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1101-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Nov 14, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Trip Payne
THEME: Arithmetic Clues … there’s a note with today’s puzzle:
With daylight saving time ending tonight, you have an extra hour to work on this extra-hard, oversize puzzle.
Unusually for a Saturday, we have a theme. Four of the clues are “arithmetic”, with the numbers used actually referring to specific answers in the grid:
19A. 81 ÷ 27 : BATTLEFIELD (PLACE divided by WAR)
81. Cul-de-sac, in some addresses : PLACE
27. It's conducted in a theater : WAR

34A. 61 + 86 : NEUTROGENA (PERT plus RIVAL)
61. Flip : PERT
86. Match : RIVAL

63A. 56 x 42 : REPEATEDLY (MANY times OVER)
56. ___ a time : MANY
42. Supervising : OVER

83A. 33 - 21 : GROSS PROFIT (NET SALES minus COSTS)
33. Take after all? : NET SALES
21. Lists for : COSTS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 35m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

17. Husband of Elisheba : AARON
According the Hebrew and Christian Bibles, Elisheba was married to Aaron, the older brother of Moses.

18. Laughable : INANE
Our word “inane”, meaning silly or lacking substance, comes from the Latin “inanitis” meaning “empty space”.

22. Bee relative : OPIE
Aunt Bee was a character in "The Andy Griffith Show". The character's full name was Beatrice Taylor but everyone in Mayberry called her "Aunt Bee". In the storyline she was the aunt of the protagonist, Sheriff Andy Taylor, and great-aunt to Andy’s son Opie. Aunt Bee was played by actress Frances Bavier.

23. Kind of sleep : REM
REM is an acronym standing for Rapid Eye Movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one's most vivid dreams.

24. Get out of the line : DELE
"Dele" is the editorial instruction to delete something from a document, and is often written in red.

28. Old Memorial Coliseum player, for short : LA RAM
The St. Louis Rams have only won the Super Bowl once, in 1999, against the Tennessee Titans. The Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936-45, Los Angeles from 1946-94 and St. Louis from 1995 to the present day.

LA’s Memorial Coliseum is home to the USC Trojans football team. The Coliseum had the distinction of hosting the Olympic Games twice, in 1932 and 1984, and was the first stadium in the world to do so. It was also home to the LA Rams NFL team from 1946 until 1979.

32. Staff with notes : STENOS
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

34. 61 + 86 : NEUTROGENA (PERT plus RIVAL)
Neutrogena is a brand of skincare products that was founded in 1930 as a cosmetics company called Natone.

Pert Plus is a Procter & Gamble shampoo and conditioner that was introduced in 1987 as a new improved version of the existing Pert line of shampoos.

39. He is one : ELEM
The element helium (He) has an atomic number (at. no.) of 2.

41. National Junior Tennis League co-founder : ASHE
Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979 Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

43. The Apostle of Cuban Independence : MARTI
José Martí was a Cuban writer and political activist who became a symbol for his country’s movement to gain independence from Spain in the 1800s, earning him the nickname “Apostle of Cuban Independence”. Martí was killed in action in a battle against Spanish troops in 1895.

46. Checkout line? : TATA
An Englishman might say "tata" or "cheerio" instead of "goodbye". Well, supposedly so!

50. Explicatory words : ID EST
“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

53. Digs near the ocean, perhaps : VILLA
The original “villas” were country houses owned by the elite in Ancient Rome. A member of the Roman elite would live in a “domus” in the city, whereas the rest of the population would live in “insulae”, apartment buildings.

57. Ends of scissors? : ESSES
There are two letters S in the word “scissors”, one at either end.

58. Like illegal charades clues : ORAL
In the parlor game known as Charades, oral clues aren’t permitted. It’s all about acting out in silence.

59. 1977 law school memoir : ONE L
Scott Turow is an author and lawyer from Chicago. Turow has had several bestselling novels including “Presumed Innocent”, “The Burden of Proof” and “Reversible Errors”, all three of which were made into films. He also wrote the autobiographical book “One L: The Turbulent True Story of a First Year at Harvard Law School”.

66. European Parliament locale : ALSACE
Of the 27 regions of metropolitan France (i.e. the territory of France within Europe), the smallest is Alsace. Alsace sits at the very east of the country, right on the border with Germany.

Strasbourg is a beautiful city that I had the privilege to visit some years ago. Strasbourg is home to many international organizations, including the European Court of Human Rights and the European Parliament.

74. Block number?: Abbr. : SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun ...

77. 1989 AP Female Athlete of the Year : GRAF
Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, more than any other man or woman other than Margaret Court. She is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

79. Sans le ___ (broke: Fr.) : SOU
“Sans le sou” is French for “broke, penniless”, literally “without the sou”.

A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

81. Cul-de-sac, in some addresses : PLACE
Even though "cul-de-sac" can indeed mean "bottom of the bag" in French, the term cul-de-sac is of English origin (the use of "cul" in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are "voie sans issue", meaning "way without exit".

88. Wind stopper? : BEANO
Beano is a dietary supplement that is used to reduce gas in the digestive tract. Beano contains an enzyme which breaks down complex sugars found in many vegetables. This makes the food more digestible and apparently cuts down on gas.

90. Cans : REARS
"Can" is a slang term for the rear end, the buttocks.

Down
4. Word with bag or board : TOTE
Parimutuel betting is a system in which the bookmaker is guaranteed a pre-determined profit. In the system, all bets are pooled, taxes and house profit are removed, and the payoff is made with the resulting pool. In some parts of the world, the parimutuel system is referred to as “the Tote” (as indeed it is in Ireland). “Tote” is short for “totalizator”, which is the automated system that runs parimutuel betting.

5. Developing option: Abbr. : ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

7. South American reptile : CAIMAN
Caimans are relatively small, crocodile-like reptiles that inhabit Central and South America. That said, the largest species can grow to 13 feet in length, but many are about 3 feet long.

9. Turn down a raise? : FOLD
In poker, say, a player can say “I fold, I’m out”.

11. "Academica" author : CICERO
Cicero was a very influential senator in Ancient Rome, in part due to his renowned ability to deliver a persuasive speech. His full name was Marcus Tullius Cicero.

12. Subject of the tribute album "Every Man Has a Woman" : ONO
“Every Man Has a Woman" is a tribute album recorded for Yoko Ono’s 50th birthday, in 1984. The tracks are songs from albums recorded by Ono, but recorded as cover version by artists such as Harry Nilsson, Roberta Flack and Ono’s husband, John Lennon. This album was supposedly Lennon’s idea, but sadly he was murdered before he could see it completed.

20. Cut from a log, maybe : ERASE
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

25. Lorelei, notably : LURER
Lorelei is the name of a legendary mermaid who lured fishermen by singing a beautiful song so that they steered their boats onto rocks lurking beneath the water's surface.

28. Novel about Dolores Haze : LOLITA
Vladimir Nabokov's novel "Lolita" has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man's obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl named Dolores Haze. 38-year-old professor Humbert Humbert privately refers to Dolores as “Lolita”. Although "Lolita" is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. "Lolita" became the first book since "Gone with the Wind" to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

29. 1979 comedy set at Camp North Star : MEATBALLS
“Meatballs” is a 1979 movie in which comic actor Bill Murray had his first starring role. The film was directed by Ivan Reitman, who later teamed up with Bill Murray again in the hit movies “Stripes” (1981) and “Ghostbusters” (1984).

35. Bolt with gold : USAIN
Usain Bolt is a Jamaican sprinter who won the 100m and 200m race gold medals in both the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games. Back in Jamaica, Bolt was really into cricket and probably would have been a very successful fast bowler had he not hit the track instead.

36. Utopias lack them : EVILS
The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book "Utopia" published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More's use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek "ou" meaning "not" and "topos" meaning "place". By calling his perfect island "Not Place", More was apparently making the point that he didn't think that the ideal could actually exist.

37. ___ Porter, "Ally McBeal" role : NELLE
Nelle Porter is a character on the TV show “Ally McBeal” who is portrayed by actress Portia de Rossi.

“Ally McBeal” is a very successful television show that aired from 1997 to 2002. It starred Calista Flockhart in the title role, as a successful lawyer. I must admit, I never watched the show, but I am told by a kind blog reader that it's good viewing. It was created by David E. Kelley, who is also the man behind other successful legal dramas including "The Practice", "Boston Legal" and "Harry's Games'. Kelley is married to actress Michelle Pfeiffer.

40. "Newhart" production co. : MTM
MTM Enterprises was a television production company founded in 1969 by Mary Tyler Moore, originally to produce the “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The company subsequently produced the likes of “The Bob Newhart Show”, “Rhoda”, “WKRP in Cincinnati”, “Hill Street Blues” and “St. Elsewhere”. That’s a lot of great television ...

“Newhart” is a very entertaining sitcom starring Bob Newhart and Mary Frann as innkeepers in rural Vermont. The show is remembered by many for its last episode, which aired in 1990. In that final episode, Bob Newhart wakes up in bed and suggests that the whole of the show’s eight-year run was just a dream. He is lying beside actress Suzanne Pleshette who played his wife in the earlier sitcom “The Bob Newhart Show”. Very, very clever …

49. Pop's ___ Brothers : EVERLY
The Everly Brothers are noted for their steel guitar sound, and their great use of harmony. Their harmony onstage wasn’t reflected off the stage though. In 1973 the brothers decided to pursue separate careers and scheduled a farewell performance attended by many fans, family and stalwarts from the music industry. Don Everly came on stage too drunk to perform, and eventually brother Phil just stormed off into the wings, smashing his guitar as he left. The boys didn’t talk to each other for ten years after that incident. Phil Everly passed away in January 2014.

52. Fleece : GYP
"Gyp" is American slang meaning "cheat". It dates back to the late 1800s and may derive from the word "gypsy".

55. Tool along : MOTOR
The phrase “tooling along”, meaning “driving a vehicle”, dates back to the early 1800s. The expression probably arose from the sense of managing skillfully, either a vehicle or a tool.

60. John Tesh fan, maybe : NEW AGER
New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter. For many years Tesh presented the show "Entertainment Tonight". For "ET" he once covered the filming of an episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation". As part of the piece, he volunteered to act as a Klingon warrior and so if you see the "Star Trek: TNG" episode called "The Icarus Factor" in reruns, watch out for John Tesh engaging in ritual torture with Mr. Worf as his victim.

64. Team once owned by Gene Autry : ANGELS
Gene Autry was a so-called singing cowboy who had an incredibly successful career on radio, television and in films starting in the thirties. Autry’s signature song was “Back in the Saddle Again”, and his biggest hit was “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”. He also had a hit with his own Christmas song called “Here Comes Santa Claus”. There’s even a town in Oklahoma called Gene Autry, named in his honor. Famously, Autry owned the Los Angeles Angels (now the Anaheim Angels) for many years, from 1961 to 1997.

65. With 67-Down, signer of the Oslo Accords : YASSIR
67. See 65-Down : ARAFAT
Yasser (also Yasir, Yassir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

68. Like boxers : CANINE
The boxer breed of dog (one of my favorites!) originated in Germany. My first dog was a boxer/Labrador mix, a beautiful animal. Our current family dog is a boxer/pug mix, another gorgeous creature.

75. Ballet move : PLIE
The French word for "bent" is "plié". In the ballet move known as a plié, the knees are bent.

76. ___ bean : FAVA
Fava bean is an alternative name for the broad bean.

80. Either "Inside Llewyn Davis" director : COEN
"Inside Llewyn Davis" is a 2013 film from the Coen brothers that stars Oscar Isaac, Casey Mulligan and John Goodman. The movie is about a week in the life of a folk singer in New York City in the early sixties. "Inside Llewyn Davis" has been well received, but based on the trailers I’ve seen, it looks a little too depressing for my taste. I could be wrong …

82. Tilt-A-Whirl part : CAR
The Tilt-A-Whirl is the fairground ride that has seven cars on a spinning platform, with the cars rotating freely and randomly. Each of the cars hold 3-4 riders, pretty nauseated riders sometimes.

85. Abbr. on a Topps card : RBI
Topps was a relaunch of an older company called American Leaf Tobacco, with the Topps name used from 1938. The earlier company was in trouble because it could not get supplies of its Turkish tobacco, so it moved into another chewy industry, making bubblegum.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Send : ELATE
6. Future works? : SCI-FI
11. Apricot or eggplant : COLOR
16. Reveal : LET ON
17. Husband of Elisheba : AARON
18. Laughable : INANE
19. 81 ÷ 27 : BATTLEFIELD (PLACE divided by WAR)
21. Lists for : COSTS
22. Bee relative : OPIE
23. Kind of sleep : REM
24. Get out of the line : DELE
26. Supertrendy : HOT
27. It's conducted in a theater : WAR
28. Old Memorial Coliseum player, for short : LA RAM
30. Utter : PURE
32. Staff with notes : STENOS
34. 61 + 86 : NEUTROGENA (PERT plus RIVAL)
39. He is one : ELEM
41. National Junior Tennis League co-founder : ASHE
42. Supervising : OVER
43. The Apostle of Cuban Independence : MARTI
46. Checkout line? : TATA
48. Upgrade, as a shower : RETILE
50. Explicatory words : ID EST
51. Powerful guy : MR BIG
53. Digs near the ocean, perhaps : VILLA
54. Miss dismissal : NO, MA’AM
56. ___ a time : MANY
57. Ends of scissors? : ESSES
58. Like illegal charades clues : ORAL
59. 1977 law school memoir : ONE L
61. Flip : PERT
63. 56 x 42 : REPEATEDLY (MANY times OVER)
66. European Parliament locale : ALSACE
70. Blanket material : SNOW
71. Crude : SALTY
73. Wicked : RAD
74. Block number?: Abbr. : SPF
77. 1989 AP Female Athlete of the Year : GRAF
79. Sans le ___ (broke: Fr.) : SOU
80. "Go ask your mother" elicitor : CAN I?
81. Cul-de-sac, in some addresses : PLACE
83. 33 - 21 : GROSS PROFIT (NET SALES minus COSTS)
86. Match : RIVAL
87. Like some coincidences : EERIE
88. Wind stopper? : BEANO
89. Sentence units : YEARS
90. Cans : REARS
91. Lay low? : INTER

Down
1. Jabbers, at times : ELBOWS
2. Unhesitatingly go for : LEAP AT
3. Threads : ATTIRE
4. Word with bag or board : TOTE
5. Developing option: Abbr. : ENL
6. Comparatively trouble-free : SAFER
7. South American reptile : CAIMAN
8. Eruption cause : IRE
9. Turn down a raise? : FOLD
10. Comprehensive : IN DEPTH
11. "Academica" author : CICERO
12. Subject of the tribute album "Every Man Has a Woman" : ONO
13. Eye liner? : LASH
14. Well aware of : ONTO
15. Hinge (upon) : REST
20. Cut from a log, maybe : ERASE
25. Lorelei, notably : LURER
28. Novel about Dolores Haze : LOLITA
29. 1979 comedy set at Camp North Star : MEATBALLS
31. #1 fans : EGOTISTS
33. Take after all? : NET SALES
35. Bolt with gold : USAIN
36. Utopias lack them : EVILS
37. ___ Porter, "Ally McBeal" role : NELLE
38. Belts : AREAS
40. "Newhart" production co. : MTM
43. No big deal : MINOR
44. Be crazy about : ADORE
45. Change the plot of : REMAP
47. Carrying : ARMED
49. Pop's ___ Brothers : EVERLY
52. Fleece : GYP
55. Tool along : MOTOR
60. John Tesh fan, maybe : NEW AGER
62. Be crazy about : EAT UP
64. Team once owned by Gene Autry : ANGELS
65. With 67-Down, signer of the Oslo Accords : YASSIR
67. See 65-Down : ARAFAT
68. Like boxers : CANINE
69. Paper cutter? : EDITOR
72. Shakes off : LOSES
74. Not at all creaky : SPRY
75. Ballet move : PLIE
76. ___ bean : FAVA
78. Not taken : FREE
80. Either "Inside Llewyn Davis" director : COEN
82. Tilt-A-Whirl part : CAR
84. "Che ___ è?" ("What time is it?": It.) : ORA
85. Abbr. on a Topps card : RBI


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections


1031-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 14, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mary Lou Guizzo & Jeff Chen
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 33m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Boston and Chicago, but not Seattle : ROCK BANDS
Boston is a rock band from … Boston. Boston’s biggest hit was “Amanda”, released in 1986.

The rock band called Chicago was formed in … Chicago. The band’s biggest hits are “If You Leave Me Now” (1976) and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” (1982). The band’s lineup has changed a lot over the years. The most tragic reason for a change was in 1978 when Terry Kath, one of the band’s founding members, died from an accidentally self-inflicted gun wound. Kath enjoyed playing with guns and as a joke held a pistol with an empty magazine to his temple and pulled the trigger. A round in the chamber killed him instantly.

14. Inuit's transport : WHALEBOAT
The Inuit peoples live in the Arctic, in parts of the US, Russia, Greenland and Canada.

15. Oscar nominee for "Fiddler on the Roof" : TOPOL
Chaim Topol (usually called just “Topol”) is an actor from Tel Aviv in Israel. I well remember Topol for his marvelous portrayal of Tevye in the original West End performance of “Fiddler on the Roof” in the sixties. He later reprised the role in the 1971 movie of the show, and then again in a 1990 Broadway revival. Famously, Topol also played good guy Milos Columbo in the James Bond movie “For Your Eyes Only”.

17. Photoshop effect : SEPIA
Sepia is that lovely rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. "Sepia" is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish.The "sepia tone" of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

Photoshop is a wonderful piece of software used for editing graphics. When I first bought a copy of Photoshop, it was really expensive (about $300, ten years ago), but now there are cost-effective, stripped-down versions available.

18. Bright lights : NEONS
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

23. Sea-___ : TAC
Sea-Tac Airport is more fully known as Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Sea-Tac is the main hub for Alaska Airlines.

25. Ring of islands? : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

26. Barely clear, in a way : AWEIGH
When an anchor is “aweigh” or “atrip”, it is just clear of the bottom, having just been lifted.

29. Expert : COGNOSCENTE
Cognoscenti (singular “cognoscente”) are people with expert knowledge in a particular field, especially in the world of arts and literature. Are similar term might be “connoisseur”. “Cognoscere” is the Latin for “to know”.

32. Like Fortunato, in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" : BURIED ALIVE
33. "The Cask of Amontillado," e.g. : HORROR STORY
“The Cask of Amontillado” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe that was first published in 1846. The story tells of a vengeful man who lures his enemy into the catacombs, locks him in chains and then traps him in a niche by sealing it with a brick wall. Nice man …

35. Predators in the "Predator" films, for short : ETS
“Predator” is a 1987 sci-fi movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger as part of a special forces team that comes up against an alien known as the Predator. Rubbish …

36. Some I.R.A.'s : CDS
A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

39. "Be on the lookout" signal, in brief : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

40. ___ country (rustic locale) : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a sub-group of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

44. Anthrax cousin : METALLICA
Metallica is a heavy metal band from Los Angeles, formed in 1981. Not my thing ...

Anthrax is a thrash metal band that formed in New York City in 1981. I have no idea what thrash metal is …

47. Prey for a dingo : KOALA
The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day ...

The dingo is a wild dog of Australia. The dingo is thought to have originated from domesticated dogs that were brought to Australia with humans that settled the land centuries ago.

51. Ora pro ___ : NOBIS
"Ora pro nobis" translates from Latin as "pray for us". It is a common term used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to "OPN".

52. Having human form : INCARNATE
Something described as “incarnate” has been given a bodily form. The Latin verb “incarnare” means “to make flesh”.

53. ___ chic : TRES
"Très chic" is a French term meaning "very stylish".

Down
1. Where primatologist Dian Fossey worked : RWANDA
Rwanda is a sovereign nation in central Africa that is populated by three groups: the Hutu, Tutsi (aka “Watutsi”) and Twa. The Tutsi are the second largest population of people in Rwanda, with the Hutu being the largest group. The bloody conflict that has existed between the Tutsi and Hutu peoples dates back to about 1880 when Catholic missionaries arrived in the region. The missionaries found that they had more success converting the Hutus than the Tutsi, and when the Germans occupied the area during WWI they confiscated Tutsi land and gave it to Hutu tribes in order to reward religious conversion. This injustice fuels fighting to this very day.

Dian Fossey carried out her famous study of gorilla populations in the mountain forests of Rwanda (NB: it was Jane Goodall that worked with chimpanzees). Sadly, Fossey was found dead in her cabin in Rwanda in 1986, murdered in her bedroom, her skull split open by a machete. The crime was never solved.

3. Gambol : CAVORT
“Gambol” is a such a lovely word, meaning to frolic and leap about.

4. TV colonel : KLINK
On the sitcom "Hogan's Heroes", Colonel Klink was the Camp Commandant, played by Werner Klemperer. Klemperer was born in Cologne in Germany, and fled the country with his family in 1935 due to Nazi persecution of Jews. Later, Klemperer joined the US Army and ended up using his show business talent to entertain the troops in the Pacific. Werner was the son of renowned conductor Otto Klemperer.

5. 20th-century first lady : BESS
Harry and Bess Truman met when they were very young children, at Sunday school. They were friends right through high school and became engaged in 1918 just before Harry went off to France during WWI, marrying the next year. Bess Truman never really took to the Washington scene when she became First Lady and stayed out of the limelight as much as she could. Perhaps that contributed to her longevity. Mrs. Truman lived to the age of 97, making her the longest living First Lady in US history.

6. Grp. with suits and cases : ABA
American Bar Association (ABA)

8. Start of an Eastern title : DALAI
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

10. Book after Hosea : JOEL
The Book of Joel in the Hebrew Bible is part of the collection known as the Twelve Minor Prophets. These books are referred to as “minor” as the texts are relatively short.

12. Introduction to English? : COINAGE
“Coinage” is the act of making coins. The term is also used for the invention of words.

13. Social gathering : KLATCH
A "klatch" (also "klatsch") is a casual gathering, particularly for conversation. "Klatch" comes from the German "klatschen" meaning "to gossip".

15. Grp. with a lot of baggage : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks.

20. British kitchen accessory : TEA CLOTH
On the other side of the Atlantic, a tea towel is known as a tea cloth.

22. Like the words "hoagie" and "kitty-corner" : REGIONAL
Hoagy is another name for a submarine sandwich. The term “hoagy” (or hoagie) originated in Philadelphia, apparently introduced by Italians working in the shipyards during WWI. The shipyards were located on Hog Island, and the sandwich was first called the Hog Island, which morphed into the hoagy.

“Kitty-corner” means “diagonally opposite”. The term is used mainly in the north and west of the US.

25. Actor with the line "Rick! Rick, help me!" : LORRE
"Rick! Rick, help me!" is a line from “Casablanca”, spoken by Signor Ugarte to Rick Blaine.

Signor Ugarte is a wonderful character in the classic film “Casablanca”. Ugarte is played by Peter Lorre, and is the man who has possession of the crucial letters of transit that were obtained by murdering two German couriers.

The marvelous actor Peter Lorre was born in what is now modern-day Slovakia. Lorre's real name was Laszlo Lowenstein. He started acting in Vienna when he was quite young, only 17 years old. When Hitler came to power, the Jewish Lowenstein headed to Paris and then London, eventually ending up in Hollywood. Lorre found himself typecast as the wicked foreigner in American movies, but I think he sneered and snarled his way to the bank.

28. "___, like lightning, seeks the highest places": Livy : ENVY
Titus Livius (aka Livy) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

30. Some E.R. cases : ODS
Overdoses (ODs)

31. Topping for skewered meat : SATE SAUCE
The dish known as “satay” originated in Java, Indonesia and is marinated pieces of meat served on a skewer in a sauce, often a spicy peanut sauce. “Satay” is the Indonesian spelling, and “sate” is the Malay spelling.

32. Idiot box : BOOB TUBE
“Idiot box” and “boob tube” are nicknames for television.

34. The son on "Sanford and Son" : LAMONT
"Sanford and Son" was an American version of a celebrated hit BBC sitcom that I grew up with in Ireland, called "Steptoe and Son".

36. Adam's apple coverer : CRAVAT
The cravat originated in Croatia and was an accessory used with a military uniform. Cravats were introduced to the fashion-conscious French by Croatian mercenaries enlisted into a regiment of the French army. The English placed a lot of emphasis on the knot used for the cravat, and in the period after the Battle of Waterloo the cravat came to be known as a "tie". What we now call a tie in English is still called a "cravate" in French.

The voice box or larynx is where pitch and volume of sound are manipulated when we talk. The structure called the Adam’s apple that protrudes from the human neck is formed by the thyroid cartilage that surrounds the larynx. The Adam’s apple of males tends to increase in size during puberty, so the feature tended to be associated more with males in days gone by, perhaps leading to the name “Adam’s” apple.

43. Betty Boop and Bugs Bunny : TOONS
Betty Boop made her first appearance on the screen in 1930, in a cartoon called "Dizzy Dishes". Her character was modeled on the the It-girl, the sexy Clara Bow of movie fame. Back then Betty Boop was a sexy poodle and it wasn't until 1932 that she morphed into completely human form. Betty was quite the risqué figure, but her vampish ways only lasted a few years. When the Production Code of 1934 came into force, Betty started to dress more modestly and toned down her behavior.

Bugs Bunny first said "What's up, Doc?" in the 1940 cartoon short "A Wild Hare", addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

47. Actress Russell of "Felicity" : KERI
Actress Keri Russell got her big break on television when she was cast in the title role in the drama show "Felicity" that ran from 1998 from 2002. The lead character in the show is Felicity Porter, a young lady introduced to the audience with a head of long curly blonde hair. Famously, Russell cut her hair extremely short at the start of the second season, an action that was associated with a significant drop in the show's viewership. Russell had to grow out her hair over the season. I haven't seen "Felicity", but I really do enjoy Russell playing one of the leads in the entertaining Cold War drama called "The Americans" that is aired by FX.

50. Adolphe with an instrument named after him : SAX
The saxophone was invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax's grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Boston and Chicago, but not Seattle : ROCK BANDS
10. Diddly-squat : JACK
14. Inuit's transport : WHALEBOAT
15. Oscar nominee for "Fiddler on the Roof" : TOPOL
16. Recommended : ADVISABLE
17. Photoshop effect : SEPIA
18. Bright lights : NEONS
19. What naturals have : RAW TALENT
21. With 24-Across, witchcraft, e.g. : DARK
22. Up : RAISE
23. Sea-___ : TAC
24. See 21-Across : ART
25. Ring of islands? : LEI
26. Barely clear, in a way : AWEIGH
29. Expert : COGNOSCENTE
32. Like Fortunato, in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" : BURIED ALIVE
33. "The Cask of Amontillado," e.g. : HORROR STORY
34. Ease : LOOSEN
35. Predators in the "Predator" films, for short : ETS
36. Some I.R.A.'s : CDS
39. "Be on the lookout" signal, in brief : APB
40. ___ country (rustic locale) : AMISH
43. Gallows ___ : TREE
44. Anthrax cousin : METALLICA
47. Prey for a dingo : KOALA
48. Helpful : OF USE
49. Get ready to click, maybe : MOUSE OVER
51. Ora pro ___ : NOBIS
52. Having human form : INCARNATE
53. ___ chic : TRES
54. Didn't kill each other : COEXISTED

Down
1. Where primatologist Dian Fossey worked : RWANDA
2. "We're in trouble now!" : OH DEAR!
3. Gambol : CAVORT
4. TV colonel : KLINK
5. 20th-century first lady : BESS
6. Grp. with suits and cases : ABA
7. Easy decision : NO-BRAINER
8. Start of an Eastern title : DALAI
9. Fusses : STEWS
10. Book after Hosea : JOEL
11. Desire : APPETITE
12. Introduction to English? : COINAGE
13. Social gathering : KLATCH
15. Grp. with a lot of baggage : TSA
20. British kitchen accessory : TEA CLOTH
22. Like the words "hoagie" and "kitty-corner" : REGIONAL
25. Actor with the line "Rick! Rick, help me!" : LORRE
27. Small dams : WEIRS
28. "___, like lightning, seeks the highest places": Livy : ENVY
29. Base men? : CURS
30. Some E.R. cases : ODS
31. Topping for skewered meat : SATE SAUCE
32. Idiot box : BOOB TUBE
33. Desire : HOPE FOR
34. The son on "Sanford and Son" : LAMONT
36. Adam's apple coverer : CRAVAT
37. X : DELETE
38. Blackened : SEARED
41. Parrot : MIMIC
42. Prefix with -graphic : ICONO-
43. Betty Boop and Bugs Bunny : TOONS
45. "The way things are ..." : AS IS ...
46. Tous ___ jours (daily: Fr.) : LES
47. Actress Russell of "Felicity" : KERI
50. Adolphe with an instrument named after him : SAX


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1030-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 14, Thursday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Woolf
THEME: Chips Ahoy … today’s grid resembles a CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE. The crossword is a rebus puzzle, with the letters CHIP appearing together in some chairs, which I have denoted in my grid with a black disc:
16A. Entertainers with something to get off their chests? : CHIPPENDALES DANCERS
23A. Wise one? : POTATO CHIP
29A. Contribute : CHIP IN
42A. The Bahamas, e.g. : ARCHIPELAGO
56A. Treat represented visually by this puzzle's answer : CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE
16D. Tribe of the Upper Midwest : CHIPPEWA
26D. Nonhuman singer of a 1958 #1 song : CHIPMUNK
29D. Fast-food chain named after a spice : CHIPOTLE
44D. They may be made with pitching wedges : CHIP SHOTS
59D. Upbeat : CHIPPER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Actor Guy of "Memento" : PEARCE
Guy Pearce is an Australian actor (actually born in England) who got his break playing in the Aussie soap opera “Neighbours”. I remember him playing drag queen Felicia Jollygoodfellow in the entertaining Australian film “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” (1994). He also appeared in several hit American movies, such as “L.A. Confidential”, “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “The Time Machine”.

13. They may be blocked in the winter : SINUSES
In anatomical terms a sinus is a cavity in tissue. Sinuses are found all over the body, in the kidney and heart for example, but we most commonly think of the paranasal sinuses that surround the nose.

16. Entertainers with something to get off their chests? : CHIPPENDALES DANCERS
Chippendales is a big touring operation featuring exotic male dancers. The show started out as a nightclub in Los Angeles in the early eighties.

20. ___ Dome (old Colts home) : RCA
The RCA Dome was probably better known as the Hoosier dome, home to the Indianapolis Colts from 1984-2007. It was torn down in 2008, but the inflated roof was put to good use afterwards. The material was re-purposed by local artisans, creating wallets, messenger bags etc. These can still be purchased, with proceeds going to charity.

23. Wise one? : POTATO CHIP
The Wise Potato Chip Company was founded in 1921 by Earl Wise, Sr.

27. Transfer ___ : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

28. Jokester : WAG
A “wag” or a “card” is a very amusing person, one who is often quite eccentric.

30. Focus of The Source magazine : RAP MUSIC
“The Source” is a monthly magazine that mainly covers the world of rap music, but also some politics and culture. I don’t have a subscription …

32. John McCain, for one : ARIZONIAN
John McCain went into the US Naval Academy in 1958, following a family tradition as his father and grandfather were both four-star admirals. The younger McCain did not achieve the same rank, retiring from the Navy as a captain in 1981, but his career development was interrupted by almost six years spent as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam. John McCain has been a US Senator from Arizona since 1987.

36. Summer abroad : ETE
In French, spring (printemps) is followed by summer (été).

37. French woman's name meaning "bringer of victory" : VERONIQUE
Veronique is the French form of the female name Veronica. The name ultimately comes from the Greek “phero” meaning “to bring” and “nike” meaning “victory”.

42. The Bahamas, e.g. : ARCHIPELAGO
“Archipelago” is a name often used for a group or chain of islands. “Archipelago” is our spelling of the Italian “arcipelago”, a word that has Greek roots. “Arcipelago” was the proper name for the Aegean Sea in Greek, a word that was eventually used for the Aegean Islands.

The Bahamas is a group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean, lying in the same island chain as Cuba and Hispaniola. The Bahamas was a British colony for many years but became independent in 1973, although it retains membership in the British Commonwealth.

47. Tar Heels' sch. : UNC
The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill started enrolling students way back in 1795, making it the oldest public university in the country (the first to enrol students).

Tar Heel is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the nickname also of the athletic teams of the University of North Carolina. No one seems to know for sure where the term "Tar Heel" originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

51. Slimming technique, briefly : LIPO
Liposuction dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result it wasn't until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

54. Burns with a camera : KEN
Ken Burns directs and produces epic documentary films that usually make inventive use of archive footage. Recent works are the sensational "The War" (about the US in WWII) and the magnificent "The National Parks: America's Best Idea". Burns’ latest offering is 2014’s “The Roosevelts”.

55. O.C.'s home : SOCAL
"The O.C." is a teen drama that aired for four seasons on Fox finishing up in 2007. I never watched it, but I understand that it is set in Newport Beach in Southern California.

63. Good Samaritan, e.g. : SAINT
"The Good Samaritan" is a parable told by Jesus that can be read in the Gospel of Luke. According to the story, a Jewish traveler is robbed, beaten and left for dead at the side of the road. A priest happens by and sees the poor man, but does not stop to help. A fellow Jew also passes and refuses to help. A third man stops and gives aid. This kind person is a Samaritan, a native of Samaria. Back then Jewish and Samaritan people were said to generally despise each other, and yet here a detested creature gives aid. Jesus told the story to a self-righteous lawyer, the intent being (I assume) to shake up his self-righteousness.

65. Development on the north side? : MOSS
There is a traditionally-held belief that in the northern hemisphere there is a heavier growth of moss on the north-facing side of trees. The assumption is that the sun creates a drier environment on the south side of the tree, an environment that is less conducive to the growth of moss.

66. Mountain nymph : OREAD
The Oreads were the nymphs that accompanied the goddess Artemis on her hunting expeditions.

Down
1. Anise relative : FENNEL
Fennel is a hardy perennial plant species in the celery family that is used as a herb. Personally, I can’t stand fennel …

3. Major figure in space? : URSA
The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for "Larger Bear") is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that's what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland: the "plough".

4. NATO member with the smallest population: Abbr. : ICEL
Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in the whole of Europe, with two-thirds of the nation's population residing in and around the capital city of Reykjavik. Iceland was settled by the Norse people in AD 874, and was ruled for centuries by Norway and then Denmark. Iceland became independent in 1918, and has been republic since 1944.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down."

7. Lab safety org. : OSHA
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

10. Popular Polish dish : PIEROGI
Pierogi are stuffed dumplings made using unleavened dough, and a traditional dish from Poland.

12. Mideast chieftains: Var. : EMEERS
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

13. Aston Martin DB5, for 007 : SPY CAR
Aston Martin is a British car manufacturer, founded in 1913 by Lionel Martin. The Aston part of the company name comes from Aston Hill, a famous site for hill-climbing cars that is nearby the original factory. Aston Martin cars are much loved by the British entertainment industry. Of course James Bond was given one in “Goldfinger”, and Michael Caine drove one in the 1969 version of “The Italian Job”. Roger Moore’s character drove a yellow Aston Martin in the seventies television show “The Persuaders!”.

15. Qom resident, e.g. : IRANI
Qom (also Qum) is a city in Iran located about 100 miles southwest of Tehran. Qom is a holy city in the Shi’a Islam tradition, and a pilgrimage destination.

16. Tribe of the Upper Midwest : CHIPPEWA
The Ojibwe (also “Ojibwa”) are the second-largest of the First Nations, surpassed only by the Cree. The name “Ojibwa” is more common in Canada, whereas the alternative anglicization “Chippewa” is more common in the US.

17. Writer John who was an authority on cards : SCARNE
John Scarne was an American magician who was known in particular for his card tricks. He also wrote a number of books on card games and gambling. Perhaps even more impressive is that he invented the shoe used in a casino for dealing cards. The dealing device is so called because early versions resembled a woman’s high-heel shoe.

18. Abbr. on a music score : STAC
Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

23. Kind of gland : PINEAL
The pineal gland is a small gland located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain. The gland gets its name from its shape, like a tiny pine cone. The pineal gland produces melatonin, a hormone that helps maintain our circadian rhythm, so varying levels of melatonin control our sleep-wake cycle.

24. Covert maritime org. : ONI
The Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) is the oldest of the US intelligence services. The ONI was set up in 1882 to determine the state of advancement of foreign naval forces.

26. Nonhuman singer of a 1958 #1 song : CHIPMUNK
Alvin and the Chipmunks is a cartoon musical group that was created for the recording of a novelty song in 1958 called “The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late)”. The three Chipmunks (Alvin, Simon and Theodore) were all voiced by singer Ross Bagdasarian, Sr. but with a speedy playback to create high-pitched voices.

29. Fast-food chain named after a spice : CHIPOTLE
A chipotle is a smoke-dried jalapeño.

31. News inits. : UPI
Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) was one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a handful of employees.

33. Last thing learned in kindergarten? : ZEE
The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

"Kindergarten" is a German term, literally meaning “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

34. Long-billed wader : AVOCET
The avocet is found in warm climates, usually in saline wetlands where it uses its upcurved bill to sweep from side-to-side in water searching for aquatic insects on which it feeds. Avocets, and other similar species, may go by the common name of "stilts", a moniker applied to them because of their long legs.

39. Like liquor, in an Ogden Nash verse : QUICKER
Ogden Nash the poet was well known for his light and humorous verse, such as:
Candy
Is dandy
But liquor
Is quicker

41. Place for un instituteur : ECOLE
In French, one might find a teacher (instituteur) in a school (école).

43. Nouveau ___ : RICHE
The “nouveau riche” are people who have achieved their wealth themselves, not from an inheritance. “Nouveau riche” is French for “new rich”.

50. Group associated with many tourist destinations : UNESCO
The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization is better known by the acronym “UNESCO”. UNESCO’s mission is help build peace in the world using programs focused on education, the sciences, culture, communication and information. The organization's work is aimed in particular at Africa, and gender equalization. UNESCO also administers a World Heritage Site program that designates and helps conserve sites of outstanding cultural or natural importance to humanity across the world.

53. Philosopher William of ___ : OCCAM
Ockham's Razor (also Occam's Razor) is a principle in philosophy and science that basically states that the simplest explanation is usually the correct one. This explanation is a corollary to the more exact statement of the principle, that one shouldn't needlessly use assumptions in explaining something. The principle was developed by 14th-century logician and Franciscan Friar William of Ockham (or "Occam" in Latin). The principle is dubbed a "razor" as it is used as a philosophical tool used to cut out absurd and spurious reasoning in an argument.

57. Lima's place : OHIO
Lima is a city located in northwestern Ohio, about 70 miles north of Dayton. The city is home to the Lima Army Tank Plant, where the M1 Abrams battle tank is produced. Lima is also home to the fictional William McKinley High School that is the setting for the TV series “Glee”.

60. Eye part : CONE
The retina is the tissue that lines the inside of the eye, the tissue that is light-sensitive. There are (mainly) two types of cell in the retina that are sensitive to light, called rods and cones. Rods are cells that best function in very dim light and only provide black-and-white vision. Cones on the other hand function in brighter light and can perceive color.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Moving : FLUID
6. Wizard's wear : ROBE
10. Actor Guy of "Memento" : PEARCE
11. Indivisibly : AS ONE
13. They may be blocked in the winter : SINUSES
14. Last line of many a riddle : WHO AM I?
16. Entertainers with something to get off their chests? : CHIPPENDALES DANCERS
19. Funeral masses : PYRES
20. ___ Dome (old Colts home) : RCA
21. Milk source : TEAT
22. Green sci. : ECOL
23. Wise one? : POTATO CHIP
27. Transfer ___ : RNA
28. Jokester : WAG
29. Contribute : CHIP IN
30. Focus of The Source magazine : RAP MUSIC
32. John McCain, for one : ARIZONIAN
35. Baby seal : PUP
36. Summer abroad : ETE
37. French woman's name meaning "bringer of victory" : VERONIQUE
42. The Bahamas, e.g. : ARCHIPELAGO
46. Word before an advice columnist's name : ASK
47. Tar Heels' sch. : UNC
48. A tot may have a big one : SIS
49. Engage in oratory : ELOCUTE
51. Slimming technique, briefly : LIPO
52. What a well may produce : ECHO
54. Burns with a camera : KEN
55. O.C.'s home : SOCAL
56. Treat represented visually by this puzzle's answer : CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE
61. One using acid, say : ETCHER
62. Wore : SPORTED
63. Good Samaritan, e.g. : SAINT
64. Arena, maybe : CENTER
65. Development on the north side? : MOSS
66. Mountain nymph : OREAD

Down
1. Anise relative : FENNEL
2. Hails : LAUDS
3. Major figure in space? : URSA
4. NATO member with the smallest population: Abbr. : ICEL
5. Hot spot : DESERT
6. Spreadsheet input : RAW DATA
7. Lab safety org. : OSHA
8. Benefit : BOON
9. Pass : ENACT
10. Popular Polish dish : PIEROGI
12. Mideast chieftains: Var. : EMEERS
13. Aston Martin DB5, for 007 : SPY CAR
15. Qom resident, e.g. : IRANI
16. Tribe of the Upper Midwest : CHIPPEWA
17. Writer John who was an authority on cards : SCARNE
18. Abbr. on a music score : STAC
23. Kind of gland : PINEAL
24. Covert maritime org. : ONI
25. Fight against : OPPOSE
26. Nonhuman singer of a 1958 #1 song : CHIPMUNK
29. Fast-food chain named after a spice : CHIPOTLE
31. News inits. : UPI
33. Last thing learned in kindergarten? : ZEE
34. Long-billed wader : AVOCET
38. Teller? : RAT
39. Like liquor, in an Ogden Nash verse : QUICKER
40. Like volunteer work : UNPAID
41. Place for un instituteur : ECOLE
42. "Wait ___!" : A SEC
43. Nouveau ___ : RICHE
44. They may be made with pitching wedges : CHIP SHOTS
45. Vehicles that often have unlicensed drivers : GO KARTS
50. Group associated with many tourist destinations : UNESCO
51. Took stock? : LOOTED
53. Philosopher William of ___ : OCCAM
55. "... ish" : SORTA
57. Lima's place : OHIO
58. Eye part : LENS
59. Upbeat : CHIPPER
60. Eye part : CONE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1029-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 14, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: It’s in There ... each of today’s themed answers contains the hidden word “IT’S”, .
54A. Longtime Prego slogan ... with a hint to the answers to the five starred clues IT'S IN THERE

17A. *Chilled appetizer or dessert FRUIT SALAD
36A. *Billboard listing HIT SONG
11D. *Kick the habit, say QUIT SMOKING
24D. *Feature of many a TV interview SPLIT SCREEN
25D. *Time to retire? PIT STOP
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Actress Ward SELA
The actress Sela Ward turns up in crosswords a lot. Ward played Teddy Reed in the TV show "Sisters" in the nineties, and was in "Once and Again" from 1999-2002. I don't know either show, but I do know Ward from the medical drama "House" in which she played the hospital's lawyer and Greg House's ex-partner. That was a fun role, I thought. More recently Ward played a lead role on "CSI: NY" and was a very welcome and much-needed addition to the cast ...

15. Barkin of "The Big Easy" ELLEN
Ellen Barkin is an actress from the Bronx in New York City. I mostly know Barkin from her roles in the 1989 movie “Sea of Love” and 2007’s “Ocean’s Thirteen”.

"The Big Easy" is a 1987 crime film set in New Orleans that stars Dennis Quaid and Ellen Barkin. The original screenplay was set in Chicago, and so the anticipated title for the movie was “Windy City”.

19. Actress Lollobrigida GINA
Gina Lollobrigida is an Italian actress, and also a photojournalist and sculptor. After her career in movies started to slow down in the seventies, she turned to photojournalism. She has photographed many of the greats, including Paul Newman, Salvador Dali, Audrey Hepburn and even the German national soccer team. In fact, she was also able to arrange an exclusive interview with Fidel Castro, much to the chagrin of the world’s professional journalists.

20. Port of Algeria ORAN
Oran lies on the Algerian coast, and is famous for being the port where the French Navy was largely destroyed by the British during WWII in order to avoid the French vessels falling into the hands of Nazi Germany after France surrendered. This decisive and unexpected unilateral action by the British sent a very strong message around the world that Britain was willing to fight alone against the axis powers if necessary.

21. Like one side of Mount Everest TIBETAN
Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepali sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

23. State that borders Bangladesh ASSAM
Assam is a state in the very northeast of India, just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea as well as its silk.

The independent nation of Bangladesh was established after the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971, when the East Pakistan was seceded by the State of Pakistan. The struggle for independence really started when the British exited the region, dividing British India into the Union of India and the Dominion of Pakistan in 1947. The Union of India became today’s Republic of India, and the Dominion of Pakistan eventually split into today’s Islamic Republic of Pakistan and the People’s Republic of Bangladesh.

26. Brand in a bowl ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

27. Sponsorship: Var. EGIS
Someone is said to be under the aegis (also “egis”) of someone else (for example) if that other person provides protection, or perhaps sponsorship. The word "aegis" comes from the Greek word for a goat ("aigis"), the idea being that the goatskin shield or breastplate worn by Zeus or Athena, gave some measure of protection.

32. Baseball great Hodges GIL
Gil Hodges was a professional baseball player and manager. Perhaps Hodges’ most celebrated achievement was managing the New York Mets team (the “Miracle Mets”) that won the 1969 World Series. Hodges died from a heart attack just a few years later in 1972, when he was only 48 years old.

33. Foot specialist? POET
In poetry a foot is the natural unit of stressed and unstressed syllables which make up the work. For example, an iambic foot consists of an unstressed syllable, followed by a stressed syllable.

34. Its capital is Pristina KOSOVO
The country name “Kosovo” is an adjectival form of the Serbian word "kos" meaning "blackbird". The name commemorates the "field of the blackbirds" the site of a 1389 battle between Serbia and the Ottoman Empire. The dispute over Kosovo technically dates back to the implosion of Yugoslavia in the 1990s. The capital of Kosovo is Pristina.

35. Geisha's sash OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot (chocho musubi) or perhaps in a drum knot (taiko musubi).

The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

36. *Billboard listing HIT SONG
The record for the most number-one “Billboard” hits is held by the Beatles (20), however, the record for the most cumulative weeks at number one in the charts is shared by Elvis Presley and Mariah Carey (79 weeks).

38. He's a real doll KEN
Barbie's male counterpart doll is Ken, and Ken's family name is Carson. Barbie's full name is Barbie Millicent Roberts. When Ken was introduced in 1959, it was as Barbie's boyfriend. In 2004 it was announced that Ken and Barbie were splitting up, and needed to spend quality time apart. Soon after the split, Barbie “met” Blaine, a boogie boarder from Australia.

39. Holy Communion, e.g. RITUAL
The Communion rite is the part of the Mass in the Roman Catholic tradition. The rite involves distribution of the Communion bread (the host, a wafer) to the faithful.

41. Very, in Vichy TRES
Vichy is a spa town in the center of France. The people from Vichy are known as Vichyssois. After Paris, was occupied by the Germans in WWII, Vichy was chosen as the seat of government for what was called the French State. The Vichy government had theoretical authority even in occupied France, and is remembered for its collaboration with the German authorities. Vichy was chosen as the new seat of government because of its relative proximity to Paris, and simply because the town had the largest hotel room capacity in the “free zone” of the country.

48. Stoners' purchases BONGS
A “bong” is a smaller and more portable version of a “hookah”, with both being filtration devices for smoking especially tobacco and cannabis. The term “bong” comes from the Thai word “baung” that is used for a wooden pope cut from bamboo.

54. Longtime Prego slogan ... with a hint to the answers to the five starred clues IT'S IN THERE
The Prego brand of pasta sauce is owned by the Campbell Soup Company. It is actually based on the family recipe of one of the company's chefs. "Prego" literally means "I pray" in Italian, but it translates in English best as "you're welcome" when it is used after a "thank you" ("grazie", in Italian).

61. Yellow sub? OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

62. Payroll IDs SSNS
Social Security Number (SSN)

63. Bottom of the barrel DREGS
The dregs in wine, the sediment that settles during fermentation (and sometimes in the bottle), is also called "lees".

Down
1. Tanning lotion letters SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun ...

3. Actress Lucy LIU
Lucy Liu is an actress from Queens, New York. Liu's big break came when she was chosen to play the Ling Woo character in "Ally McBeal". I liked her in the 2000 film "Charlie's Angels" but as I am no fan of Quentin Tarantino, I did not enjoy the movie "Kill Bill". I am having fun watching one of Liu’s more recent projects, in which she plays one of the two leads in the TV crime drama “Elementary”.

4. Bach composition ARIOSO
An arioso (plural “ariosi”) is a solo vocal piece in a classical work such as an opera or an oratorio. An arioso's structure lies somewhere between that of a full-blown aria and speech-like recitative.

7. Feeling fluish, say ILL
Influenza (flu) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

8. Rodeo ropes REATAS
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”. We tend to use the spelling “riata” in English, but sometimes can use the original Spanish word.

10. Frank McCourt's "___ Ashes" ANGELA’S
"Angela's Ashes" is a Pulitzer-winning memoir by Frank McCourt. It tells of McCourt's upbringing in an impoverished family in Limerick in the west of Ireland.

12. Forearm bone ULNA
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

13. Ex-Fed head Greenspan ALAN
Alan Greenspan served as the Chairman of the Federal Reserve from 1987 to 2006, the longest anyone has held that post. He was appointed by President Reagan for a four-year term, and was reappointed by subsequent presidents until Greenspan retired. Outside of the world of economics, Greenspan is married to NBC journalist Andrea Mitchell, and back in the seventies he even dated Barbara Walters.

23. Excuses, excuses ALIBIS
"Alibi" is the Latin word for "elsewhere" as in, "I claim that I was 'elsewhere' when the crime was committed ... I have an 'alibi'".

25. *Time to retire? PIT STOP
A racing car might get “retired” (get new tires) during a pit stop.

26. Ancient market AGORA
In early Greece the "agora" was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word "agoraphobia" comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of "public meeting places".

37. Canadian-born hockey great ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn't skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

44. Big name at Little Bighorn CUSTER
The Battle of Little Bighorn was a famous engagement between the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho Native American peoples against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the US Army led by General George Custer. Custer was soundly defeated and he and all of his men were killed in the engagement. I had the privilege of visiting the battle site a few years ago, and it was a very memorable experience.

50. Acacia features PODS
Acacia is a genus of tree and shrub, also known as thorntree, whistling thorn and wattle. The acacia is the primary food source for the giraffe in the wild, with the animal eating the leaves high in the tree, leaves that are inaccessible by competing species.

52. Bookstore sect. BIOG
Biography (biog.)

56. Yalie ELI
Eli is the nickname for a graduate of Yale University, a term used in honor of the Yale benefactor Elihu Yale.

57. Part of AARP: Abbr. RET
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

58. Canon camera EOS
I've been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Actress Ward SELA
5. Church bell location SPIRE
10. Shade at the swimming pool AQUA
14. Skating competition entry, maybe PAIR
15. Barkin of "The Big Easy" ELLEN
16. Void NULL
17. *Chilled appetizer or dessert FRUIT SALAD
19. Actress Lollobrigida GINA
20. Port of Algeria ORAN
21. Like one side of Mount Everest TIBETAN
23. State that borders Bangladesh ASSAM
25. Comic strip makeup PANELS
26. Brand in a bowl ALPO
27. Sponsorship: Var. EGIS
29. Illustrious FAMED
32. Baseball great Hodges GIL
33. Foot specialist? POET
34. Its capital is Pristina KOSOVO
35. Geisha's sash OBI
36. *Billboard listing HIT SONG
38. He's a real doll KEN
39. Holy Communion, e.g. RITUAL
41. Very, in Vichy TRES
42. Temper IRE
43. Grps. ASSNS
44. Part of a planet CORE
45. Pay (up) ANTE
46. Ruin, as a dog might shoes CHEW UP
48. Stoners' purchases BONGS
50. Reasons for some street closures PARADES
52. One being strung along? BEAD
53. Dentist's instruction OPEN
54. Longtime Prego slogan ... with a hint to the answers to the five starred clues IT'S IN THERE
59. Safe-deposit box item, maybe DEED
60. Surface anew, in a way RESOD
61. Yellow sub? OLEO
62. Payroll IDs SSNS
63. Bottom of the barrel DREGS
64. Something to match WITS

Down
1. Tanning lotion letters SPF
2. Canal zone? EAR
3. Actress Lucy LIU
4. Bach composition ARIOSO
5. Ingredient in much Asian cooking SESAME OIL
6. ___ B PLAN
7. Feeling fluish, say ILL
8. Rodeo ropes REATAS
9. Culminate with END IN
10. Frank McCourt's "___ Ashes" ANGELA’S
11. *Kick the habit, say QUIT SMOKING
12. Forearm bone ULNA
13. Ex-Fed head Greenspan ALAN
18. Part of a chorus line? TRA
22. Obscures BEFOGS
23. Excuses, excuses ALIBIS
24. *Feature of many a TV interview SPLIT SCREEN
25. *Time to retire? PIT STOP
26. Ancient market AGORA
28. Follow GET
30. Turns inside out EVERTS
31. Gifted person? DONEE
33. Gradually introduced, with "in" PHASED
34. Leg strengtheners KNEE BENDS
37. Canadian-born hockey great ORR
40. Lets go of UNHANDS
44. Big name at Little Bighorn CUSTER
45. "You said it!" AND HOW!
47. Remarkable, as a coincidence WEIRD
49. Bran name? OAT
50. Acacia features PODS
51. Copiers APES
52. Bookstore sect. BIOG
55. Seattle-to-L.A. direction SSE
56. Yalie ELI
57. Part of AARP: Abbr. RET
58. Canon camera EOS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1028-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 14, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrea Carla Michaels
THEME: Singular NBA Teams ... each of today’s themed answers ends with the name of an NBA team. In fact, the full list of NBA teams with nonplural names is included in the grid:
48A. Org. whose only members with nonplural names appear at the ends of 17-, 25-, 41- and 56-Across NBA

17A. Related add-ons, informally ALL THAT JAZZ (giving “the Utah Jazz”)
25A. Tom Cruise/Nicole Kidman racing film DAYS OF THUNDER (giving “the Oklahoma City Thunder”)
41A. "That" something in an Arlen/Mercer standard OLD BLACK MAGIC (giving “the Orlando Magic”)
56A. Keep cool in summer BEAT THE HEAT (giving “the Miami Heat”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Edie of "Nurse Jackie" FALCO
"Nurse Jackie" is a comedy-drama series centered on an emergency room nurse at a hospital in New York City. The lead character is played by Edie Falco, who also played Tony Soprano’s wife on the “The Sopranos”.

11. Prime meridian std. GST
GST is Greenwich Sidereal Time.

Astronomers use sidereal time to know where to locate given stars in the night sky. Sidereal time is a time scale that takes into account the Earth’s rotation relative to stars with a fixed location in the night sky.

A meridian is a line of longitude, and the Prime Meridian is that line of longitude defined as 0 degrees. The Prime Meridian is also called the Greenwich Meridian as it passes through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich in southeast London. Of course the line of longitude that is used to represent 0 degrees is an arbitrary decision. 25 nations formally decided in 1884 to use the Greenwich Meridian as 0 degrees as it was already a popular choice. That is all except the French, who abstained from the vote and used the Paris Meridian as 0 degrees on French charts for several decades.

14. Hipbone-related ILIAC
The sacrum and the two ilia are three bones in the human pelvis.

16. Waikiki wear LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

17. Related add-ons, informally ALL THAT JAZZ (giving “the Utah Jazz”)
The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to their current home in Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

19. "___ long gone daddy in the U.S.A." (Springsteen lyric) I’M A
“I’m a long gone daddy in the U.S.A." is a lyric from Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA”.

“Born in the USA” is a 1984 song (and album) written and recorded by Bruce Springsteen. The song was written three years earlier as the title song for a movie, but was never used. That film ultimately was released as “Light of Day” starring Michael j. Fox. The original intention was for Springsteen to star in the film himself.

20. Golden Horde members TATARS
Tatars are an ethnic group of people, mainly residing in Russia (a population of about 5 1/2 million). One of the more famous people with a Tatar heritage was Hollywood actor Charles Bronson. Bronson’s real name was Charles Buchinsky.

The Golden Horde was a group of Mongols who ruled over what is now Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Moldova and the Caucasus, from the 1240s until 1502. It has been suggested that the name of the group derives from the yellow tents used by the rulers of the Golden Horde. And, the Golden Horde’s influence and rule led to the term “horde” entering English, via many languages spoken in Slavic Eastern Europe.

21. Suffix with sucr- and lact- -OSE
The sugar we consume as "table sugar" is mainly sucrose that is extracted from sugar cane and sugar beet. We also consume lactose, naturally occurring in milk, and fructose, naturally occurring in fruit. But most of the sugar we eat or drink tends to be prepared commercially, the most famous being high-fructose corn syrup, which is glucose that is industrially processed into a glucose/fructose mix. Don't get me started on the politics of food ...

22. Brouhaha STIR
"Brouhaha", meaning “ado, stir”, was a French word that back in the 1550s meant "the cry of the devil disguised as clergy" . Wow!

24. "Straight ___ Compton" (seminal rap album) OUTTA
“Straight Outta Compton” was the first album by N.W.A. N.W.A was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube.

25. Tom Cruise/Nicole Kidman racing film DAYS OF THUNDER (giving “the Oklahoma City Thunder”)
“Days of Thunder” is 1990 movie about NASCAR racing that stars Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman and Robert Duvall. “Days of Thunder” is the first of three films that co-starred Cruise and Kidman, with the other two being “Far And Away” and “Eyes Wide Shut”.

The Oklahoma City Thunder NBA team arrived in the city in 2008 after relocating from Seattle, where they were named the SuperSonics. The “Thunder” name was chosen as a reference to Oklahoma City’s exposure to the storms of Tornado Alley, and to the 45th Infantry Division “Thunderbirds” who were headquartered there until 1968.

33. Dodgers great Campanella ROY
Roy Campanella was a Major League Baseball player considered by many to have been one of the greatest catchers the game has ever seen. Campanella played for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the forties and fifties and was a pioneer in breaking the color barrier as he started out playing in the Negro Leagues. Sadly, he was paralyzed in a car accident when in his late thirties and so his career was tragically cut short.

36. Figure skater Harding TONYA
Tonya Harding won the US Figure Skating Championships in 1991. Harding’s reputation was greatly tarnished in the run up to the 1994 Olympics, when her former husband and her bodyguard contracted someone to attack Harding's main competitor, Nancy Kerrigan. During a practice session for the US Championship, a hired thug assaulted Kerrigan with police baton, attempting to break her leg. Kerrigan was forced to withdraw, and Harding won the championship. Both Harding and Kerrigan were selected for the Olympic team, and despite attempts to get Harding removed, both skated at the Games in Lillehammer. Harding finished in eighth place, and Kerrigan won the silver medal. Harding admitted that she helped cover up the attack when she found out about it, and was stripped of her US Championship title.

37. Scotch ___ TAPE
Scotch Tape is a brand of adhesive tape made by 3M. “Scotch Tape” is one of those brand names that has become so used widely that it has become a generic term for the product. The equivalent brand name of product that we use over in Ireland is Sellotape. This British brand also has become a generic term, and is our equivalent to “Scotch tape”.

39. Place for a kiddie hawk? AERIE
An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an “eyrie”.

40. Elevator innovator OTIS
Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the "safety elevator", a design that he showcased at the 1853 World's Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

41. "That" something in an Arlen/Mercer standard OLD BLACK MAGIC (giving “the Orlando Magic”)
"That Old Black Magic" is a song written by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The song has been recorded by many artists over the decades, but was first released by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra in 1942.

The Orlando Magic were formed in 1989 as an NBA expansion team. A local paper was asked to run a competition to suggest names for the new team and the community came up with its four top picks of "Heat", "Tropics", "Juice" and "Magic". A committee then opted for "Orlando Magic". A good choice I think ...

47. The Beatles' "___ Love Her" AND I
“And I Love Her” is a lovely ballad recorded by the Beatles in 1964. It is one of my favorite Lennon/McCartney compositions, and there’s a lovely rendition of the song in the Beatles movie “A Hard Day’s Night”.

51. "Fiddler on the Roof" setting SHTETL
The Yiddish word for "town" is "shtot", and so "shtetl" is the diminutive form meaning "small town".

The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Aleichem about Tevye, a milkman living in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. "Fiddler on the Roof" had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

55. Old-time actress Hagen UTA
Uta Hagen was a German-born American actress. Hagen married Jose Ferrer in 1938, but they were divorced ten years later after it was revealed that she was having a long-running affair with Paul Robeson. Her association with Robeson, a prominent civil rights activist, earned her a spot on the Hollywood Blacklist during the McCarthy Era. This forced her away from film, but towards a successful stage career in New York City.

56. Keep cool in summer BEAT THE HEAT (giving “the Miami Heat”)
The Miami Heat basketball team debuted in the NBA in the 1988-89 season. The franchise name was chosen in a competitive survey, with “Miami Heat” beating out “Miami Vice”.

58. Obama or Clinton, informally DEM
By tradition, the Secret Service code names used for the US President and family all start with the same letter. For the current First Family, that letter is R:
- Barack Obama: Renegade
- Michelle Obama: Renaissance
- Malia Obama: Radiance
- Sasha Obama: Rosebud
The codenames for the Clinton First Family start with the letter E:
- Bill Clinton: Eagle
- Hillary Rodham Clinton: Evergreen
- Chelsea Clinton: Energy

61. Gridiron gains: Abbr. YDS
We never used the word "gridiron" when I was growing up in Ireland (meaning a grill used for cooking food over an open fire). So, maybe I am excused for finding out relatively recently that a football field gridiron is so called because the layout of yard lines over the field looks like a gridiron used in cooking!

62. One of the Coen brothers ETHAN
I think it's great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry "insiders". Ethan's wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the lovely Frances McDormand.

Down
1. Company that owns Ferrari FIAT
Fiat is the largest car manufacturer in Italy, and is headquartered in Turin in the Piedmont region in the north of the country. Fiat was founded in 1899 by Giovanni Agnelli, when the company’s name was “Fabbrica Italiana di Automobili Torino” (FIAT). A few years ago, Fiat became the majority shareholder in Chrysler.

Enzo Ferrari was an Italian race car driver, and founder of the Ferrari car manufacturing company. Ferrari died in 1988, and in 2003 the company named the Enzo Ferrari model after its founder.

2. Milan's Teatro ___ Scala ALLA
The La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: "Teatro alla Scala" in Italian.

6. First anti-AIDS drug AZT
AZT is the abbreviated name for the drug azidothymidine, much used in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. AZT was originally developed in the seventies as a potential treatment for retroviruses (cancer-causing viruses), although it was never approved for use in treatment. In 1984, it was confirmed that AIDS was caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), so scientists turned to known antiviral drugs in the search for a viable treatment. Burroughs-Wellcome came up with a treatment regime using AZT, and filed a patent in 1985. The patent was challenged in court but the patent expired anyway in 2005 without any decision being made. There are now at least four generic forms of AZT approved for sale in the US.

7. Luck that's workin' for ya MOJO
The word “mojo”, meaning magical charm or magnetism, is probably of Creole origin.

8. "___ a Teenage Werewolf" I WAS
“I Was a Teenage Werewolf” is a 1957 horror movie starring Michael Landon in the title role. The film was a breakthrough role for Landon, and two years later he landed the role of Little Joe on TV’s “Bonanza”.

11. Fashionable celebs GLITTERATI
The glitterati are the fashionable celebrities. "Glitterati" is a melding of the words "glitter" and "literati".

22. South of France SUD
In France, “nord” (north) is opposite to “sud” (south).

26. Famous Yosemite photographer ANSEL ADAMS
As an amateur photographer, I have been a big fan of the work of Ansel Adams for many years and must have read all of his books. Adams was famous for clarity and depth in his black and white images. Central to his technique was the use of the zone system, his own invention. The zone system is a way of controlling exposure in an image, particularly when there is a high contrast in the subject. Although the technique was developed primarily for black & white film, it can even apply to digital color images. In the digital world, the main technique is to expose an image for the highlights, and one or more images for the shadows. These images can then be combined digitally giving a final photograph with a full and satisfying range of exposures.

27. Fauna's counterpart FLORA
The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

28. Elixir TONIC
An elixir is a solution of alcohol and water that is used to deliver a medicine. The term “elixir” can also be used to mean a medicine that has the power to cure all ills.

29. "Frida" star Salma HAYEK
Salma Hayek is a Mexican actress. Hayek was the first Mexican national to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar, for her portrayal of artist Frida Kahlo in the 2002 movie "Frida".

30. Acapulco article UNA
The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

31. Hot spot? SPA
The word "spa" migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name "Spa" comes from the Walloon word "espa" meaning "spring, fountain".

39. Lawyers' org. ABA
American Bar Association (ABA)

44. Subject of a massive statue in the ancient Parthenon ATHENA
The Athena Parthenos (“Athena the Virgin” in English) was a massive statue of the goddess Athena made from gold, silver and ivory, which stood in the Parthenon in Athens. It was created by the sculptor Phidias around 447 BC. About 150 years later, the gold was stripped from the statue to pay troops. It was finally removed by the Romans in the 5th century AD. There is a replica of Athena in the city of Nashville, Tennessee that stands over 40 feet tall.

48. Call at a deli counter NEXT
The word "delicatessen" (or “deli” for short) came into English from the German "Delikatessen". The Germans borrowed the word from French, in which language "délicatesse" means "delicious things (to eat)". The term's ultimate root is "delicatus", the Latin for "giving pleasure, delightful".

49. "Splish Splash" spot BATH
“Splish Splash” was a hit for Bobby Darin in 1958, and was the result of a bet. The first line (Splish splash, I was taking a bath) was suggested by Jean Kaufman, the mother of disk jockey “Murray the K”. Murray wagered that Darin couldn’t write a song beginning with those words. Darin won the bet …

50. Gillette brand ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

52. Architect Saarinen EERO
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK. The list of his lesser-known, but still impressive, works includes several buildings erected on academic campuses. For example, the Chapel and Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus, the Emma Hartman Noyes House at Vassar College, and Yale's David S. Ingalls Rink.

54. Astronomical meas. LT YR
A light-year (lt. yr.) is a measure of distance, not time. It is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year. The accepted abbreviation for a light-year is “ly”. A light-second is a lot shorter distance: about 186,282 miles.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Edie of "Nurse Jackie" FALCO
6. Not quite right AMISS
11. Prime meridian std. GST
14. Hipbone-related ILIAC
15. "Holy cow!" ZOWIE!
16. Waikiki wear LEI
17. Related add-ons, informally ALL THAT JAZZ (giving “the Utah Jazz”)
19. "___ long gone daddy in the U.S.A." (Springsteen lyric) I’M A
20. Golden Horde members TATARS
21. Suffix with sucr- and lact- -OSE
22. Brouhaha STIR
23. Tennis umpire's call LET!
24. "Straight ___ Compton" (seminal rap album) OUTTA
25. Tom Cruise/Nicole Kidman racing film DAYS OF THUNDER (giving “the Oklahoma City Thunder”)
31. Things confessed at confession SINS
32. Bad things from sharks? LOANS
33. Dodgers great Campanella ROY
35. It's attention-getting PSST!
36. Figure skater Harding TONYA
37. Scotch ___ TAPE
38. Whiz ACE
39. Place for a kiddie hawk? AERIE
40. Elevator innovator OTIS
41. "That" something in an Arlen/Mercer standard OLD BLACK MAGIC (giving “the Orlando Magic”)
45. Exotic jelly fruit GUAVA
46. "No thanks, I already ___" ATE
47. The Beatles' "___ Love Her" AND I
48. Org. whose only members with nonplural names appear at the ends of 17-, 25-, 41- and 56-Across NBA
51. "Fiddler on the Roof" setting SHTETL
55. Old-time actress Hagen UTA
56. Keep cool in summer BEAT THE HEAT (giving “the Miami Heat”)
58. Obama or Clinton, informally DEM
59. Add-on EXTRA
60. So unhip as to be hip, maybe NERDY
61. Gridiron gains: Abbr. YDS
62. One of the Coen brothers ETHAN
63. Din-making AROAR

Down
1. Company that owns Ferrari FIAT
2. Milan's Teatro ___ Scala ALLA
3. Gentle rise and fall of the voice LILT
4. It makes things happen CATALYST
5. Earthy tones OCHRES
6. First anti-AIDS drug AZT
7. Luck that's workin' for ya MOJO
8. "___ a Teenage Werewolf" I WAS
9. Jumbo, for one SIZE
10. "Oh yeah? ___ who?" SEZ
11. Fashionable celebs GLITTERATI
12. Like the climate of Miami or Rio SEMITROPIC
13. Princess topper TIARA
18. Concerning AS TO
22. South of France SUD
24. Follower of clip or slip -ONS
25. Not full-price DISCOUNTED
26. Famous Yosemite photographer ANSEL ADAMS
27. Fauna's counterpart FLORA
28. Elixir TONIC
29. "Frida" star Salma HAYEK
30. Acapulco article UNA
31. Hot spot? SPA
34. "You betcha!" YES!
36. Business card abbr. TEL
37. With it TOGETHER
39. Lawyers' org. ABA
42. Roman 506 DVI
43. Turn to pulp MASH
44. Subject of a massive statue in the ancient Parthenon ATHENA
45. Tastelessly showy GAUDY
48. Call at a deli counter NEXT
49. "Splish Splash" spot BATH
50. Gillette brand ATRA
52. Architect Saarinen EERO
53. Cry made with a curtsy, maybe TADA!
54. Astronomical meas. LT YR
56. Honey Nut Cheerios mascot BEE
57. Catch some rays TAN


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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