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0831-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Aug 14, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: Heard at the Movies … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a movie that on the BEST PICTURE Oscar:
23A. Jewish bread/Played, as a violin/Throw (1950) : CHALLAH/BOWED/HEAVE (“All About Eve”)
31A. Toyota rival/Measure of power/Insult (1954) : HONDA/WATT/AFFRONT (“On the Waterfront”)
47A. Reside/Savage/Puzzle (out)/Wash (2013) : DWELL/FIERCE/SUSS/LAVE (“12 Years a Slave”)
64A. Hooligan/Strange/Silo contents (1972) : THUG/ODD/FODDER (“The Godfather”)
79A. Wildlife protector/Difficult/Hotel door feature (1980) : WARDEN/HAIRY/PEEPHOLE (“Ordinary People”)
97A. "In what way?"/Like overcooked steak/Possess/European capital on a gulf (1985) : HOW/TOUGH/HAVE/RIGA (“Out of Africa”)
109A. What you get when you say 23-, 31-, 47-, 64-, 79- or 97-Across out loud : BEST PICTURE WINNER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 37m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SALAAM (salaom), BONSAI(bonsoi)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Halle Berry was once runner-up for this : MISS USA
The beautiful and talented actress Halle Berry is the only African American woman to win a best Actress Oscar, which she received for her performance in the 2001 movie "Monster's Ball". She also won a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress in 2005 for playing the title role in "Catwoman", and she very graciously accepted the award in person. Good for her!

13. Hanes competitor : BVD
The men’s underwear known as BVDs are made by the Bradley, Voorhees & Day. The company was started in 1876 to make bustles for women, and is named for its founders.

20. French filmmaker who led the Cinéma Pur movement : RENE CLAIR
René Clair was a film director from Paris who made movies in France, the UK and in the US. I must admit, the only René Clair film that I’ve seen is 1945’s “And Then There Were None”, an adaptation of the Agatha Christie mystery novel that stars Barry Fitzgerald and Walter Huston.

“Cinéma Pur” (meaning “Pure Cinema”) was a movement that started in French filmmaking that focused on the cinematic elements of film such as motion and visual composition, demoting a film’s storyline and plot.

22. When Earth Day is celebrated: Abbr. : APR
Earth Day was founded in the US, an event introduced by Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin. Earth Day was designed to increase awareness and appreciation of our planet's natural environment. The original Earth Day was on April 22nd, 1970. Decades later, the day is observed in over 175 countries.

23. Jewish bread/Played, as a violin/Throw (1950) : CHALLAH BOWED HEAVE (“All About Eve”)
I must confess that I have a problem watching movies starring Bette Davis. I think I must have seen her play one of her more sinister roles when I was a kid and it gave me nightmares or something. So, I have never seen the 1950 classic film "All About Eve", given that Bette Davis gets top billing. But, the title role of Eve Harrington was played by Anne Baxter, and Ms Baxter's movies I do enjoy. Coincidentally, on the epic television series "Hotel", when Bette Davis became ill, it was Anne Baxter who was chosen to take on her role.

Challah is a special braided bread that is eaten by Ashkenazi Jews on the Sabbath. The bread is served to commemorate the manna that fell from the heavens as the Israelites wandered around the desert after the Exodus from Egypt.

26. Ring material : CANVAS
The floor of a boxing or wrestling ring is traditionally made from canvas.

27. ___ cloud (source of comets) : OORT
The Oort Cloud is a hypothetical spherical cloud of comets that lies about a light-year from the sun. It is postulated that periodic comets that enter our solar systems (like Halley's Comet) originate in this cloud. The phenomenon was named for Dutch astronomer Jan Oort.

28. Org. in "The Sopranos" : FBI
"The Sopranos" is an outstanding television drama that was made by HBO and is a story about Italian-American mobsters in New Jersey. "The Sopranos" has made more money than any other television series in the history of cable television. It's "must see TV" ...

30. One quarter of a quartet : ALTO
In choral music, an alto is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word "alto" describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term "contralto" describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male's voice (not a boy's) with the same range as an alto is called a "countertenor".

31. Toyota rival/Measure of power/Insult (1954) : HONDA WATT AFFRONT (“On the Waterfront”)
The 1954 drama "On the Waterfront", starring Marlon Brando, told a story of violence and corruption among longshoremen. The movie was based on a series of 24 articles written by investigative journalist Malcolm Johnston and published in "The New York Sun". The original news stories uncovered mob infiltration on the New York City Waterfront, but the location for the film was chosen as Hoboken, New Jersey.

36. Parisian possessive : SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

37. Sound units : BELS
In the world of acoustics, one bel is equal to ten decibels.

40. Peace in the Middle East : SALAAM
The word "salaam" is an Anglicized spelling of the Arabic word for "peace". It can mean an act of deference, in particular a very low bow.

42. Forbes competitor : INC
“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

44. Ca, Ce, Co or Cu : ELEM
Calcium (Ca), Cerium (Ce), Cobalt (Co) and Copper (Cu) are all chemical elements.

47. Reside/Savage/Puzzle (out)/Wash (2013) : DWELL FIERCE SUSS LAVE (“12 Years a Slave”)
“12 Years a Slave" is a powerful 2013 film adapted from the memoir “Twelve Years a Slave” by Solomon Northup. Northup was an African American who was born a free man in Upstate New York where he worked as a farmer and a violinist. He was lured to Washington, D.C. where slavery was legal, and there was kidnapped by slave traders. Northup spent twelve years as a slave in Louisiana before an intermediary made contact with friends and family who were able to obtain his release. The slave trader in Washington who committed the crime was arrested and tried, although he was acquitted, because D.C. law prohibited an African American from testifying against Caucasians.

53. Greatly desired objects : GRAILS
The Holy Grail is theme found throughout Arthurian legend. The grail itself is some vessel, with the term “grail” coming from the Old French “graal” meaning “cup or bowl made of earth, wood or metal”. Over time, the legend of the Holy Grail became mingled with stories of the Holy Chalice of the Christian tradition, the cup used to serve wine at the Last Supper. Over time, the term “grail” came to be used for any desired or sought-after object.

54. Any of the "South Park" characters : TOON
“South Park” is an adult-oriented cartoon series on Comedy Central. I don’t do “South Park” …

59. Number by a door? : CAROL
The word "carol" came into English via the Old French word "carole", which was a "dance in a ring". When "carol" made it into English, about 1300 AD, the term was used to describe a dance as well as a joyful song. Around 1500 AD, carols that were sung came to be associated with Christmas.

61. Islamic spirit : JINN
The "genie" in the bottle takes his or her name from "djinn" (sometimes “jinn”). Djinns were various spirits considered lesser than angels, with people exhibiting unsavory characteristics said to be possessed by djinn. When the book "The Thousand and One Nights" was translated into French, the word "djinn" was transformed into the existing word "génie", because of the similarity in sound and the related spiritual meaning. This "génie" from the Arabian tale became confused with the Latin-derived "genius", a guardian spirit thought to be assigned to each person at birth. Purely as a result of that mistranslation the word genie has come to mean the "djinn" that pops out of the bottle. A little hard to follow, I know, but still quite interesting …

64. Hooligan/Strange/Silo contents (1972) : THUG ODD FODDER (“The Godfather”)
"The Godfather" series of films is of course based on "The Godfather" novel by Mario Puzo, first published in 1969. Francis Ford Coppola worked with Puzo in partnership to adapt his novel into the screenplay for the first film, and to write the screenplays for the two sequels. Coppola holds that there are really only two films in "The Godfather" series, with "The Godfather Part III" actually being the epilogue.

68. Only non-U.S. M.L.B. team: Abbr. : TOR
The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

69. Some cameras, for short : SLRS
SLR stands for "single lens reflex". Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

72. Like a milquetoast : WUSSY
Someone described a “milquetoast” is particularly weak and timid. The term comes from a character called Caspar Milquetoast in the comic strip “The Timid Soul” drawn by H. T. Webster. Webster came up with Caspar’s name by deliberately misspelling “milk toast”, which is a bland food that is suitable for someone with a weak stomach.

75. Comedian Kevin : HART
Kevin Hart is an actor and comedian from Philadelphia. Hart plays the lead role on a reality TV parody on BET called “Real Husbands of Hollywood”.

77. Obama follower? : -CARE
The official name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”.

79. Wildlife protector/Difficult/Hotel door feature (1980) : WARDEN HAIRY PEEPHOLE (“Ordinary People”)
“Ordinary People” is a fascinating 1980 film about a family dealing with the death of one their sons in a boating accident. Starring Donald Sutherland and Mary Tyler Moore, “Ordinary People” was the first film directed by Robert Redford.

86. Load bearer? : HAMPER
A laundry hamper might bear a load of laundry.

90. California roll ingredient : CRAB
A California roll is a kind of sushi roll that is made inside-out, with the seaweed inside and the rice on the outside. A California roll often includes rice, seaweed, cucumber and avocado. The dish originated in Los Angeles where a chef at the Tokyo Kaikan restaurant substituted avocado for fatty tuna (“toro”) in a traditional sushi recipe. The chef also put the seaweed on the inside, as his American customers preferred not to look directly at seaweed while they were eating it!

97. "In what way?"/Like overcooked steak/Possess/European capital on a gulf (1985) : HOW TOUGH HAVE RIGA (“Out of Africa”)
“Out of Africa” is a Sydney Pollack film released in 1985, starring Robert Redford and Meryl Streep. The storyline is based on the autobiographical book of the same name by Karen Blixen (written under the pen name Isak Dinesen).

103. British author who wrote "The Old Devils" : AMIS
Kingsley Amis (what a great name!) was a very successful English writer, famous for producing entertaining, comedic novels. His most famous novel probably is his first, "Lucky Jim" published in 1954, although he won a Booker Prize for a later novel, "The Old Devils" published in 1986. He passed on some of his talent through his genes, it seems, as his son Martin Amis is a very successful novelist too.

105. Oklahoma tribe : OTOE
The Native American people known as the Otoe were the first tribe encountered by the Lewis and clark Expedition. The meeting took place at a point on the Missouri River that is now known as Council Bluff.

106. Brave group, informally? : NL EAST
The Atlanta Braves baseball team has announced that it will move from Turner Field in Atlanta to a new park to be built in Cobb County, Georgia, which is just northwest of Atlanta.

108. Kind of garden : ZEN
Japanese Zen gardens are inspired by the meditation gardens of Zen Buddhist temples. Zen gardens have no water in them, but often there is gravel and sand that is raked in patterns designed to create the impression of water in waves and ripples.

116. ___ Islas Filipinas : LAS
When the Spanish explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos discovered the islands of Leyte and Samar, he called them Felipinas, after King Philip II of Spain. Eventually, the name was used for the whole archipelago, becoming what we now call in English, the Philippines.

117. "Inglourious Basterds" org. : OSS
The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

I tried hard to enjoy the 2009 movie "Inglourious Basterds", but I find the violence in a Quentin Tarantino film so very hard to take. However, it got good reviews, so maybe you shouldn't let me put you off.

118. ___ nous : ENTRE
"Entre nous" is French for "between us".

Down
1. Shopping malls on Black Friday, e.g. : MECCAS
In the world of retail, “Black Friday” is the day after Thanksgiving in the US. Black Friday is when many stores start the holiday shopping season, and so offer deep discounts to get ahead of the competition.

2. Scarf down : INHALE
“To scarf down” is teenage slang from the sixties meaning “to wolf down, to eat hastily”. The term is probably imitative of “to scoff”.

4. Round of shots : SALVO
A salvo is a simultaneous discharge of guns. Ironically, “salvo” comes from the Latin “salve” meaning “be in good health”. Salvo was originally the name given to the firing of guns in the air as a sign of respect or greeting for an important visitor. Good health!

5. Campus attended by Elle in "Legally Blonde" : UCLA
“LEGALLY blonde” is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon as a girlish sorority president who heads to Harvard to earn a law degree. “LEGALLY blonde” was successful enough to warrant two sequels as well as a spin-off musical that played most successfully in London’s West End (for 974 performances).

10. Pair of socks? : ONE-TWO
A one-two punch …

12. Duke, e.g.: Abbr. : SCH
Duke University was founded in 1838 as Brown’s Schoolhouse. The school was renamed to Trinity College in 1859, and to this day the town where the college was located back then is known as Trinity, in honor of the school. The school was moved in 1892 to Durham, North Carolina in part due to generous donations from the wealthy tobacco industrialist Washington Duke. Duke’s donation required that the school open its doors to women, placing them on an equal footing with men. Trinity’s name was changed to Duke in 1924 in recognition of the generosity of the Duke family.

13. Start of a children's rhyme : BAA BAA
The old English nursery rhyme “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep” is usually sung as:
Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes, sir, yes, sir,
Three bags full;
One for the master,
And one for the dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.
The tune that accompanies the rhyme is a variant of the French melody “Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman”, which we know best in English as the tune for “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”.

15. Rap mogul, briefly : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

16. Prohibited : TABOO
The word "taboo" was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean". Cook described "tabu" (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

18. President after Johnson : GRANT
Ulysses S. Grant had been a career soldier when he was elected as the 18th president of the US, and had risen to commander of all the Union armies by the end of the Civil War. Grant served two nonconsecutive terms as president, and also made a failed bid for a third term. Grant’s reputation was tarnished by his apparent tolerance of corruption in his administration. On the other hand, Grant worked hard to protect African Americans during Reconstruction after the Civil War, and pursued peaceful relations with Native Americans.

Andrew Johnson was the 17th President of the US, the man who came to power after the assassination of President Lincoln. As well as being Lincoln's successor, Johnson is remembered as the first sitting president to be impeached. Johnson fell foul of the so-called "Radical Republicans" due to his efforts to quickly incorporate the southern states back into the Union. His political opponents chose the Tenure of Office Act as their "weapon" for impeachment. The Act prevented a president from removing an appointee of a past-president without the consent of the Senate. Johnson had removed the sitting Secretary of War without consulting Congress creating the opportunity for an impeachment trial in Congress. He was acquitted though, as his opponents fell one vote shy of the majority needed. The impeachment of President Johnson was the only presidential impeachment until that of President Clinton in 1999.

24. Growing art form? : BONSAI
The term "bonsai" is used more correctly to describe the Japanese art of growing carefully shaped trees in containers. Bonsai has come to be used as the name for all miniature trees in pots.

29. Fred Flintstone's boss : MR SLATE
In “The Flintstone” animated TV show, Fred Flintstone operates a bronto-crane at the Slate Rock and Gravel Company, which is owned by Fred’s boss Mr. Slate.

32. Minnesota's St. ___ College : OLAF
St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota is named after the former king and patron saint of Norway, Olaf II.

34. Heavenly bodies? : TENS
Tradition has it that a beautiful body is given a rating of “ten”.

37. Plebiscite, e.g. : BALLOT
Today a “ballot” is a piece of paper used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

A plebiscite is a vote in which the entire electorate accepts or rejects a proposition. A referendum might be termed a plebiscite, as are propositions that appear on the ballot in some states.

40. Número of Mexican states that border the U.S. : SEIS
In Spanish, the number (número) of Mexican states bordering the US is six (seis), and they are:
- Baja California
- Sonora
- Chihuahua
- Coahuila
- Nuevo León
- Tamaulipas
There are four American states along the US-Mexico border, and they are:
- California
- Arizona
- New Mexico
- Texas

41. Subway systems : METROS
The Paris Métro is the busiest underground transportation system in western Europe, carrying about 4.5 million passengers a day, about the same as the New York City Subway. The system took its name from the company that originally operated it: "La Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris", which was shorted to “Métro”. The term “Metro” was then adopted for similar systems in cities all over the world.

43. Figures on some Valentine's Day cards : CUPIDS
Cupid is the god of desire and erotic love in Roman mythology. The Greek counterpart of Cupid is Eros.

Saint Valentine’s Day was chosen by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saints' day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

46. "Careless Hands" crooner : MEL TORME
Mel Tormé was a jazz singer, with a quality of voice that earned him the nickname “The Velvet Fog”. Tormé also wrote a few books, and did a lot of acting. He was the co-author of the Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire …"

“Careless Hands" is a song that was first recorded in 1948. A 1948 version of “Careless Hands" topped the charts for Mel Tormé, making it Tormé’s first number one.

49. Cross : ROOD
A rood is a crucifix that specifically symbolizes the cross on which Jesus was crucified.

50. It was satirized in "Dr. Strangelove" : COLD WAR
“Dr. Strangelove” is a black comedy directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick, released in 1964. The big star in the film is the great Peter Sellers, who plays three key roles.

52. Last word of an annual holiday song : SYNE
The song "Auld Lang Syne" is a staple at New Year's Eve, the words of which were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

57. "S.N.L." producer Michaels : LORNE
Lorne Michaels is a television producer, best known as the creator of “Saturday Night Live”. We can get some insight into Michaels’ character and demeanor by watching the show “30 Rock”. The character played by Alec Baldwin is inspired by Michaels.

60. First name in mysteries : AGATHA
Agatha Christie is the best-selling novelist of all time, having sold about 4 billion copies worldwide in total. The only books to have sold in higher volume are the works of William Shakespeare and the Bible.

61. Rachel's firstborn, in the Bible : JOSEPH
According to the Bible, Joseph was the eleventh of Jacob’s twelve sons. Ten of Jacob’s sons were borne by his first wife Leah, and two by his second wife Rachel. Joseph was Rachel’s firstborn. Joseph proved to be Jacob’s favorite son, to whom he gave a “long coat of many colors”. Joseph’s half-brothers plotted against him and sold him into slavery. This Biblical story is retold in the hit musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice called “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”.

According to the Bible, Leah was one of the two wives of Jacob, the other being Leah’s sister Rachel. Jacob’s intention had been to marry Rachel, but the Leah and Rachel’s father “switched” his daughters and provided Leah as the veiled bride. Jacob married Rachel a week later, and lived with the two wives concurrently.

66. Alecto, Megaera or Tisiphone : FURY
The Furies in Roman mythology were the female personification of vengeance. They were also known as the Dirae, "the terrible". There were at least three Furies:
- Alecto: the "unceasing"
- Megaera: the "grudging"
- Tisiphone: the "avenging murder"

74. One of the superheroes in 2012's "The Avengers" : THOR
Thor is a superhero who was introduced to us by Marvel Comics in 1962. The character is of course based on the Norse god Thor, and comes complete with a magical hammer. Like so many comic book heroes it seems, Thor has made it to the big screen. Actor Chris Hemsworth played the role in the 2011 film “Thor” directed by the great Kenneth Branagh. Branagh must have needed the cash. Thor’s father Odin is played by Anthony Hopkins. He must have needed the cash too …

77. Former Oldsmobile model : CIERA
Oldsmobile made the Cutlass Ciera from 1982 to 1996. The Ciera was the brand name's most successful model.

78. Road starting at the Porta Capena : APPIAN WAY
The Appian Way has to be the most famous of the amazing roads of Ancient Rome. It stretched from Rome right into the south of Italy, terminating in the city of Brindisi in the southeast. The first section of the military road was completed in 312 BC, by the Roman censor called Appius Claudius Caecus, who gave the road its name "Via Appia", or "Appian Way".

80. Film villain with prosthetic hands : DR NO
"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. No and Fu Manchu.

83. Kindle purchase, in brief : E-MAG
I finally bought myself a Kindle Fire HD not too long ago. I’ve started reading e-books for the first time in my life. I’ve always been behind the times ...

88. "Daniel in the Lions' Den" artist : RUBENS
Peter Paul Rubens was a Flemish painter who worked in the city of Antwerp in Belgium. When Rubens was 53-years-old, four years after the death of his first wife, he married a 16-year-old girl. It was his young wife who inspired many of the voluptuous figures with whom Rubens became associated later in his career.

The painting “Daniel in the Lions' Den" by Rubens can be viewed in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

91. Long-legged shorebird : AVOCET
The avocet is found in warm climates, usually in saline wetlands where it uses its upcurved bill to sweep from side-to-side in water searching for aquatic insects on which it feeds. Avocets, and other similar species, may go by the common name of "stilts", a moniker applied to them because of their long legs.

94. "Happy Days" girl : JOANIE
Erin Moran is the lovely actress most famous for playing Joanie Cunningham on "Happy Days" and the resulting (short-lived) spin-off sitcom called "Joanie Loves Chachi". Long before she got her big break in "Happy Days", Moran played Jenny Jones on the children's drama "Daktari" from the late sixties.

96. 96 for Big Ben, heightwise : METRES
Strictly speaking, I think that this clue is incorrect as the bell called “Big Ben” isn’t 96 metres tall. It’s the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, in which Big Ben is housed, that’s 96 metres tall.

Big Ben is the name commonly used for the large bell in the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster (aka the Houses of Parliament). Big Ben's official name is the Great Bell, and there is some debate about the origins of the nickname. It may be named after Sir Benjamin Hall who oversaw the bell's installation, or perhaps the English heavyweight champion of the day Benjamin Caunt.

98. Symbol for ohms : OMEGA
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

102. Three-time French Open champ : LENDL
Ivan Lendl is a former professional tennis player from Czechoslovakia. Lendl appeared in eight consecutive US Open finals in the eighties, a record that stands to this day.

107. Euros replaced them : LIRE
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

109. Work for Plutarch, informally : BIO
Plutarch was a Greek historian who became a Roman citizen. Plutarch’s most famous work is probably “Parallel Lives”, a series of paired biographies, with each pair comparing the lives of one Greek and one Roman.

111. Hog's Head, in the Harry Potter books : INN
The Hog’s Head is a pub in the village of Hogsmeade in the “Harry Potter” series of books. The Hog’s Head is owned by Aberforth Dumbledore, who is the brother of Albus Dumbledore, the headmaster at Hogwarts.

112. Tip of the tongue? : -ESE
The suffix “-ese” is seen in languages (tongues) such as Japanese, Chinese and Taiwanese.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Halle Berry was once runner-up for this : MISS USA
8. Foreheads : BROWS
13. Hanes competitor : BVD
16. Identify on Facebook : TAG
19. Ties up : ENLACES
20. French filmmaker who led the Cinéma Pur movement : RENE CLAIR
22. When Earth Day is celebrated: Abbr. : APR
23. Jewish bread/Played, as a violin/Throw (1950) : CHALLAH BOWED HEAVE (“All About Eve”)
25. Tan line producer, maybe : BRA
26. Ring material : CANVAS
27. ___ cloud (source of comets) : OORT
28. Org. in "The Sopranos" : FBI
29. Spend time in idle reverie : MOON
30. One quarter of a quartet : ALTO
31. Toyota rival/Measure of power/Insult (1954) : HONDA WATT AFFRONT (“On the Waterfront”)
36. Parisian possessive : SES
37. Sound units : BELS
38. Strip club fixture : POLE
39. Anagram - and synonym - of 71-Across : AYES
40. Peace in the Middle East : SALAAM
42. Forbes competitor : INC
44. Ca, Ce, Co or Cu : ELEM
47. Reside/Savage/Puzzle (out)/Wash (2013) : DWELL FIERCE SUSS LAVE (“12 Years a Slave”)
53. Greatly desired objects : GRAILS
54. Any of the "South Park" characters : TOON
55. Strike concern : PAY
56. Kiss's partner : TELL
58. Bananas : NUTSO
59. Number by a door? : CAROL
61. Islamic spirit : JINN
62. Inner: Prefix : ENTO-
63. Dating service datum : AGE
64. Hooligan/Strange/Silo contents (1972) : THUG ODD FODDER (“The Godfather”)
68. Only non-U.S. M.L.B. team: Abbr. : TOR
69. Some cameras, for short : SLRS
71. See 39-Across : YEAS
72. Like a milquetoast : WUSSY
73. Complete reversal : U-TURN
75. Comedian Kevin : HART
76. Seed : PIT
77. Obama follower? : -CARE
78. Sad news : A SHAME
79. Wildlife protector/Difficult/Hotel door feature (1980) : WARDEN HAIRY PEEPHOLE (“Ordinary People”)
84. Have the lead : STAR
85. "Chances ___ ..." : ARE
86. Load bearer? : HAMPER
87. Memo opener : IN RE
90. California roll ingredient : CRAB
93. "That's what she ___" : SAID
94. Road block? : JAM
97. "In what way?"/Like overcooked steak/Possess/European capital on a gulf (1985) : HOW TOUGH HAVE RIGA (“Out of Africa”)
102. Get whipped : LOSE
103. British author who wrote "The Old Devils" : AMIS
104. "___ man!" : BE A
105. Oklahoma tribe : OTOE
106. Brave group, informally? : NL EAST
108. Kind of garden : ZEN
109. What you get when you say 23-, 31-, 47-, 64-, 79- or 97-Across out loud : BEST PICTURE WINNER
113. Meringue ingredient : EGG
114. P.O.W.'s, e.g. : INTERNEES
115. Rush-hour subway rider, facetiously : SARDINE
116. ___ Islas Filipinas : LAS
117. "Inglourious Basterds" org. : OSS
118. ___ nous : ENTRE
119. Holes in shoes : EYELETS

Down
1. Shopping malls on Black Friday, e.g. : MECCAS
2. Scarf down : INHALE
3. Some wide receiver routes : SLANTS
4. Round of shots : SALVO
5. Campus attended by Elle in "Legally Blonde" : UCLA
6. Beach homes? : SEASHELLS
7. Kind of blond : ASH
8. Ponder, with "on" : BROOD
9. Prepare to put back in the fridge, say : REWRAP
10. Pair of socks? : ONE-TWO
11. Unite : WED
12. Duke, e.g.: Abbr. : SCH
13. Start of a children's rhyme : BAA BAA
14. Make more intense, as colors : VIVIFY
15. Rap mogul, briefly : DRE
16. Prohibited : TABOO
17. Where a golf fairway transitions into a green : APRON
18. President after Johnson : GRANT
21. One half of a 10-Down : LEFT
24. Growing art form? : BONSAI
29. Fred Flintstone's boss : MR SLATE
32. Minnesota's St. ___ College : OLAF
33. Strange : ALIEN
34. Heavenly bodies? : TENS
35. Mood : FEEL
37. Plebiscite, e.g. : BALLOT
40. Número of Mexican states that border the U.S. : SEIS
41. Subway systems : METROS
43. Figures on some Valentine's Day cards : CUPIDS
45. Ultimate : EVENTUAL
46. "Careless Hands" crooner : MEL TORME
47. Narcs enforce them : DRUG LAWS
48. Marsh rodent : WATER RAT
49. Cross : ROOD
50. It was satirized in "Dr. Strangelove" : COLD WAR
51. Kind of blond : SANDY
52. Last word of an annual holiday song : SYNE
53. Grind : GNASH
57. "S.N.L." producer Michaels : LORNE
59. Bring up to speed : CUE IN
60. First name in mysteries : AGATHA
61. Rachel's firstborn, in the Bible : JOSEPH
65. Build up : HYPE
66. Alecto, Megaera or Tisiphone : FURY
67. Made haste : RUSHED
70. Some shipping routes : STRAITS
74. One of the superheroes in 2012's "The Avengers" : THOR
77. Former Oldsmobile model : CIERA
78. Road starting at the Porta Capena : APPIAN WAY
80. Film villain with prosthetic hands : DR NO
81. Cheeky : ARCH
82. Less puzzling : EASIER
83. Kindle purchase, in brief : E-MAG
88. "Daniel in the Lions' Den" artist : RUBENS
89. Discharges : EGESTS
91. Long-legged shorebird : AVOCET
92. Surpass : BETTER
94. "Happy Days" girl : JOANIE
95. Green light : ASSENT
96. 96 for Big Ben, heightwise : METRES
97. Eye shade : HAZEL
98. Symbol for ohms : OMEGA
99. Common bar food : WINGS
100. Kind of mail : HATE
101. Get up : ROUSE
102. Three-time French Open champ : LENDL
107. Euros replaced them : LIRE
109. Work for Plutarch, informally : BIO
110. Not post- : PRE-
111. Hog's Head, in the Harry Potter books : INN
112. Tip of the tongue? : -ESE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0830-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 14, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: Did not finish!
ANSWERS I MISSED: Too many in the bottom-left ...


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. ___ Street, London's onetime equivalent to New York's Wall Street : LOMBARD
Lombard Street in London has been associated with the banking and insurance industries since medieval times, and is sometimes compared with New York City’s Wall Street. The street was developed on land granted in the late 13th century to goldsmiths from Lombardy in Italy, hence the name.

8. Lurid nightspot : GOGO BAR
Go-go dancing started in the early sixties. Apparently, the first go-go dancers were women at the Peppermint Lounge in New York City who would spontaneously jump up onto tables and dance the twist. It wasn't long before clubs everywhere started hiring women to dance on tables for the entertainment of their patrons. Out in Los Angeles, the "Whisky a Go Go" club on Sunset Strip added a twist (pun intended!), as they had their dancers perform in cages suspended from the ceiling, creating the profession of "cage dancing". The name "go-go" actually comes from two expressions. The expression in English "go-go-go" describes someone who is high energy, and the expression in French "a gogo" describes something in abundance.

15. Synthetic purplish colorant : AZO BLUE
Azo compounds have very vivid colors and so are used to make dyes, especially dyes with the colors red, orange and yellow. The term “azo” comes from the French word “azote” meaning “nitrogen”. French chemist Lavoisier coined the term “azote” from the Greek word “azotos” meaning “lifeless”. He used this name as in pure nitrogen/azote animals die and flames are snuffed out (due to a lack of oxygen).

17. Vicks product : ZZZQUIL
ZzzQuil, Benadryl, Unisom and Sominex are all brand names for the antihistamine diphenhydramine, which also has sedative properties.

18. Rap type : GANGSTA
Gangsta rap is a type of hip hop music with lyrics that reflect the violent lifestyle experienced by some inner-city youth.

19. Assn. with a "100 Years ... 100 Movies" list : AFI
The American Film Institute (AFI) was founded in 1967 by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). One of the AFI’s more visible programs is the “100 Year Series”, including lists of Best Movies in several categories and a list of the Best Movie Quotes in 100 years of movie-making.

20. Bygone Acura : INTEGRA
Acura is a division of the Honda Motor Company, their luxury brand. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

22. Non-Roman Caesar : SID
Sid Caesar achieved fame in the fifties on TV's "Your Show of Shows". To be honest, I know Sid Caesar mainly from the fun film version of the musical "Grease", in which he played Coach Calhoun.

26. Musical title character who "made us feel alive again" : MAME
The musical "Mame" opened on Broadway in 1966, with Angela Lansbury in the title role. The musical is based on the 1955 novel "Auntie Mame" written by Patrick Dennis.

29. "___ in '56" (old campaign button) : IKE
“I Like Ike” was a political slogan that originated with the grassroots movement to get Dwight D. Eisenhower to run for president in the 1952 presidential election. The slogan was modified in the president’s reelection campaign four years later to “Ike in ‘56”.

33. Sybill Trelawney, in the Harry Potter books : SEERESS
Professor Sybill Trelawney is a Divination teacher at Hogwarts in the “Harry Potter” series of children’s novels. Trelawney is played by the great Emma Thompson in the big-screen adaptations of the books.

35. Gorp, e.g. : MIX
“Gorp” is the name sometimes used for trail mix, particularly by hikers. It’s not really known for sure how this name came about, but some say it stands for “good old raisins and peanuts” or perhaps “gobs of raw protein”.

46. "___ man can tether time or tide": Burns : NAE
“Nae man can tether time or tide" is a line from the Robert Burns poem “Tam o’ Shanter”.

48. Tim Tebow, in college football : GATOR
Tim Tebow is a former quarterback who played mainly for the Denver Broncos and New York Jets. Tebow's relatively short professional career followed a very successful college career during which he became the first sophomore to win the Heisman Trophy.

49. "Sweet" girl of song : JANE
“Sweet Jane” is a 1970 song recorded by the Velvet Underground.

53. Ox- tail? : -IDE
Oxides are usually named for the number of oxygen atoms in each molecule of the oxide. Oxides with one oxygen atom are called monoxides (as in carbon monoxide: CO). Oxides with two oxygen atoms are dioxides (as in carbon dioxide: CO2). Oxides with three oxygen atoms are trioxides (as in sulfur trioxide: SO3). Oxides with four oxygen atoms are tetroxides (as in dinitrogen tetroxide: N2O4).

54. Trattoria specification : AL DENTE
The Italian expression "al dente" literally means "to the tooth" or "to the bite" and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender yet still crisp.

A trattoria is an Italian restaurant. In Italian, a “trattore” is the keeper of an eating house.

57. Mercury's winged sandals : TALARIA
The winged sandals of the Greek messenger god Hermes, and his Roman equivalent Mercury, as called the talaria. The name comes from the Latin “talaris” meaning “of the ankle”.

59. Outlook alternative : AOL MAIL
Outlook is the email management application that comes with Microsoft Office.

62. Cash in a country bar : ROSANNE
Rosanne Cash is the eldest daughter of Johnny Cash, and is a successful singer in her own right.

63. Parallel bars? : UPC CODE
UPC stands for Universal Price Code or Universal Product Code. The first UPC-marked item to get scanned in a store was on June 26, 1974 at 08:01 a.m. at Marsh's supermarket in Troy, Ohio. It was a 10-pack of Wrigley's Juicy Fruit chewing gum …

64. Onetime "Lifts and separates" sloganeer : PLAYTEX
Playtex Apparel makes bras and other lingerie. The most popular Playtex bras are iconic names such as “the Living Bra”, “the Cross Your Heart Bra” and "the Eighteen Hour Bra”. The famous slogan “it lifts and separates” is associated with the Cross Your Heart Bra and dates back to 1954.

Down
1. "The Raising of ___" (Rembrandt painting) : LAZARUS
Rembrandt’s “The Raising of Lazarus” was an early work, and was owned by the artist for most of his life. Rembrandt sold the work in 1656, along with many other paintings and antiquities, in order to avoid bankruptcy. “The Raising of Lazarus” can now be seen at the LA County Museum of Art.

2. Annual heavy metal tour : OZZFEST
Ozzfest is a festival tour held annually that was founded by Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne. As one might expect, it’s a heavy metal and hard rock event.

3. Big name in browsers : MOZILLA
Open-source software has the source code available to users and is not protected by copyright. The intent is to allow collaboration in the development of the software in the hope of producing a better product. One of the more famous examples of an open-source product is the Mozilla Firefox Internet browser that some of you may be using to read this blog.

5. Parisian possessive : A LUI
The French for “his, belonging to him” is “à lui”, and for “hers, belonging to her” is “à elle”

7. Trapezius neighbor : DELTOID
The deltoid muscle (delt) is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

The trapezius is a muscle in the neck and upper back that moves the shoulder blade and supports the arm.

10. Rowlands of "A Woman Under the Influence" : GENA
Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. More recently, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son, Nick Cassavetes.

12. Beverage with a triangular logo : BASS ALE
The red triangle on the label of a bottle of Bass Ale was registered in 1875 and is UK Registered Trade Mark (TM) No: 00001, the first trade mark issued in the world.

14. Kindles, e.g. : READERS
I finally bought myself a Kindle Fire HD not too long ago. I’ve started reading e-books for the first time in my life. I’ve always been behind the times ...

24. Bleeth of "Baywatch" : YASMINE
Yasmine Bleeth is a former actress who is known for playing Caroline Holden on the TV show “Baywatch”, and Lee Anne Demerest on the soap opera “One Life to Live”.

26. Avon competitor : MARY KAY
Mary Kay Ash founded her skincare and cosmetics company, somewhat ominously on Friday 13th, 1963. In 1968, Mary Kay Ash bought herself a pink Cadillac, specially painted to match the color of one of her compacts. The car became so famous that she gave away five of them to her top saleswoman, a tradition that endures to this day.

In 1886, a young man called David McConnell was selling books door-to-door. To enhance his sales numbers he was giving out free perfume to the ladies of the houses that he visited. Seeing as his perfume was more popular than his books, he founded the California Perfume Company in New York City and started manufacturing and selling across the country. The company name was changed to Avon in 1939, and the famous "Avon Calling" marketing campaign was launched in 1954.

34. URL ender : EDU
The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:
- .com (commercial enterprise)
- .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
- .mil (US military)
- .org (not-for-profit organization)
- .gov (US federal government entity)
- .edu (college-level educational institution)

37. Japanese electronics giant : FUJITSU
The Japanese company Fujitsu is the third-largest IT service provide in the world, after IBM and HP. It is also the second-oldest IT company, after IBM, having been founded in 1935 as Fuji Telecommunications Equipment Manufacturing.

39. "Funky Cold Medina" rapper : TONE LOC
Tone Lōc is the stage name of the rapper Anthony Smith.

41. "Cloud Shepherd" sculptor : JEAN ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

“Cloud Shepherd” is a sculpture by the artist Jean Arp that can be seen on the grounds of the University City of Caracas.

42. Ferocious Flea fighter, in cartoons : ATOM ANT
Atom Ant is a cartoon character introduced by Hanna-Barbera in 1965.

43. Producer of a hair-raising experience? : ROGAINE
Rogaine is a brand name for the drug Minoxidil. It was developed as an oral medication to treat high blood pressure, but was found to have an exploitable side-effect. It caused an increased in the rate of hair growth. A topical solution was marketed to promote growth of hair especially in balding men. The drug seems to work well, but when the application is stopped, things go back to normal in about 60 days. Wouldn’t dream of touching the stuff myself …

47. Aldous Huxley's "___ and Essence" : APE
Aldous Huxley was a writer from England whose best-known work is the novel “Brave New World”. Huxley was noted for his interest in parapsychology and mysticism, as well as for his promotion of the idea of taking psychedelic drugs “in a search for enlightenment”.

54. Best Picture before "12 Years a Slave" : ARGO
“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I saw “Argo” recently and recommend it highly, although I found the scenes of religious fervor pretty frightening …

“12 Years a Slave" is a powerful 2013 film adapted from the memoir “Twelve Years a Slave” by Solomon Northup. Northup was an African American who was born a free man in Upstate New York where he worked as a farmer and a violinist. He was lured to Washington, D.C. where slavery was legal, and there was kidnapped by slave traders. Northup spent twelve years as a slave in Louisiana before an intermediary made contact with friends and family who were able to obtain his release. The slave trader in Washington who committed the crime was arrested and tried, although he was acquitted, because D.C. law prohibited an African American from testifying against Caucasians.

55. Wife of Albert Einstein : ELSA
Einstein was Elsa’s family name after she married Einstein, and also beforehand. Elsa and Albert were first cousins.

58. Party concerned with civil rights, briefly : ANC
The African National Congress (ANC) started out as the South African Native National Congress in 1912 with the goal of improving the lot of Black South Africans. After years of turmoil, the ANC came to power in the first open election in 1964.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___ Street, London's onetime equivalent to New York's Wall Street : LOMBARD
8. Lurid nightspot : GOGO BAR
15. Synthetic purplish colorant : AZO BLUE
16. Took too many courses? : OVERATE
17. Vicks product : ZZZQUIL
18. Rap type : GANGSTA
19. Assn. with a "100 Years ... 100 Movies" list : AFI
20. Bygone Acura : INTEGRA
22. Non-Roman Caesar : SID
23. Have a dependency : RELY
25. "Would you look at that!" : GOLLY!
26. Musical title character who "made us feel alive again" : MAME
27. What the Sup. Court interprets : US LAW
29. "___ in '56" (old campaign button) : IKE
30. Plantation machine : BALER
31. Hid : STASHED
33. Sybill Trelawney, in the Harry Potter books : SEERESS
35. Gorp, e.g. : MIX
36. Like some projects, for short : DIY
37. Mesh with : FIT INTO
41. Piece of trash? : JUNK ART
45. Slightly ahead : UP ONE
46. "___ man can tether time or tide": Burns : NAE
48. Tim Tebow, in college football : GATOR
49. "Sweet" girl of song : JANE
50. Ones with issues? : PAPAS
52. Person holding many positions : YOGI
53. Ox- tail? : -IDE
54. Trattoria specification : AL DENTE
56. Key holder? : MAP
57. Mercury's winged sandals : TALARIA
59. Outlook alternative : AOL MAIL
61. Parasite : SPONGER
62. Cash in a country bar : ROSANNE
63. Parallel bars? : UPC CODE
64. Onetime "Lifts and separates" sloganeer : PLAYTEX

Down
1. "The Raising of ___" (Rembrandt painting) : LAZARUS
2. Annual heavy metal tour : OZZFEST
3. Big name in browsers : MOZILLA
4. Popular chip flavor : BBQ
5. Parisian possessive : A LUI
6. Kicking oneself for : RUING
7. Trapezius neighbor : DELTOID
8. Welders' wear : GOGGLES
9. Egg maker : OVARY
10. Rowlands of "A Woman Under the Influence" : GENA
11. Assn. : ORG
12. Beverage with a triangular logo : BASS ALE
13. Occasionally : AT TIMES
14. Kindles, e.g. : READERS
21. Pride : lion :: gang : ___ : ELK
24. Bleeth of "Baywatch" : YASMINE
26. Avon competitor : MARY KAY
28. "Do I have to?," for one : WHINE
30. Extraterrestrial, e.g. : BEING
32. Abbr. on a business card : EXT
34. URL ender : EDU
37. Japanese electronics giant : FUJITSU
38. Download from Apple : IPAD APP
39. "Funky Cold Medina" rapper : TONE LOC
40. Not entirely of one's own volition, say : ON A DARE
41. "Cloud Shepherd" sculptor : JEAN ARP
42. Ferocious Flea fighter, in cartoons : ATOM ANT
43. Producer of a hair-raising experience? : ROGAINE
44. Certain movie house : TRIPLEX
47. Aldous Huxley's "___ and Essence" : APE
50. Worked with : PLIED
51. Common comedian's prop : STOOL
54. Best Picture before "12 Years a Slave" : ARGO
55. Wife of Albert Einstein : ELSA
58. Party concerned with civil rights, briefly : ANC
60. "If I ___ ..." : MAY


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0829-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 14, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Daniel Raymon
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Poll Internet users on, perhaps : CROWDSOURCE
“Crowdsourcing” is mainly an online phenomenon, and is the solicitation of perhaps services, ideas or content from a large group of people. “Crowdsourcing” is a portmanteau of “crowd” and “outsourcing”. One example of crowdsourcing is “crowdfunding”, where an individual solicits many small contributions from a large number of people to fund a project.

16. W. Coast airport one might think has poor security? : LAX
Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

18. Middle-earth baddie : ORC
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

19. Short order? : REG
Regulation (reg.)

20. Kiwi's companion : MATE
Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name "Kiwi" for a New Zealander isn't offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country's national symbol. "Kiwi" is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply "kiwi". However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the "s", and indeed the capital "K"!).

21. Longtime N.F.L. coach whose name is French for "the handsome" : LEBEAU
Dick LeBeau is considered by many to be one of the football's greatest defensive coordinators. He is currently on the staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers.

23. Ordinary person : PLEB
“Plebe” is a slang term for a freshman in the US military and naval academies. Plebe is probably short for "plebeian", an adjective describing someone of the common class in Ancient Rome, one of the "plebs" (a singular collective noun). "Pleb" is a shortened version of plebeian, and is a term used outside of the military schools to mean "commoner".

25. Soprano Grist : RERI
Reri Grist is an operatic soprano from New York City who now lives in Hamburg, Germany.

27. Neighbor of St. Kitts : NEVIS
Saint Kitts is the more familiar name for Saint Christopher Island, part of the West Indies. Saint Kitts, along with the neighboring island of Nevis, is part of the country known as the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis. Saint Kitts has had a troubled history, with the Spanish, British and French all vying for control of the island. Most of the population today is descended from slaves brought onto Saint Kitts to farm tobacco and then sugar cane. Most of the slaves were from Africa, although Irish and Scottish slaves were also used.

30. Anti-Mafia measure, briefly : RICO
The RICO act is more correctly called the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. The law was used largely to prosecute members of the Mafia in the seventies, and has been applied more broadly since.

32. Eliot title surname : BEDE
"Adam Bede" was the first novel written by the English writer George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans). It was published in 1859 and has been in print since then, over 150 years.

George Eliot was the pen name of English novelist Mary Anne Evans. As one might think, Evans chose a male pen name in order that her work might be best appreciated in the Victorian era. Eliot wrote seven novels including “Adam Bede” (1859), “The Mill on the Floss” (1860), “Silas Marner” (1861) and “Middlemarch” (1871-72).

35. "Miss Julie" composer, 1965 : NED ROREM
American composer Ned Rorem is famous for his musical compositions, but also for his book, "Paris Diary of Ned Rorem" that was published in 1966. Rorem talks openly about his sexuality in the book, and also about the sexuality of others including Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, much to some people’s chagrin.

37. Ray often seen over a range : RACHAEL
Rachael Ray is a celebrity chef and host of several shows on the Food Network television channel. Ray comes from a family that owned and managed a number of restaurants in the northeast of the country. One of Ray’s TV shows is “$40 a Day”, in which she demonstrates how to visit various cities in North America and Europe and eat three meals and a snack on a daily budget of just $40.

42. He played John Glenn in 1983 and John McCain in 2012 : ED HARRIS
Ed Harris played future US Senator John Glenn in 1983’s “The Right Stuff”, and US Senator John McCain in 2012’s “Game Change”.

Ed Harris is a very talented actor, noted for two great performances in movies about the Space Program. He played John Glenn in "The Right Stuff" in 1983, his "breakthrough" role. Twelve years later he has a stellar performance as the flight director Gene Kranz in "Apollo 13".

John Glenn is a retired Marine Corps pilot, astronaut and US Senator. As an astronaut, Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth, in 1962, and later became the oldest person to fly in space, in 1998.

John McCain went into the US Naval Academy in 1958, following a family tradition as his father and grandfather were both four-star admirals. The younger McCain did not achieve the same rank, retiring from the Navy as a captain in 1981, but his career development was interrupted by almost six years spent as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam. John McCain has been a US Senator from Arizona since 1987.

44. Bo Jackson was one in '89 : MVP
Bo Jackson is a former professional baseball and football player. Jackson was named All-Star in both sports, the first athlete to be so honored.

45. Mideast's Gulf of ___ : ADEN
The Gulf of Aden is the body of water that lies south of the Red Sea, and just north of the Horn of Africa.

46. Department store chain founder : MACY
The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early New York stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

48. Like un bébé : PETIT
In French, a baby (un bébé) is small (petit).

52. Costa ___ : RICAN
Costa Rica is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua in the north, and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the "greenest" country in the world, the "happiest" country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

54. Whaler's direction? : THAR
Thar (there) she blows!

56. Angela Lansbury, e.g. : DAME
Angela Lansbury is a veteran actress and singer from London. Lansbury has been entertaining professionally for over 70 years now. She has won five Tony Awards, a number that has only be equalled by Julie Harris and Audra McDonald. My wife and I watched Lansbury in the 1944 film “Gaslight” the other night, her first film role. Lansbury played Jessica Fletcher on the small screen in “Murder, She Wrote”.

57. Group sharing a culture : ETHNOS
Ethnos: an ethnic group.

59. Year Bush was re-elected : MMIV
President George W. Bush defeated opponent John Kerry in the 2004 US presidential election.

61. Kroger alternative : IGA
IGA stands for Independent Grocers Alliance, a chain of supermarkets that extends right around the world. IGA's headquarters is in Chicago.

The Kroger supermarket chain is the largest grocery store company in the US. It is also the second largest retailer in the country, after Walmart, and the fifth largest retailer in the world. The company was founded in 1883 in Cincinnati, Ohio by Barney Kroger.

63. Singer known as "La Divina" : MARIA CALLAS
Although the operatic soprano Maria Callas was born in New York City, she was educated in music in Greece, and launched her career in Italy. Her marvelous performances earned her the nickname "La Divina", and she was described by Leonard Bernstein as "the Bible of opera ..."

Down
2. Doc Savage portrayer : RON ELY
Ron Ely is most famous for playing the title role in the "Tarzan" TV series in the sixties. Years later, Ely hosted the 1980 and 1981 "Miss America" pageants right after longtime host Bert Parks retired, before the job was taken over by Gary Collins. And Ely is a successful mystery novelist. He wrote "Night Shadows" and "East Beach" in the mid-nineties, both of which featured his private eye Jake Sands.

“Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze” is a 1975 film starring Ron Ely in the title role. The movie is based on a series of pulp magazine stories featuring the adventurer Doc Savage. This one bombed at the box office, and was overwhelmed by the 1975 blockbuster “Jaws”.

3. Cousin of a donkey : ONAGER
The onager is also known as the Asiatic wild ass. The onager is a little larger than a donkey, and looks like a cross between a donkey and a horse. One characteristic of the onager is that is remarkably “untamable”.

6. Cool red giant : S STAR
Stars are usually classified based on the color of the light that they emit. These classifications are, from hottest to coolest, O, B, A, F, G, K and M. One way to remember the order of these letters is to use the mnemonic “Oh, be a fine girl, kiss me”. The colors of these stars range from blue (class O) to red (class M). Our sun is class G, a yellow star, but I think we all know that …

Red giants are very large stars with a relatively low mass. The atmosphere of a red giant is also very inflated and extends a long way into space so the surface of that atmosphere that we see is relatively cool, which gives it a red color. Stars are classified by their spectral characteristics, basically the color of the light they emit. As such, red giants are classified as M stars. Cool red giants are of a color beyond the usual range, and are classified as S stars.

7. The world, to a go-getter? : OYSTER
The oft-used idiom “the world is your oyster” means that you are in a position to take advantage of all that life has to offer. This is yet another phrase that was coined by playwright William Shakespeare, in “The Merry Wives of Windsor”.
Falstaff: I will not lend thee a penny.
Pistol: Why then the world's mine oyster/Which I with sword will open.

9. Travel option: Abbr. : RTE
Route (rte.)

11. Football Hall-of-Famer Tunnell : EMLEN
Emlen Tunnell was the first African American to play for the New York Giants football team. Tunnell was also the first African American inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, being so honored in 1967.

13. Bo Jackson was one in '89 : LA RAIDER
The Oakland Raiders football team was founded in 1960, and was originally intended to play in Minnesota. Instead, the team played in Oakland from 1960 to 1981 and then spent 12 years in Los Angeles before returning to Oakland in 1995.

22. Played like Bird or Trane : BEBOPPED
Charlie Parker was a Jazz saxophonist, who was often just called "Bird" or "Yardbird". He was a leader in the development of the style of jazz called "bebop", which gained popularity in the forties. Charlie Parker had a rough life outside of music. He was a heroin addict, and a heavy drinker. When he died, the coroner who performed his autopsy estimated his age as between 50 and 60 years old based on the appearance of his body and condition of his organs. He was actually 34-years-old when he died in a New York City hotel room in 1955.

John Coltrane was a jazz saxophonist who also went by the nickname “Trane”. John’s son Ravi Coltrane is also a noted jazz saxophonist.

24. Notable lifelong bachelor in U.S. history : BUCHANAN
James Buchanan was US President just prior to the Civil War. He was the only president from the state of Pennsylvania, and also the only president who remained a bachelor for the whole of his life. As he was unmarried, Buchanan’s niece Harriet Lane acted as First Lady. Buchanan earned the nickname “Ten-Cent Jimmie” during the 1856 presidential election campaign. He was famous for his claim that ten cents a day was enough for a working man to live on.

26. Player of Fin Tutuola on TV : ICE-T
Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles. Maybe he should have stuck to his real name, Tracy Marrow? Then again, maybe not … Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about break-dancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

29. Host of 1950s TV's "Bank on the Stars" : PAAR
Jack Paar was most famous as the host of “The Tonight Show”, from 1957 to 1962. When he died in 2004, “Time” magazine wrote that Paar was “the fellow who split talk show history into two eras: Before Paar and Below Paar”. Very complimentary …

“Bank on the Stars” is a TV game show that originally aired in the fifties. The game involved two teams being quizzed about scenes from famous movies.

31. Longtime Laker Lamar : ODOM
Lamar Odom is a basketball forward playing for the LA Clippers. Apparently Odom loves candy, and that's how he earned his nickname, "The Candy Man". Odom is married to Khloé Kardashian, and the couple’s wedding featured on an episode of the reality show “Keeping Up with the Kardashians”. Not a show that I have ever seen …

34. Salon job : PERM
“Perm” is the name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves or curls. I don't worry about such things, as it's a number-one all over for me ...

36. Answer, quickly : RSVP
RSVP stands for "répondez s'il vous plaît", which is French for "please, answer".

39. Neighbor of Georgia : CHECHNYA
Chechnya is a federal subject of Russia located in the North Caucasus in the very southwest of the country. The capital of Chechnya is Grozny. In the days of the USSR, Chechnya was part of the Chechen-Ingush Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (ASSR). The former ASSR was subsequently divided into the Chechen Republic and the Republic of Ingushetia. The Chechen Republic declared independence from the Russian Federation, which resulted in the First Chechen War, fought from 1994 to 1996. Boris Yeltsin’s government in Moscow signed a peace treaty ending the war and ceding autonomy to Chechnya. However, Chechnya-based Islamic fighters invaded Dagestan in 1999, at which point Russian troops entered Chechnya again, starting the Second Chechen War. The second conflict raged until 2009, when the Russians withdrew many of their troops having severely disabled the capabilities of the Chechen separatists.

40. "South Pacific" girl : LIAT
Liat is a character in the musical “South Pacific”, a young native woman who falls in love with an American marine.

The 1949 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “South Pacific” is based on stories from the 1947 book “Tales of the South Pacific” by James A. Michener. “South Pacific” really is a classic show, featuring some classic songs like “Bali Ha’i”, “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair”, “Some Enchanted Evening” and “Happy Talk”.

43. Political theorist Carl : SCHMITT
Carl Schmitt was a major philosopher and political theorist from Germany. His work and views is regarded by some as controversial due to his association with the Nazi Party. For a while Schmitt was known as “the crown jurist of the Third Reich”.

47. Steinway competitor : YAMAHA
The Japanese company Yamaha started out way back in 1888 as a manufacturer of pianos and reed organs. Even though the company has diversified since then, Yamaha's logo still reflects it musical roots. Even on Yamaha motorcycles you can see a logo made up of three intersecting tuning forks.

Steinway & Sons is supplier of handmade pianos based in New York City and in Hamburg, Germany. The company was founded in Manhattan in 1853 by German immigrant Henry E. Steinway. One element of Steinway’s business model is to offer a “piano bank” service. Performing artists can “borrow” a particular piano from the bank for a particular concert or tour. About 400 pianos are in the bank, and are located over the world. The value of the bank’s collection of pianos is estimated at over $25 million.

53. ESPN analyst Garciaparra : NOMAR
Nomar Garciaparra is one of only thirteen players to have hit two grand slams during a single game in the Majors. He accomplished the feat in 1999 for the Boston Red Sox against the Seattle Mariners.

65. Fighting Tigers' sch. : LSU
The LSU Tigers are the sports teams of Louisiana State University, officially known as the Fightin' Tigers, with the school mascot of "Mike the Tiger". The name comes from the days of the Civil War, when two Louisiana brigades earned the nickname the "Louisiana Tigers".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Poll Internet users on, perhaps : CROWDSOURCE
12. Inn stock : ALE
15. Code often used for take-home tests : HONOR SYSTEM
16. W. Coast airport one might think has poor security? : LAX
17. Summed up : IN A NUTSHELL
18. Middle-earth baddie : ORC
19. Short order? : REG
20. Kiwi's companion : MATE
21. Longtime N.F.L. coach whose name is French for "the handsome" : LEBEAU
23. Ordinary person : PLEB
25. Soprano Grist : RERI
27. Neighbor of St. Kitts : NEVIS
28. Symbol of sentimentality : SYRUP
30. Anti-Mafia measure, briefly : RICO
32. Eliot title surname : BEDE
33. Budgetary concern : CAP
35. "Miss Julie" composer, 1965 : NED ROREM
37. Ray often seen over a range : RACHAEL
41. As surplus : TO SPARE
42. He played John Glenn in 1983 and John McCain in 2012 : ED HARRIS
44. Bo Jackson was one in '89 : MVP
45. Mideast's Gulf of ___ : ADEN
46. Department store chain founder : MACY
48. Like un bébé : PETIT
52. Costa ___ : RICAN
54. Whaler's direction? : THAR
56. Angela Lansbury, e.g. : DAME
57. Group sharing a culture : ETHNOS
59. Year Bush was re-elected : MMIV
61. Kroger alternative : IGA
62. Mark, as a survey square : X IN
63. Singer known as "La Divina" : MARIA CALLAS
66. Natural rock climber : IVY
67. Words following an understatement : AND THEN SOME
68. Leaves on a trolley, say : TEA
69. "Don't worry ..." : REST ASSURED

Down
1. In-flight calls? : CHIRPS
2. Doc Savage portrayer : RON ELY
3. Cousin of a donkey : ONAGER
4. Secured : WON
5. One expected to get beaten : DRUM
6. Cool red giant : S STAR
7. The world, to a go-getter? : OYSTER
8. Mark the start of : USHER IN
9. Travel option: Abbr. : RTE
10. Word with wall or tower : CELL
11. Football Hall-of-Famer Tunnell : EMLEN
12. Juice source for a trendy drink : ALOE VERA
13. Bo Jackson was one in '89 : LA RAIDER
14. Response to an insult : EXCUSE ME!
22. Played like Bird or Trane : BEBOPPED
24. Notable lifelong bachelor in U.S. history : BUCHANAN
26. Player of Fin Tutuola on TV : ICE-T
29. Host of 1950s TV's "Bank on the Stars" : PAAR
31. Longtime Laker Lamar : ODOM
34. Salon job : PERM
36. Answer, quickly : RSVP
37. Means of furtive escape : REAR EXIT
38. 12-Down, often : ADDITIVE
39. Neighbor of Georgia : CHECHNYA
40. "South Pacific" girl : LIAT
43. Political theorist Carl : SCHMITT
47. Steinway competitor : YAMAHA
49. Suitable job? : TAILOR
50. "Count me in" : I’M GAME
51. Like big hair, often : TEASED
53. ESPN analyst Garciaparra : NOMAR
55. Sieves, in a way : RICES
58. Not unhinged : SANE
60. Relocation transportation : VANS
64. Travel options: Abbr. : RDS
65. Fighting Tigers' sch. : LSU


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0828-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Aug 14, Thursday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ned White
THEME: Down Ward … each of today’s themed answers is a WARD written in the DOWN direction:
21D. With 40-Down, how rain falls ... or a literal description of the answers to the four theme clues : DOWN
40D. See 21-Down : WARD

3D. 21-/40-Down to a doctor : PATIENT AREA (hospital WARD)
10D. 21-/40-Down on 1950s-'60s TV : BEAVER’S DAD (WARD Cleaver)
24D. 21-/40-Down in Hollywood : ACTRESS SELA (Sela WARD)
28D. 21-/40-Down to a penologist : PRISON WING (prison WARD)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Much of Brides magazine : AD PAGES
“Brides” is a monthly magazine that was first published way back in 1934. The mission of the magazine is to provide resources for brides planning a wedding.

8. Wall St. operator : ARB
"Arb" is short for an arbitrageur, one who profits from the purchase of securities in one market and the subsequent sale in another, hence taking advantage of price discrepancies across markets.

11. [as per the original] : SIC
"Sic" indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. "Sic" is Latin for "thus, like this".

15. Toscanini, for one : MAESTRO
“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” is the Italian word for “master”.

17. Kitschy quality : NO TASTE
“Kitsch” is a German word, an adjective that means “gaudy, trash”.

20. Retailer owned by Gap : OLD NAVY
Old Navy is a store brand founded and owned by The Gap. The name Old Navy was taken from the Old Navy Cafe in Paris.

The Gap is a San Francisco-based clothing retailer founded in 1969. The name “the Gap” was a homage to the popular sixties term “the generation gap”.

22. "We Three Kings of Orient Are," e.g. : NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for "birth" (natalis). Noel has come to be used as an alternative name for a Christmas carol.

The Christmas carol “We Three Kings” is a favorite of mine. The carol was written in 1857 by the rector of an Episcopal church in Williamsport, Pennsylvania called John Henry Hopkins, Jr. Hopkins composed “We Three Kings” for a Christmas pageant in New York City.

23. Part of a spiral galaxy farthest from the center : OUTER ARM
Our galaxy is the Milky Way, and the nearest "spiral galaxy" to ours is the Andromeda Galaxy. Andromeda is not the nearest galaxy, as that honor belongs to the Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy.

32. 1960s TV's Cousin ___ : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

34. Stable color : ROAN
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

36. Adolf Hitler, e.g., according to a 1983 hoax : DIARIST
The German magazine "Stern" is famous for having published in 1983 excerpts from "The Hitler Diaries", supposedly lost diaries written by Adolf Hitler recovered from a plane crash near Dresden in 1945. The editors of "Stern", in trying to balance secrecy with the need for authentication, apparently did a shoddy job in determining if these books were indeed written by Hitler. Within weeks of the publication of the extracts in a blaze of publicity, the documents were proven to be obvious fakes written on modern paper with modern ink. Stern paid almost one million dollars in the early eighties for the fake diaries, much of which was never recovered.

38. Depression Era architectural movement : MODERNE
Art Moderne is an architectural style that was popular in the 1930s. Art Moderne emerged as a streamlined variant of Art Deco, less ornamental and with purer lines. One example of Art Modern architecture is the design of the Emerald City seen in the movie “The Wizard of Oz”.

40. H2O, to a tot : WAWA
A water molecule is composed of an oxygen atom with two hydrogen atoms on roughly opposite sides (about a 150-degree angle). So, sometimes the molecule is represented by “HOH”, although more usually it’s “H2O”.

41. What makes a top stop? : ESS
The word “top” can be made into “stop” by adding a letter S (ess) in the front.

47. Party request : RSVP
RSVP stands for "répondez s'il vous plaît", which is French for "please, answer".

53. Where most of Russia is : ASIA
Russia occupies over one eighth of the world’s inhabited land area, making it the largest country in the world.

59. Approval for un hombre : SI, SENOR
In Spanish, a man (un hombre) might say “yes, sir” (si, senor).

60. 1920s-'30s Ford output : MODEL AS
The Ford Model A was the original car produced by the Ford Motor Company. The first production run lasted from 1903 to 1904, when it was replaced by the Model C. The name “Model A” was brought back in 1927 and used for the successor to the Model T.

62. Some washers : GES
The General Electric Company is usually referred to simply as “GE”. One of the precursor companies to GE was Edison General Electric, founded in 1890 by the inventor Thomas Edison. What we know today as GE was formed two years later when Edison merged his company with Charles Coffin’s Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1896, GE was selected as one of the 12 companies listed on the newly formed Dow Jones Industrial Average. GE is the only one of the original 12 that is still on that list. I spent over ten years with GE at the beginning of my working career, and in fact it was GE that asked me to transfer to the US back in the 1980s ...

63. Event at Victoria's Secret or Nordstrom : BRA SALE
Victoria’s Secret was founded in 1977 in San Francisco, California. The founder wanted to create an environment where men were comfortable buying lingerie for their wives and girlfriends, an alternative to a department store.

The Nordstrom chain of fashion stores was founded in 1901 by John W. Nordstrom and Carl F. Wallin as a retailer of shoes, under the name “Wallin & Nordstrom”. The store’s name changed to just “Nordstrom” in 1930, soon after both founders retired and sold their shares to Nordstrom’s two sons.

Down
1. Boutros-Ghali's successor as U.N. chief : ANNAN
Kofi Annan is a diplomat from Ghana who served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007. Annan attended the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1971-72, and graduated with a Master of Science degree.

Boutros Boutros-Ghali is an Egyptian diplomat, the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations. Boutros-Ghali was nominated for a second term as Secretary-General in 1996, but the US used its right of veto to block the appointment. According to senior delegates, the US wasn't too happy with his handling of the international crisis in Bosnia.

2. Golden, in Guadalajara : DE ORO
Guadalajara is a populous city in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The Mexican city is named after the city of the same name in the center of Spain.

5. Yanks : GIS
The initials "G.I." stand for "Government Issue" and not "General Infantry" as is often believed. GI was first used in the military to denote equipment made from Galvanized Iron and during WWI, incoming German shells were nicknamed "GI cans". Soon after, the term GI came to be associated with "Government Issue" and eventually became an adjective to describe anything associated with the Army.

The term “Yankee” originated back in the 1600s when Dutch settlers used to called English colonists “Jankes”, a disparaging term meaning “Little Johns”.

6. This, in Tijuana : ESTO
Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana's growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar's in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar's claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

7. Writer/illustrator Silverstein : SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children's books is "The Giving Tree", which was first published in 1964. "The Giving Tree" tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

10. 21-/40-Down on 1950s-'60s TV : BEAVER’S DAD (WARD Cleaver)
Ward Cleaver and his wife June were the parents of Wally Cleaver and his younger brother "The Beaver". The four family members appeared in the fifties sitcom "Leave It to Beaver".

We used to see a lot of American television programming growing up in Ireland, but "Leave It to Beaver" was one show that didn't make it across the Atlantic. I've seen a couple of episodes, and I am not sure it would travel well. The show went on the air for the first time the day that Sputnik was launched by the Russians, and aired its last show just a few months before President Kennedy was assassinated. An iconic series, by all accounts.

11. Orchestra section: Abbr. : STR
Strings (str.)

12. Something a fund manager may manage, for short : IRA
Individual retirement account (IRA)

13. Lift : COP
“To cop” is “to steal”, from the Latin “capere” meaning “to take”.

16. Disposable cup material : STYRENE
Styrene is a sweet-smelling, colorless liquid that is used to make the plastic called polystyrene.

24. 21-/40-Down in Hollywood : ACTRESS SELA (Sela WARD)
The actress Sela Ward turns up in crosswords a lot. Ward played Teddy Reed in the TV show "Sisters" in the nineties, and was in "Once and Again" from 1999-2002. I don't know either show, but I do know Ward from the medical drama "House" in which she played the hospital's lawyer and Greg House's ex-partner. That was a fun role, I thought. More recently Ward played a lead role on "CSI: NY" and was a very welcome and much-needed addition to the cast ...

26. Rations (out) : METES
To "mete out" is to distribute by allotments. The verb comes from the Old English word "metan" meaning "to measure", which is also believed to be the root of our word "meter".

28. 21-/40-Down to a penologist : PRISON WING (prison WARD)
“Penology” is the study of the punishment of crime and the management of prisons.

32. Clarification lead-in : ID EST
i.e. = id est = that is, in Latin …

35. Los Angeles's U.S.S. ___ Museum : IOWA
The USS Iowa that saw action in WWII was the fourth ship to be so called by the US Navy. Among her many missions, the Iowa carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Casablanca in 1943 for one of the famed war summits with Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin. We can visit the Iowa at the Port of Los Angeles now, as it is now a floating museum.

43. Certain soundboard knobs : FADERS
A fader is a knob (or usually a slider) that gradually increases or decreases the level of an audio signal. You’ll often see audio engineers at a performance or in a recording studio sliding buttons up and down. Those are faders.

46. Dugout, for one : CANOE
The boat called a canoe takes its name from the Carib word “kenu” meaning “dugout”. It was Christopher Columbus who brought “kenu” into Spanish as “canoa”, which evolved into our English “canoe”.

49. Out : PASSE
“Passé” is a French word, meaning "past, faded".

51. Bausch & ___ (eye-care brand) : LOMB
Bausch & Lomb is an American company headquartered in Rochester, New York. It is a major supplier of contact lenses and associated eye-care products. As one might guess, the company was founded (in 1853) by two German immigrants, John Jacob Bausch and Henry Lomb. Bausch was an optician, and Lomb the "money man". The company was set up originally to manufacture monocles.

52. ___ effort : E FOR
Apparently the phrase “E for effort” originated as a WWII campaign in the US to help boost productivity in factories.

54. Screening org. : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks.

55. It's mostly nitrogen : AIR
Air is mainly composed of nitrogen (78%), oxygen (21%) and argon (1%). We hear a lot about carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It makes up (or should make up!) about 0.04%, but that’s an important 0.04%.

56. Presidential advisory grp. : NSC
The National Security Council (NSC) was created by President Harry S. Truman in 1947. The NSC is chaired by the sitting president and meets in the White House Situation Room.

58. Rx overseer : FDA
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol "Rx" that's used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter's blessing to help a patient recover.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Much of Brides magazine : AD PAGES
8. Wall St. operator : ARB
11. [as per the original] : SIC
14. In the general vicinity : NEARISH
15. Toscanini, for one : MAESTRO
17. Kitschy quality : NO TASTE
18. Cornered : IN A TRAP
19. Bust ___ (laugh hard) : A RIB
20. Retailer owned by Gap : OLD NAVY
22. "We Three Kings of Orient Are," e.g. : NOEL
23. Part of a spiral galaxy farthest from the center : OUTER ARM
27. Ones who cry uncle? : NEPHEWS
31. Feed a line to again : RECUE
32. 1960s TV's Cousin ___ : ITT
34. Stable color : ROAN
35. Query for clarification : ISN'T IT?
36. Adolf Hitler, e.g., according to a 1983 hoax : DIARIST
38. Depression Era architectural movement : MODERNE
39. Exit : EGRESS
40. H2O, to a tot : WAWA
41. What makes a top stop? : ESS
42. Manage : SEE TO
43. Pretenses : FACADES
45. Diner or sleeper : TRAIN CAR
47. Party request : RSVP
50. Rot : TWADDLE
53. Where most of Russia is : ASIA
54. Something not seen on a nudist, maybe : TAN LINE
57. Compensates for : OFFSETS
59. Approval for un hombre : SI, SENOR
60. 1920s-'30s Ford output : MODEL AS
61. Parabola, for one : ARC
62. Some washers : GES
63. Event at Victoria's Secret or Nordstrom : BRA SALE

Down
1. Boutros-Ghali's successor as U.N. chief : ANNAN
2. Golden, in Guadalajara : DE ORO
3. 21-/40-Down to a doctor : PATIENT AREA (hospital WARD)
4. Good for planting : ARABLE
5. Yanks : GIS
6. This, in Tijuana : ESTO
7. Writer/illustrator Silverstein : SHEL
8. Nearly perfect : A-MINUS
9. Attacked : RAN AT
10. 21-/40-Down on 1950s-'60s TV : BEAVER’S DAD (WARD Cleaver)
11. Orchestra section: Abbr. : STR
12. Something a fund manager may manage, for short : IRA
13. Lift : COP
16. Disposable cup material : STYRENE
21. With 40-Down, how rain falls ... or a literal description of the answers to the four theme clues : DOWN
24. 21-/40-Down in Hollywood : ACTRESS SELA (Sela WARD)
25. Trashes : RUINS
26. Rations (out) : METES
28. 21-/40-Down to a penologist : PRISON WING (prison WARD)
29. Carriage puller, in rural dialect : HOSS
30. Not fast : EAT
32. Clarification lead-in : ID EST
33. "Easy there, ___" : TIGER
35. Los Angeles's U.S.S. ___ Museum : IOWA
37. Give an alias : RETITLE
38. Bud : MAC
40. See 21-Down : WARD
43. Certain soundboard knobs : FADERS
44. Wipes out : ERASES
46. Dugout, for one : CANOE
48. Key : VITAL
49. Out : PASSE
51. Bausch & ___ (eye-care brand) : LOMB
52. ___ effort : E FOR
54. Screening org. : TSA
55. It's mostly nitrogen : AIR
56. Presidential advisory grp. : NSC
58. Rx overseer : FDA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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