years old, for her role as Addie in "Paper Moon". The youngest person to win an honorary Academy Award was Shirley Temple, who was only 5 years old when she was presented with an Oscar in 1934.

16. "Cogito, ___ sum" : ERGO
The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, "Cogito ergo sum", which translates into English as "I think, therefore I am".

29. Health care giant with a Tree of Life logo : CIGNA
The health care management company known as CIGNA was formed in 1982 by a merger of two insurance companies. One was Connecticut General (CG) and the other Insurance Company of North America (INA).

32. Major African humanitarian concern of the 2000s : CRISIS IN DARFUR
In response to a 2003 rebellion in the Darfur region of Sudan, the Sudanese government embarked on a campaign of ethnic cleansing against the non-Arab population in the region. Hundreds of thousands of civilian deaths ensued, and eventually Sudan’s president Omar al-Bashir was indicted for crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court. al Bashir is still in office.

34. Hollywood setting: Abbr. : FLA
Hollywood is a city in southern Florida, and is the twelfth-largest city in the state.

39. Traitor Aldrich : AMES
Aldrich Ames worked for the CIA until he was convicted in 1994 of spying for the Soviet Union. Prior to identifying Ames as a spy, the CIA was highly concerned at the high rate of disappearance of their own agents behind the Iron Curtain and they struggled for years to find the mole that they assumed must be working within their own ranks. After he was finally arrested, the CIA was criticized for not having identified Ames sooner, particularly as he was living an extravagant lifestyle relative to his apparent means. Ames is serving a life sentence in the US Penitentiary in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

42. Actor Jannings : EMIL
Emil Jannings, an actor from Switzerland, was the first person to receive an Oscar. He was the star of the 1928 silent movie called "The Last Command".

43. Chess ending : MATE
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be "in check". If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in "checkmate" and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce "check!") so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn't occur.

45. '80s TV star who later pitched Snickers : MR T
Mr. T's real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie "Rocky III". In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, "No, I don't hate Balboa, but I pity the fool". He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called "I Pity the Fool", and produced a motivational video called "Be Somebody ... or Be Somebody's Fool!".

48. "___ Enchanted" (2004 film) : ELLA
"Ella Enchanted" is the title of a fantasy novel written by Gail Carson Levine, and published in 1997. It is a retelling of the story of Cinderella, with lots of mythical creatures added. A film adaptation was released in 2004, starring Anne Hathaway in the title role.

50. 1982 holiday country hit by Alabama : CHRISTMAS IN DIXIE
Alabama is a band from Fort Payne, Alabama who perform a blend of country music and southern rock.

52. 1960s pop singer Sands : EVIE
Evie Sands is a singer from Brooklyn, New York. Sands is also a noted songwriter, having penned songs that have been recorded by the likes of Barbra Streisand, Gladys Knight, Karen Carpenter, Linda Ronstadt and Dusty Springfield.

55. LAX, O'Hare and others : HUBS
Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

O'Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport's current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O'Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O'Hare who grew up in Chicago. O'Hare was the US Navy's first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Butch O'Hare's father Edward was a lawyer friend of Al Capone who eventually worked undercover for the IRS and helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion. Some years later, Edward was shot to death while driving his car.

59. Grammy-nominated 1998 hit for Alanis Morissette : THANK U
Alanis Morissette is a Canadian singer-songwriter. After releasing two pop albums in Canada, in 1995 she recorded her first album to be distributed internationally. Called "Jagged Little Pill", it is a collection of songs with more of a rock influence. The album was a huge success, the highest-selling album of the 1990s, and the highest-selling debut album by any artist at any time (selling over 30 million units).

66. Bill's partner : COO
When birds “bill and coo” together they touch beaks and make noises to each other. The term is also used when two lovers talk quietly to each other, and kiss.

69. Actress Moore : DEMI
Demi Moore was born Demetria Guynes and took the name Demi Moore when she married her first husband, Freddy Moore. She changed her name to Demi Guynes Kutcher a few years after marrying her present husband, Ashton Kutcher. She still uses Demi Moore as her professional name.

70. Highland tongue : ERSE
There are actually three Erse languages. Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

72. Kaput : PFFT
"Pfft" is an interjection used to describe something which has suddenly disappeared, gone "kaput".

Kaput comes to us from French (via German). "Capot" means "not having won a single trick" in the French card game called Piquet.

73. "Celeste Aida," for one : ARIA
"Celeste Aida" translates to "Heavenly Aida", and is an aria from the Verdi opera “Aida”.

"Aida" is the famous opera by Giuseppe Verdi, actually based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first performed in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline, Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course complications arise!

74. Enterprise for Morton : SALT MINING
Morton Salt started doing business in 1848 in Chicago, and now is the largest producer of salt in North America.

79. Collect on the surface, in chemistry : SORB
Adsorption is the accumulation of chemicals on the surface of a solid or liquid. Absorption is the accumulation through pores or interstices. The derivative verb “sorb” can be applied to either process.

83. Dadaism pioneer : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

87. AOL, e.g., for short : ISP
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP's network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs. I'd go with cable if I were you, if it's available in your area ...

90. Fast-food chain with the Ultimate Angus sandwich : ARBY'S
The Arby’s chain of fast food restaurants was founded in 1964 by two brothers, Forrest and Leroy Raffel. The name “Arby’s” is a homonym of “RB’s”, standing for “Raffel Brothers”.

94. One who drills, fills and bills: Abbr. : DDS
Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)

98. Directing a shell : COXING
The coxswain of a boat is one in charge, particularly of its steering and navigation. The name is shortened to "cox" particularly when used for the person steering and calling out the stroke in a competition rowing boat.

A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”.

99. Down Easter : MAINER
The coast of Maine is often referred to as “Down East” by the people of New England.

100. Rogue : PICARO
A picaroon, also known as a picaro, is a rogue, adventurer or perhaps a pirate.

101. The ___ Mets : AMAZIN’
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” (aka “Amazin’ Mets”) who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

103. Label for pans? : AWFUL
To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

104. House entered near the autumnal equinox : LIBRA
In the world of astrology, the horoscope is divided into twelve “houses”. These houses are the birth signs with which we are familiar.

108. Spanish hero whose 113-Down is represented enigmatically six times in this puzzle : EL CID
Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was known as El Cid Campeador, which translates as "The Champion" or perhaps "The Lord, Master of Military Arts". El Cid was a soldier who fought under the rule of King Alfonso VI of Spain (among others). However, he was sent into exile by the King in 1080, after acting beyond his authorization in battle. El Cid then offered his services to his former foes, the Moorish kings, After a number of years building a reputation with the Moors, he was recalled from exile by Alfonso. By this time El Cid was very much his own man. Nominally under the orders of Alfonso, he led a combined army of Spanish and Moorish troops and took the city of Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, making it is headquarters and home. He died there, quite peacefully in 1099.

110. ___ Torres, four-time Olympic swimming gold medalist : DARA
Dara Torres is a US swimmer who has won twelve Olympic medals. Torres is also the only American swimmer to have competed in five Olympic Games, and is the oldest swimmer to have made it onto the Olympic team, at 41.

114. Colleen : LASS
“Cailín” is the Irish word for “girl”, and is usually anglicized as “Colleen”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. It may be cut by an uppercut : CHIN
5. Drink cooler : ICE CUBE
12. Map feature : SCALE
17. Nurse : SIP
20. "From Here to Eternity" setting : OAHU
21. Stage-diving locale : MOSH PIT
22. More than willing : EAGER
23. For : PRO
24. Stoker of fear? : BRAM
25. Not flat or sharp : ON PITCH
26. Lay ___ : AN EGG
27. Politician with a like button? : IKE
28. Adorns : BEDECKS
30. Minnesota player, familiarly : VIKE
31. Microwaveable snack : HOT POCKET
33. Dress that drapes : SARI
34. Hall-of-___ : FAMER
35. Highly desirable to Uncle Sam? : ONE-A
36. Wine list heading : REDS
37. Competitor in some county fairs : HOG CALLER
40. Offer to buy unspecified stocks, say : BLIND BID
42. Lean meat source : EMU
44. Shortstop-turned-ESPN analyst Garciaparra : NOMAR
45. "Thanks a ___!" : MIL
46. Stylebook concern : USAGE
49. Area with XY coordinates? : MAN CAVE
51. Routine checkup : YEARLY PHYSICAL
57. Desire : ITCH
58. Stay inactive over the summer : ESTIVATE
60. Paris street : RUE
61. Vend : SELL
62. Moderator of the first Obama/McCain and Obama/Romney debates : LEHRER
64. Early Chinese dynasty : HSIA
65. Graph's x-coordinate : ABSCISSA
67. Statement after long deliberation : I'VE MADE A DECISION
72. Relayed : PASSED ON
75. Son of Aphrodite : EROS
76. Common pool or store posting : NO DOGS
80. Word with house or boy : FRAT
81. Type : ILK
82. "The Education of a Golfer" autobiographer : SAM SNEAD
85. What might give you a big head? : AFRO
86. Hollywood and Bollywood, e.g. : FILM INDUSTRIES
89. Material in the hats of Buckingham Palace guards : BEAR FUR
91. Byes : TATAS
92. Litter member : PUP
93. Do-nothing : IDLER
95. Grp. battling consumer fraud : BBB
96. 1980s video game spinoff : MS PAC-MAN
100. Drag staple : PADDED BRA
103. Et ___ : ALII
105. Surf sound : ROAR
106. Ones trapped in boxes of their own making? : MIMES
107. Connecticut Ivy : YALE
109. Southern grocery chain : WINN-DIXIE
111. Harry Potter mark : SCAR
112. Downloader's directive : INSTALL
115. Agents' org. : FBI
116. Black ___ : AS INK
117. Post-Weimar period : NAZI ERA
119. Terrace farming pioneers : INCA
120. Mantel piece : URN
121. "Walk Away ___" (1966 hit) : RENEE
122. "Absolutely Fabulous," e.g. : BRITCOM
123. "JAG" spinoff : NCIS
124. Fail to keep up : LAG
125. Beyond piqued : ANGRY
126. Allow to continue : CONDONE
127. H.S. proficiency exams : GEDS

Down
1. ___ salad : COBB
2. Proverbial speedsters : HARES
3. "That's what my Spidey sense told me" : I HAD A HUNCH
4. Quince, e.g. : NUMERO
5. Reassuring reply : I’M OK
6. Reasons to say no : CONS
7. Subj. of a thought experiment : ESP
8. Lament about modern men : CHIVALRY IS DEAD
9. When computers work : UPTIME
10. Trade cross words : BICKER
11. C4H10O : ETHER
12. European coastal plant once thought to be an aphrodisiac : SEA HOLLY
13. Pachelbel classic, familiarly : CANON IN D
14. When Tatum O'Neal won her Oscar : AGE TEN
15. Part of a hockey goalie's equipment : LEG PAD
16. "Cogito, ___ sum" : ERGO
17. Ray-finned fishes of the Southwest U.S. : SPIKED ACES
18. Ticked off : IRKED
19. Versifiers : POETS
29. Health care giant with a Tree of Life logo : CIGNA
32. Major African humanitarian concern of the 2000s : CRISIS IN DARFUR
34. Hollywood setting: Abbr. : FLA
38. Like the contents of many attics : COVERED IN DUST
39. Traitor Aldrich : AMES
40. Nastiness : BILE
41. Tour transport : BUS
42. Actor Jannings : EMIL
43. Chess ending : MATE
45. '80s TV star who later pitched Snickers : MR T
47. Some square dancers : GALS
48. "___ Enchanted" (2004 film) : ELLA
50. 1982 holiday country hit by Alabama : CHRISTMAS IN DIXIE
52. 1960s pop singer Sands : EVIE
53. Tiny battery : AAAA
54. Laud : PRAISE
55. LAX, O'Hare and others : HUBS
56. "Of course!" : YES INDEED!
59. Grammy-nominated 1998 hit for Alanis Morissette : THANK U
63. New Year's ___ : EVE
66. Bill's partner : COO
68. Jell-O maker : MOLD
69. Actress Moore : DEMI
70. Highland tongue : ERSE
71. "Right away, boss" : CONSIDER IT DONE
72. Kaput : PFFT
73. "Celeste Aida," for one : ARIA
74. Enterprise for Morton : SALT MINING
77. Bad way to be caught : OFF BALANCE
78. Eats : GRUB
79. Collect on the surface, in chemistry : SORB
82. Floor : STUN
83. Dadaism pioneer : ARP
84. Up to snuff : ABLE
87. AOL, e.g., for short : ISP
88. Item for a houseguest : SPARE KEY
90. Fast-food chain with the Ultimate Angus sandwich : ARBY'S
94. One who drills, fills and bills: Abbr. : DDS
97. Up : ARISEN
98. Directing a shell : COXING
99. Down Easter : MAINER
100. Rogue : PICARO
101. The ___ Mets : AMAZIN’
102. Half a star, maybe : RATING
103. Label for pans? : AWFUL
104. House entered near the autumnal equinox : LIBRA
106. "All In" network : MSNBC
108. Spanish hero whose 113-Down is represented enigmatically six times in this puzzle : EL CID
110. ___ Torres, four-time Olympic swimming gold medalist : DARA
112. Press : IRON
113. Moniker : NAME
114. Colleen : LASS
118. Green: Prefix : ECO-


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0628-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jun 14, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Josh Knapp
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 41m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

16. The Rice Krispies mascots, e.g. : TRIO
Snap, Crackle and Pop are three elves employed as the mascots for Kellogg's Rice Krispies. The trio first appeared in an ad campaign in 1933, although the phrase "snap, crackle and pop" had been used for the cereal for some time in radio ads. By the way, the elves are selling "Rice Bubbles" in Australia, and the elves have different names in other parts of the world (like "Cric!, Crac! and Croc! in Quebec).

17. Georgia neighbor : AZERBAIJAN
Azerbaijan is a former Soviet Republic lying on the Caspian Sea just northeast of Iran. The Azerbaijan Democratic Republic established in 1918 became the Muslim world’s first democratic and secular state. It didn’t last long though, as two years later it was absorbed into the Soviet Union.

The former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) of Georgia is now an independent country. Supposedly, the Georgian people were given their name because they especially revered St. George. The flag of Georgia does indeed feature five St. George’s crosses.

18. Amazon icon : CART
The Amazon.com website features a very prominent shopping cart.

19. Raskolnikov's love in "Crime and Punishment" : SONYA
"Crime and Punishment" is one of the two most famous novels by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, the other being "The Brothers Karamazov".

20. City whose name is pronounced like the natives' word for "Where is ...?" : NOME
Nome, Alaska has over 3,500 residents, the majority of whom are Native American. The next largest ethnic group in Nome is the white population. The origin of the name “Nome” isn’t well understood, it seems. One theory is that was a misunderstanding of the local Inupiaq word for the phrase “Where at?”

21. Something an aichmophobe fears, briefly : HYPO
Aichmophobia is a morbid fear of sharp or pointed objects, like perhaps a needle. Some aichmophobes can even fear a pointed finger. “Aichme” is Greek for “point”

26. Abbr. at the end of some crossword clues : VAR
Variant (var.)

27. 2003 Billy Bob Thornton crime film : BAD SANTA
“Bad Santa” is a black comedy, not one I really enjoyed, starring Billy Bob Thornton as the not-so-nice Santa Claus. If you want to see an unrated version of the film, you can just buy the DVD and watch the special feature called “Badder Santa”.

I’ve always thought that the actor Billy Bob Thornton really knows how to give an understated performance, and he does it really well. Thornton came to the public eye as actor and screenwriter for the 1996 movie “Slingblade”. He won an Academy Award for screenwriting for that film. Thornton has been married five times in all, most famously to the actress Angelina Jolie.

32. Language of Middle-earth : ELVISH
Middle-earth is the setting for J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy novels “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” series.

34. Craigslist section : FREE
Craigslist is an online network of communities that features classified advertisements organized geographically. Craigslist was started by Craig Newmark in 1995, originally as an email distribution list for his friends who lived and worked in the San Francisco Bay Area.

35. It's usually closed before leaving : TAB
When we “run a tab” at a bar say, we are “running a tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

39. Presidential debate mo. : OCT
The first presidential election debate is considered to be the famous 1960 event in which Senator John F. Kennedy faced off against Vice President Richard Nixon. There were other debates that are considered precursors to the 1960 exchange, dating back to the time of Abraham Lincoln, but these debates weren’t between candidates from opposing parties for the office of president.

41. Father of Paris : PRIAM
Priam was king of Troy during the Trojan War. Reputedly, Priam was father to fifty sons and many daughters with his many wives. His eldest son and heir to the throne was Hector. Paris was another of Priam’s sons, the man who caused the Trojan War by eloping with Helen, Queen of Sparta.

44. With 51-Across, end of the London blitz? : TEE
(51A. See 44-Across : ZED)
The last two letters in the word “blitz” are T (tee) and Z (zee, zed).

46. Ruler with a palace near St. Mark's : DOGE
Doges were the elected chief magistrates of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

St. Mark’s Basilica is the Roman Catholic cathedral in the the city of Venice, Italy. In front of the basilica is the Piazza San Marco, the city's main public square. St. Mark’s Square is a remarkable urban space in Europe as the sound of the human voice dominates, rather than the sound of traffic. That is indeed remarkable ...

47. San Diego's ___ Pines, site of the 2008 U.S. Open : TORREY
Torrey Pines Golf Course sits on the Pacific Coast in La Jolla in Southern California. The course takes its name from a rare tree found in the area called the Torrey Pine.

50. On the q.t. : MUM
The phrase “mum’s the word” has been around since the early 1700s. “Mum” has been used to mean “silent” for centuries, the idea being that “mum” is the sound made when the lips are tightly sealed.

“On the qt” is a slang term for “on the quiet”. It has been around since the 1870s.

54. Valley girl's "no" : AS IF
The original "valley girls" were the young, middle-class females living in San Fernando Valley in Southern California.

58. Kung Pao chicken ingredient : CHILI
Sichuan (also Szechuan) is a province in southwest China. Sichuan is noted for its cuisine, which is hot and spicy as it uses plenty of garlic, chili peppers and the Sichuan peppercorn. A famous Szechuan dish in the US is Kung Pao chicken.

63. Solstice time : JUNE
A solstice occurs twice in every year. The summer solstice is the longest day of the year (has the most daylight), and the winter solstice is the shortest.

64. Literally, "different lizard" : ALLOSAURUS
The most popular dinosaurs depicted in the movies, especially the older ones, are the Tyrannosaurs and the Allosauruses. They look very similar, with the former being the really big guy.

68. Midwest squad : REDS
The Red Scare (i.e. anti-communist sentiment) following WWII had such an effect on the populace that it even caused the Cincinnati baseball team to change its name from the Reds. The team was called the Cincinnati Redlegs from 1953-1958, as the management was fearful of losing money due to public distrust of any association with "Reds".

69. Bizarre and alienating : KAFKAESQUE
Franz Kafka was born in 1883 in Prague, then part of Bohemia and today the capital of the Czech Republic. Kafka is known as one of the greatest novelists who worked in the German language, and even has an adjective named after him. Something that is "kafkaesque" is senseless, disorienting and may have menacing complexity. As it was for many great artists, Kafka's fame came after his death when much of his work was published.

Down
2. Two-time Oscar-winning screenwriter : PUZO
The novelist and screenwriter Mario Puzo, was best known for his book “The Godfather”, which he also co-adapted for the big screen. His name is less associated with some very famous screenplays that he wrote, including “Earthquake”, “Superman” and “Superman II”.

3. Love at the French Open, essentially : RIEN
“Rien” is French for “nothing”.

5. Changing place : CABANA
Our word “cabana” comes from the Spanish “cabaña”, the word for a small hut or a cabin.

6. Start of an "Ave Maria" line : ORA
"Ave Maria" ("Hail Mary" in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the "Hail Mary" comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:
AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

7. Beer named for a port on the Yellow Sea : TSINGTAO
I think that Tsingtao is the first Chinese beer that comes to mind to most Westerners. Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers. The name “Tsingtao” is a European name for Qingdao, the port city where the brewery is headquartered in Shandong province.

8. Guy from Tucson in a Beatles song : JOJO
The Beatles song “Get Back” was first released in 1969. It is the only Beatles song that gives credit to another artist on the label, naming the keyboard player Billy Preston. Yes, the label actually says "Get Back" by The Beatles and Billy Preston. Here are the opening lines:
Jojo was a man who thought he was a loner
But he knew it wouldn't last.
Jojo left his home in Tucson, Arizona
For some California grass.

9. 1960 historical film written and directed by John Wayne, with "The" : ALAMO
“The Alamo” is a 1960 film, and very much a personal project for John Wayne. Wayne directed the movie, and put one and half million dollars of his own money into it (which he lost). Wayne wanted to play a small role in the film, so that he could focus on directing, as the film marked his directorial debut. But, other investors insisted on Wayne play the lead role of Davy Crockett as they felt they would have a better chance of recouping their money using the box office draw of the Wayne name.

John Wayne was called Marion Mitchell Morrison at birth, named after his grandfather who was a Civil War veteran. When young Marion was a little boy, a local fireman used to call him "Little Duke" because he was always seen walking with his large dog called "Duke". Marion liked the name "Duke" and so he called himself Duke Morrison for the rest of his life. That said, Duke Morrison also used John Wayne as a stage name.

23. Argentine ___ : ANT
The Argentine ant is native to Argentina and surrounding countries, although human travel has introduced it as an invasive species right across the world. Argentine ants rank amongst the world’s most destructive animal invaders.

27. Key of Schumann's Symphony No. 1 : B-FLAT MAJOR
Robert Schumann’s Symphony No. 1 is also called the Spring Symphony. Schumann started work on the piece in January of 1841, and it premiered just two months later in Leipzig. That first performance was conducted by his friend Felix Mendelssohn.

30. "Popeye" cartoonist Elzie : SEGAR
Elzie Segar was a cartoonist who went by the name E. C. Segar. Segar was the man who created the strip “Thimble Theater”, home of the character Popeye.

31. Part of the Disney family, so to speak : ABC TV
The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is the world’s largest broadcaster in terms of revenues. ABC was formed in 1943, created out of the former NBC Blue radio network.

33. "Falstaff" composer : VERDI
“Falstaff” is an opera by Giuseppe Verdi that draws on the character Falstaff from William Shakespeare’s “The Merry Wives of Windsor”. “Falstaff” was the maestro’s last opera, written while Verdi was in his 80s.

38. Attention-getter, in some rooms : OYEZ!
Town criers make public announcements on the streets, usually shouting “Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!” to attract attention. The term “oyez” derives from the Anglo-Norman word for “listen” and is used in this instance to mean “Hear ye!” "Oyez!" might also beused in a courtroom as the court's proceedings are opened.

49. Obsolescent media holder : CD CASE
That means I must be obsolescent too …

52. It's around the mouth : DELTA
A river delta is found at its mouth.

55. Own (up) : FESS
The term “fess” is most often seen as part of the phrasal verb “to fess up” meaning “to admit to something”. “Fess” is simply a shortened form of “confess”.

57. Dedicatee of a famous Tallinn church : OLAF
St. Olaf’s Church in Tallinn, the second largest city in Estonia, was originally built in the 12th century by Scandinavian settlers.

60. Setting for "Three Kings," 1999 : IRAQ
“Three Kings” is a 1999 war movie set during the end of the Persian Gulf War in Iraq. The title characters are played by George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg and Ice Cube. I didn’t think much of this one …

61. Beaut : LULU
We call a remarkable thing or a person a “lulu”. The term is used in honor of Lulu Hurst, the Georgia Wonder, who was a stage magician active in the 1880s.

65. "Come ___?" (greeting) : STA
"Come sta?" is "how are you?" in Italian.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Tangy fruit pastry filling : APRICOT JAM
11. Physical, say : EXAM
15. There might be one after a bridge : GUITAR SOLO
16. The Rice Krispies mascots, e.g. : TRIO
17. Georgia neighbor : AZERBAIJAN
18. Amazon icon : CART
19. Raskolnikov's love in "Crime and Punishment" : SONYA
20. City whose name is pronounced like the natives' word for "Where is ...?" : NOME
21. Something an aichmophobe fears, briefly : HYPO
22. Old mount : NAG
24. Grandmotherly plaints : OYS
26. Abbr. at the end of some crossword clues : VAR
27. 2003 Billy Bob Thornton crime film : BAD SANTA
32. Language of Middle-earth : ELVISH
34. Craigslist section : FREE
35. It's usually closed before leaving : TAB
36. Playground retort : DOES SO!
37. Ax : LET GO
39. Presidential debate mo. : OCT
41. Father of Paris : PRIAM
42. What may accompany a salute : AYE AYE
44. With 51-Across, end of the London blitz? : TEE
46. Ruler with a palace near St. Mark's : DOGE
47. San Diego's ___ Pines, site of the 2008 U.S. Open : TORREY
48. Prerequisites for some overseas travel : VACCINES
50. On the q.t. : MUM
51. See 44-Across : ZED
53. New, informally : MOD
54. Valley girl's "no" : AS IF
56. Cry over spilled milk? : MEOW!
58. Kung Pao chicken ingredient : CHILI
63. Solstice time : JUNE
64. Literally, "different lizard" : ALLOSAURUS
66. Some extracts : ORES
67. Advice of caution to a beginner : START SMALL
68. Midwest squad : REDS
69. Bizarre and alienating : KAFKAESQUE

Down
1. "What ___!" ("How fun!") : A GAS
2. Two-time Oscar-winning screenwriter : PUZO
3. Love at the French Open, essentially : RIEN
4. Humble response : I TRY
5. Changing place : CABANA
6. Start of an "Ave Maria" line : ORA
7. Beer named for a port on the Yellow Sea : TSINGTAO
8. Guy from Tucson in a Beatles song : JOJO
9. 1960 historical film written and directed by John Wayne, with "The" : ALAMO
10. Well-off : MONEYED
11. Put on the surface, in a way : ETCH
12. Superpower : X-RAY VISION
13. Ventilation provider : AIR PASSAGE
14. Campers' relatives : MOTORHOMES
23. Argentine ___ : ANT
25. Spillover : SLOP
27. Key of Schumann's Symphony No. 1 : B-FLAT MAJOR
28. "Really?" : ARE YOU SURE?
29. Not willing to give : DETERMINED
30. "Popeye" cartoonist Elzie : SEGAR
31. Part of the Disney family, so to speak : ABC TV
33. "Falstaff" composer : VERDI
38. Attention-getter, in some rooms : OYEZ!
40. Company asset : TEAMWORK
43. Freebie on some airplane flights : EYE MASK
45. Prefix with efficiency : ECO-
49. Obsolescent media holder : CD CASE
52. It's around the mouth : DELTA
55. Own (up) : FESS
57. Dedicatee of a famous Tallinn church : OLAF
59. Runs smoothly : HUMS
60. Setting for "Three Kings," 1999 : IRAQ
61. Beaut : LULU
62. Vacation destination : ISLE
65. "Come ___?" (greeting) : STA


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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