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0801-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Aug 14, Friday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ashton Anderson & James Mulhern
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Ultra 93 vendor : SUNOCO
Back in the late 1800s, Sunoco was known as the Sun Oil Company.

16. Winner of the inaugural Václav Havel Prize for Creative Dissent (2012) : AI WEIWEI
Ai Weiwei is a Chinese artist who has been vocal in his criticism of his country’s position on human rights and democracy. Wei Wei was an artistic consultant largely responsible for the look and feel of the Beijing National Stadium, commonly referred to as the “Bird’s Nest”, that was showcased during the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Václav Havel is a Czech playwright. Starting in the sixties, Havel became very active in the politics of his country. He eventually rose to the position of President, and was the last person to hold the office of President of Czechoslovakia, and the first to hold the office of President of the Czech Republic.

17. Two-dimensional : PLANAR
The dimension of an object is defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify each point in the object. Therefore a line is one-dimensional, as you only need an x-coordinate to specify a particular point on the line. A plane is two-dimensional, as you need both an x-coordinate and a y-coordinate to locate a point on the plane. The inside of a solid object is then three-dimensional, needing an x-, y- and z-coordinate to specify a point, say within a cube.

18. The Hub : BEANTOWN
In the days of sail, the natural trade routes across the Atlantic involved a lot of ships arriving in Boston directly from West Indies. One of the main cargoes carried by these vessels coming from the West Indies was molasses. An abundance of cheap molasses led to an abundance of baked beans in the port city, and all those baked beans gave rise to Boston's nickname “Beantown”.

One of the nicknames for the city of Boston is “The Hub”, short for “The Hub of the Universe”. In 1858, Oliver Wendell Holmes referred to the Massachusetts State House Building in Boston as the “Hub of the Solar System”, and the idea stuck.

21. Ferrari rival, informally : JAG
Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters "SS" at that time.

Enzo Ferrari was an Italian race car driver, and founder of the Ferrari car manufacturing company. Ferrari died in 1988, and in 2003 the company named the Enzo Ferrari model after its founder.

25. First talking pet in American comics : TIGE
"Buster Brown" was a comic strip created in 1902 by Felton Outcault. Outcault took his name Buster from the very popular film star at the time, Buster Keaton. Buster's dog Tige, was an American Pit Bull Terrier. Apparently when Tige started to "talk" in the strip, he became the first talking pet in American comics.

26. Steel-eyed one? : CARNEGIE
Andrew Carnegie was an industrialist and philanthropist from Scotland who made his fame and fortune in the US steel industry. He founded the Carnegie Steel Company in 1892, which was destined to become US Steel. After he sold Carnegie Steel, making his fortune, Carnegie devoted the rest of his life to philanthropy. Famously, he built Carnegie Hall in New York, founded Carnegie Mellon University in PIttsburgh, and set up several charitable trust funds that are still doing valuable work today.

28. Horse whisperer, e.g. : TAMER
"The Horse Whisperer" is a 1998 movie based on a 1995 novel of the same name by Nicholas Evans. Robert Redford starred in the film, and directed. "The Horse Whisperer" was the first film in which Redford both appeared and directed.

30. Boorish member of King Arthur's Round Table : SIR KAY
According to Arthurian legend, Sir Kay was one of the first Knights of the Round Table. He was also King Arthur’s foster brother. Over time, Sir Kay was described boor and bully, having started out as valiant warrior.

40. Coin with a hole in it : KRONE
"Krone" translates into English as "crown", and was the name given to coins that bore the image of the monarch. Today, the krone is the name given to the currency of Norway and of Denmark. Some of the Norwegian and Danish kroner have holes in the middle, giving them a "doughnut" or "torus" shape.

41. First substitute on a basketball bench : SIXTH MAN
Basketball is truly an American sport. It was created in 1891 by a James Naismith at the YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts. His goal was to create something active and interesting for his students in the gym. The first "hoops" were actually peach baskets, with the bottoms of the baskets intact. When a player got the ball into the "net", someone had to clamber up and get the ball back out again in order to continue the game!

42. Van Gogh's "L'Église d'Auvers-sur-___" : OISE
"L'Église d'Auvers-sur-Oise” (“The Church at Auvers”) is an 1890 painting by Dutch post-impressionist Vincent Van Gogh. “Doctor Who” fans might recall that this painting is central to the plot of an excellent episode feature Van Gogh.

Auvers-sur-oise is in effect a suburb of Paris now, lying just 17 miles from the center of the city. By the time Van Gogh moved there, he was quite ill and in poor mental health. The reason he moved to Auvers was to be treated by one Dr. Paul Gachet who became a good friend, as well as the subject in two of Van Gogh's portraits. Van Gogh shot himself in the chest in a field in Auvers in 1890, and managed to walk back to the Ravoux Inn where he was staying. Sadly, he died from his wounds two days later.

43. Chop-chop : ASAP
"Chop chop" is Chinese Pidgin English, and is just a reiteration of the word "chop" used in the sense of moving quickly.

45. Willy Wonka Candy Company candy : NERDS
The Willy Wonka Candy Company brand is owned by Nestle, and operates using licensed materials from the Roald Dahl book "Charlie & the Chocolate Factory". Nerdsis a name on a whole line of candy's produced within the brand's portfolio.

47. "The X-Files" program, for short : SETI
SETI is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

"The X-Files" is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history.

48. Soft spot : SOFA
"Sofa" is a Turkish word meaning "bench".

49. Modern storage space : THE CLOUD
In the world of computing, when one operates “in the cloud”, one’s files and key applications are not stored on one’s own computer, but rather are residing “in the cloud”, on a computer(s) somewhere out on the Internet. I do 90% of my computing in the cloud. That way I don’t have to worry about backing up files, and I can operate from any computer if I have to. In fact, I am working in the cloud right now as I type up this post ...

51. Flush : LOADED
Flush, loaded, with lots of money.

54. How Columbo often worked : ON A HUNCH
"Columbo" is a police drama that aired from 1971-78, with some more episodes made as recently as 2003. Columbo was of course played by Peter Falk, although the character of Columbo was first played by Bert Freed in 1960 in an episode of "The Chevy Mystery Show". That first appearance was so successful that the episode was adapted for the stage in 1962, with Thomas Mitchell taking on the role. Then the same episode was stretched into a TV movie in 1968, with Peter Falk playing Lt. Columbo for the first time.

Down
1. Ancient symbol of royalty : ASP
The venomous snake called an asp was a symbol of royalty in Ancient Egypt.

2. French bottom : CUL
“Cul” is indeed a French word meaning “bottom”, but I think it’s quite rude …

6. One of a vocal pair : CORD
The vocal cords are also known as the vocal folds. The vocal cords are two folds of mucous membrane that project into the larynx. The folds vibrate when air passes through the larynx, allowing sounds to be made.

7. Hack : CABBIE
Hackney is a location in London, and it probably gave it's name to a "hackney", an ordinary type of horse around 1300. By 1700 a "hackney" was a person hired to do routine work, and "hackneyed" meant "kept for hire". This morphed into a hackney carriage, a carriage or car for hire, and into “hack”, a slang term for a taxidriver.

8. Sacred: Prefix : HIERO-
The prefix hiero-comes from the Greek word "hieros" meaning sacred or holy. The classic use of the prefix is in the term “hieroglyphics”, meaning "sacred carving", the writing system that uses symbols and pictures.

10. 50 ___ : CENT
Rap star 50 Cent's real name is Curtis James Jackson III, and is from South Jamaica in Queens, New York. 50 Cent had a rough life starting out, first dealing drugs at the age of 12. He dropped his illegal activities to pursue a rap career, but still fell victim to an assailant who pumped nine bullets into him. The alleged shooter was himself shot three weeks later, and died. 50 Cent's alleged attacker was a bodyguard and close friend of Mike Tyson.

12. It means "sulfur island" in Japanese : IWO JIMA
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. The name is Japanese for “Sulfur Island”, referring to the sulfur mining on which Iwo Jima’s economy once depended. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there since.

23. Indian novelist Raja ___ : RAO
Raja Rao was an Indian writer, but one who wrote and published mainly in English. His much acclaimed 1960 novel “The Serpent and the Rope” is largely autobiographical. Rao spent the last decades of life living in the US.

30. Faux money : SCRIP
“Scrip” isn’t legal tender, but operates just like currency in specific applications. It is in effect a form of credit. Originally the word “scrip” was used for a certificate giving one the right to receive something, often shares of a stock. “Scrip” is probably short for (sub)script(ion) receipt.

31. Holly : ILEX
Ilex, commonly known as holly, is a genus of hundreds of species of flowering plants. The holly used for Christmas decoration is Ilex aquifolium. The wood from the holly bush was once a favorite for construction of Scottish bagpipes, until dense tropical woods became readily available.

37. Rush home? : AM RADIO
Rush Limbaugh is a conservative talk radio host from Cape Girardeau, Missouri. “The Rush Limbaugh Show” is the most-listened-to talk radio program in the country with 15 million listeners tuning in each week.

38. Soupçon : TAD
Soupçon translates literally from French into English as "suspicion", and can be used in the sense that a "suspicion" of something is a just a hint, a crumb.

39. Nation's exterior? : ENS
There are two letters N (en) in the word “nation”, one at either end.

40. Submit : KOWTOW
To kowtow is to show servile deference. “Kowtow” comes from the Chinese “k’o-t’ou” which is the name for the custom of kneeling and touching the forehead to the ground in a gesture of respect. The Chinese term literally translates as “knock the head”.

48. Remote : SLIM
A remote chance, a slim chance.

50. Revolutionary name : CHE
Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Argentina, and in 1948 he started to study medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. While at school he satisfied his need to "see the world" by taking two long journeys around South America, the story of which are told in Guevara's memoir later published as "The Motorcycle Diaries". While travelling, Guevara was moved by the plight of the people he saw and their working conditions and what he viewed as capitalistic exploitation. In Mexico City he met brothers Raul and Fidel Castro and was persuaded to join their cause, the overthrow of the US-backed government in Cuba. He rose to second-in-command among the Cuban insurgents, and when Castro came to power Guevara was influential in repelling the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing Soviet nuclear missiles to the island. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to continue his work as a revolutionary. He was captured by Bolivian forces in 1967, and was executed. Fidel Castro led the public mourning of Guevara's death, and soon the revolutionary was an icon for many left-wing movements around the world.

53. "The Partridge Family" actress : DEY
The actress Susan Dey first appeared on “The Partridge Family” when she was 17-years-old when she had no acting experience. Years later, Dey won a Golden Globe for playing the leading role of Grace Van Owen in “L. A. Law”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Very harsh : ACIDIC
7. Cash flow statement? : CHA-CHING!
15. Ultra 93 vendor : SUNOCO
16. Winner of the inaugural Václav Havel Prize for Creative Dissent (2012) : AI WEIWEI
17. Two-dimensional : PLANAR
18. The Hub : BEANTOWN
19. Meander : WEND
20. "I say" sayer : BRIT
21. Ferrari rival, informally : JAG
22. Wildly cheering : AROAR
24. Real joker : RIOT
25. First talking pet in American comics : TIGE
26. Steel-eyed one? : CARNEGIE
28. Horse whisperer, e.g. : TAMER
29. Moves uncertainly : TODDLES
30. Boorish member of King Arthur's Round Table : SIR KAY
32. Like dungeons, typically : DANK
33. Footprint, maybe : CLUE
34. Tough to figure out : KNOTTY
36. Paraphrase : RESTATE
40. Coin with a hole in it : KRONE
41. First substitute on a basketball bench : SIXTH MAN
42. Van Gogh's "L'Église d'Auvers-sur-___" : OISE
43. Chop-chop : ASAP
45. Willy Wonka Candy Company candy : NERDS
46. Flint-to-Kalamazoo dir. : WSW
47. "The X-Files" program, for short : SETI
48. Soft spot : SOFA
49. Modern storage space : THE CLOUD
51. Flush : LOADED
54. How Columbo often worked : ON A HUNCH
55. Queued up : IN LINE
56. Be at the end of one's rope? : WATER-SKI
57. Principal part : MELODY

Down
1. Ancient symbol of royalty : ASP
2. French bottom : CUL
3. Very succinctly : IN A WORD
4. "No problem, I'm on it!" : DONE AND DONE!
5. "Been there" : I CAN RELATE
6. One of a vocal pair : CORD
7. Hack : CABBIE
8. Sacred: Prefix : HIERO-
9. Anticipate : AWAIT
10. 50 ___ : CENT
11. Google unit : HIT
12. It means "sulfur island" in Japanese : IWO JIMA
13. Into crystals and energy fields, say : NEW AGEY
14. Redhead : GINGER
22. Be part of the picture : ACT
23. Indian novelist Raja ___ : RAO
24. Kind of business : RISKY
25. Be a patsy : TAKE THE FALL
27. Hat-tipping sort : GENT
28. Catchphrase for the paranoid : TRUST NO ONE
30. Faux money : SCRIP
31. Holly : ILEX
34. Deity with more than 16,000 wives : KRISHNA
35. "Easy-peasy" : NO SWEAT
37. Rush home? : AM RADIO
38. Soupçon : TAD
39. Nation's exterior? : ENS
40. Submit : KOWTOW
41. Greeted someone : SAID “HI”
43. Time immemorial : AEONS
44. Fast : STUCK
47. "Dirtbag," e.g. : SLUR
48. Remote : SLIM
50. Revolutionary name : CHE
52. Kill : END
53. "The Partridge Family" actress : DEY


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0731-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 14, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Chen & Jill Denny
THEME: Spaces ... we have a string of spaces in the grid today, with each square assuming the word SPACE to complete the corresponding down-answers. There are also some themed answers that are synonyms for SPACE BAR:

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 23s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Financial writer Marshall : LOEB
Marshall Loeb is an author and editor who writes about the business world. Loeb was managing editor for “Money” magazine from 1980 to 1986, and managing editor for “Fortune” magazine from 1986 to 1994.

5. Girl of Guatemala : CHICA
“Chica” is a Spanish word for “girl”.

Guatemala in Central America became independent from Spain in 1821, first becoming part of the Mexican Empire, and then completely independent two years later.

10. Captain played by Patrick Stewart : AHAB
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

15. Chinese province known for its spicy cuisine : HUNAN
Hunan is a province in south-central China. It is located south of Lake Dongting, which gives the province its name, as “Hunan” translates as “south of the lake”.

16. Plumb crazy : LOCO
In Spanish, if one isn't sane (sano) one might be described as crazy (loco).

23. Shark : USURER
“Usury” was originally the name given to the practice of lending money at interest, but the term now refers to lending at excessive rates of interest, the evil practice of a loan shark.

25. Dangling piece of jewelry : EARBOB
“Earbob” is an alternative name for an earring, and is a term mainly used in the Southern US.

28. 55-Across, e.g.? : “STAR WARS” CANTINA
In the original "Star Wars" movie (later called "Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope"), Mos Eisley is an outpost and hangout of less than reputable traders. The place to be seen in the outpost is Chalmun’s Spaceport Cantina. Han Solo and Luke Skywalker get attacked there by Sandtroopers, but make their escape.

34. Antipolio pioneer : SABIN
Albert Sabin developed the oral polio vaccine. Sabin's vaccine was a "live" controlled vaccine. The equally famous Salk vaccine was a "killed" vaccine.

35. Second of all? : EVE
According to the Bible, Adam was first of all humankind, and Eve was second.

36. Sardonic Larry : DAVID
Larry David was one of the creators of the sitcom “Seinfeld”, and was a co-writer of many of the episodes. David also stars in the HBO comedy “Curb Your Enthusiasm”.

38. Journal : LOG
The word "logbook" dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel's speed, progress etc. using a "log". A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

46. Mars, e.g. : DEUS
Mars was a Roman god (“deus” in Latin).

50. Easily prepared lunch item, informally : PB AND J
Peanut butter and jelly (PB&J or PBJ)

59. Jackie's #2 : ARI
Aristotle Onassis was born to a successful Greek shipping entrepreneur in Smyrna in modern-day Turkey. However, his family lost its fortune during WWI and so Aristotle worked with his father to build up a new business empire centered on the importation of tobacco. In 1957, Aristotle founded the Greek national airline, what is today called Olympic Air, and he also got into the business of shipping oil around the world. He married Athina Livanos in 1946, the daughter of a wealthy shipping magnate. They had two children, including the famous Christina Onassis. Livanos divorced Onassis on discovering him in bed with the opera singer Maria Callas. Onassis ended his affair with Callas in order to marry Jackie Kennedy in 1968.

63. Short news item : SQUIB
A “squib” is short and humorous piece in a newspaper or magazine. The term might possible be imitative of the small firework called a squib, as a newspaper’s squib might be intended to ignite thinking and discourse.

65. Sign word after "Ye" : OLDE
The word "olde" wasn't actually used much earlier than the 1920s. "Olde" was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc.

66. Ottoman V.I.P. : AGA
"Aga" (also "agha") is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

68. One with a staff position? : REST
A “rest” is a symbol on a musical staff that indicates a pause.

69. ___ Noire (Russie borderer) : MER
In French, the Black Sea (Mer Noire) borders Russian (Russie).

The Black Sea is in southeastern Europe just south of Ukraine. In the north of the Black Sea is the Crimean Peninsula.

Down
4. Irish oath : BEGORRA
I've always thought of the Irish terms “begorra/begorrah” as one of those softened "by God" oaths, like "by golly". I can't think of one person back home in Ireland who uses the term, though!

5. Who said "The less you open your heart to others, the more your heart suffers" : CHOPRA
Deepak Chopra is a medical doctor who is now an advocate for alternative medicine. Chopra was born in New Delhi, India and immigrated to the US in 1968. He is an advocate for mind/body spiritual healing. I have heard Chopra speak, and he really knows how to get his message across ...

6. Alternative to standard TV : HULU
Hulu.com is a website providing streaming video of full television shows. It is a joint venture of NBC and Disney, and so features a lot of their content. The service is free and is supported by advertising, but you can sign up for a premium subscription and get access to more shows. A lot of younger folks seem to use it a lot ...

9. Bargnani of the N.B.A. : ANDREA
Andrea Bargnani is a basketball player from Rome in Italy who now plays for the New York Knicks.

10. Home of Banff National Park : ALBERTA
Alberta is a big province, about the size of Texas. Alberta is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Princess Louise also donated her name to Lake Louise, the large glacial lake in the province, now within the bounds of Banff National Park.

Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada is located high in the Canadian Rockies and is a popular tourist destination. The town of Banff and the surrounding park were given their name in 1884 by then president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, George Stephen. He named Banff for his birthplace of Banffshire in Scotland.

13. Where the nose is : BOW
The nose of a ship is her bow.

21. Whimper : MEWL
“To mewl” is to cry weakly, like a baby, with the word being somewhat imitative.

22. Nebr. neighbor : KANS
The official nickname of Kansas is the Sunflower State. One of Kansas’s major crops is the sunflower. The sunflower is the state symbol, and Mount Sunflower is the highest point in Kansas.

The Platte River used to be called the Nebrakier, which is an Oto word meaning "flat river". Indeed, the state of Nebraska takes its name from “Nebrakier”.

23. You, on the Yucatán : USTED
The Yucatán is one of Mexico's 31 states, and is located in the east of the country, on the northern tip of the Yucatán peninsula.

24. Pilot's place : STOVE
A pilot light is a small gas flame, one using a relatively small amount of fuel, that remains lit as an ignition source for larger gas burners.

27. Feature of some cuts : BANGS
“Bangs” is another word that caught me out when I arrived in the US. “Bangs” back in Ireland are called “a fringe”. Apparently the US term is derived from the hair on horses somehow.

29. Howard of Ayn Rand's "The Fountainhead" : ROARK
"The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand was first published in 1943, her first novel to achieve public success. The story focuses on an idealistic architect, Howard Roark. Roark is uncompromising in his designs, refusing the give the public what it wants, staying doggedly loyal to his own vision.

30. Part of U.S.S.R.: Abbr. : SOV
The acronym USSR stands for "Union of Soviet Socialist Republics", which translates into Russian as “Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик”, the CCCP.

44. Nine-digit no. issuer : SSA
Social Security Administration(SSA)

A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

47. It might make one's shadow disappear : RAZOR
A razor can be used to take off that five o’clock shadow.

48. The Roman dramatist Seneca, once : EXILE
Seneca the Younger was a playwright as well as a tutor and advisor to the Emperor Nero of Ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

51. Pacific nation once known as Pleasant Island : NAURU
Nauru is the world's smallest island nation, located in the South Pacific 300 km to the east of Kiribati. The island was taken as a colony by Germany in the late 1800s, and came under the administration of Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom after WWI. The Japanese invaded during WWII, but Nauru was one of the islands that was bypassed in the US advance across the Pacific towards Japan. Nauru achieved independence in 1968.

52. Like prunes : DRIED
A prune is a dried plum. The name “prune” comes from the Latin “prunum”, the word or “plum”.

56. Hit 1996 live-action/animated film : SPACE JAM
“Space Jam” is a 1996 movie that is a fictional account of the retirement of Michael Jordan from the NBA. Michael Jordan himself stars in the film, along with a whole host of “Looney Tunes” cartoon characters.

64. Bev. units : QTS
The unit of volume “quart” (qt.) is so called because it is one quarter of a gallon.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Financial writer Marshall : LOEB
5. Girl of Guatemala : CHICA
10. Captain played by Patrick Stewart : AHAB
14. Shade provider : EAVE
15. Chinese province known for its spicy cuisine : HUNAN
16. Plumb crazy : LOCO
17. Be long and boring : DRAG
18. Prayer starter : O, LORD
19. Ruined, in a way : BLEW
20. 55-Across, e.g. : COMPUTER KEY
23. Shark : USURER
25. Dangling piece of jewelry : EARBOB
28. 55-Across, e.g.? : “STAR WARS” CANTINA
32. Come to : TOTAL
33. "Amazing!" : OOH!
34. Antipolio pioneer : SABIN
35. Second of all? : EVE
36. Sardonic Larry : DAVID
38. Journal : LOG
39. Low state : DESPAIR
42. Drops : LESSENS
45. Lender's assessment : RISK
46. Mars, e.g. : DEUS
47. Edit : REWORK
50. Easily prepared lunch item, informally : PB AND J
54. Fire truck item : AXE
55. Visual representation of this puzzle's theme : “SPACE BAR”
59. Jackie's #2 : ARI
60. Insults : ZINGS
62. Left or right : JAB
63. Short news item : SQUIB
65. Sign word after "Ye" : OLDE
66. Ottoman V.I.P. : AGA
67. ___ rings : TREE
68. One with a staff position? : REST
69. ___ Noire (Russie borderer) : MER
70. Lather : SUDS

Down
1. Trailblazed : LED
2. Stroke, in a way : OAR
3. Empties : EVACUATES
4. Irish oath : BEGORRA
5. Who said "The less you open your heart to others, the more your heart suffers" : CHOPRA
6. Alternative to standard TV : HULU
7. "How could ___?" : I NOT
8. Attention to detail : CARE
9. Bargnani of the N.B.A. : ANDREA
10. Home of Banff National Park : ALBERTA
11. People swear by it : HOLY BIBLE
12. Strikeout star : ACE
13. Where the nose is : BOW
21. Whimper : MEWL
22. Nebr. neighbor : KANS
23. You, on the Yucatán : USTED
24. Pilot's place : STOVE
26. ___ rings : ONION
27. Feature of some cuts : BANGS
29. Howard of Ayn Rand's "The Fountainhead" : ROARK
30. Part of U.S.S.R.: Abbr. : SOV
31. Word with honey or flower : CHILD
36. You might need a lot of it for your files : DISK SPACE
37. It's far out : DEEP SPACE
40. Master : PRO
41. Areas that may be protected by military jets : AIR SPACES
43. Regions within regions : SUBSPACES
44. Nine-digit no. issuer : SSA
47. It might make one's shadow disappear : RAZOR
48. The Roman dramatist Seneca, once : EXILE
49. Proceeds indirectly : WENDS
51. Pacific nation once known as Pleasant Island : NAURU
52. Like prunes : DRIED
53. Agrees : JIBES
56. Hit 1996 live-action/animated film : SPACE JAM
57. We're living in it : SPACE AGE
58. Name for 55-Across : SPACE BAR
61. Fetch : GET
64. Bev. units : QTS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0730-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 14, Wednesday



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Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jean O'Conor
THEME: Punny Things in the Kitchen … each of today’s themed answers is a kitchen implement, but with each clue referring to a surprising interpretation of the answer:
17A. List of user IDs? : COOKIE SHEET
22A. Undergarment fitting device? : MEASURING CUP
30A. Jailer with a key ring? : CAN OPENER
43A. Hardly an attraction for a surfer? : MICROWAVE
49A. Directors in charge of downsizing? : CUTTING BOARD
58A. Attractive but annoying date? : CHAFING DISH
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Sandwich usually served with mayo : BLT
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

Mayonnaise originated in the town of Mahon in Menorca, a Mediterranean island belonging to Spain. The Spanish called the sauce “salsa mahonesa” after the town, and this morphed into the French word “mayonnaise” that we use in English today.

10. Scott Pelley's network : CBS
Scott Pelley is a TV journalist who currently is anchoring the “CBS Evening News”, and as such is the successor to Katie Couric.

13. Tyler of "The Lord of the Rings" : LIV
Actress and model Liv Tyler is the daughter of Steven Tyler, lead singer with Aerosmith, and Bebe Buell, a celebrated model and singer. Liv Tyler plays the Elf maiden Arwen Undómiel in Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy.

14. April to September, for baseball : SEASON
As many of you know, I’m no sports expert. I just read that the 2014 MLB season opened on March 22nd, with a game between the LA Dodgers and the Arizona Diamondbacks in Sydney, Australia. The first games played in North America took place on March 30th. The last games are scheduled to play on September 28th. So, doesn’t that make baseball season from March through September, at least in 2014?

15. Stadium closed in 2008 : SHEA
Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows, New York was named after William A. Shea, the man credited with bringing National League baseball back to the city in the form of the New York Mets. Shea Stadium was dismantled (not imploded) in 2008-2009, and the site now provides additional parking for the new stadium nearby called Citi Field.

16. Like some stocks, for short : OTC
Over-the-counter (OTC)

17. List of user IDs? : COOKIE SHEET
When you visit a website, often it will leave a little piece of text information called a "cookie" on your computer. As a cookie is a text file, and not executable, it is relatively harmless. However, as browsers routinely read these text files, cookies can be used as "spyware". Basically, the browser can read the cookie and tell a lot about your browsing habits. This can be a good thing, so when you go back to your favorite websites you will be recognized and this can help you. For example, you may have shopped at a site and you'll find that your shopping cart still has the items you were looking at, often because the items were stored in a cookie. However, they can be "bad" as some spyware uses the cookies to detect your browsing habits and can direct the browser to do things you may not want it to do. So, I only accept cookies from sites I trust, as they do enhance my browsing experience ...

26. Plains Indians : OSAGES
The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. They were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

30. Jailer with a key ring? : CAN OPENER
“Can” is a slang term for “jail”.

35. The Rosetta Stone is one : STELA
Stelae (singular “stele” or “stela”) were used all over the world, sometimes as territorial markers and sometimes to commemorate military victories. In later times stelae were commonly erected as commemorative markers in graveyards or other religious sites.

Rosetta is a coastal city and port on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt. The Rosetta Stone is an Ancient Egyptian artifact of tremendous importance in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics. Carvings on the stone are actually three translations of the same passage of prose, one in Egyptian hieroglyphics, one in Egyptian Demotic language, and one in classical Greek. The stone was discovered by the French military during Napoleon's 1798 campaign in Egypt. Before the French could get it back to France, the stone somehow ended up in enemy hands (the British), so it is now on display in the British Museum. Ownership of the stone is very much in dispute. The French want it, and understandably, the Egyptians would like it back.

58. Attractive but annoying date? : CHAFING DISH
A “chafing dish” is a portable grate used for dishes that must be cooked over a slow heat, The heat source is often charcoal or an alcohol burner. The term “chafing” comes from the French “chauffer” meaning “to make warm”.

61. TurboTax alternative, for short : CPA
Certified public accountant (CPA)

TurboTax is a software- and online-based income tax preparation service. It’s what I use, and I recommend it highly …

63. ___ greens : TURNIP
The names of veggies cause me grief sometimes. What's called a turnip here in the US, we call a swede back in Ireland. An Irishman’s turnip is a rutabaga over here. Thank goodness a potato is a potato, or I'd just give up altogether :)

64. Vessel that was 300 cubits long : ARK
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah's life-preserver during the flood.

65. Poison ___ : OAK
Two of the plants that are most painful to humans are poison oak and poison ivy. Poison oak is mainly found west of the Rocky Mountains, and poison ivy to the east.

Down
1. What century plants do only once : BLOOM
“Century plant” and “American aloe” are common names for the flowering plant Agave americana. The century plant lives for maybe 10-30 years (not a hundred!). It flowers only once, towards the end of a long life. It dies after flowering.

4. Sch. with a noted marching band : USC
The University of Southern California (USC) is a private school in Los Angeles. Apart from its excellent academic record, USC is known the success of its athletic program. USC athletes have won more Olympic medals than the students of any other university in the world. The USC marching band is very famous as well, and is known as the “Spirit of Troy”. The band has performed with many celebrities, and is the only college band to have two platinum records.

6. Most Cook Islanders : MAORI
The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word "māori" simply means "normal", distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

The Cook Islands is a grouping of 15 small islands in the South Pacific that is an associated state with New Zealand. under this arrangement, New Zealand is responsible for the defense of the Cook Islands and represents them on the world stage. Cook Islanders are citizens of New Zealand, but they are also Cook Island nationals. The Cook Islands have their own democratically elected parliament and are self-governed.

8. "___ anything later?" : DOING
Nope …

9. "Romanian Rhapsodies" composer : ENESCO
George Enescu (aka Georges Enesco) was a Romanian composer and performer. Enescu's most popular works are two “Romanian Rhapsodies” (1901-2) and the opera “Oedipe” (1936).

11. Gripe : BEEF
A “beef” is a complaint or a grievance. It’s not quite clear how “beef” came to have this meaning, but one suggestion is that derives from the habit of soldiers at the end of the 1800s complaining about the quality or availability of beef in their rations.

12. College Board creation : SAT
Today the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the acronym SAT.

18. Noted children's "doctor" : SEUSS
Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel was commander of the Animation Department of the USAF during WWII. He was behind many propaganda films including one called "Our Job in Japan". Even though the film was produced specifically as propaganda, this same movie was used after the war as a basis for the short feature "Design for Death", a study of Japanese culture released in 1947 and winner of an Oscar for best Documentary.

20. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan's greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki's best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

28. Peak figure: Abbr. : ELEV
Elevation (elev.)

29. ___-Coburg (former German duchy) : SAXE
Saxony was the name given at different times in history to states along the Elbe river in central Europe. As the various states broke up, they spawned many duchies that retained the name "Saxe". The most famous of these duchies was probably Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, two united duchies in Germany that ceased to exist after WWII. A notable branch of the Saxe-Coburg and Gotha House is the British Royal Family, as Queen Victoria was married to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. King George V of the United Kingdom changed the name of the family to the House of Windsor in a politically sensible move during WWI.

31. Former Chevy subcompact : AVEO
The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact automobile that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

32. Book before Deut. : NUM
The Book of Numbers in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles relates much of the journey of Moses and the Israelites from Egypt to the promised land. The title comes from the numbering of the people that is described in the beginning of the book.

Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. The English title of Deuteronomy comes from a Greek word that translates as "second law".

33. British record giant : EMI
EMI was a British music company, with the acronym originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

42. Arab kingdom native : SAUDI
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the largest Arab country in the Middle East and is the world's largest oil producer, home to the world's largest oil reserves. The Saudi dynasty started in central Arabia in 1744 when the secular leader Muhammad ibn Saud joined forces with the Islamic scholar and Imam, Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab. At the time, Saud was a ruler of a town near Riyadh and he was determined to bring "true" Islam to the Arabian peninsula. Since 1744 the fortunes of the Saudi family have risen and fallen, but it is that same family who rules what we know today as Saudi Arabia.

45. Pinocchio material : WOOD
“The Adventures of Pinocchio” is an 1883 children’s novel by Carlo Collodi, which is all about an animated puppet called Pinocchio and Geppetto, his poor woodcarver father. Pinocchio is prone to telling lies, the stress of which causes his short nose to become longer.

47. Hospital implants : STENTS
In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body's conduit.

50. Dress smartly, in old parlance : TOG UP
The verb "tog", meaning to dress up, comes from the Latin "toga", the garment worn in Ancient Rome. "Tog" can be use as an informal word for a coat or a cloak. Back in Ireland, togs are what we call swimming shorts.

51. Hindu warrior king : INDRA
In Hindu mythology, Indra is the King of the gods, Lord of Heaven. He is also the God of War, Storms and Rainfall.

52. German refusals : NEINS
"Nein" is the German for "no".

54. Rapper with the 3x platinum single "Hold On, We're Going Home" : DRAKE
Drake is the stage name of rapper Aubrey Graham from Toronto.

55. Karmann ___, classic German sports car : GHIA
Volkswagen made the Karmann Ghia from 1955 to 1974. The original model was built on the VW Beetle chassis, was styled by the Italian automobile design house Ghia, and the bodywork was hand-built by the German coach-builder Karmann.

58. Exec in charge of $$$ : CFO
Chief financial officer (CFO)

59. ___ card : SIM
Most cell phones have SIM cards these days. SIM cards hold the personal information of the subscriber, with the acronym being short for Subscriber Identity Module.

60. Some PCs and printers : HPS
The giant multinational called HP (originally Hewlett-Packard) was founded in 1939 with an investment of $538, in a one-car garage in Palo Alto, California by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard. The company name would have been Packard-Hewlett if Dave Packard had won a coin toss!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sandwich usually served with mayo : BLT
4. Like messy beds : UNMADE
10. Scott Pelley's network : CBS
13. Tyler of "The Lord of the Rings" : LIV
14. April to September, for baseball : SEASON
15. Stadium closed in 2008 : SHEA
16. Like some stocks, for short : OTC
17. List of user IDs? : COOKIE SHEET
19. "I'm surprised to see you!" : OH HI!
21. Run some water over : RINSE OFF
22. Undergarment fitting device? : MEASURING CUP
25. Tag ... or a word that can precede tag : NAME
26. Plains Indians : OSAGES
30. Jailer with a key ring? : CAN OPENER
35. The Rosetta Stone is one : STELA
36. Massachusetts or Connecticut in D.C. : AVE
37. Was livid : FUMED
39. Cowboy moniker : TEX
40. Card combinations : MELDS
43. Hardly an attraction for a surfer? : MICROWAVE
46. Impersonate : POSE AS
48. "... ducks in ___" : A ROW
49. Directors in charge of downsizing? : CUTTING BOARD
55. Elementary start : GRADE ONE
57. Textile artist, perhaps : DYER
58. Attractive but annoying date? : CHAFING DISH
61. TurboTax alternative, for short : CPA
62. Features of many late-1950s cars : FINS
63. ___ greens : TURNIP
64. Vessel that was 300 cubits long : ARK
65. Poison ___ : OAK
66. Jerks : SPASMS
67. Fish eggs : ROE

Down
1. What century plants do only once : BLOOM
2. Limber : LITHE
3. Just 2 to 13, once : TV CHANNELS
4. Sch. with a noted marching band : USC
5. Opposite of paleo- : NEO-
6. Most Cook Islanders : MAORI
7. Welcome at the door : ASK IN
8. "___ anything later?" : DOING
9. "Romanian Rhapsodies" composer : ENESCO
10. Food Network V.I.P. : CHEF
11. Gripe : BEEF
12. College Board creation : SAT
15. Patronize, as a store : SHOP AT
18. Noted children's "doctor" : SEUSS
20. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
23. One crouching at home : UMP
24. Snorkeling spot : REEF
27. Aid for a bank heist : GETAWAY CAR
28. Peak figure: Abbr. : ELEV
29. ___-Coburg (former German duchy) : SAXE
30. Summer getaway : CAMP
31. Former Chevy subcompact : AVEO
32. Book before Deut. : NUM
33. British record giant : EMI
34. Cam button : REC
38. Bummer : DRAG
41. Some coffee orders : DECAFS
42. Arab kingdom native : SAUDI
44. Planet, e.g. : ORB
45. Pinocchio material : WOOD
47. Hospital implants : STENTS
50. Dress smartly, in old parlance : TOG UP
51. Hindu warrior king : INDRA
52. German refusals : NEINS
53. Not an original : REPRO
54. Rapper with the 3x platinum single "Hold On, We're Going Home" : DRAKE
55. Karmann ___, classic German sports car : GHIA
56. Arrange in order : RANK
58. Exec in charge of $$$ : CFO
59. ___ card : SIM
60. Some PCs and printers : HPS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0729-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 14, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Nursery Worker’s Suggestions … today’s themed answers are all plants with two-part names, with the clue being matched to the first part of that name:
18A. Nursery worker's suggestion for a backstabber? : SNAKE PLANT
36A. ... for a scoundrel? : DOGWOOD
57A. ... for a fall guy? : GOATSBEARD
3D. ... for a grouch? : CRABGRASS
32D. ... for a lothario? : WOLF’S BANE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 29s!!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … MESTIZA (mestiha), XZIBIT (Xhibit)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Willy of "Free Willy," e.g. : ORCA
The orca that starred in the 1993 movie "Free Willy" was actually called Keiko, with Willy being his "stage name". Keiko had a sad life. He was captured near Iceland in 1979 and sold to a local aquarium. Subsequently he was sold on to Marineland in Ontario, and then Six Flags Mexico in 1985. After starring in the movie, his fans raised money with the intent of returning Keiko to the wild. Keiko had become very ill, partly from being confined in a small tank in Mexico, so a lot of money had to be spent returning him to good health. He was purchased by the Oregon Coast Aquarium who undertook the task of treating him and preparing him for the wild. You might recall the dramatic journey he took from Mexico to Oregon in US Air Force transport plane in 1996. Having regained his health, he was flown to Iceland and there was gradually reintroduced into the wild. Sadly, Keiko did not fare too well back in the ocean. He was never adopted by a pod, so lived a solitary life. He lost weight, would sometimes follow fishing boats and play with any humans who would give him attention. In 2003 he beached himself in Taken Bay in Norway, where he died.

5. Kind of breath : BATED
“Bated breath” is breath that has lessened in intensity, “abated”.

10. Transportation for Mary Poppins or E.T. : BIKE
The “Mary Poppins” series of children’s novels was written by Australian-born English writer and actress P. L. Travers. Mary Poppins is a magical children’s nanny with a best friend called Bert. In the famous musical film adaptation of the Mary Poppins stories, Poppins is played by Julie Andrews and Bert is played Dick Van Dyke.

1982’s classic science fiction movie “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” was directed by Steven Spielberg. The idea behind the film came from Spielberg himself, and the character E.T. was based on an imaginary friend that he conjured up as a child after his parents divorced in 1960.

17. United Nations headquarters decoration : FLAG
The United Nations building is located on “international territory” in New York City in Manhattan, overlooking the East River. The building is sometimes referred to as “Turtle Bay”, as it is located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of the city.

18. Nursery worker's suggestion for a backstabber? : SNAKE PLANT
Snake plant and mother-in-law’s tongue are familiar names for the plant Sansevieria trifasciata. The moniker “snake plant” is given because of the shape of its leaves, and “mother-in-law’s tongue” is a reference to the leaves’ sharpness!

22. Pontius ___ : PILATE
Pontius Pilate was the judge at the trial of Jesus Christ and the man who authorized his crucifixion. Over the years, many scholars have suggested that Pilate was a mythical character. However in 1961 a block of limestone was found in the modern-day city of Caesarea in Israel, and in the block was an inscription that included the name of Pontius Pilate, citing him as Prefect of Judea.

24. Killer bees and others : MENACES
Killer bees are descended from European and African bees that were deliberately interbred by a Brazilian geneticist in 1957. The resulting hybrid was intended to be isolated from local populations, but 28 swarms were accidentally released into the wild. Over the coming decades, the Africanized bees have been remarkably successful in ecological terms and have spread right through South and Central America. The first to be found in the US were discovered in California in 1985.

25. Shrew : VIRAGO
The term “virago” can describe a strong or courageous woman. The term can also be used pejoratively to mean a shrewish, domineering woman. “Virago” uses the Latin root “vir” meaning “man”, with the “-ago” suffix feminizing the term.

28. Tennis's Ivanovic : ANA
Ana Ivanovic is a Serbian tennis player, and former world number one. As well as playing tennis, she also studied finance at university in her native Belgrade.

29. Former New York governor Spitzer : ELIOT
Eliot Spitzer was the Governor of New York for just over a year before he resigned when it surfaced that he had been a client of a prostitution ring.

31. Deuces : TWOS
“Deuce” is a word that we sometimes use for a “two” in a game of dice or cards. The term comes from “deux”, the French word for “two”.

39. Physicist Georg : OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

43. The Tigers of the S.E.C. : LSU
LSU's full name is Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College.

44. Responds hotly? : SEXTS
"Sexting" (a portmanteau of "sex" and "texting") is the sending of explicit dialog and images between cell phones. The term "sexting" was first coined by the UK's "Sunday Telegraph Magazine" in a 2005 article. Apparently the practice is "rampant" among teens and young adults. Whatever happened to dinner and a movie ...?

49. Mujer of mixed race : MESTIZA
Mestizo (feminine form is “mestiza”) is a term that was used by the colonial Spanish and Portuguese in South America, to describe people with mixed European and Amerindian ancestry. The word "mestizo" comes from the Latin "mixticius" meaning "mixed".

“Mujer” is a Spanish word meaning “woman”.

52. Noted filmmaker with a dog named Indiana : LUCAS
The producer and director George Lucas has amassed an incredibly large fortune, primarily due to the phenomenal success of his movie franchises “Star Wars” and “Indiana Jones”. Worth about $3 billion, Lucas has gone the way of Bill Gates and Warren Buffett, agreeing to give half of his fortune to charity as part of "The Giving Pledge".

"Raiders of the Lost Ark" is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg's first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in "Star Wars", and also appeared in Lucas's "American Graffiti"). Tom Selleck was offered the role but couldn't get out of his commitments to "Magnum, P.I." Eventually Spielberg got his way, and that was a good thing I'd say ...

53. Milanese fashion house : ARMANI
Giorgio Armani is an Italian fashion designer and founder of the company that has borne his name since 1975. Although Armani is famous for his menswear, the company makes everything from jewelry to perfume.

57. ... for a fall guy? : GOATSBEARD
A fall guy is a scapegoat, or simply “goat”.

59. Connecticut Ivy : YALE
The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

63. Cartoon collectibles : CELS
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

64. Wheelbarrow or thimble, in Monopoly : TOKEN
There are eight tokens included in the game of Monopoly as of 2013. These are the wheelbarrow, battleship, racecar, thimble, boot, Scottie dog, top hat and cat. The latest to be introduced was the cat in 2013, replacing the iron. The battleship and the cannon (aka howitzer, now retired) had been added to the Monopoly game as part of a recycling exercise. The pieces were intended for the game "Conflict" released in 1940, but when Parker Bros. pulled "Conflict" off the market due to poor sales, they added their excess battleships and cannons to Monopoly.

Down
1. Does a mob hit on : OFFS
“To off” is a slang term meaning “to kill, assassinate”.

2. Move, to a Realtor : RELO
Some helpful blog readers have educated me on the term "Realtor" and have pointed out why the word is capitalized. "Real estate agent" is a general, generic term. "Realtor" is the name given to a member of the trade association known as the National Association of Realtors (NAR). The NAR has gone so far as the trademark the term "Realtor" in the US.

4. German chancellor Merkel : ANGELA
The formidable politician Angela Merkel is the current Chancellor of Germany, the country's head of state. Merkel is the first female German Chancellor and when she chaired the G8 in 2007 she became only the second woman to do so, after the UK’s Margaret Thatcher. Merkel grew up in East Germany under Communist rule.

5. Extended piece by John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin or John Entwistle of the Who : BASS SOLO
John Paul Jones is the stage name of bass player John Baldwin, who is best known as a member of the English rock group Led Zeppelin. Baldwin took his stage name from the 1959 biographical film “John Paul Jones”, about the exploits of the Scottish sailor and naval hero of the US cause during the American Revolutionary War.

The English musician John Entwistle was best known as the bass guitarist for the rock band the Who. Entwistle died in 2002 at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas, having succumbed to a heart attack brought on by the use of cocaine.

6. ___ Dei : AGNUS
"Agnus Dei" is Latin for "Lamb of God", a term used in Christian faiths for Jesus Christ, symbolizing His role as a sacrificial offering to atone for the sins of man.

9. Like the diving end of a pool vis-à-vis the other end : DEEPER
We use the French phrase "vis-a-vis" to mean "with regard to" or "in relation to". The literal translation from the French is "face to face". When we imported the phrase into English in the mid-1700s, it had two other meanings that were more faithful to the original. Firstly, it could be a "face to face" meeting (not so today), and secondly, it was a type of carriage in which the occupants faced each other.

11. "Shaft" composer Hayes : ISAAC
Isaac Hayes was a soul singer and songwriter. Hayes wrote the score for the 1971 film "Shaft", and the enduring "Theme from 'Shaft'" won him an Academy Award in 1972.

12. Kunta ___ of "Roots" : KINTE
Not only did Alex Haley author the magnificent novel "Roots", but he was also the collaborator with Malcolm X on "The Autobiography of Malcolm X". His 1976 novel "Roots" is based on Haley's own family history, and he claimed to be a direct descendant of the real life Kunta Kinte, the slave who was kidnapped in the The Gambia in 1767. If you remember the fabulous television adaptation of "Roots", you might recall that Kunta Kinte was played by LeVar Burton, who later went on to play another famous role, Geordi La Forge on "Star Trek: the Next Generation".

13. ___ Park, Colo. : ESTES
Estes Park is a town in a beautiful part of the US, in northern Colorado. Estes Park is home to the headquarters of Rocky Mountain National Park. My fire-fighting brother-in-law was based at that park, so I’ve visited and can attest that it is a gorgeous place to live. He lives in Omaha now. The geography in Omaha is a little different ...

25. Improvise musically : VAMP
“To vamp” is to improvise musically, usually on a piano, and is often an accompaniment to a solo.

30. Sinatra's "___ Kick Out of You" : I GET A
“I Get a Kick Out of You” is a Cole Porter song that was written for the 1934 musical “Anything Goes”. Ethel Merman performed the song in the show, and the most famous cover version was recorded by Frank Sinatra. The lyrics caused a few problems over the years. The original has a reference to the Lindberghs, which had to be removed in response to the Lindbergh kidnapping, so:
I shouldn't care for those nights in the air
That the fair Mrs. Lindbergh goes through
became:
Flying too high with some guy in the sky
Is my idea of nothing to do
The original also has a reference to cocaine, which had to be taken out for the 1936 movie version of the show. The first line below:
Some get a kick from cocaine
I'm sure that if
I took even one sniff
That would bore me terrif-
ically, too
became:
Some like the perfume in Spain

Frank Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants living in Hoboken, New Jersey. Like so many of our heroes, Sinatra had a rough upbringing. His mother was arrested several times and convicted of running an illegal abortion business in the family home. Sinatra never finished high school, as he was expelled for rowdy conduct. He was later arrested as a youth on a morals charge for carrying on with a married woman, which was an offence back then. But Sinatra straightened himself out by the time he was twenty and started singing professionally.

32. ... for a lothario? : WOLF’S BANE
“Wolf’s Bane” is a common name for genus of plant Aconitum. The plant canyield a toxin that was once used to kill wolves, hence its common name.

There is a character Lothario in Don Quixote, and in the "Fair Penitent", a 1703 play by Nicholas Rowe. In both cases the Lothario in question exhibits less than wholesome behavior towards a woman, giving rise to the term “lothario” meaning a "roue".

38. Bing Crosby's record label : DECCA
Decca Records started out in 1929 as a British record label. The US branch of Decca was opened up in 1934, but the UK and US entities went their separate ways starting in WWII.

The singer Bing Crosby was a great lover of the game of golf. Crosby had just finished up 18 holes on a course in Spain in 1977 when he suffered a massive heart attack on the final green. Crosby’s last words were “That was a great game of golf, fellas.”

45. One in Munich : EINS
The German for one, two, three is "eins, zwei, drei".

46. Rapper who hosted MTV's "Pimp My Ride" : XZIBIT
Xzibit is the stage name of rapper Alvin Joiner from Detroit. Xzibit is the host of the show “Pimp My Ride”, which airs on MTV. The show covers the restoration of cars in poor condition.

48. Light courses? : EASY AS
An easy A, is a school course that is not very challenging.

51. Picayune : SMALL
Something described as “picayune” is of little value or importance. The original picayune was a Spanish coin worth half a real, not a lot of money.

52. Lash ___ of old westerns : LARUE
Alfred LaRue was an actor who appeared in a lot of western movies in the forties and fifties. He was very adept with the bullwhip, earning him the nickname “Lash”. Years after his on screen career ended, LaRue was the guy who trained Harrison Ford how to use a bullwhip for his role in the "Indiana Jones" series of films.

54. Purchase for Halloween : MASK
All Saints' Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints' Day is All Hallows Eve, better known by the Scottish term "Halloween".

55. Designer Cassini : OLEG
Oleg Cassini, the French-born American fashion designer, had two big names particularly associated with his designs. In the sixties he produced the state wardrobe for First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and he was also the exclusive designer for Hollywood's Gene Tierney, who was Cassini's second wife.

56. Trees for making longbows : YEWS
Yew is the wood of choice for the longbow, a valued weapon in the history of England. The longbow is constructed with a core of yew heartwood (as the heartwood resists compression) that has a sheath of yew sapwood (as the sapwood resists stretching). The yew was in such demand for longbows that for centuries yew trees were in short supply in Britain and the wood had to be imported from all over Europe.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Willy of "Free Willy," e.g. : ORCA
5. Kind of breath : BATED
10. Transportation for Mary Poppins or E.T. : BIKE
14. Bit of office greenery : FERN
15. Forge a deal, say : AGREE
16. How a sale item may be sold : AS IS
17. United Nations headquarters decoration : FLAG
18. Nursery worker's suggestion for a backstabber? : SNAKE PLANT
20. Gets more clearheaded : SOBERS UP
22. Pontius ___ : PILATE
23. Part of a place setting : GLASS
24. Killer bees and others : MENACES
25. Shrew : VIRAGO
27. Ones cutting in line, e.g. : JERKS
28. Tennis's Ivanovic : ANA
29. Former New York governor Spitzer : ELIOT
31. Deuces : TWOS
35. Peaks: Abbr. : MTS
36. ... for a scoundrel? : DOGWOOD
39. Physicist Georg : OHM
40. Ask, as a riddle : POSE
42. Run away (with) : ELOPE
43. The Tigers of the S.E.C. : LSU
44. Responds hotly? : SEXTS
47. Atmospheric phenomenon during low temperatures : ICE FOG
49. Mujer of mixed race : MESTIZA
52. Noted filmmaker with a dog named Indiana : LUCAS
53. Milanese fashion house : ARMANI
54. Overly devoted son : MAMA’S BOY
57. ... for a fall guy? : GOATSBEARD
59. Connecticut Ivy : YALE
60. Away from a chat program, say : IDLE
61. It's debatable : ISSUE
62. From the top : ANEW
63. Cartoon collectibles : CELS
64. Wheelbarrow or thimble, in Monopoly : TOKEN
65. Line parts: Abbr. : SEGS

Down
1. Does a mob hit on : OFFS
2. Move, to a Realtor : RELO
3. ... for a grouch? : CRABGRASS
4. German chancellor Merkel : ANGELA
5. Extended piece by John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin or John Entwistle of the Who : BASS SOLO
6. ___ Dei : AGNUS
7. Snare : TRAP
8. Cry at a horror house : EEK!
9. Like the diving end of a pool vis-à-vis the other end : DEEPER
10. Gas balloon supply : BALLAST
11. "Shaft" composer Hayes : ISAAC
12. Kunta ___ of "Roots" : KINTE
13. ___ Park, Colo. : ESTES
19. Rosy : PINK
21. Was fierce, as a storm : RAGED
24. "I second that" : ME TOO
25. Improvise musically : VAMP
26. "What's gotten ___ you?" : INTO
27. Features of a droopy face : JOWLS
30. Sinatra's "___ Kick Out of You" : I GET A
32. ... for a lothario? : WOLF’S BANE
33. Extremely : OH SO
34. Self-satisfied : SMUG
37. Old-time drug hangout : OPIUM DEN
38. Bing Crosby's record label : DECCA
41. Millionaires' properties : ESTATES
45. One in Munich : EINS
46. Rapper who hosted MTV's "Pimp My Ride" : XZIBIT
48. Light courses? : EASY AS
49. Illusions : MAGIC
50. Wear away, as a bank : ERODE
51. Picayune : SMALL
52. Lash ___ of old westerns : LARUE
54. Purchase for Halloween : MASK
55. Designer Cassini : OLEG
56. Trees for making longbows : YEWS
58. Spanish "that" : ESO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0728-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jul 14, Monday



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Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: String Quartet … we have a QUARTET of hidden words in each of our themed answers. The circled letters spell out four types of STRING-like material:
17A. Chance of an impossibility : ZERO PERCENT (hiding "rope")
30A. Nickelodeon show whose protagonist has a football-shaped head : HEY ARNOLD! (hiding "yarn")
44A. For even a second more : ANY LONGER (hiding "nylon")
59A. Component of a language class, informally : VOCAB LESSON (hiding "cable")

37A. Classical music group ... or what the four sets of circled letters make up? : STRING QUARTET
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 24s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. N.Y.C. alternative to JFK : LGA
The accepted three big airports serving New York City are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia's name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to "New York" and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city's limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called "LaGuardia" as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as "LaGuardia" in 1947.

15. Mandel of "America's Got Talent" : HOWIE
Howie Mandel is a Canadian "funny guy". He's making a lot of money a few years ago as host of "Deal or No Deal", and now as a judge on "America's Got Talent". But I remember him from "St. Elsewhere" in the eighties, the first American TV show that I started to watch regularly when I moved to the US.

NBC’s show “America’s Got Talent” is part of a global franchise based in the UK. The original show is called “Britain’s Got Talent”, and the whole franchise is owned by Simon Cowell. The first host of "America's Got Talent" was Regis Philbin (2006), followed by Jerry Springer (2007-2008). Nick Cannon has been the host since 2009.

16. Galley propeller : OAR
Galleys were large medieval ships mainly found in the Mediterranean. They were propelled by a combination of sails and oars.

19. 666, for the numbers on a roulette wheel : SUM
The name "roulette" means "little wheel" in French, and the game as we know it today did in fact originate in Paris, in 1796. A roulette wheel bears the numbers 1-36. A French entrepreneur called François Blanc introduced the number “0” on the wheel, to give the house an extra advantage. Legend has it that Blanc made a deal with the devil in order to unearth the secrets of roulette. The legend is supported by the fact that the numbers 1 through 36 add up to a total of “666”, which is the “Number of the Beast”. Spooky ...

24. Cutters that cut with the grain : RIP SAWS
In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special rip saw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

30. Nickelodeon show whose protagonist has a football-shaped head : HEY ARNOLD!
“Hey Arnold!” is an animated show for kids that runs on Nickelodeon. Arnold is a fourth-grader living in a big city.

35. Note between fa and la : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

37. Classical music group ... or what the four sets of circled letters make up? : STRING QUARTET
A string quartet is a musical group consisting of two violinists, a violist and a cellist.

42. ___ de cologne : EAU
Back in 1709, an Italian perfume-maker moved to Cologne in Germany. There he invented a new fragrance that he named Eau de Cologne after his newly adopted town. The fragrance is still produced in Cologne, using a secret formulation. However, the terms "Eau de Cologne" and "cologne", are now used generically.

52. Nineveh's land : ASSYRIA
Assyria was an ancient kingdom located on the Upper Tigris river in Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq), named for it's capital city of Assur. According to the Bible, of the original Twelve Tribes of Israel, Ten Tribes "disappeared”, were lost when the Kingdom of Israel was destroyed by the Assyrians in 720 BCE.

Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city on the eastern bank of the Tigris River in modern-day Iraq. The ruins of the city are located just on the other side of the river from the Iraqi city of Mosul. At one time, Nineveh was the largest city in the world.

54. Indian dress : SARI
The item of clothing called a "sari" (also "saree") is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that's a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

55. ___ mater : ALMA
The literal translation for the Latin term "alma mater" is "nourishing mother". “Alma mater” was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one's alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one's last place of education.

57. Critical hosp. department : ICU
Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

58. A.T.M. co. : NCR
NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884, originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo.

64. Weasley family owl : ERROL
Errol is one of the magical creatures from the “Harry Potter” series of books by J. K. Rowling. Errol is a Great Grey Owl that delivers the mail for the Weasley family. He is old and prone to accidents so often needs help from other owls.

Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger are the principal characters in the “Harry Potter” series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling.

67. Baseball's Pee Wee : REESE
Pee Wee Reese was a shortstop who played his professional career with the Brooklyn and LA Dodgers. Reese is remembered not only for his skill on the field, but for his very visible support for teammate Jackie Robinson, who famously struggled to be accepted as the first African American player in the majors.

Down
1. ___ of Menlo Park (Thomas Edison) : WIZARD
Thomas Alva Edison was nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

2. Penguin variety : ADELIE
The Adélie penguin is found along the Antarctic coast, and are named after the Antarctic territory called Adélie Land that is claimed by France. Adélie Land was discovered by French explorer Jules Dumont D’Urville in 1840, and he named the territory after his wife Adéle.

3. Mexican wrap : SERAPE
"Serape" is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word "zarape". A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a hole in the middle for the head. Most serapes have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

4. "___ Te Ching" (classic Chinese text) : TAO
The “Tao Te Ching”is a classical Chinese text, fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

5. Psychic's "gift," briefly : ESP
Extrasensory Perception (ESP)

7. Birds in the "Arabian Nights" : ROCS
The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants. The roc was said to come from the Indian subcontinent. The supposed existence of the roc was promulgated by Marco Polo in the accounts that he published of his travels through Asia.

The “Arabian Nights” is a name often used in English for the famous collection of tales in Arabic that came from West and South Asia. The original name for the collection is “One Thousand and One Nights”. Some of the more famous stories in the collection with which we are most familiar today in English, were not included in the original Arabic version, for example “Aladdin’s Wonderful Lamp”, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” and “The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor”. These tales were added during the translation from Arabic.

11. Like a catch-22 situation : LOSE-LOSE
“Catch-22” is a novel by Joseph Heller set during WWII. The title refers to absurd bureaucratic constraints that soldiers had to suffer. Heller’s “Catch 22” was invoked by an army psychiatrist to explain that any pilot requesting to be evaluated for insanity, to avoid flying dangerous missions, had to be sane as only a sane man would try to get out of such missions. The term “catch-22 has entered the language and describes a paradoxical situation from which one can’t escape due to contradictory rules; one loses, no matter what choice one makes.

12. Knight's glove : GAUNTLET
Gauntlets are gloves, usually with an extended cuff that extends to cover the forearm. Gauntlets were often made of metal and were used as part of a suit of armor. In days of yore a knight might “throw down the gauntlet”, tossing one of his gauntlets to the ground symbolizing that he has issued a challenge. The prospective opponent would pick up the gauntlet if he accepted that challenge.

13. One of eight on an octopus : ARM
The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Drives me crazy ...

26. ___ Spumante : ASTI
Asti is a sparkling white wine from the Piedmont region of Italy, and is named for the town of Asti around which the wine is produced. The wine used to be called Asti Spumante, and it had a very bad reputation as a “poor man’s champagne”. The “Spumante” was dropped in a marketing attempt at rebranding associated with a reduction in the amount of residual sugar in the wine.

31. Suffix with Kafka : -ESQUE
Franz Kafka was born in 1883 in Prague, then part of Bohemia and today the capital of the Czech Republic. Kafka is known as one of the greatest novelists who worked in the German language, and even has an adjective named after him. Something that is "kafkaesque" is senseless, disorienting and may have menacing complexity. As it was for many great artists, Kafka's fame came after his death when much of his work was published.

32. Word pronounced the same when its first two letters are removed : YOU
“You” is pronounced the same as “U”.

37. Grew old : SENESCED
“To senesce” is to grow old. The Latin for “grow old” is “senescere”, from “senex” meaning “old”.

45. Dickens's "___ Twist" : OLIVER
"Oliver Twist" is a novel by Charles Dickens. It is a popular tale for adaptation to the big screen. There were two silent film versions, in 1909 and 1922, and the first talkie version was released in 1933, with many to follow. The latest "Oliver" for the big screen was a 2005 Roman Polanski production.

49. Kidman who is neither a kid nor a man : NICOLE
Nicole Kidman is an Australian-American actress whose breakthrough role was the female lead in 1989's "Dead Calm". Kidman was actually born in Hawaii, to Australian parents. As a result, she has dual citizenship of Australia and the US.

53. Mule on a canal, in song : SAL
The song "Fifteen Miles on the Erie Canal" was written in 1905. The lyrics are nostalgic and look back to the days when traffic on the canal was pulled by mules, bemoaning the introduction of the fast-moving engine-powered barges. The first line is "I've got an old mule and her name is Sal".

55. Unit of farmland : ACRE
At one time, an acre was defined as the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day. This was more precisely defined as a strip of land one furlong long (660 feet) and one chain wide (66 feet). The word "furlong" is actually derived from the Old English words meaning "furrow long", the length of the furrow plowed by the oxen.

56. Thailand/Vietnam separator : LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country's name is "Meuang Lao". The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of "Lao" entities united into one, the French added the "S" and so today we tend to use "Laos" instead of "Lao".

58. Org. for LeBron James : NBA
LeBron James plays basketball for the Miami Heat. James seems to be in demand for the covers of magazines. He became the first African American man to adorn the front cover of "Vogue" in March 2008. That made him only the third male to make the "Vogue" cover, following Richard Gere and George Clooney.

61. Squeeze (out) : EKE
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say ...

62. Sketch comedy TV series since '75 : SNL
NBC first aired a form of "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) in 1975 under the title "NBC's Saturday Night". The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from "The Tonight Show". Back then "The Tonight Show" had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call "Saturday Night Live".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Squander : WASTE
6. Like a cat in need of a firefighter, stereotypically : TREED
11. N.Y.C. alternative to JFK : LGA
14. Notions : IDEAS
15. Mandel of "America's Got Talent" : HOWIE
16. Galley propeller : OAR
17. Chance of an impossibility : ZERO PERCENT
19. 666, for the numbers on a roulette wheel : SUM
20. In the manner of : A LA
21. Fraidy-cat : WUSS
22. Portent : OMEN
24. Cutters that cut with the grain : RIP SAWS
27. Innocent's opposite : GUILTY
29. Watery abysses : DEEPS
30. Nickelodeon show whose protagonist has a football-shaped head : HEY ARNOLD!
33. From ___ Z : A TO
35. Note between fa and la : SOL
36. Functions : USES
37. Classical music group ... or what the four sets of circled letters make up? : STRING QUARTET
41. Yank : JERK
42. ___ de cologne : EAU
43. ___ the pants off : SUE
44. For even a second more : ANY LONGER
47. Insipid : BLAND
51. Observed : BEHELD
52. Nineveh's land : ASSYRIA
54. Indian dress : SARI
55. ___ mater : ALMA
57. Critical hosp. department : ICU
58. A.T.M. co. : NCR
59. Component of a language class, informally : VOCAB LESSON
63. Mattress's place : BED
64. Weasley family owl : ERROL
65. Prepared to be knighted : KNELT
66. Coupon bearers, often : ADS
67. Baseball's Pee Wee : REESE
68. Somebody ___ problem : ELSE’S

Down
1. ___ of Menlo Park (Thomas Edison) : WIZARD
2. Penguin variety : ADELIE
3. Mexican wrap : SERAPE
4. "___ Te Ching" (classic Chinese text) : TAO
5. Psychic's "gift," briefly : ESP
6. Plump songbird : THRUSH
7. Birds in the "Arabian Nights" : ROCS
8. Rams' mates : EWES
9. German article : EIN
10. Roundabout route : DETOUR
11. Like a catch-22 situation : LOSE-LOSE
12. Knight's glove : GAUNTLET
13. One of eight on an octopus : ARM
18. "Gross!" : EWW!
23. With great attention to detail : MINUTELY
25. Hand-held Fourth of July firework : SPARKLER
26. ___ Spumante : ASTI
27. Black-tie parties : GALAS
28. N.F.L. lengths: Abbr. : YDS
31. Suffix with Kafka : -ESQUE
32. Word pronounced the same when its first two letters are removed : YOU
34. Upright, as a box : ON END
37. Grew old : SENESCED
38. Those who put a lot of effort into social climbing, in modern lingo : TRY-HARDS
39. Joke : GAG
40. Chafes : RUBS
41. Short boxing punch : JAB
45. Dickens's "___ Twist" : OLIVER
46. Talk on and on and on : RAMBLE
48. Comes up : ARISES
49. Kidman who is neither a kid nor a man : NICOLE
50. Intimidates : DAUNTS
53. Mule on a canal, in song : SAL
55. Unit of farmland : ACRE
56. Thailand/Vietnam separator : LAOS
58. Org. for LeBron James : NBA
60. Rock with gold or silver, say : ORE
61. Squeeze (out) : EKE
62. Sketch comedy TV series since '75 : SNL


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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