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1201-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Dec 14, Monday



QuickLinks:
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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Guzzetta
THEME: I Really Adore You! … each of today’s themed answers is a remark made by a someone who is smitten, with the remark suits that person’s profession:
17A. "You really ___!," said the adoring seismologist : ROCK MY WORLD
51A. "You really ___!," said the adoring ship captain : FLOAT MY BOAT
11D. "You really ___!," said the adoring tailor : SUIT MY FANCY
25D. "You really ___!," said the adoring arsonist : LIGHT MY FIRE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. Cul-de-___ : SAC
Even though "cul-de-sac" can indeed mean "bottom of the bag" in French, the term cul-de-sac is of English origin (the use of "cul" in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are "voie sans issue", meaning "way without exit".

14. Coliseum : ARENA
Our word “coliseum”, meaning an arena, was first imported into English to describe a music hall in the early 1700s. The term is a variant of the Latin “Colosseum”, the huge amphitheater in Rome.

The Colosseum of Rome was the largest amphitheater in the whole of the Roman Empire in its day, and could seat about 50,000 people. Even today, it is the largest amphitheater in the world. The structure was originally called the “Amphitheatrum Flavium” but the name changed to “Colosseum” when a colossal statue of Emperor Nero was located nearby.

17. "You really ___!," said the adoring seismologist : ROCK MY WORLD
Seismology is the study of earthquakes, from :”seismos”, the Greek for “shaking”,

19. Investment option for old age, in brief : IRA
Individual retirement account (IRA)

27. Connoisseur of fine food : GOURMET
A gourmand is someone who takes great pleasure in consuming food and drink, often eating and drinking to excess. The related term “gourmet” refers to someone who has a refined palate.

30. Starting restaurant employee, maybe : BUSBOY
A busboy is a person who assists a waiter, mainly by clearing tables. The verb “to bus” arose in the early 1900s and is probably a reference to the wheeled cart that was used to carry dishes.

33. Groovy : FAB
The term “groovy” meaning “neat, cool” comes from the jazz slang phrase “in the groove”.

37. Larger cousin of a violin : CELLO
The word “cello” is an abbreviation for “violoncello”, an Italian word for “little violone”, referring to a group of stringed instruments that were popular up to the end of the 17th century. The name violoncello persisted for the instrument that we know today, although the abbreviation ‘cello was often used. Nowadays we just drop the apostrophe.

39. Ping-Pong table divider : NET
Ping-pong is called table tennis in the UK, where the sport originated in the 1880s. Table tennis started as an after-dinner activity among the elite, and was called "wiff-waff". To play the game, books were stacked in the center of a table as a "net", two more books served as ""rackets" and the ball used was actually a golf ball. The game evolved over time with the rackets being upgraded to the lids of cigar boxes and the ball becoming a champagne cork (how snooty is that?). Eventually the game was produced commercially, and the sound of the ball hitting the racket was deemed to be a "ping" and a "pong", giving the sport its alternative name.

40. Mineral layer involved in fracking : SHALE
“Fracking” is a familiar term for “hydraulic fracturing”. Fracking involves the injection of chemicals and sand in water at high pressure into a wellbore. This creates cracks in layers of rock deep in the earth allowing perhaps oil or natural gas to flow more freely to the surface. I know someone who works for the US Geological Surface, and he’s measuring seismic activity in parts of the country where it has never been seen before. It seems that that fracking does have an impact on our environment after all …

41. Loma ___, Calif. : LINDA
Loma Linda is a city in California located not far from Los Angeles. The name Loma Linda translates from Spanish as “Beautiful Hill”.

42. Event on the Bounty : MUTINY
Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote "Mutiny on the ‘Bounty'", based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the "Bounty Trilogy". The three books are:
1. "Mutiny on the 'Bounty'", the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
2. "Men Against the Sea", the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
3. "Pitcairn's Island", a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

44. "Modern Family" or "All in the Family" : SITCOM
“Modern Family” is a marvelous television show shown on ABC since 2009. The show’s format is that of a “mockumentary”, with the cast often addressing the camera directly. In that respect “Modern Family” resembles two other excellent shows: “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation”, both of which might also be described a “mockumentaries”.

"All in the Family" is an American sitcom, a remake of the incredibly successful BBC show called "Till Death Us Do Part". Both the UK and US versions of the sitcom were groundbreaking in that the storyline brought into focus topics previously considered unsuitable for a television comedy, including racism, homosexuality, women's liberation, menopause and impotence. "All in the Family" is one of only three TV shows that has topped the Nielsen ratings for five consecutive seasons (the other two are "The Cosby Show" and "American Idol").

45. Field for Newton or Einstein : PHYSICS
Sir Isaac Newton was one of the most influential people in history, the man who laid the groundwork for all of classical mechanics. The story about an apple falling on his head, inspiring him to formulate his theories about gravity, well that's not quite true. Newton often told the story about observing an apple falling in his mother's garden and how this made him acutely aware of the Earth's gravitational pull. However, he made no mention of the apple hitting him on the head.

After Albert Einstein moved to the US in 1933, he became quite a celebrity and his face was readily recognizable. Einstein was frequently stopped in the street by people who would naively ask him if he could explain what "that theory" (i.e. the theory of relativity) was all about. Growing tired of this, he finally learned to tell people that he was sorry, but folks were constantly mistaking him for Albert Einstein!

47. Gentle winds : ZEPHYRS
A zephyr is a gentle breeze, traditionally a light wind from the west. The term comes from the Greek god of the west wind, who was called Zephyrus.

50. Spoon-bending Geller : URI
Uri Geller's most famous performance is perhaps his uncomfortable failure on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson in 1973. Carson "hi-jacked" Geller on live television by providing him with spoons to bend and watches to start, none of which had been available to Geller before the show aired. Clever!

58. French sea : MER
“Mer” is a French word for “sea”.

59. Rodeo rope : REATA
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”. We tend to use the spelling “riata” in English, but sometimes can use the original Spanish word.

61. Letter before cue, ar, ess ... : PEE
P, Q, R, S (pee, cue, ar, ess)

63. Examined before robbing : CASED
The term "case the joint" is American slang dating back at least to 1915, meaning to examine a location with the intent of robbing it. The origins of the phrase are apparently unknown.

Down
3. Sleuth, in old crime fiction : TEC
“Tec” is a slang term for a private detective, a private investigator (PI).

4. Quill fluid : INK
Quills have been used as writing implements since the 6th century. Historically, goose, swan and turkey feathers have been the quills of choice. A bird's feather is well suited for writing, as the hollow shaft acts as a reservoir for ink which then flows to the tip due to capillary action. Choice of feather is important. Right-handed writers are best served by feathers from the left wing, as the feather curves away from the palm of the hand when writing. The tip of the quill is sharpened using a "quill knife". This quill knife is the ancestor of what we know today as a "penknife".

5. Activity with a tent and s'mores : CAMP OUT
S'mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s'more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called "Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts". Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

7. One of three on "Let's Make a Deal" : DOOR
The game show "Let's Make a Deal" first aired way back in 1963. For many years of course, it was hosted by Monty Hall. There's a version airing right now that is hosted by Wayne Brady.

9. Class for some immigrants, for short : ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

10. Fortress : REDOUBT
A redoubt is a system of fortifications that surround a larger fort. The redoubt is used to protect soldiers stationed outside the main fort, and to provide additional defenses. The term “redoubt” (originally “redout”) means “place of retreat”.

18. Website for customer reviews : YELP
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

23. Beelike : APIAN
Something “apian” is related to bees. “Apis” is the Latin for “bee”.

26. "Iliad" locale : TROY
“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

28. Norway's capital : OSLO
Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiana. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city's name to "Kristiana", and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiana.

32. Garbanzos, e.g. : BEANS
The garbanzo, or chickpea, is absolutely my favorite legume to eat.

37. Fashionable : CHIC
"Chic" is a French word meaning "stylish".

40. Go for a wok, say? : STIR-FRY
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

47. Z Z Z, to Greeks : ZETAS
Zeta is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a precursor of our Roman letter Z. The word "zeta" is also the ancestor of the name "zed", which became "zee", the pronunciation that we use here in the US.

54. Cousin of a python : BOA
Boa constrictors are members of the Boidae family of snakes, all of which are non-venomous. Interestingly, the female boa is always larger than the male.

55. Delivery room docs : OBS
Obstetrician (Ob.)

56. Ginger ___ : ALE
The brand most closely associated with ginger ale is Canada Dry. "Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale" was first formulated in 1904 by a Canadian chemist called John McLoughlin from Ontario. Prohibition in the United States helped sales of the drink as it was particularly effective in masking the taste of illegally-produced homemade liquor.

57. Sen. Cruz : TED
US Senator Ted Cruz served as Solicitor General for the state of Texas before heading to Washington. Cruz was appointed Solicitor General in 2003 at the age of 32, making him the youngest Solicitor General in the country. Famously, Cruz is an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and made a speech in 2013 in the US Senate on the subject that lasted for 21 hours and 19 minutes. It was the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sight-related : OPTIC
6. Pink part of a cow, in cartoons : UDDER
11. Cul-de-___ : SAC
14. Coliseum : ARENA
15. Din : NOISE
16. "Gross!" : UGH!
17. "You really ___!," said the adoring seismologist : ROCK MY WORLD
19. Investment option for old age, in brief : IRA
20. Jury member : PEER
21. Frequently : OFTEN
23. In sum : ALL TOLD
27. Connoisseur of fine food : GOURMET
29. Take part in a buddy system, say : PAIR UP
30. Starting restaurant employee, maybe : BUSBOY
31. Gold bar : INGOT
32. Constructed : BUILT
33. Groovy : FAB
36. Sore : ACHY
37. Larger cousin of a violin : CELLO
38. Whittle down : PARE
39. Ping-Pong table divider : NET
40. Mineral layer involved in fracking : SHALE
41. Loma ___, Calif. : LINDA
42. Event on the Bounty : MUTINY
44. "Modern Family" or "All in the Family" : SITCOM
45. Field for Newton or Einstein : PHYSICS
47. Gentle winds : ZEPHYRS
48. One with a long, long sentence : LIFER
49. "___ and restrictions may apply" : FEES
50. Spoon-bending Geller : URI
51. "You really ___!," said the adoring ship captain : FLOAT MY BOAT
58. French sea : MER
59. Rodeo rope : REATA
60. Having high moral principles : NOBLE
61. Letter before cue, ar, ess ... : PEE
62. "Oh no!" : YIKES!
63. Examined before robbing : CASED

Down
1. Relative of a paddle : OAR
2. Con's opposite : PRO
3. Sleuth, in old crime fiction : TEC
4. Quill fluid : INK
5. Activity with a tent and s'mores : CAMP OUT
6. Single : UNWED
7. One of three on "Let's Make a Deal" : DOOR
8. Northwest by north, e.g.: Abbr. : DIR
9. Class for some immigrants, for short : ESL
10. Fortress : REDOUBT
11. "You really ___!," said the adoring tailor : SUIT MY FANCY
12. Coincide : AGREE
13. "U.S.A.! U.S.A.! U.S.A.!," e.g. : CHANT
18. Website for customer reviews : YELP
22. To's opposite : FRO
23. Beelike : APIAN
24. Knight's weapon : LANCE
25. "You really ___!," said the adoring arsonist : LIGHT MY FIRE
26. "Iliad" locale : TROY
27. Trickery : GUILE
28. Norway's capital : OSLO
30. One who might steal a classmate's lunch money : BULLY
32. Garbanzos, e.g. : BEANS
34. Zeal : ARDOR
35. Grins from ear to ear : BEAMS
37. Fashionable : CHIC
38. Essence : PITH
40. Go for a wok, say? : STIR-FRY
41. Mouth the words : LIP-SYNC
43. Take advantage of : USE
44. Appear : SEEM
45. Ready for market, as a chicken : PLUMP
46. One landing a job : HIREE
47. Z Z Z, to Greeks : ZETAS
49. Destiny : FATE
52. Hawaiian necklace : LEI
53. Tree with lobed leaves : OAK
54. Cousin of a python : BOA
55. Delivery room docs : OBS
56. Ginger ___ : ALE
57. Sen. Cruz : TED


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1130-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 14, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt Ginsberg
THEME: Zap! … we have a rebus puzzle (of sorts) today, with the letters AD appearing together in some squares of the grid. We need the AD to solve the down-clues. With the AD included, each across-answer is a well-known phrase or word. But, we need to “zap” the “AD” in the across-direction, as it needs to disappear to give us the answer to the across-clue:
19A. Focused on one's fellow fraternity members? : BRO-MINDED (from “broad-minded”)
24A. Dublin dance? : IRISH BALL (from “Irish ballad”)
36A. What Clark Kent needs to become Superman? : CHANGE OF DRESS (from “change of address”)
45A. Somewhat bashful? : ON THE SHY SIDE (from “on the shady side”)
63A. Local afternoon newscast? : FIVE O'CLOCK SHOW (from “five o’clock shadow”)
83A. Business offering the right to buy and sell securities? : OPTION AGENCY (from “adoption agency”)
93A. How to find what a creep is looking at? : FOLLOW THE LEER (from “follow the leader”)
109A. Says "I didn't do it!" before fessing up? : LIES FIRST (from “ladies first”)
115A. Cigarettes or booze? : LEGAL VICE (from “legal advice”)

4D. Prefix with masochistic : SADO-
18D. English glam-rock band with six #1 hits : SLADE
33D. Father : PADRE
36D. Refuse at the polling station : CHADS
61D. "Butterfly" actress, 1982 : ZADORA
65D. Band-Aid competitor : CURAD
85D. Ugly ones : TOADS
86D. Pop's pop : GRANDDAD
102D. Scoop (out) : LADLE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 38m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Pass off : FOIST
The word "foist", meaning “to pass off as genuine”, comes from the Dutch word meaning "take in hand". The original concept came from playing dice, in which one die was held surreptitiously in one hand.

10. Pianist Schumann, early champion of Brahms : CLARA
If you ever get the chance to see it, I highly recommend the movie 1947 "Song of Love", a biopic about the lives of Robert Schumann and his extraordinary wife, Clara Wieck. Schumann is played by Paul Henreid (of "Casablanca" fame) and Clara is played wonderfully by Katherine Hepburn. Clara was a concert pianist, and as Katherine Hepburn was an accomplished pianist herself, you see Hepburn actually playing some challenging pieces herself at the keyboard (although the soundtrack does feature a professional player).

15. Certain servers : IBMS
In the world of computer science, a computer accessing a service is called a “client”. The service is provided on a computer called a “server”. These days, clients and servers often communicate via the Internet. I am typing up this blog post on my laptop (the client) and am connected via the Internet to the Google Drive service that resides on a computer somewhere (the server).

21. Egyptian war god : HORUS
Horus was one of the oldest gods in Ancient Egyptian religion. Most often, Horus was depicted as a falcon or a man with a falcon head.

26. Pooh's baby friend : ROO
Like most of the characters in A. A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh", Roo was inspired by on a stuffed toy belonging to Milne's son Christopher Robin.

27. King Abdullah, e.g. : SAUDI
King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia has been in power since 2005. Abdullah is a son of Ibn Saud who founded modern Saudi Arabia.

33. Like the Head Start program, for short : PRE-K
The Head Start Program was launched in 1965 as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society initiative and has the goal of providing education, health, nutrition and social services to low-income children. Head Start began as a six-week summer school program designed to prepare poorer kids for kindergarten, but was soon expanded as the six-week program was deemed inadequate.

34. African flier : TSETSE
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name "tsetse" comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as "fly". Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as "sleeping sickness". Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

36. What Clark Kent needs to become Superman? : CHANGE OF DRESS (from “change of address”)
Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

42. One-named chanteuse : CHARO
Charo is an actress, comedian and flamenco guitarist from Spain. She is quite famous for her comedic catchphrase “cuchi cuchi”. Charo's real name is ... wait for it ... María del Rosario Pilar Martínez Molina Gutiérrez de los Perales Santa Ana Romaguera y de la Hinojosa Rasten.

44. Julius Wilbrand invention of 1863, for short : TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

52. Red alert source? : TASS
TASS is the abbreviation used for the former news agency that had the full name Telegraph Association of the Soviet Union (Telegrafnoe Agentstvo Sovetskovo Soyuza). When the Soviet Union dissolved in 1992, the Moscow-based agency's scope changed along with its name. It is now known as the Information Telegraph Agency of Russia (ITAR-TASS).

55. Oscar winner who was formerly a regular on TV's "Laugh-In" : HAWN
I remember watching the ditsy Goldie Hawn character on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In". Hawn used to give great performances on the show, convincing everyone that she was the stereotypical dumb blonde. Well, what a career she was to carve out for herself!

56. Fine wool sources : MERINOS
The Merino breed of sheep is prized for the soft quality of its wool.

61. Polish capital : ZLOTYS
The zloty is the currency of Poland, with word "zloty" translating into English as "golden". The zloty has been around since the Middle Ages.

67. Sentence ender, maybe : PAROLE
The term "parole" is a French word that we use in English, with the French "parole" meaning "word, speech". Of particular interest is the French phrase "parole d'honneur" which translates as "word of honor". In the early 1600s we started using "parole" to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his "word of honor" not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

71. Eggs-to-be : OOCYTES
An oocyte is an immature egg cell involved in reproduction.

75. Subject of a Fox hunt : IDOL
"American Idol" is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show "Pop Idol". I can't abide either program(me) ...

76. Excel function : SORT
Microsoft Excel is the spreadsheet program included in the Microsoft Office suite of applications. Microsoft’s first spreadsheet program was introduced back in 1982 and called “Multiplan”. Multiplan’s popularity waned due to the success of the competing product Lotus 1-2-3. Microsoft then introduced Excel, initially just for the Macintosh. When Excel was extended to Windows, Lotus was slow to respond and Microsoft took over the market.

79. ___-Locka, Fla. : OPA
Opa-Locka is a rather interesting city in Florida. Opa-Locka is located near Miami, and has a themed city plan that is based on “One Thousand and One Nights”. The city hall has a very Arabian look, and some examples of street names are Ali Baba Avenue and Sesame Street.

88. Carrier to Tokyo : ANA
All Nippon Airways (ANA) is a Japanese airline, second in size only to Japan Airlines (JAL).

89. End of an era? : -ZOIC
The suffix “-zoic” is used in the names of geological eras. The term comes from teh Greek “zoikos” meaning “life”.

91. III : IOTAS
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. Upper case iota looks like our capital letter “I”, and lowercase iota looks like our lowercase “i”, but without the dot. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

92. Textile patented in 1894 : RAYON
Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

100. Flowering tropical plant : CANNA
The Canna is a genus of flowering plant that is sometimes called the canna lily, even though it isn’t actually a true lily. The name “Canna” comes from the Latin for “cane, reed”.

101. Spartacus, at one time : SLAVE
Spartacus was a gladiator and slave who became a leader in the Third Servile War, the last in a series of unsuccessful slave rebellions against the Roman Republic. The Third Servile War is also called the Gladiator War and the War of Spartacus. Spartacus features in a 1951 historical novel by Howard Fast called “Spartacus”, which inspired the 1960 movie of the same name starring Kirk Douglas.

104. Northern passage : FJORD
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

106. Chain letters? : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

117. Where Indiana Jones reunites with Marion : NEPAL
Marion Ravenwood (played by Karen Allen) is the old flame of Indiana Jones’ (played by Harrison Ford) in the series of movies.

119. Paul who composed the "Tonight Show" theme : ANKA
Paul Anka wrote the theme tune for “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” in 1962. It was a reworking of a song that Anka had written earlier called “Toot Sweet”. “Toot Sweet” had also been rewritten as a song called “It’s Really Love” and recorded by Annette Funicello in 1959. If you listen to “It’s Really Love”, you can see the similarity with “The Tonight Show” theme.

Down
1. "This guy walks into ___ ..." : A BAR
So a man walks into a bar and says to the bartender, "Give me 12 shots of your most expensive Tequila!" The bartender pours the shots and lines them up. The guy starts shooting them back really quickly, one right after another. The bartender says in shock, "Why are you drinking those so fast?!" The guy stops long enough to get out a few words, "You would drink these fast too, if you had what I have" Confused, the bartender asks, "Why? what do you have?" The guy says, "About four dollars" ...

2. Fictional villain whose given name is Julius : DR NO
"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu.

8. Golfer ___ Pak : SE-RI
Se-Ri Pak is a South Korean golfer playing on the LPGA tour. Having a Korean name, we really should be calling her Pak Se-Ri as she is known in her homeland. Korean names always start with the family name.

9. Some OT enders : TDS
In football, overtime (OT) might end with a touchdown (TD).

10. Mao adversary : CHIANG
Chiang Kai-Shek was the leader of the Nationalist Movement in China right through to the end of WWII. The Nationalists lost out in a Civil War to the Communists backed by the Soviet Union after war, and Chiang Kai-Shek and his government were forced to flee to Taiwan. Chiang Kai-shek claimed rule over China from Taiwan until his death in 1975.

17. Washington attraction : MALL
The National Mall is a park in downtown Washington, D.C. The National Mall is home to several museums that are part of the Smithsonian, as well as the National Gallery of Art.

18. English glam-rock band with six #1 hits : SLADE
Slade was a favorite band from my youth, a rock band from the north of England who made it big during the seventies. One of Slade’s hallmark marketing techniques was a deliberate misspelling of their song titles. Some of those titles are: “Merry Xmas Everybody”, “Gudbuy T’Jane” and my personal favorite “Cum On Feel the Noize”.

25. Armored, as a horse : BARDED
Barding is defensive armor for horses that was used in the late Middle Ages.

28. Asian capital known as the City of Lakes : HANOI
Hanoi was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City.

31. Astronaut's woe, perhaps : ITCH
I guess an astronaut in a spacesuit would find an itch somewhat frustrating …

36. Refuse at the polling station : CHADS
We are all familiar with "hanging chads" after the famous Florida election recounts of 2000. A chad is any piece of paper punched out from a larger sheet. So, those round bits of paper we've all dropped over the floor when emptying a hole punch, they're chads.

37. Old Hollywood's ___ Code : HAYS
The Motion Picture Production Code that was in place from 1930 to 1968 was named for Presbyterian elder Will H. Hays. Hays was hired by the movie studios to help clean up Hollywood’s image after several scandals had hit the industry. The actual list of standards was drawn up by Catholic layman Martin Quigley and Jesuit priest Father Daniel A. Lord in 1929, but the code still came to bear the name of Will Hays.

40. British guns : STENS
The STEN gun is an iconic armament that was used by the British military. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun's designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

47. Pieces in the game Othello : DISCS
The game called Reversi is also sold as Othello. The name Othello was chosen as a nod to the play by William Shakespeare.

48. Certain Endorian : EWOK
The Ewoks are creatures who live on the moon of Endor, first appearing in "Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi". They're the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

58. Bubkes : NIL
“Bupkis” (also “bubkes”) is a word that means “absolutely nothing, nothing of value”, and is of Yiddish origin.

59. O'Connor successor : ALITO
Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Sandra Day O’Connor is a former Associate justice on the US Supreme Court. O’Connor was the first woman appointed to the court, and was in office from 1981 after being appointed by President Reagan. As the court became more conservative she was viewed as the swing vote in many decisions. As a result, O’Connor was known as one of the most powerful women in the world. She retired in 2006 (replaced by Samuel Alito), and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009.

60. Bilge : ROT
The bilge is lowest internal part of a ship. The water that collects in there is called bilge water. The term “bilge” is also used as slang for nonsense talk.

61. "Butterfly" actress, 1982 : ZADORA
Pia Zadora is an American actress and singer. Zadora's most famous role was in the 1982 film "Butterfly" in which she worked with Orson Welles and Stacey Keach. The film was based on the novel "The Butterfly" by James M. Cain and deals with the difficult subject of father-daughter incest.

62. ___ cit. (footnote abbr.) : LOC
Loc. cit. is short for "loco citato" meaning "in the place cited". Loc. cit. is used in a footnote instead of op. cit. as it refers not only to a prior work, but also to the same page in that work.

64. Mexican bear : OSO
In Spanish, "osa" is a female bear, and "oso" is a male.

67. Rice ___ : PILAF
“Pilaf” is a Persian word, and we use it to describe rice that is browned in oil and then cooked in a seasoned broth.

68. Hersey novel locale : ADANO
"A Bell for Adano" is a novel written by John Hersey. Hersey's story is about an Italian-American US Army officer, Major Joppolo, who found a replacement for a town's bell stolen by fascists. "A Bell for Adano" was made into a film in 1945, the same year the novel won a Pulitzer.

72. Singer whose "I Get Ideas" was on the charts for 30 weeks : TONY MARTIN
Tony Martin was an actor and singer from San Francisco. Martin’s second wife was actress and singer Cyd Charisse.

73. Its icon is Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

81. Some oxygen molecules : OZONES
Ozone gets its name from the Greek word ozein, meaning "to smell". It was given this name as ozone's formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas's distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms, whereas a “normal” oxygen has just two atoms.

95. Ancient Macedonian capital : EDESSA
The Greek city of Edessa is in the Central Macedonian region of the country. Edessa was the ancient capital of Macedon, and home to fabled King Midas.

96. Stonehenge feature : LINTEL
A lintel is a structural beam that spans an opening in a wall, usually a door or a window.

The magnificent Stonehenge monument in the south of England was built from 3000 to 2000 BC. “Stonehenge” has given its name to “henges”, a whole class of earthenwork monuments that are circular in form with an internal ditch surrounded by a bank. Paradoxically, Stonehenge doesn’t qualify as a henge by this contemporary definition, as its earthen bank is surrounded by an external ditch.

100. Chewed stimulants : COCAS
The coca plant is native to South America, similar in appearance to a blackthorn bush. Coca leaves have been chewed for centuries, perhaps even as far back as 3,000 years ago. Chewing the leaves apparently produces a pleasurable, numb sensation in the mouth and a pleasant taste. The most famous alkaloid in the leaf is cocaine, but this wasn't extracted in its pure form until the mid-1800s. The cocaine was used in a medicines and tonics and other beverages, including the original version of Coca-Cola! Before 1903, a glass of Coke would contain about 9 mg of cocaine. Coca-Cola still uses coca leaves, as the flavor is prized, but the cocaine is extracted before it arrives at the bottling plant.

103. With 105-Down, some amphorae : WINE
105. See 103-Down : JUGS
An amphora is a ceramic vase with two handles on either side of a long neck. The name "amphora" is Latin, coming from the Greek meaning "on both sides of the carrier", referring to the two carrying handles.

111. West ___ (upscale furniture store) : ELM
West Elm is an upscale furniture store that is owned by Williams-Sonoma. The chain was founded in 2002.

112. Actress Gardner : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of "Mogambo" (1953), "On the Beach" (1959), "The Night of the Iguana" (1964) and "Earthquake" (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Interjects : ADDS
5. Pass off : FOIST
10. Pianist Schumann, early champion of Brahms : CLARA
15. Certain servers : IBMS
19. Focused on one's fellow fraternity members? : BRO-MINDED (from “broad-minded”)
21. Egyptian war god : HORUS
22. Fast break? : MEAL
23. Workers in booths : ANNOUNCERS
24. Dublin dance? : IRISH BALL (from “Irish ballad”)
26. Pooh's baby friend : ROO
27. King Abdullah, e.g. : SAUDI
28. Like a desert climate : HARSH
29. Like circus tumblers : AGILE
30. What may come with a trophy : TITLE
32. "Shut up!" : CAN IT!
33. Like the Head Start program, for short : PRE-K
34. African flier : TSETSE
36. What Clark Kent needs to become Superman? : CHANGE OF DRESS (from “change of address”)
41. Response to a gotcha : WINCE
42. One-named chanteuse : CHARO
43. Dry : SERE
44. Julius Wilbrand invention of 1863, for short : TNT
45. Somewhat bashful? : ON THE SHY SIDE (from “on the shady side”)
49. Article of papal attire : RED SHOE
51. ___ spot : AGE
52. Red alert source? : TASS
53. Uncommon cry after a lottery drawing : I WIN!
55. Oscar winner who was formerly a regular on TV's "Laugh-In" : HAWN
56. Fine wool sources : MERINOS
59. Firing offense? : ARSON
61. Polish capital : ZLOTYS
63. Local afternoon newscast? : FIVE O'CLOCK SHOW (from “five o’clock shadow”)
67. Sentence ender, maybe : PAROLE
70. Execs : SUITS
71. Eggs-to-be : OOCYTES
75. Subject of a Fox hunt : IDOL
76. Excel function : SORT
77. "I'm f-f-freezing!" : BRRR!
79. ___-Locka, Fla. : OPA
80. Show, as cards in gin rummy : LAY DOWN
83. Business offering the right to buy and sell securities? : OPTION AGENCY (from “adoption agency”)
88. Carrier to Tokyo : ANA
89. End of an era? : -ZOIC
91. III : IOTAS
92. Textile patented in 1894 : RAYON
93. How to find what a creep is looking at? : FOLLOW THE LEER (from “follow the leader”)
97. Become fond of : WARM TO
98. Ones bowled over? : PINS
99. What Microsoft Word's Track Changes shows : EDITS
100. Flowering tropical plant : CANNA
101. Spartacus, at one time : SLAVE
103. Itsy-bitsy : WEENY
104. Northern passage : FJORD
106. Chain letters? : RNA
109. Says "I didn't do it!" before fessing up? : LIES FIRST (from “ladies first”)
111. Clarifies : ELUCIDATES
113. Fibula : leg :: ___ : arm : ULNA
114. Taken : IN USE
115. Cigarettes or booze? : LEGAL VICE (from “legal advice”)
116. Conclude in court : REST
117. Where Indiana Jones reunites with Marion : NEPAL
118. Overly involved : MESSY
119. Paul who composed the "Tonight Show" theme : ANKA

Down
1. "This guy walks into ___ ..." : A BAR
2. Fictional villain whose given name is Julius : DR NO
3. "Wrong way" : DO NOT ENTER
4. Prefix with masochistic : SADO-
5. One may be grand : FINALE
6. Perfectly timed : ON CUE
7. Fingered : IDED
8. Golfer ___ Pak : SE-RI
9. Some OT enders : TDS
10. Mao adversary : CHIANG
11. Country singer Morgan : LORRIE
12. Blue bloods, informally : ARISTOS
13. "A.S.A.P.!" : RUSH!
14. Bit of air pollution : ASH
15. Digicam component : IMAGER
16. "Well, fine" : BE LIKE THAT
17. Washington attraction : MALL
18. English glam-rock band with six #1 hits : SLADE
20. Essential, in a way : MUST-SEE
25. Armored, as a horse : BARDED
28. Asian capital known as the City of Lakes : HANOI
31. Astronaut's woe, perhaps : ITCH
32. Sleeper and others : CARS
33. Father : PADRE
34. When D.S.T. starts or ends : TWO AM
35. Burn a little : SINGE
36. Refuse at the polling station : CHADS
37. Old Hollywood's ___ Code : HAYS
38. Leaves in a waiting room? : FERN
39. Flaky? : SNOWY
40. British guns : STENS
42. Climax of many an action film : CHASE
46. Hot pot spot : STOVE
47. Pieces in the game Othello : DISCS
48. Certain Endorian : EWOK
50. Flamboyant : SHOWY
54. Connections : INS
57. Poker resignation : I FOLD
58. Bubkes : NIL
59. O'Connor successor : ALITO
60. Bilge : ROT
61. "Butterfly" actress, 1982 : ZADORA
62. ___ cit. (footnote abbr.) : LOC
64. Mexican bear : OSO
65. Band-Aid competitor : CURAD
66. Orchestra section : HORNS
67. Rice ___ : PILAF
68. Hersey novel locale : ADANO
69. Major annoyances : ROYAL PAINS
72. Singer whose "I Get Ideas" was on the charts for 30 weeks : TONY MARTIN
73. Its icon is Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
74. Decline : SAY NO
76. Pique activity? : SNIT
77. Quick snack : BITE
78. Sound of approval : ROAR
81. Some oxygen molecules : OZONES
82. Bowls over : WOWS
84. High fidelity? : PIETY
85. Ugly ones : TOADS
86. Pop's pop : GRANDDAD
87. Make : EARN
90. "Things aren't so bad" : CHEER UP
94. Occupy : LIVE AT
95. Ancient Macedonian capital : EDESSA
96. Stonehenge feature : LINTEL
97. With caution : WARILY
100. Chewed stimulants : COCAS
101. Potential libel : SLUR
102. Scoop (out) : LADLE
103. With 105-Down, some amphorae : WINE
104. Scoot : FLEE
105. See 103-Down : JUGS
107. Head turner : NECK
108. Between ports : ASEA
110. Cod piece : FIN
111. West ___ (upscale furniture store) : ELM
112. Actress Gardner : AVA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1129-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 14, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … ANSONIA (Antonia), BLINDER (plinder), ENSOR (Entor), DRIBS (drips)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

17. Like one of Brunei's two main languages : MALAYAN
The official name of Brunei is the Nation of Brunei, the Abode of Peace. Brunei is situated in the island of Borneo, almost completely surrounded by Malaysia. Brunei's government is dictated by the constitution adopted in 1959, and is ruled by a sultan with full executive authority. The main language spoken in the country is “Melayu Brunei” (Brunei Malay), with the official language being Malay. Apparently Malay and Brunei Malay are quite different from each other, with native speakers finding it difficult to understand each other.

21. Boobs : TWITS
"Twit" is a word not used very often here in America. It's a slang term that was quite common in England where it was used for "someone foolish and idiotic".

22. Continental Congress delegate from Connecticut : DEANE
Silas Deane was a member of the Continental Congress. When Deane was dispatched to Paris by the Congress, he became America's first foreign diplomat. His amazing story is told in Joel Richard Paul's book called "Unlikely Allies".

24. Onetime host of CBS's "The Morning Show" : PAAR
Jack Paar was most famous as the host of “The Tonight Show”, from 1957 to 1962. When he died in 2004, “Time” magazine wrote that Paar was “the fellow who split talk show history into two eras: Before Paar and Below Paar”. Very complimentary …

“The Morning Show” was CBS’s first attempt at a morning show. “The Morning Show” launched with Walter Cronkite at the helm, followed by hosts Jack Paar and Dick Van Dyke. However, the show was pulled in 1956.

29. Alternative to quotes: Abbr. : ITAL
Italic type leans to the right. The style is known as "italic" because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

30. Cry at a revival : I’M SAVED!
A “revival meeting” is a service in the Christian tradition that is held to provide inspiration to church members, or to gain converts.

37. She played Wallis Simpson in "The King's Speech" : EVE BEST
Eve Best is an actress from London who perhaps is best known for playing Wallis Simpson in the marvelous 2010 film “The King’s Speech”.

“The King’s Speech” is a wonderful, wonderful 2010 film about King George VI and his efforts to overcome his speech impediment. Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter all do fabulous jobs playing the lead characters. It is an independent film, so was made with a relatively low budget of $15 million, but grossed almost $400 million at box offices worldwide. It is the most successful British independent film of all time.

38. But, in Bonn : ABER
After WWII, Bonn was chosen as the capital of West Germany, a choice promoted by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer who was from the area. After German reunification, the capital was moved to Berlin.

39. Be a Debbie Downer : MOPE
“Debbie Downer” is a slang phrase describing someone who knows how to bring down the mood. There was a character on “Saturday Night Live” who took the name Debbie Downer, played by comic actress Rachel Dratch.

41. "King ___" of old comics : AROO
“King Aroo” was a comic strip that ran from 1950 until 1965. King Aroo rules over a land called Myopia.

43. Boxer who won 1980's Brawl in Montreal : DURAN
Roberto Durán is a retired professional boxer from Panama. He earned the nickname “Manos de Piedra” (Hands of Stone) during his very successful career. Durán retired in 2001 after being involved in a car crash which required life-saving surgery.

44. Grammy-nominated Franklin and others : ERMAS
Erma Franklin was an R&B and gospel singer. She was the elder sister of Aretha Franklin. Erma toured with Aretha for a while, and even recorded backup vocals on her sister's big hit "Respect".

51. Historic residential hotel in Manhattan : ANSONIA
The Ansonia building in the Upper West Side of New York City was opened as a residential hotel in 1904, and in fact was the first air-conditioned hotel in the whole city. Former residents of the Ansonia include Babe Ruth, Arturo Toscanini, Igor Stravinsky and Enrico Caruso.

52. Part of a 14-Down's harness : BLINDER
The piece of horse tack known as blinkers are also called blinders. Blinkers prevent a horse viewing what’s to the rear and to the side.

55. Spray on a dress : CORSAGE
“Corsage” is a word we imported from French in the late 15th century. Back then we used it to mean “the size of the body”. By the early 1800s a corsage was a bodice, or the body of a woman’s dress. At the beginning of the 20th century, the French term “bouquet de corsage” was being used for a “bouquet worn on the bodice”, and this has been shortened simply to “corsage”.

Down
3. Small unit of atmospheric pressure : MILLIBAR
An isobar is a line on a weather map connecting points of equal barometric pressure. A “bar” is a unit of atmospheric pressure that is almost equal to the atmospheric pressure at sea level.

5. Kings of León : REYES
In Spanish, kings (reyes) rule.

León is a province in the autonomous community of Castile and León in the northwest of Spain. The province’s capital is the city of León, which was founded as Roman military encampment around 29 BC.

7. Payroll dept. info : SSNS
Social security number (SSN)

12. Principal lieutenant of Hector in the "Iliad" : AENEAS
Aeneas was a Trojan who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of all Romans. Aeneas’s story is told in Virgil’s epic poem “The Aeneid”.

13. Portable heater : STERNO
Sterno is a very useful product, a "jellied alcohol" that usually comes in a can. The can is opened and the contents burn very easily and persistently. The brand name "Sterno" comes from the original manufacturer, S. Sternau & Co. of Brooklyn, New York.

25. Formless life form : AMEBA
An ameba (or "amoeba" as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek "amoibe", meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

26. Bloom in Robert Frost's "A Late Walk" : ASTER
The wonderful poet Robert Frost was a native of San Francisco, but lived most of life in New England. He also spent a few years in England, just before WWI. Frost was well recognized for his work during his lifetime, and received four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry.

Here is Robert Frost’s poem “A Late Walk”.
When I go up through the mowing field,
The headless aftermath,
Smooth-laid like thatch with the heavy dew,
Half closes the garden path.

And when I come to the garden ground,
The whir of sober birds
Up from the tangle of withered weeds
Is sadder than any words

A tree beside the wall stands bare,
But a leaf that lingered brown,
Disturbed, I doubt not, by my thought,
Comes softly rattling down.

I end not far from my going forth
By picking the faded blue
Of the last remaining aster flower
To carry again to you.

27. Nickname in the Best Picture of 1969 : RATSO
Enrico Salvatore “Ratso” Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man, played by Dustin Hoffman.

31. Block from the White House : VETO
"Veto" comes directly from Latin and means "I forbid". The word was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

34. Enthusiasm shown during a 2008 race : OBAMANIA
“Obamania” was a word coined for the enthusiasm expressed for then-presidential candidate Barack Obama in the 2008 election.

36. Olympic sport that includes passades and pirouettes : DRESSAGE
The equestrian sport of dressage involves demonstration of how well as horse responds to training. “Dressage” is a French word meaning “training”.

39. Food whose name means "little purée" : MUESLI
"Muesli" is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. “Muesli” is a diminutive of the German word “Mues” meaning “puree”. Delicious ...

44. "Masks Confronting Death" painter, 1888 : ENSOR
James Ensor was a Belgian painter active in the first half of the twentieth century. Endor was noted for his influence on the expressionists and surrealists.

46. "No ___ think is in my tree" ("Strawberry Fields Forever" lyric) : ONE I
“Strawberry Fields Forever" is a fabulous song by John Lennon and Paul McCartney that was recorded by the Beatles in 1967. Strawberry Field was a children’s home run by the Salvation Army that was located near to where John Lennon lived as a child.

47. Michael who played Worf on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" : DORN
in the television series “Star Trek: The Next Generation”, Mr. Worf is one of the main characters. Work is a Klingon officer on the Enterprise, and is played by Michael Dorn. Worf is a unique character in the “Star Trek” franchise in that he also appeared regularly in another “Star Trek” show: “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine”.

48. Like Italian "bread," e.g.: Abbr. : MASC
The Italian word for “the bread” is “il pane”, so “pane” is a masculine noun.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Likes a lot : ADMIRES
8. It's not to be believed : HOGWASH
15. Ones clearing for takeoff? : DEICERS
16. O.K. : AGREE TO
17. Like one of Brunei's two main languages : MALAYAN
18. Less experienced : GREENER
19. It might give you a headache : ILLNESS
20. Hunting party? : SEEKERS
21. Boobs : TWITS
22. Continental Congress delegate from Connecticut : DEANE
23. Quads, e.g. : SIBS
24. Onetime host of CBS's "The Morning Show" : PAAR
28. "___ doing ..." : IN SO
29. Alternative to quotes: Abbr. : ITAL
30. Cry at a revival : I’M SAVED!
32. Something not found in this puzzle's answer : THREE-LETTER WORD
37. She played Wallis Simpson in "The King's Speech" : EVE BEST
38. But, in Bonn : ABER
39. Be a Debbie Downer : MOPE
41. "King ___" of old comics : AROO
42. Height of fashion : RAGE
43. Boxer who won 1980's Brawl in Montreal : DURAN
44. Grammy-nominated Franklin and others : ERMAS
45. Giant with a big trunk : REDWOOD
48. Flunkies : MENIALS
50. "Let me repeat: Forget it!" : I SAID NO!
51. Historic residential hotel in Manhattan : ANSONIA
52. Part of a 14-Down's harness : BLINDER
53. Putting away : STORING
54. Registers : SINKS IN
55. Spray on a dress : CORSAGE

Down
1. Comes clean : ADMITS IT
2. Handle : DEAL WITH
3. Small unit of atmospheric pressure : MILLIBAR
4. Insomniac's lament : I CAN’T SLEEP A WINK
5. Kings of León : REYES
6. Noteworthy times : ERAS
7. Payroll dept. info : SSNS
8. Fairy tale figures : HAGS
9. Fairy tale figure : OGRE
10. Less likely to give : GREEDIER
11. They play hard on Saturday and Sunday : WEEKEND WARRIORS
12. Principal lieutenant of Hector in the "Iliad" : AENEAS
13. Portable heater : STERNO
14. You can bet on it : HORSE
24. Mount, with "up" : PILE
25. Formless life form : AMEBA
26. Bloom in Robert Frost's "A Late Walk" : ASTER
27. Nickname in the Best Picture of 1969 : RATSO
31. Block from the White House : VETO
33. They're 50-50 : EVEN ODDS
34. Enthusiasm shown during a 2008 race : OBAMANIA
35. Wining and dining : REGALING
36. Olympic sport that includes passades and pirouettes : DRESSAGE
39. Food whose name means "little purée" : MUESLI
40. Transition to fatherhood : ORDAIN
43. Tiny amounts : DRIBS
44. "Masks Confronting Death" painter, 1888 : ENSOR
46. "No ___ think is in my tree" ("Strawberry Fields Forever" lyric) : ONE I
47. Michael who played Worf on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" : DORN
48. Like Italian "bread," e.g.: Abbr. : MASC
49. Inside opening? : ENTO-


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1128-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Nov 14, Friday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tracy Gray
THEME: Black Friday … we have a rebus puzzle today, which is unusual for a Friday. It’s BLACK FRIDAY, so we have a SALE in several squares (represented by “SA..” in my grid).
56A. Time of annual madness ... or a hint to four squares in this puzzle : BLACK FRIDAY

17A. Christian symbol used during the Crusades : JERUSALEM CROSS
34A. Many an informative tweet : NEWS ALERT
39A. Early Stephen King thriller : SALEM’S LOT
64A. Big Sur institute : ESALEN
10D. Cracks, as piping : SPRINGS A LEAK
18D. Italian port on the Tyrrhenian Sea : SALERNO
30D. Mother of the Freedom Movement, to friends : ROSA LEE PARKS
50D. Water : ADAM’S ALE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 34m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Gaping opening : MAW
“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

15. "Easy Rider" ride : HARLEY
The Harley-Davidson motorcycle company was started up in the very early 1900s by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson, . Their first design was in effect an engine hooked up to a pedal bicycle, but the 116 cc cylinder capacity simply couldn't generate enough power to get up the hills of their native city of Milwaukee. The pair came up with a redesigned model that had a cylinder capacity of 405 cc, which the partners built in a shed at the back of Davidson's house. In 1906, the partners built their first factory, located where the company's headquarters is to this day, on Juneau Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

"Easy Rider" is a 1969 movie about two bikers traversing the American Southwest and the South. The bikers are famously played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper, who also co-wrote the screenplay. Fonda produced the film and Hopper directed.

17. Christian symbol used during the Crusades : JERUSALEM CROSS
The Jerusalem Cross is also called the Crusaders’ Cross. At the center of the design is a cross potent, a heraldic cross with crossbars at the four ends. There are also four smaller Greek crosses in each quadrant of the large cross in the center. The design comes from the coat of arms of Godfrey of Bouillon during the First Crusade.

19. Coastal feature : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

21. Bit of electric guitar play : HOT LICK
A “lick” is a musical phrase, one often played during an improvised solo in the jazz and rock styles. A “lick” differs from a “riff” in that riffs can include chord progressions whereas licks are usually single-note melodies.

24. Trading insider Boesky : IVAN
Ivan Boesky Wall Street trader who was found guilty of insider trading and served two years in prison. His sentence was a lot lighter than it could have been, as he cooperated with the authorities and informed on others. Boesky partly inspired the character Gordon Gekko played by Michael Douglas in the 1987 movie “Wall Street”. Boesky used the words “I think greed is healthy. You can be greedy and still feel good about yourself" in a speech delivered in 1986. Gekko said “greed -- for lack of a better word -- is good. Greed is right. Greed works.”

27. Results of refrigerator raids : NOSHES
Our word "nosh" has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word "nashn" meaning "to nibble".

34. Many an informative tweet : NEWS ALERT
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so (but one should never say “never”). Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

35. Wordsworth's "___: Intimations of Immortality" : ODE
“Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood” is a 1804 poem by by English poet William Wordsworth. That said, the first part of the poem was written in 1802, completed in 1804, and then first published in 1807.

36. New England architectural style : CAPE COD
The Cape Cod architectural style is relatively simple. Cape Cod cottages often have a story and a half, with a steep roof and end gables. There is a distinctive single chimney at the center of the roof. The front door is also place centrally in the wall.

38. Best effort : ALL
Give it your best effort, give it your all.

39. Early Stephen King thriller : ‘SALEM’S LOT
Stephen King's "’Salem's Lot" was published in 1975, his second novel. It belongs to the horror genre, so you won't catch me reading it. The title refers to the Maine town of Jerusalem’s Lot, or ‘Salem’s Lot for short. There's an interesting story about the actual publication of the first edition. The intended price of $8.95 was changed at the last minute to $7.95, but not all the price changes were made before release. A few copies "escaped" with the dust cover marked $8.95, and they are now worth a lot of money. Go check your bookshelves ...

41. Charles, for one : ROI
Charles I was king ("roi" in French) of the Franks from 768 to 800. He was known as "Charles the Great" or , more famously, Charlemagne.

42. Ball opener? : SKEE
Skee Ball is that arcade game where you roll balls up a ramp trying to "bounce" it into rings for varying numbers of points. The game was first introduced in Philadelphia, in 1909.

43. Gulf of Aqaba resort city : EILAT
Eilat (sometimes “Elat”) the most southerly city in Israel, sitting right at the northern tip of the Red Sea, on the Gulf of Aqaba.

44. "... And God Created Woman" actress : BARDOT
Brigitte Bardot is a former model and actress, as well as a noted animal rights activist. Perhaps her best known screen performance is in the 1956 French film “...And God Created Woman" that was directed by her then husband, Roger Vadim.

46. Its highest possible score is 240, for short : PSAT
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

48. Space blanket material : MYLAR
Mylar is a brand name for a polyester film with many uses, one of which is to make reflective surfaces. Mylar can be used to make reflective solar sails, which are a fascinating form of spacecraft propulsion. Believe it or not, reflecting photons of light each provide a small amount of thrust, and enough of them can propel an object in the vacuum of space.

A “space blanket” is a very light-weight and thin blanket made from a thin sheet of Mylar. Space blankets are often used in emergencies as the Mylar gives a very reflective surface, which serves to reduce heat loss from the body. Hikers can also use the blanket to reflect the sun as a signal in an emergency situation.

52. St. Francis of Assisi, for one : ASCETIC
St. Francis founded the Franciscan religious order in Assisi in 1208. He died in 1226, and was declared a saint just two years later in 1228. Construction of the Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi started immediately after the canonization, and finished 25 years later. The Basilica is now a United Nations World Heritage Site.

54. Chain owned by Wyndham Worldwide : RAMADA
A ramada is a shelter, with a rook and no walls, mainly found in the American southwest. Nowadays, the shelter can be temporary or permanent, but originally ramadas were makeshift shelters constructed by aboriginal Indians from branches or bushes.

55. Hit animated film of 2011 : RIO
“Rio” is a 2011 animated movie about a male blue macaw who is brought to mate with a female blue macaw in Rio de Janeiro, hence the movie’s title. Fans can go see “Rio 2” that was released in 2014.

56. Time of annual madness ... or a hint to four squares in this puzzle : BLACK FRIDAY
In the world of retail, “Black Friday” is the day after Thanksgiving in the US. Black Friday is when many stores start the holiday shopping season, and so offer deep discounts to get ahead of the competition.

59. Colorful carp : KOI
Koi are also called Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

61. Falsetto-voiced Muppet : ELMO
The man behind/under the character Elmo on “Sesame Street” is Kevin Clash. If you want to learn more about Elmo and Clash, you can watch the 2011 documentary “Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey”.

62. It has many famous alums : SNL
The list of successful alums of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) includes, to name but a few:
- Tina Fey
- Robert Downey Jr.
- Eddie Murphy
- Billy Crystal
- Chevy Chase

64. Big Sur institute : ESALEN
Esalen is a retreat centre in Big Sur, California that was opened in 1962. The center is located on the coast, about 50 miles south of Monterey. It takes its name from the Esselen Native American tribe that once lived in the area where the institute is located.

Down
2. Singer who was awarded an M.B.E. in 2013 : ADELE
The English singer Adele Adkins goes by the stage name "Adele". Adele describes her musical style as “heartbroken soul”. Not too long ago, Adele wrote and performed the theme song for the latest James Bond film, “Skyfall”.

4. Ordinary guy: Var. : SHMO
“Schmo” (also “shmo”) is American slang for a dull or boring person, from the Yiddish word “shmok”.

5. XXX part : TAC
When I was growing up in Ireland we played "noughts and crosses" ... our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

7. Warm greetings? : ALOHAS
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

8. Unstable physics particle : MESON
A meson is an unstable subatomic particle, made up of one quark and one antiquark.

11. "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" author : ERIC CARLE
Eric Carle is a very successful children’s author and book illustrator, with over 100 million of his books sold around the world. Carle’s most famous title is “The Very Hungry Caterpillar”, and it alone has sold 30 million copies.

18. Italian port on the Tyrrhenian Sea : SALERNO
Salerno is a port city on the southwest coast of Italy. In WWII, after the Italians negotiated a peace treaty with the Allies in 1943, the King of Italy relocated to Salerno from Rome. The new Italian government was set up in the city, and for a few months Salerno was “capital” of the country.

The Tyrrhenian Sea is that part of the Mediterranean that lies off the west coast of Italy. It is bounded on the north and east by the Italian mainland, on the west by the large islands of Corsica and Sardinia, and on the south by Sicily.

22. Theater magnate Marcus : LOEW
Marcus Loew was a New Yorker, born into a poor Jewish family. He started out in a penny arcade business and used its profits to buy into a nickelodeon. He built a whole chain of movie theaters, and then moved into the production of films so that he could guarantee supply of features that he could show in his theaters. Eventually he pulled together the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film production company, and sadly passed away just three years after he inked the deal.

24. "Come hungry. Leave happy" sloganeer : IHOP
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn't do too well in marketing tests ...

30. Mother of the Freedom Movement, to friends : ROSA LEE PARKS
Rosa Parks was one of a few brave women in days gone by who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white woman. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda.

32. Electrical transformer : TESLA COIL
A Tesla coil is used to create the high voltages needed to ionize air in those pyrotechnic shows where sparks jump from globe to globe. The same technology was used up to the twenties in spark-gap radio transmitters which were central to wireless telegraphy back then. The Tesla coil is named after the physicist Nikola Tesla. Nikola Tesla was born in Serbia, but later moved to the US. His work on mechanical and electrical engineering was crucial to the development of alternating current technology, the same technology that is used by equipment at the backbone of modern power generation and distribution systems.

42. Stonewall, say : STYMIE
The word “stymie” comes from golf, and is a situation in which one’s approach to the hole is blocked by an opponent’s ball.

44. Tummy soother : BICARB
“Bicarb” is a familiar term for sodium bicarbonate. Another name for the same compound is “baking soda”. When sodium carbonate is added to a batter, it reacts with acids and releases carbon dioxide which gives baked goods texture, all those "holes".

45. Baseball All-Star Infante : OMAR
Omar Infante is a professional baseball player from Venezuela who plays with the Detroit Tigers.

47. Tolkien protagonist : BILBO
Bilbo Baggins is the main character in J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel "The Hobbit", and a supporting character his "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

50. Water : ADAM’S ALE
I suppose water was all that Adam had available to him to drink, so that's how the expression “Adam's ale” arose (I am guessing ... can't find anything definitive anywhere). The phrase “Adam’s Ale” makes a nice juxtaposition with "the demon drink"!

51. So-called "laboratory's first gift to the loom" : RAYON
Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

53. Way up? : T-BAR
A T-bar is a type of ski lift in which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There's also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

54. Country addresses, for short : RFDS
Rural Free Delivery (RFD) was started in the US in 1891. Prior to RFD, rural Americans had to travel to the nearest post office to pick up their mail.

58. "2 Broke Girls" actress Dennings : KAT
Kat Dennings is the stage name of actress Katherine Litwack, noted today for her co-starring role on CBS’s sitcom “2 Broke Girls”. Dennings is an avid blogger, and you can check out her video blog on YouTube.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Gaping opening : MAW
4. Tees off : STEAMS
10. Salon service : SET
13. Hoo-has : ADOS
15. "Easy Rider" ride : HARLEY
16. Beginning to mature? : PRE-
17. Christian symbol used during the Crusades : JERUSALEM CROSS
19. Coastal feature : RIA
20. Expert : OLD PRO
21. Bit of electric guitar play : HOT LICK
23. Epoxy, e.g. : RESIN
24. Trading insider Boesky : IVAN
26. Ages ago : ONCE
27. Results of refrigerator raids : NOSHES
29. Fathered : BEGAT
30. Prime or crime follower : RATE
33. Small amount of liquor : TOT
34. Many an informative tweet : NEWS ALERT
35. Wordsworth's "___: Intimations of Immortality" : ODE
36. New England architectural style : CAPE COD
38. Best effort : ALL
39. Early Stephen King thriller : ‘SALEM’S LOT
41. Charles, for one : ROI
42. Ball opener? : SKEE
43. Gulf of Aqaba resort city : EILAT
44. "... And God Created Woman" actress : BARDOT
46. Its highest possible score is 240, for short : PSAT
47. Jam : BIND
48. Space blanket material : MYLAR
52. St. Francis of Assisi, for one : ASCETIC
54. Chain owned by Wyndham Worldwide : RAMADA
55. Hit animated film of 2011 : RIO
56. Time of annual madness ... or a hint to four squares in this puzzle : BLACK FRIDAY
59. Colorful carp : KOI
60. One way to study : ABROAD
61. Falsetto-voiced Muppet : ELMO
62. It has many famous alums : SNL
63. Some NASA designs : ROBOTS
64. Big Sur institute : ESALEN

Down
1. Epic : MAJOR
2. Singer who was awarded an M.B.E. in 2013 : ADELE
3. An argument : WORDS
4. Ordinary guy: Var. : SHMO
5. XXX part : TAC
6. Misidentify, e.g. : ERR
7. Warm greetings? : ALOHAS
8. Unstable physics particle : MESON
9. Alphabetizing, e.g.: Abbr. : SYST
10. Cracks, as piping : SPRINGS A LEAK
11. "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" author : ERIC CARLE
12. It whistles while it works : TEAKETTLE
14. Flat on one's back : SUPINE
18. Italian port on the Tyrrhenian Sea : SALERNO
22. Theater magnate Marcus : LOEW
24. "Come hungry. Leave happy" sloganeer : IHOP
25. Expert : VETERAN
28. Assists, e.g. : STAT
29. Sack : BED
30. Mother of the Freedom Movement, to friends : ROSA LEE PARKS
31. What a ticket is good for : ADMISSION
32. Electrical transformer : TESLA COIL
34. Reason to be barred from a bar : NO ID
36. Simple 29-Down : COT
37. Part of a tennis net : CORD
40. One way to be running or working : LATE
42. Stonewall, say : STYMIE
44. Tummy soother : BICARB
45. Baseball All-Star Infante : OMAR
47. Tolkien protagonist : BILBO
49. Big dipper : LADLE
50. Water : ADAM’S ALE
51. So-called "laboratory's first gift to the loom" : RAYON
53. Way up? : T-BAR
54. Country addresses, for short : RFDS
57. Baby's sound : COO
58. "2 Broke Girls" actress Dennings : KAT


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1127-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Nov 14, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Stanley Newman
THEME: Thanksgiving Phrase … each of today’s themed answers goes with the clue “Thanksgiving phrase”, and is a phrase used in various languages to give thanks. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!
15A. Thanksgiving phrase : MUCHAS GRACIAS (Spanish)
51A. Thanksgiving phrase : MERCI BEAUCOUP (French)
16D. Thanksgiving phrase : GRAZIE MILLE (Italian)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 19s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. State south of Veracruz : OAXACA
Oaxaca is a state in the southern part of Mexico on the Pacific coast. The state takes the name of Oaxaca, its largest city.

14. Upwards of 170 beats per minute : PRESTO
On a musical score, presto is used to indicate a fast tempo. "Presto" is the Italian word for "quick".

17. Mario Vargas Llosa's home : PERU
Mario Vargas Llosa is a Peruvian writer of renown, one of the most significant authors from Latin America by all accounts. Llosa is also very active politically, and in 1990 ran unsuccessfully for the Peruvian presidency.

19. Somerhalder of "The Vampire Diaries" : IAN
Ian Somerhalder had his big break as an actor in the TV drama "Lost", and now has a part in TV's "The Vampire Diaries".

“The Vampire Diaries” is a series of horror novels aimed at teens, with a spinoff television series of the same name. I don’t do vampires …

21. Newcastle and others : ALES
Newcastle upon Tyne in the North of England is home to the famous Newcastle Brown Ale.

23. Sister of the grand duchess Anastasia : OLGA
The Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna was the eldest daughter of the doomed Nicholas and Alexandra, the last Emperor and Empress of Russia. Olga was murdered along with her parents and siblings in 1918.

The last ruler of Imperial Russia was Tsar Nicholas II (of the House of Romanov). Famously, the Tsar and his family were murdered in 1918 in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Russia by members of the Bolshevik secret police. The Tsar's youngest daughter was 16-year-old Anastasia and rumors of her escape have persisted for years. The rumors grew with the help of numerous women who claimed to be Anastasia. In 2009, DNA testing finally proved that the remains of all of the Tsar's immediate family, including Anastasia, have been found and identified.

27. ___ shooting : SKEET
There are three types of competitive shotgun target shooting sports:
- Skeet shooting
- Trap shooting
- Sporting clays

29. Parts of a Nativity scene : MAGI
"Magi" is the plural of the Latin word "magus", a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the "wise men from the East" who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born.

31. Highest-paid TV star of 2014, by far : JUDGE JUDY
Judge Judy of television fame is actually Judith Sheindlin, a retired family court judge from New York. Ms. Sheindlin reportedly earns $47 million per year for “Judge Judy”. That's a tad more than she was earning on the "real" bench, I think, and it makes her the highest-earning personality on television by a long shot.

36. "When You're Good to ___" ("Chicago" tune) : MAMA
The wonderful 1975 musical Broadway “Chicago” is based on a 1926 play of the same name written by a news reporter called Maurine Dallas Watkins. Watkins had been assigned to cover the murder trials of Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner for the “Chicago Tribune”, and used the story that unfolded as the basis for her play. Annan became the character Roxie Hart, and Gaertner became Velma Kelly. I’ve only ever seen the 2002 movie version of “Chicago” and never a live performance ...

37. Bit of honey, perhaps: Abbr. : TSP
Teaspoon (tsp.)

40. Classic diva performances? : POUTS
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

41. Minor inventions : FIBS
To "fib" is to "to tell a lie". The term likely comes from "fibble-fable" meaning "nonsense", itself derived from "fable".

42. Second-largest moon of Saturn : RHEA
Rhea is the second-largest of Saturn’s moons, and the ninth-largest of all the moons in our solar system. The moon is named after the Titan Rhea from Greek mythology. Unlike our moon, Rhea might have an atmosphere of sorts, and even rings.

47. Monster in the "Odyssey" : SCYLLA
Charybdis was a beautiful naiad, a water nymph of Greek mythology. Zeus became enraged with Charybdis and turned her into a sea monster. In Greek myth, the monstrous form of Charybdis lay at one side of a narrow channel of water, with another sea monster, Scylla, lying at the other. Sailors found it impossible to navigate the channel as getting to a safe distance from one monster left them in the clutches of the other. From this tale arose the expression “between Scylla and Charybdis” meaning having two choices, neither of which is a good one.

50. On the money : TO A T
The expression "to a T" can also be written as "to a tee", and has been around at least since 1693.

54. Eastern terminus of the Erie Canal : ALBANY
The Erie Canal runs from Albany to Buffalo in the state of New York. What the canal does is allow shipping to proceed from New York Harbor right up the Hudson River, through the canal and into the Great Lakes. When it was opened in 1825, the Erie Canal had immediate impact on the economy of New York City and locations along its route. It was the first means of "cheap" transportation from a port on the Atlantic seaboard into the interior of the United States. Arguably it was the most important factor contributing to the growth of New York City over competing ports such as Baltimore and Philadelphia. It was largely because of the Erie Canal that New York became such an economic powerhouse, earning it the nickname of "the Empire State". Paradoxically, one of the project’s main proponents was severely criticized. New York Governor DeWitt Clinton received so much ridicule that the canal was nicknamed “Clinton’s Folly” and “Clinton’s Ditch”.

55. Actual first name of Tom Seaver and Orson Welles : GEORGE
George Thomas “Tom” Seaver is a former baseball pitcher, noted for his ten-year stint with the New York Mets from 1967 to 1977. Seaver earned the nickname "Tom Terrific", and is the only Met player to have his jersey number retired. When he quit baseball he moved out here to California and opened up a small winery in Calistoga. Keep an eye out for the vineyard's name, "Seaver Family Vineyards", and their cabernets "Nancy's Fancy" and "GTS".

George Orson Welles (known as “Orson”) is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

57. Idlers : SLOTHS
"Sloth", meaning "indolence, sluggishness", comes from the Middle English word "slowe", the same root for our contemporary word "slow". The animal, the sloth, is named for its slow-moving behavior.

Down
1. Big citrus fruits : POMELOS
A pomelo is a very large, pear-shaped citrus fruit native to Southeast Asia.

2. Honors : LAURELS
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

5. Put one over on : SCAM
The slang term "scam" meaning a swindle may come from the British slang "scamp".

9. What bench presses enhance : PECS
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

10. Symbol for Freud's field : PSI
The Greek letter “psi” is used as a symbol for the fields of psychology and psychiatry.

Sigmund Freud was an Austrian neurologist, and founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychiatry.

11. Merchandiser that's never closed : E-TAILER
"E-tail" is the term used these days for online shopping. E-tail is often compared to regular shopping in the "real world" by juxtaposing it with a "brick and mortar" store.

20. Statistician Silver : NATE
Nate Silver is a statistician who first gained notoriety by developing a forecasting system that predicted the future performance of baseball players. He then made a name for himself in the world of politics by predicting the outcome of the 2008 US presidential race. Silver successfully predicted the outcome of the election in 49 of the 50 states, missing out on Indiana, which Barack Obama won by less than 1% of the vote.

26. Big name in boots : UGG
Uggs are sheepskin boots that originated in Australia and New Zealand. Uggs have sheepskin fleece on the inside for comfort and insulation, with a tanned leather surface on the outside for durability. Ugg is a generic term down under, although it’s a brand name here in the US.

31. Coffee sack material : JUTE
Jute is a very popular vegetable fiber, second only to cotton in terms of the amount produced. Jute fiber is also called hessian, and fabric made from jute can be called hessian cloth. In the US, cloth made from jute can be called burlap.

34. It meets the Shenandoah at Harper's Ferry : POTOMAC
Harpers Ferry is a town in West Virginia located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers. We tend to remember Harpers Ferry as the place where John Brown led a raid on a federal armory during the Civil War with the intent of arming slaves.

38. Clothing items with fringes : SERAPES
"Serape" is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word "zarape". A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a hole in the middle for the head. Most serapes have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

41. Visits by Voyager 1, e.g. : FLYBYS
NASA’s Voyager program launched two unmanned probes to explore the outer limits of our solar system. The probes were launched on different dates in 1977, with each date chosen to take advantage of particular alignments of the planets. The two probes are still active to some extent, and will be so for at least another decade. Voyager 1 is now the farthest man-made object from the Earth. In fact, Voyager 1 left our solar system in 2012, making it the first spacecraft to enter interstellar space. Cool …

47. Certain JPEG : SCAN
The JPEG file format was created by the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), hence the name.

An image file on a computer can be compressed so that it takes up less space. Some time the compression is "lossless" meaning even though the file is compressed, and data it is discarded, the image still looks the same. One example of data that can be discarded without loss of quality, is to not bother recording the color information of pixels that are the same color as others. Just saying "this pixel is the same is that one" takes up less space. One can compress files even more if one allows loss of quality. One well known compression algorithm that is "lossy" is the jpeg (also “.jpg”) format. The person compressing the file can decide how much quality will suffer in jpeg format, with larger files being of higher quality than the smaller ones.

49. Writer about Cro-Magnons and Neanderthals : AUEL
As Jean Auel prepared her first book in the “Earth’s Children” series, she did a lot of research about the Ice Age, the setting for her stories. She went as far as taking a survival course in cold conditions, learning to build an ice cave and how to make fire, tan leather and knap stone.

Remains of early man, dating back to 35,000 years ago, were found in Abri de Cro-Magnon in southwest France, giving the name to those early humans. Cro-Magnon remains are the oldest human relics that have been discovered in Europe.

The Homo genus includes the species Homo sapiens (modern humans), but we're the only species left in that genus. The last known species related to humans was Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal Man) which died off about 24,000 years ago. However, another species was discovered in Indonesia in 2003 that has been dubbed Homo floresiensis (Flores Man ... sometimes called "hobbit"), and it may possibly have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Watch this space ...

52. Hitter's stat : RBI
Runs batted in (RBI)

53. Corp. manager : COO
Chief operating officer (COO)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Kindly : PLEASE
7. Absorbed, with "up" : SOPPED
13. State south of Veracruz : OAXACA
14. Upwards of 170 beats per minute : PRESTO
15. Thanksgiving phrase : MUCHAS GRACIAS (Spanish)
17. Mario Vargas Llosa's home : PERU
18. Pluses : MERITS
19. Somerhalder of "The Vampire Diaries" : IAN
21. Newcastle and others : ALES
22. Absorbed : ATE
23. Sister of the grand duchess Anastasia : OLGA
24. Capacity : ROLE
25. [Wrong] : BUZZ!
27. ___ shooting : SKEET
28. Dangerous curve ahead, say : ESS
29. Parts of a Nativity scene : MAGI
30. Having roared too much, say : HOARSE
31. Highest-paid TV star of 2014, by far : JUDGE JUDY
33. Half of some partnerships : SPOUSE
36. "When You're Good to ___" ("Chicago" tune) : MAMA
37. Bit of honey, perhaps: Abbr. : TSP
40. Classic diva performances? : POUTS
41. Minor inventions : FIBS
42. Second-largest moon of Saturn : RHEA
43. Relative of -kin : -ETTE
44. Unkindly : ILL
45. Goes off : ERRS
46. Pigtails and ponytails : DOS
47. Monster in the "Odyssey" : SCYLLA
50. On the money : TO A T
51. Thanksgiving phrase : MERCI BEAUCOUP (French)
54. Eastern terminus of the Erie Canal : ALBANY
55. Actual first name of Tom Seaver and Orson Welles : GEORGE
56. Holds on : CLINGS
57. Idlers : SLOTHS

Down
1. Big citrus fruits : POMELOS
2. Honors : LAURELS
3. Pretext : EXCUSE
4. "That hits the spot" : AAH!
5. Put one over on : SCAM
6. Disburden : EASE
7. Bit of perfume : SPRITZ
8. Sermonize : ORATE
9. What bench presses enhance : PECS
10. Symbol for Freud's field : PSI
11. Merchandiser that's never closed : E-TAILER
12. Doctors' orders : DOSAGES
16. Thanksgiving phrase : GRAZIE MILLE (Italian)
17. Take a coat off : PARE
20. Statistician Silver : NATE
23. Word that can be a noun, verb, adjective, adverb or interjection : OKAY
25. Directed : BADE
26. Big name in boots : UGG
27. Word before bread or water : SODA
29. Tousle : MUSS
30. Operates perfectly : HUMS
31. Coffee sack material : JUTE
32. Skewer : JAB
33. Went like lightning : SPED
34. It meets the Shenandoah at Harper's Ferry : POTOMAC
35. Beat in the market : OUTSELL
37. Over and done with : THROUGH
38. Clothing items with fringes : SERAPES
39. Over and done with : PAST
41. Visits by Voyager 1, e.g. : FLYBYS
42. Counter with a sharp edge : RETORT
44. One use for marzipan : ICING
47. Certain JPEG : SCAN
48. Hangs back : LAGS
49. Writer about Cro-Magnons and Neanderthals : AUEL
52. Hitter's stat : RBI
53. Corp. manager : COO


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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