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0101-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jan 15, Thursday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jill Denny & Jeff Chen
THEME: Par for the Course … I have colored in three sections of the grid, each of which includes the letters PAR. We “TWO under PAR”, “ONE over PAR” and “ONE under PAR”. The equivalent terms for these three golf scores are EAGLE, BOGEY and BIRDIE. It is these golf terns that are used to make sense of the the three themed answers. Happy New Year, everyone!
15A. Belt and hose : CAR PARTS
17A. Neil Armstrong declaration : THE TWO HAS LANDED
= 17A. Neil Armstrong declaration : THE EAGLE HAS LANDED (TWO under PAR)

26A. What a parent might warn a child to watch out for : THE ONE MAN
32A. Bash with a splash : POOL PARTY
= 26A. What a parent might warn a child to watch out for : THE BOGEY MAN (ONE over PAR)

38A. Chutes and ladders locale : WATER PARK
42A. 1961 Tony winner for Best Musical : BYE BYE ONE
= 42A. 1961 Tony winner for Best Musical : BYE BYE BIRDIE (ONE under PAR)

53A. Average ... or a literal hint to 17-, 26- and 42-Across : PAR FOR THE COURSE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Kind of game or line : PICK-UP
A pick-up game is one that is started spontaneously by a group of players, with those competing usually just dropping by in the hope of participating.

17. Neil Armstrong declaration : THE EAGLE HAS LANDED (TWO under PAR)
We always seem to remember the phrase "The Eagle has landed", historic words spoken by Neil Armstrong when he put down Apollo 11's Lunar Excursion Module on the surface of the moon. Looking back I have to say that the words preceding "The Eagle has landed" seem to have even more impact. During the descent to the moon's surface Armstrong used the call sign "Eagle", indicating that he was communicating from the LEM. After he killed the engines on touching down, Armstrong's first words home to Earth were "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." That switch of call sign from "Eagle" to "Tranquility Base" always sends shivers down my spine ...

The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:
- Bogey: one over par
- Par
- Birdie: one under par
- Eagle: two under par
- Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
- Condor: four under par
No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

19. Film critic Jeffrey : LYONS
Jeffrey Lyons is a TV and film critic from New York City. Interestingly, Lyons spent three season training as a field goal kicker with the New York Giants, and spent seven summers studying bullfighting in Spain.

20. Part of a dovetail joint : TENON
One simple type of joint used in carpentry is a mortise and tenon, basically a projection carved at the end of one piece of wood that fits into a hole cut into the end of another. In a dovetail joint, the projecting tenon is not rectangular but is cut at a bias, so that when the dovetails are joined they resist being pulled apart. You'll see dovetail joints in drawers around the house.

21. Sub : HERO
"Hero" is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name "hero" was coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the "New York Herald Tribune" when he wrote that "one had to be a hero" to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

23. Seizure sensors, for short : EEGS
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is "brain dead".

26. What a parent might warn a child to watch out for : THE BOGEY MAN (ONE over PAR)
The term "Bogey" originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one-over-par (and not one-over-par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name Bogey came from a music hall song of the time "Here Comes the Bogey Man". In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be "playing against Colonel Bogey". Then, during WWI, the marching tune "Colonel Bogey" was written and named after the golfing term. If you don't recognize the name of the tune, it's the one that's whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie "The Bridge on the River Kwai".

35. Noir alternative : AU LAIT
Café au lait (“coffee with milk”) is usually strong, drip coffee to which one adds steamed milk. At least that's the way we tend to make in this country.

36. Part of a Spanish explorer's name : DE LEON
Juan Ponce de León was a famous Spanish explorer and conquistador. Ponce de León led the Europeans to Florida, and it was he who gave the state its name (Spanish for “Flowery Land”). He was injured on his last voyage to Florida, supposedly by a poisoned arrow, and died from his wound in Havana, Cuba.

37. "Funny Girl" composer : STYNE
Jule Styne was an English songwriter who made a name for himself in America with a series of popular musicals. Styne wrote a number of famous songs including “Don’t Rain on My Parade” from “Funny Girl”, “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” from “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, and “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” from “Gypsy”.

The movie "Funny Girl" stars Barbra Streisand in the title role of Fanny Brice. The real Fanny Brice was a theater and film actress, and "Funny Girl" is very loosely based on her life story. Fanny Brice was born into a Hungarian Jewish family in New York City, with the real name of Fania Borach.

41. Ho Chi Minh City festival : TET
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning "Feast of the First Morning", with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

During the Vietnam War, Hanoi was the capital of North Vietnam and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the North Vietnamese victory, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City.

42. 1961 Tony winner for Best Musical : BYE BYE BIRDIE (ONE under PAR)
“Bye Bye Birdie” is a stage musical set in 1958, first performed in 1960 on Broadway. It was inspired by the real-life events surrounding Elvis Presley getting drafted into the Army in 1957. The “Elvis” character in the musical is called Conrad Birdie, a play on the name of the singer Conway Twitty. One of the songs from the show is “Put on a Happy Face”.

43. Sistine Chapel painting setting : EDEN
The Sistine Chapel, in the Pope's residence in Rome, takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV who was responsible for restoring the old Capella Magna in the 15th century. It was about a century later (1508-1512) that Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel under the patronage of Pope Julius II.

48. Butterfly, but not a caterpillar : IMAGO
The imago is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

58. Cave : GROTTO
The word "grotto" comes to us from the Italian "grotta" meaning "vault" or "cavern".

60. Duke's transportation? : A TRAIN
The A Train in the New York City Subway system runs from 207th Street, through Manhattan and over to Far Rockaway in Queens. The service lends its name to a jazz standard "Take the 'A' Train", the signature tune of Duke Ellington and a song much sung by Ella Fitzgerald. One version of the lyric is:
You must take the A Train
To go to Sugar Hill way up in Harlem
If you miss the A Train
You'll find you've missed the quickest way to Harlem
Hurry, get on, now, it's coming
Listen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)
Get on the A Train
Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem.

Down
2. Comedian Mort : SAHL
Mort Sahl is a Canadian-born actor and comedian who moved to the US with his family when he was a child. Sahl became friends with John F. Kennedy. When Kennedy became president, Sahl wrote a lot of jokes for the President's speeches, although he also told a lot of Kennedy jokes in his acts. After the President was assassinated in 1963, Sahl was intensely interested in finding out who was behind the crime and even got himself deputized as a member of one of the investigating teams. He was very outspoken against the results of the Warren Commission report on the assassination, and soon found himself out of favor with the public. It took a few years for him to make his comeback, but come back he did.

3. Deuce follower : TREY
A trey of clubs, for example, is a name for the three of clubs in a deck of cards. The name “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips.

Our term “deuce” ultimately comes via French from the Latin “duo” meaning “two”.

6. "Now ___ shakes my soul": Sappho : EROS
Some lines from the Ancient Greek poet Sappho:
Now Eros shakes my soul,
a wind on the mountain falling on the oaks.

Sappho was an Ancient Greek poet born on the Greek island of Lesbos. Sappho was much admired for her work, although very little of it survives today. She was renowned for writing erotic and romantic verse that dealt with the love of women as well as men. It was because of this poetry that the word “lesbian” (someone from Lesbos) is used to describe a gay woman.

8. Traveler's checks, for short? : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks.

10. Site of a 1953 C.I.A.-directed coup : IRAN
The 1953 Iranian coup d'état overthrew Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh and put in place a military government which eventually led to the Shah of Iran taking power. The coup was orchestrated by the British and American governments. Arguably, the US and UK motivation was the control of oil.

14. Taxi eschewer, for short : PED
Pedestrian (ped.)

21. 2013 Joaquin Phoenix film : HER
2003’s “Her” is a rather unusual film. It stars Joaquin Phoenix as a man who develops a relationship with a computer operating system called “Samantha”, which is voiced by Scarlett Johansson.

22. Chest compressor, for short : EMT
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

28. Brio : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

“Brio” is borrowed from Italian, in which language it means vigor and vivacity. "Con brio" is a musical direction often found on a score, instructing the musicians to play "with energy, vigor".

29. Big name in morning radio : OPIE
“The Opie & Anthony Show” is a talk show broadcast on XM and Sirius satellite radio. Hosts of the show are Opie Hughes and Anthony Cumia. I’ve turned into a bit of grouch in my old age, and I must admit that I find broadcasts like “The Opie & Anthony Show” very puerile and offensive. Past features in the show include “Whip ‘em Out Wednesdays”, “Voyeur Bus” and “T&A with O&A”. You get the idea …

30. "The Confessions of ___ Turner" (1967 Pulitzer winner) : NAT
The Confessions of Nat Turner is a 1976 novel by William Styron.

Nat Turner was a slave in Virginia who led a slave rebellion in 1831 that led to the deaths of over a hundred people. Half of the casualties were white,and half were black. The 55 white deaths took place on the day of the rebellion as a growing mob of slaves traveled from house-to-house freeing fellow slaves but also killing any white people they came across; men, women and children. The rebellion was suppressed within two days by a white militia. Slaves involved in the rebellion were tried for insurrection and related crimes, and a total of 56 blacks were executed on suspicion of involvement in the uprising. In the aftermath, life for slaves became even more difficult as any freedoms that they had earned were largely curtailed.

34. Canned food made by Nestlé : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

36. "L.A. Law" actress : DEY
The actress Susan Dey first appeared on “The Partridge Family” when she was 17-years-old when she had no acting experience. Years later, Dey won a Golden Globe for playing the leading role of Grace Van Owen in “L. A. Law”.

"L.A. Law" ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network's most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful "Hill Street Blues" in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, "E.R." The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

38. Peter Fonda's role in "Easy Rider" : WYATT
"Easy Rider" is a 1969 movie about two bikers traversing the American Southwest and the South. The bikers are famously played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper, who also co-wrote the screenplay. Fonda produced the film and Hopper directed.

39. ___ Lingus : AER
Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn't that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with "Aer Lingus" being a phonetic spelling of the Irish "aer-loingeas" meaning "air fleet". These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland's oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.

40. TV channel with the slogan "Very Funny" : TBS
Turner Broadcasting System (TBS) adopted the slogan “Very Funny” in 2004. The slogan is meant to contrast TBS with its sister channel TNT, which focuses on drama shows. The TNT slogan is “Drama, Period”.

44. Clinton-backed pact : NAFTA
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is between Canada, Mexico and the United States. When NAFTA came into force in 1994 it set up the largest free trade zone in the world.

48. Brain-freezing treat : ICEE
Icee and Slurpee are brand names of those slushy drinks. Ugh …

49. Sitcom character who curses by shouting "Shazbot!" : MORK
"Mork & Mindy" was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams, of course) in a special episode of "Happy Days". The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and "Nanu Nanu" means both "hello" and "goodbye" back on the planet Ork. "I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu". Great stuff ...

There were a few terms coined for the sitcom “Mork & Mindy” in the later seventies that became popular at the time, and are sometimes still quoted today. Most popular was Mork’s greeting “Na-Nu Na-Nu”. Mork also used “Shazbot” as a profanity, said “KO” instead of “OK”.

52. "Hedda Gabler" setting : OSLO
“Hedda Gabler” is a play by the great Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, first published in 1890. Considered one of the greatest theater roles, the title character of Hedda Gabler is sometimes referred to as “the female Hamlet”.

53. Org. that's most likely to appreciate this puzzle? : PGA
The Professional Golfers' Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

57. Job ad abbr. : EEO
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Commission was set up by the Civil Rights Act.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Person close to 100? : A-STUDENT
9. Kind of game or line : PICK-UP
15. Belt and hose : CAR PARTS
16. Poker declaration : I RAISE
17. Neil Armstrong declaration : THE EAGLE HAS LANDED (TWO under PAR)
19. Film critic Jeffrey : LYONS
20. Part of a dovetail joint : TENON
21. Sub : HERO
23. Seizure sensors, for short : EEGS
26. What a parent might warn a child to watch out for : THE BOGEY MAN (ONE over PAR)
31. Deviate from one's path : YAW
32. Bash with a splash : POOL PARTY
33. "___ inglés?" : HABLA
35. Noir alternative : AU LAIT
36. Part of a Spanish explorer's name : DE LEON
37. "Funny Girl" composer : STYNE
38. Chutes and ladders locale : WATER PARK
41. Ho Chi Minh City festival : TET
42. 1961 Tony winner for Best Musical : BYE BYE BIRDIE
43. Sistine Chapel painting setting : EDEN
45. Antennae, so to speak : EARS
46. Charged : RAN AT
48. Butterfly, but not a caterpillar : IMAGO
53. Average ... or a literal hint to 17-, 26- and 42-Across : PAR FOR THE COURSE
58. Cave : GROTTO
59. Trump : OVERRULE
60. Duke's transportation? : A TRAIN
61. Game for which it's helpful to have hands-on experience? : PEEKABOO

Down
1. House work? : ACT
2. Comedian Mort : SAHL
3. Deuce follower : TREY
4. Until : UP TO
5. Beginning : DAWN
6. "Now ___ shakes my soul": Sappho : EROS
7. Highest power? : NTH
8. Traveler's checks, for short? : TSA
9. Not let up in criticism : PILE ON
10. Site of a 1953 C.I.A.-directed coup : IRAN
11. Paddle around : CANOE
12. Organlike legume : KIDNEY BEAN
13. Function : USE
14. Taxi eschewer, for short : PED
18. Animal shelter animal : STRAY
21. 2013 Joaquin Phoenix film : HER
22. Chest compressor, for short : EMT
24. In abundance : GALORE
25. Ritzy : SWANK
26. Promoted : TOUTED
27. Real imp : HOLY TERROR
28. Brio : ELAN
29. Big name in morning radio : OPIE
30. "The Confessions of ___ Turner" (1967 Pulitzer winner) : NAT
32. Wallop : PASTE
33. "___, boy!" : HERE
34. Canned food made by Nestlé : ALPO
36. "L.A. Law" actress : DEY
38. Peter Fonda's role in "Easy Rider" : WYATT
39. ___ Lingus : AER
40. TV channel with the slogan "Very Funny" : TBS
42. Concern : BEAR ON
44. Clinton-backed pact : NAFTA
47. "Don't blame me!" : NOT I!
48. Brain-freezing treat : ICEE
49. Sitcom character who curses by shouting "Shazbot!" : MORK
50. Special quality : AURA
51. Eats : GRUB
52. "Hedda Gabler" setting : OSLO
53. Org. that's most likely to appreciate this puzzle? : PGA
54. Sketches, e.g. : ART
55. Short flight : HOP
56. New Year's ___ : EVE
57. Job ad abbr. : EEO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1231-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Dec 14, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

Share today's solution with a friend:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Woolf
THEME: PRNDL … each of today’s themed answers ends with the name of an automatic transmission gear:
68A. Quintet representing the ends of the answers to the five starred clues : PRNDL

18A. *Legoland, for one : THEME PARK
29A. *Tricky football play : DOUBLE REVERSE
34A. *Like you or me? : GENDER NEUTRAL
44A. *Essential feature of a PC : INTERNAL DRIVE
57A. *Equal rival : SWEET ‘N LOW
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 00s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. What "you had me at," in a classic movie line : HELLO
"Jerry Maguire" is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several liines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:
- “Show me the money!”
- “You complete me”
- “You had me at ‘hello’”

14. Sauce commonly served with seafood : AIOLI
To the purist, especially in Provence in the South of France, the “home” of aioli, aioli is prepared just by grinding garlic with olive oil. However, other ingredients are often added to the mix, particularly egg yolks.

16. Treasure lost on the Spanish Main : ORO
“Oro” is Spanish for “gold”.

When one thinks of the word “main” in the context of the sea, the Spanish Main usually comes to mind. Indeed, the use of the more general term “main”, meaning the sea, originates from the more specific "Spanish Main". "Spanish Main" originally referred to land and not water, as it was the name given to the mainland coast around the Caribbean Sea in the days of Spanish domination of the region.

17. Material that may be acid-washed : DENIM
Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase "de Nimes" (from Nimes) gives us the word "denim". Also, the French phrase "bleu de Genes" (blue of Genoa) gives us our word "jeans".

18. *Legoland, for one : THEME PARK
There are currently six Legoland theme parks in the world, with two here in North America. One of the US parks is in Winter Haven, Florida and the other is in Carlsbad, California (which is the one that I’ve visited … a fun place).

22. Busy time at Speedway or Churchill Downs : RACE DAY
Churchill Downs is a thoroughbred racetrack located in Louisville, Kentucky that is famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby each year. The track is named for John and Henry Churchill who once owned the land on which the course was built.

23. 1992 or 2006 Winter Olympics locale : ALP
Albertville is a city in south-eastern France, in the Alps. The city was established in 1836 by King Charles Albert of Sardinia, which resulted in the name “Albertville”. Albertville is perhaps most famous today as the host of the 1992 Winter Olympic Games.

The 2006 Winter Olympics were held in Turin, in the Italian Alps. The Turin games were one of the most expensive Winter Games ever staged, and sadly much of that cost was a huge overrun. The event ended up costing almost twice what had been budgeted.

26. Next-to-last word in a fairy tale : EVER
… and they all lived happily ever after.

28. Actor with the movie line "Me, I always tell the truth. Even when I lie" : PACINO
“Me, I always tell the truth. Even when I lie" is from the 1983 movie “Scarface”.

“Scarface” is a 1983 gangster movie starring Al Pacino as a Cuban expatriate drug lord in Miami. The film was directed by Brian De Palma and written by Oliver Stone, and is a remake of a 1932 film of the same name.

32. First word in a fairy tale : ONCE
Once upon a time …

33. Actress Sorvino : MIRA
Mira Sorvino is an American actress, winner of an Oscar for her supporting role in the 1995 Woody Allen movie "Mighty Aphrodite". Sorvino also played a title role opposite Lisa Kudrow in the very forgettable "Romy and Michele's High School Reunion".

41. South American wildcat : EYRA
The jaguarundi is a small wild cat that is native to Central and South America. Also called the eyra cat, the jaguarundi used to be found in Texas as well. It is believed they are extinct in the US now.

55. Sign on again : RE-UP
“To re-up” is an informal term used in the world of the military meaning to sign up again for another tour of duty.

57. *Equal rival : SWEET‘N LOW
Sweet’n Low is an artificial sweetener with saccharin as the main ingredient. At least that’s in the US. In Canada the main ingredient is sodium cyclamate. Saccharin was banned in Canada in 1977 due to fears that the sweetener caused cancer. The original studies showing the incidence of cancer in lab rats were eventually shown to be faulty, and so the ban was lifted in 2014.

Equal is an aspartame-based artificial sweetener. Equal was the first aspartame sweetener to hit the market, and did so in the early eighties. Up to that point, the only artificial sweetener available was saccharin.

64. TV actor Jason : O’MARA
Jason O’Mara is an actor from Ireland who plies his trade over here in the US. O’Mara played the lead role in the American version “Life on Mars” and on “Terra Nova”.

65. One of eight popes : URBAN
There have been eight popes named Urban who have led the Roman Catholic Church. Pope Urban I was in office from 222 to 230 and is the only one of the eight to have been sanctified. Urban VII’s papacy was the shortest in the history of the church. He died from malaria just 13 days after having been chosen as Pope in September 1590.

66. Home of Team Coco : TBS
Team Leno and Team Coco were the two “sides” in the so called “War for Late Night” of 2010. Team Leno represented Jay Leno, and Team Coco were behind Conan O’Brien.

68. Quintet representing the ends of the answers to the five starred clues : PRNDL
PRNDL … that would be Park, Reverse, Neutral, Drive and Low. The gear shift for an automatic transmission is sometimes known familiarly as the “prindle stick”, from the abbreviations PRNDL.

Down
3. Lithium-___ battery : ION
Lithium-ion and nickel-cadmium are types of rechargeable batteries.

4. Award coveted on "Mad Men" : CLIO
The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

“Mad Men" is AMC’s flagship show. The series is set in the sixties and explores life in and around the advertising business on Madison Avenue in New York City. “Mad Men” brings you right back to the days of three-martini lunches and chain-smoking of cigarettes. Great stuff ...

5. Late-night host on ABC : KIMMEL
Jimmy Kimmel is currently the host of the late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” Kimmel also co-hosted “The Man Show” and my personal favorite, “Win Ben Stein’s Money”.

6. Mad ___ : HATTER
In Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", the Hatter makes his first appearance in a chapter called "A Mad Tea-Party". This event is usually described as "The Mad Hatter's Tea Party", even though the Hatter was just a guest. The host was the March Hare. In fact, the phrase "mad Hatter" doesn't appear anywhere in Lewis Carroll's novel, although the character, the Hatter (and sometimes "Hatta"), is described as mad.

9. Home of the oldest continuously functioning university in the Americas : LIMA, PERU
Lima is the capital city of Peru. Lima was founded in 1535 by the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro, who named it “la Ciudad de los Reyes” (the City of Kings). He chose this name because the decision to found the city was made on January 6th, the feast of the Epiphany that commemorates the visit of the three kings to Jesus in Bethlehem. Lima is home to the oldest university in all of the Americas, as San Marco University was founded in 1551 during the days of Spanish colonial rule.

10. Common diamond measure : ONE CARAT
A carat is a unit of mass used in measuring gemstones that is equal to 200 mg.

11. One who lines up speakers? : ROADIE
A "roadie" is someone who loads, unloads and sets up equipment for musicians on tour, on the road.

12. Firth of Clyde island : ARRAN
The Isle of Arran is in Scotland, in the Firth of Clyde. The Isle of Arran is often confused with the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland, because of the similarity in names.

13. Locale of a Godzilla rampage : TOKYO
Godzilla is a Japanese invention. The first in a very long series of films was released way back in 1954. The original name in Japanese was "Gojira", but this was changed to Godzilla for audiences outside of Japan. "Gojira" is a combination of "gorira" and "kujira", the Japanese words for gorilla and whale, apt because Godzilla is a big ape-like creature that came out of the deep.

19. Weightlifter's pride : PECS
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

25. Brownish purple : PUCE
The name of the purple shade known as "puce" has a strange derivation. "Puce" came into English from French, in which language "puce" means "flea". Supposedly, puce is the color of a flea!

30. #1 Michael Jackson song about an 11-Across : BEN
The song "Ben" was recorded by Michael Jackson in 1972. "Ben" was originally written for Donny Osmond, but as he wasn't available to record it was offered to Michael Jackson. The song was written as the theme song for the 1972 horror film "Ben", the sequel to the icky but successful "Willard", a killer-rat movie.

37. School basics, in a manner of speaking : RRR
Reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic ...

38. Pioneering sci-fi play : RUR
Karel Čapek was a Czech writer noted for his works of science fiction. Čapek’s 1920 play "R.U.R." is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word "robot". The words "automaton" and "android" were already in use, but Capek gave us "robot" from the original Czech "robota" meaning "forced labor". The acronym “R.U.R.”, in the context of the play, stands for “Rossum’s Universal Robots”.

40. Big name in jeans : LEVI
Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

43. Prurient interest : SEX
Someone described as “prurient” has an extreme interest in sexual matters. Back in the 1600s, “prurient” meant “to have an itch”. Today the meaning is exclusively limited to “to have an itching desire”.

45. West ___ virus : NILE
West Nile virus (WNV) is named for the West Nile region in Uganda where it was first identified. The virus has since spread throughout the world. WNV claimed the lives of 286 people in the US in 2012. The virus is mosquito-borne, and there is no vaccine available.

46. What the Heimlich maneuver clears : AIRWAY
Henry Heimlich is an American physician who popularized the abdominal thrusts used to help choking victims, which came to be known as the Heimlich Maneuver. As an aside, Heimlich is the first cousin of Anson Williams, the actor who played "Potsie" on TV's "Happy Days"!

47. Big name in jeans : LEE
The Lee company famous for making jeans was formed in 1889, by one Henry David Lee in Salina, Kansas.

50. Muslim princely title : NAWAB
A “nawab” (also “nabob”) was a deputy governor in the Mogul empire in India. The term is also used as an Muslim honorary title in India and Pakistan. We use “nabob” in English for a person of wealth and prominence.

54. Map showing property divisions : PLAT
A plat is a map showing actual and planned features, so a town might have a plat showing existing and intended buildings.

56. Catherine who married Henry VIII : PARR
Henry VIII was of course the English King with the most wives. Well, something rubbed off on his last wife, Catherine Parr. She was to become the English Queen with the most husbands! By the time she married Henry, she had been widowed twice, and after Henry died she married once again.

58. Bobby who won two Stanley Cups : ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn't skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

60. Son of, in foreign names : IBN
In Arabic names, “ibn” is a word meaning “son of”. The words “bin” and “ben” are also used for “son of”. The word “bint” means “daughter of”. Similarly, in Hebrew “ben” is used to mean “son of”, and “bat” is used to mean “daughter of”.

61. Jay on "Modern Family," e.g. : DAD
Ed O'Neill made it big on television playing Al Bundy on the sitcom "Married ... with Children", not a show I ever cared for. However, I really enjoy watching O'Neill playing Jay Pritchett on the excellent sitcom "Modern Family".

62. Show for which Conan O'Brien once wrote, in brief : SNL
Before Conan O'Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host he was a writer. He wrote for both "Saturday Night Live" and "The Simpsons".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Manual : STICK
6. What "you had me at," in a classic movie line : HELLO
11. See 30-Down : RAT
14. Sauce commonly served with seafood : AIOLI
15. Had a home-cooked meal : ATE IN
16. Treasure lost on the Spanish Main : ORO
17. Material that may be acid-washed : DENIM
18. *Legoland, for one : THEME PARK
20. Cut : OMIT
22. Busy time at Speedway or Churchill Downs : RACE DAY
23. 1992 or 2006 Winter Olympics locale : ALP
26. Next-to-last word in a fairy tale : EVER
28. Actor with the movie line "Me, I always tell the truth. Even when I lie" : PACINO
29. *Tricky football play : DOUBLE REVERSE
32. First word in a fairy tale : ONCE
33. Actress Sorvino : MIRA
34. *Like you or me? : GENDER NEUTRAL
41. South American wildcat : EYRA
42. Does something with : USES
44. *Essential feature of a PC : INTERNAL DRIVE
49. Art house showings : INDIES
51. Level : TIER
52. Rig : FIX
53. Aid for store security : MALL COP
55. Sign on again : RE-UP
57. *Equal rival : SWEET ‘N LOW
59. Some help they are! : MAIDS
63. Place for a stud : EAR
64. TV actor Jason : O’MARA
65. One of eight popes : URBAN
66. Home of Team Coco : TBS
67. Hear again, as a case : RETRY
68. Quintet representing the ends of the answers to the five starred clues : PRNDL

Down
1. Pathetic : SAD
2. Very rare baseball result : TIE
3. Lithium-___ battery : ION
4. Award coveted on "Mad Men" : CLIO
5. Late-night host on ABC : KIMMEL
6. Mad ___ : HATTER
7. Old verb ending : -ETH
8. Be creepy, in a way : LEER
9. Home of the oldest continuously functioning university in the Americas : LIMA, PERU
10. Common diamond measure : ONE CARAT
11. One who lines up speakers? : ROADIE
12. Firth of Clyde island : ARRAN
13. Locale of a Godzilla rampage : TOKYO
19. Weightlifter's pride : PECS
21. "___ been thinking ..." : I’VE
23. Hubbub : ADO
24. Tennis court determination : LONG
25. Brownish purple : PUCE
27. Leftover : REMNANT
30. #1 Michael Jackson song about an 11-Across : BEN
31. Strive : VIE
35. Smoke ___ : DETECTOR
36. "Look this way" : EYES ON ME
37. School basics, in a manner of speaking : RRR
38. Pioneering sci-fi play : RUR
39. "In your dreams!" : AS IF!
40. Big name in jeans : LEVI
43. Prurient interest : SEX
44. Do-nothings : IDLERS
45. West ___ virus : NILE
46. What the Heimlich maneuver clears : AIRWAY
47. Big name in jeans : LEE
48. Generate, as support : DRUM UP
49. "No more for me, please" : I’M SET
50. Muslim princely title : NAWAB
54. Map showing property divisions : PLAT
56. Catherine who married Henry VIII : PARR
58. Bobby who won two Stanley Cups : ORR
60. Son of, in foreign names : IBN
61. Jay on "Modern Family," e.g. : DAD
62. Show for which Conan O'Brien once wrote, in brief : SNL


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1230-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Dec 14, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeffrey Wechsler
THEME: Loop de Loop de Loop … we have a loop made of loops defined by the circled letters. The word LOOP rotates clockwise as it progresses clockwise around the grid.

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. What bulldogs' jowls do : SAG
The bulldog breed of dog has been around at least since 1500. Back then, bulldogs were used in the “sport” of bull baiting. Dogs would be set on a tethered bull to see which bulldog could latch onto the bull’s nose and drag it to the ground. Bull baiting was outlawed in England in 1835.

8. Food for Fido, perhaps : SCRAPS
"Fido", the name for many a dog, is Latin for "I trust".

14. "Hasta luego!" : ADIOS
The term “adios” is Spanish for “goodbye”. In the Spanish language, “adios” comes from the phrase “a dios vos acomiendo” meaning “I commend you to God”.

“Hasta luego!” translates literally from Spanish as “until later!”, and is used to say “see you later!”.

16. Houlihan : Maj. :: Klinger : ___ : CPL
Loretta Swit started playing "Hot Lips" Houlihan on "M*A*S*H" in 1972. She and Alan Alda were the only actors who appeared in both the pilot and the series finale. Swit has written a book on needlepoint, would you believe? It's called "A Needlepoint Scrapbook".

Actor Jamie Farr is best known for playing the cross-dressing Max Klinger in the sitcom ”M*A*S*H”. Although Farr landed a role in the 1955 movie “Blackboard Jungle”, his career didn’t really take off until he started appearing regularly on “The Red Skelton Show”. Years later he managed to get a one-episode appearance in ”M*A*S*H”, and his character and performance were received so well that he became a regular on the show. Farr actually did serve in the US Army in Korea, although it was after hostilities had ended. The dog tags that Farr wore when filming ”M*A*S*H” were the one's he actually wore while serving in the military.

17. "House" star Hugh : LAURIE
English actor and comedian Hugh Laurie used to be half of a comedy double act with Stephen Fry called simply “Fry and Laurie”. Fry and Laurie met in Cambridge University through their mutual friend, the actress Emma Thompson. Over in North America, Laurie is best known for playing the title role in the medical drama “House”.

18. Xerox competitor : RICOH
Ricoh is a Japanese company that started out in 1936 and by the year 2000 was the biggest manufacturer of copiers in the world. The company is also well known as a supplier of cameras. The most successful of Ricoh’s lines of cameras is the compact model called a Caplio.

19. Friend of Pooh : ROO
Like most of the characters in A. A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh", Roo was inspired by on a stuffed toy belonging to Milne's son Christopher Robin.

21. Green who was on four seasons of "The Voice" : CEELO
CeeLo Green is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. Apparently Green is one of the coaches for the contestants on the singing TV show “The Voice”. That’s all I need to know …

“The Voice” is yet another reality television show. “The Voice” is a singing competition in which the judges hear the contestants without seeing them in the first round. The judges then take on chosen contestants as coaches for the remaining rounds. “The Voice” is a highly successful worldwide franchise that originated in the Netherlands.

22. U.N. grp. monitoring workers' rights : ILO
The ILO (International Labour Organization) is an agency now administered by the UN which was established by the League of Nations after WWI. The ILO deals with important issues such as health and safety, discrimination, child labor and forced labor. The organization was recognized for its work in 1969 when it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

23. Brown v. Board of Education city : TOPEKA
Brown v. Board of Education was the US Supreme Court Case that established the unconstitutionality of separate public schools for black and white students. Oliver L. Brown was one of thirteen parents who filed a class action suit against the Topeka, Kansas Board of Education on behalf of their twenty children. The suit called for the city to reverse its racial segregation policy. The final decision by the US Supreme Court led by Chief Justice Earl Warren was unanimous in rejecting segregation.

24. Cheerleaders' handfuls : POMPOMS
The French call a ball made of tufted wool a "pompon", a word that we imported into English directly as "pompon". We use "pompon" to describe perhaps bobbles on some hats, or the tufted balls that are shaken by cheerleaders at sports events. Over time, the spelling "pompom" has become common in English, probably due to mishearing. To confuse matters a little, we also use the word "pom-pom", which is a nickname for a British autocannon used mainly as an anti-aircraft weapon, particularly during WWII.

27. Announcer Johnny famous for crying "Come on down!" : OLSON
Johnny Olson was the announcer on "The Price is Right" from day one in 1972, until he passed away in 1985.

34. North Carolinian : TAR HEEL
Tar Heel is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the nickname also of the athletic teams of the University of North Carolina. No one seems to know for sure where the term "Tar Heel" originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

41. Maneuver for slot car racers or stunt pilots, as suggested by this puzzle's circled letters : LOOP DE LOOP DE LOOP
A loop de loop is a vertical loop. A vehicle executing a loop de loop completes a 360-degree circle.

45. Jonathan Swift, notably : IRONIST
Jonathan Swift was an Irish author and cleric. Swift is most famous perhaps for his 1726 novel "Gulliver's Travels", but we Irishmen also remember him as the Dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin. Swift was renowned for his wit and satire.

46. Food for Fido : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

47. Zairean president Mobutu ___ Seko : SESE
Mobutu Sese Seko was the longtime President of Zaire (later to be called the Democratic Republic of the Congo). Mobutu was known to be a very corrupt dictator and it is believed that he embezzled over $5 billion from his country. On a lighter note, Mobutu was the money man behind the famous 1974 boxing match between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman known as “The Rumble in the Jungle”. Mobutu was anxious to expand the image of Zaire so he used his nation’s funds to entice the fighters to have a go at each other in his homeland.

50. Sound in a lamasery : CHANT
A monastery, particularly in the Buddhist tradition might be called a lamasery. The monks in a lamasery are called lamas.

53. Had a good day on the links, say : SHOT PAR
The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. "Hlinc" was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

64. Iris ring : AREOLE
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

65. Toon chihuahua : REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” is an animated television show that ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. The title characters are Marland "Ren" Höek, a scrawny Chihuahua, and Stimpson J. Cat, a rotund Manx cat. Not my cup of tea ...

66. Film producer Carlo : PONTI
The renowned Italian film producer Carlo Ponti was not quite as famous as his celebrity wife Sophia Loren. Ponti met Loren as a contestant in a beauty contest he was judging in 1950. Back then she was a budding young actress still using her real name, Sofia Lazzaro. The two married in 1957 even though divorce was illegal at the time in Italy, so Ponti was still married to his first wife.

67. Like Greece or Serbia : BALKAN
The Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe is usually referred to as “the Balkans”. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains located in present-day Bulgaria and Serbia. “Balkan” is Bulgarian for “mountain”.

68. Oslo Accords grp. : PLO
The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

69. Ethnic group of Southeast Asia : HMONG
The Hmong people are an ethnic group from the mountains of China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand.

72. Bird in a Hans Christian Andersen tale : SWAN
Hans Christian Andersen's tale "The Ugly Duckling" has to be one of the most endearing ever written. Unlike so many "fairy tales", "The Ugly Duckling" isn't based on any folklore and simply a product of Andersen's imagination. It is speculated that Andersen was the illegitimate son of the Crown Prince of Denmark, and that he wrote the story of the ugly duckling that turned into a beautiful swan as a metaphor for the secret royal lineage that was within Andersen himself.

Down
1. Setting for Seurat's "La Grande Jatte" : PARC
Georges Seurat was a French Post-Impressionist. His most famous work, in the pointillist style, can be viewed in the Art Institute of Chicago, "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte - 1884". If you've seen the movie "Ferris Bueller's Day Off", it features quite prominently in a wonderful, wonderful scene shot at the gallery.

2. Toon beagle : ODIE
Odie is Garfield's best friend and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

3. Victims of the farmer's wife : MICE
Three blind mice. Three blind mice.
See how they run. See how they run.
They all ran after the farmer's wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife,
Did you ever see such a sight in your life,
As three blind mice?

5. Gift vouchers, arcade tickets and such : SCRIP
“Scrip” isn’t legal tender, but operates just like currency in specific applications. It is in effect a form of credit. Originally the word “scrip” was used for a certificate giving one the right to receive something, often shares of a stock. “Scrip” is probably short for (sub)script(ion) receipt.

6. Olympic gold medalist Ohno : APOLO
Speed-skater Apolo Ohno has won more Winter Olympics medals than any other American. Ohno also did a great job winning the 2007 season of television's "Dancing with the Stars".

7. Atmosphere of many a Poe story : GLOOM
Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn't really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

11. Zodiac opener : ARIES
Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

12. Socialist, disparagingly : PINKO
The term "pinko" came to us courtesy of "Time" magazine, in 1925. Back then "pinko" was used to describe those who were politically left of center. Red was the color associated with the left going back to the 1800s (how times have changed!), and "pink" was assigned to people who were not aligned with the left politically, but had left-leaning tendencies.

13. Alternative to an S.U.V. : SEDAN
The American "sedan" car is the equivalent of the British "saloon" car. By definition, a sedan car has two rows of seating and a separate trunk (boot in the UK), although in some models the engine can be at the rear of the car.

28. Penne ___ vodka : ALLA
Penne alla vodka is a pasta dish with a sauce made of vodka, cream , tomatoes, onions and sausage or bacon.

32. Common grass variety named for its color : REDTOP
Redtop grass is also known as Black Bent. The grass is green with a purplish/red flower cluster, giving the variety its name.

36. A Reagan : RON
Ron Reagan's views couldn't be any further from his father's, I think. Before Air America went bust, he had a daily 3-hour spot, and these days he makes frequent appearances on MSNBC. Reagan is also a good dancer, and for a while was a member of the Joffrey Ballet.

37. ___ polloi : HOI
"Hoi polloi" is a Greek term, literally meaning "the majority, the many". In English, "hoi polloi" has come to mean "the masses" and is often used in a derogatory sense.

38. Arias, usually : SOLI
"Soli" (the plural of "solo") are pieces of music performed by one artist, whereas "tutti" are pieces performed by all of the artists.

39. Egyptian Christian : COPT
The Copts make up the largest minority religious group in Egypt. Copts are Christians, with most adhered to the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, and others practicing Coptic Catholicism or Coptic Protestantism. The term “Copt” ultimately derives from a Greek word for Egyptian.

40. Wall St. debuts : IPOS
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

47. "Jersey Shore" housemate : SNOOKI
Nicole Polizzi is quite the celebrity, known by her nickname of Snooki on the MTV reality television show “Jersey Shore”. Polizzi gets her nickname from the character Snooki in the film “Save the Last Dance”, a nickname she was given in middle school because she was the first in her group of friends to kiss a boy.

49. "The Honeymooners" husband : RALPH
The classic sitcom “The Honeymooners” only aired for 39 episodes, with the last being broadcast in September of 1956. However, the sitcom itself was based on a recurring sketch that appeared on “Cavalcade of Stars” and then “The Jackie Gleason Show” from 1951-1955.

50. Chesapeake Bay feast : CRABS
Chesapeake Bay is on the Atlantic coast and is surrounded by the states of Maryland and Virginia. Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the whole country, with over 150 rivers and streams draining into it.

51. Western Afghan city : HERAT
Herat is the third largest city in Afghanistan, and is located in the northeast of the country.

52. Amtrak option : ACELA
The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, getting up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The brand name "Acela" was created to evoke "acceleration" and "excellence".

54. ___ Productions (Oprah Winfrey company) : HARPO
Oprah Winfrey’s multimedia production company is known as Harpo Studios. “Harpo” is “Oprah” spelled backwards, and is also the name of the husband of the character Winfrey played in the movie “The Color Purple”.

55. Big name in kitchen sponges : O-CEL-O
“o-cel-o” is a brand of kitchen sponge made by 3M.

56. :50 : TEN OF
For example, 2:50 is “ten of three”, ten minutes to three.

58. Itches : YENS
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

62. European smoker : ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Feature of a royal event : POMP
5. What bulldogs' jowls do : SAG
8. Food for Fido, perhaps : SCRAPS
14. "Hasta luego!" : ADIOS
16. Houlihan : Maj. :: Klinger : ___ : CPL
17. "House" star Hugh : LAURIE
18. Xerox competitor : RICOH
19. Friend of Pooh : ROO
20. Not forgotten : IN MIND
21. Green who was on four seasons of "The Voice" : CEELO
22. U.N. grp. monitoring workers' rights : ILO
23. Brown v. Board of Education city : TOPEKA
24. Cheerleaders' handfuls : POMPOMS
27. Announcer Johnny famous for crying "Come on down!" : OLSON
28. Point the finger at : ACCUSE
31. Our planet, to Germans : ERDE
33. Be impending : LOOM
34. North Carolinian : TAR HEEL
38. Chem., e.g. : SCI
41. Maneuver for slot car racers or stunt pilots, as suggested by this puzzle's circled letters : LOOP DE LOOP DE LOOP
44. Yodeler's locale : ALP
45. Jonathan Swift, notably : IRONIST
46. Food for Fido : ALPO
47. Zairean president Mobutu ___ Seko : SESE
48. Goes around : ORBITS
50. Sound in a lamasery : CHANT
53. Had a good day on the links, say : SHOT PAR
57. Transcribe again : RECOPY
59. Expert : ACE
60. Shakes, as in a car chase : LOSES
64. Iris ring : AREOLE
65. Toon chihuahua : REN
66. Film producer Carlo : PONTI
67. Like Greece or Serbia : BALKAN
68. Oslo Accords grp. : PLO
69. Ethnic group of Southeast Asia : HMONG
70. Dry cleaning targets : STAINS
71. Punch-in-the-stomach sound : OOF!
72. Bird in a Hans Christian Andersen tale : SWAN

Down
1. Setting for Seurat's "La Grande Jatte" : PARC
2. Toon beagle : ODIE
3. Victims of the farmer's wife : MICE
4. Certain water circulator : POOL PUMP
5. Gift vouchers, arcade tickets and such : SCRIP
6. Olympic gold medalist Ohno : APOLO
7. Atmosphere of many a Poe story : GLOOM
8. Sexy skirt feature : SLIT
9. Kiss and cuddle : CANOODLE
10. Dishevel, as bed linen : RUMPLE
11. Zodiac opener : ARIES
12. Socialist, disparagingly : PINKO
13. Alternative to an S.U.V. : SEDAN
15. Waves away : SHOOS
25. Olympic lengths : METERS
26. Permeates, with "through" : SEEPS
28. Penne ___ vodka : ALLA
29. Composure : COOL
30. Farm enclosure ... or a farmers' group : COOP or CO-OP
32. Common grass variety named for its color : REDTOP
35. Lily family plants : ALOES
36. A Reagan : RON
37. ___ polloi : HOI
38. Arias, usually : SOLI
39. Egyptian Christian : COPT
40. Wall St. debuts : IPOS
42. Schedule for take-off? : DIET PLAN
43. Parts of chemistry buildings : LAB ROOMS
47. "Jersey Shore" housemate : SNOOKI
49. "The Honeymooners" husband : RALPH
50. Chesapeake Bay feast : CRABS
51. Western Afghan city : HERAT
52. Amtrak option : ACELA
54. ___ Productions (Oprah Winfrey company) : HARPO
55. Big name in kitchen sponges : O-CEL-O
56. :50 : TEN OF
58. Itches : YENS
61. The white of a whiteout : SNOW
62. European smoker : ETNA
63. 11-Down, for one : SIGN


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1229-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Dec 14, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

Share today's solution with a friend:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Spell “It Out” … today’s themed answers start with words that sound like the letters I-T-O-U-T, so we are SPELLING “IT OUT”.
64A. Leave no room for misinterpretation ... or what the first words of the answers to the five starred clues do, literally : SPELL IT OUT (spell “it out”)

17A. *What a good speaker maintains with the audience : EYE CONTACT (giving the letter “I”)
25A. *Golfers' bookings : TEE TIMES (giving the letter “T”)
30A. *"Man!" : OH BROTHER! (giving the letter “O”)
45A. *"Wait, wait ... go back" : YOU LOST ME (giving the letter “U”)
51A. *Bit of Boston Harbor debris in 1773 : TEA CHEST (giving the letter “T”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Titanic victim John Jacob ___ : ASTOR
John Jacob Astor IV was a member of the famous and wealthy Astor family of New York. Astor and his second wife Madeleine were passengers on the RMS Titanic when it made its fateful journey in 1912. John did not survive the tragedy, and was the wealthiest person to go down with the ship. Madeleine was picked up in a lifeboat, along with her nurse and maid.

14. Havana hero José : MARTI
José Martí was a Cuban writer and political activist who became a symbol for his country’s movement to gain independence from Spain in the 1800s, earning him the nickname “Apostle of Cuban Independence”. Martí was killed in action in a battle against Spanish troops in 1895.

19. Female org. since the 1850s : YWCA
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was founded in the mid-1800s about 50 years after the YMCA, although the two organizations have always been independent of each other. Having said that, some YWCA and YMCA organizations have amalgamated at the local level and often share facilities. The YWCA is quite the organization, and is the largest women's group in the whole world.

20. U.S. intelligence org. : NSA
The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation.

21. ___ nut (Chinese fruit) : LITCHI
Litchis are better known in English as lychees. One can't eat the skin of the lychee fruit, which is why you'll notice that you are only served the sweet flesh. If you've never tried them, you should do so as they're delicious. Even though there is a nut-like seed within the edible flesh of the lychee fruit, I wouldn't eat it, as it is poisonous.

29. Fox News anchor Smith : SHEP
Shep Smith is a television journalist and host with Fox News. Smith has been hosting “Shepard Smith Reporting” on Fox since 2013.

35. "August: ___ County" (2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning play) : OSAGE
"August: Osage County" is a dark comedy play by Tracy Letts that won a 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. I saw a 2013 movie adaptation that has a great cast including Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Ewan McGregor, and Benedict Cumberbatch. I really enjoyed it ...

39. Weightless state, informally : ZERO-G
The force of gravity that we all feel is referred to as “one G”. As gravity is a actually an accelerating force, acceleration is measured relative to that force of gravity. So, if we are sitting in a vehicle that accelerates at 3G, then we are experiencing a force that is three times that which we feel from the gravitational pull of the earth. Zero-G is weightlessness that is experienced when in space, outside the influence of the earth's gravity.

48. Lansing's home: Abbr. : MICH
Lansing, Michigan is unique among US state capitals in that it is not a county seat, even though it is located in Ingham County. The county seat is Mason, Michigan.

51. *Bit of Boston Harbor debris in 1773 : TEA CHEST (giving the letter “T”)
The famous destruction of tea in Boston Harbor to protest against the Tea Act took place on December 16, 1773. The action was referred to as the “destruction of the tea” for decades, and it wasn’t until 1834 that the term “Boston Tea Party” first appeared in print.

59. "___! The Herald Angels Sing" : HARK
“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” is one of my favorite Christmas carols. It was written in 1739 by Charles Wesley, although he scored it as a very slow and somber tune. A number of musicians modified the music over the years (including Felix Mendelssohn) giving us the more uplifting air that we know today.

62. ___ constrictor : BOA
Boa constrictors are members of the Boidae family of snakes, all of which are non-venomous. Interestingly, the female boa is always larger than the male.

63. ___ of Wight : ISLE
The Isle of Wight is the largest island in England, and lies about five miles off the south coast of the country.

66. Putin's refusal : NYET
"Nyet" is Russian for "no", and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

Vladimir Putin became acting President of Russia at the very end of 1999 when Boris Yeltsin resigned. Putin was elected in his own right in 2000, re-elected in 2004, and then ran up against a term limit in 2008. In 2008 Putin was appointed by his successor, President Dmitry Medvedev, to the position of Prime Minister. Putin is a controversial figure, inside and outside Russia. On the one hand he led the country out of an economic crisis into a period of stability and relative prosperity (but maybe back again …). On the other hand he has been associated with government corruption and accused of allowing private concerns to have undue influence on government actions. And then there is the Crimea ...

67. German automaker : OPEL
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we'd say "estate car" in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

68. Vikings, e.g. : NORSE
The Vikings were a Germanic people from northern Europe who were noted as great seafarers. Key to the success of the Vikings was the design of their famous “longships”. Made from wood, the longship was long and narrow with a shallow hull, It was also light, so that the crew would actually carry it small distances over land and around obstacles. Longships were designed to be propelled both by sail and by oars.

70. Wall Street inits. : NYSE
The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement.

71. ___ Park, Colo. : ESTES
Estes Park is a town in a beautiful part of the US, in northern Colorado. Estes Park is home to the headquarters of Rocky Mountain National Park. My fire-fighting brother-in-law was based at that park, so I’ve visited and can attest that it is a gorgeous place to live. He lives in Omaha now. The geography in Omaha is a little different ...

Down
3. October 31 option : TREAT
Trick or treat!

4. Needing no Rx : OTC
Over-the-counter (OTC)

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol "Rx" that's used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter's blessing to help a patient recover.

5. 1970 John Wayne film : RIO LOBO
“Rio Lobo” is a Western movie that was released in 1970, starring John Wayne. “Rio Lobo” is the third film in a trilogy that was directed by Howard Hawks, the other two films being “Rio Bravo” (1959) and “El Dorado” (1966). “Rio Lobo” was the last film that Hawks directed.

6. Glam rock band ___ the Hoople : MOTT
Mott the Hoople was a glam rock band from England that was big in the mid-seventies. The name of the band come from the title of a novel by Willard Manus.

I remember the days of glam rock so well, as it was a hugely popular genre of music in the British Isles during the early seventies. Artistes wore the wildest of clothes, big hair, shiny outfits and really high platform boots. Names associated with glam rock are T. Rex, David Bowie, Roxy Music and Gary Glitter.

10. Thwarts : STYMIES
The word “stymie” comes from golf, and is a situation in which one’s approach to the hole is blocked by an opponent’s ball.

12. Title for Sam or Ben : UNCLE
The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word "Samland" for "America" in intelligence communiques.

Uncle Ben's is a famous brand of rice introduced in 1943. It was the biggest selling brand of rice in the US from the fifties through the nineties. As one might imagine, the name "Uncle Ben" is pretty offensive and Mars, who owns the brand now, have tried to distance themselves from the African-American slave/domestic servant image. In 2007 there was a TV campaign showing "Uncle Ben" as Chairman of the Board of the company. But, he is still called Uncle Ben ...

13. Enjoys Joyce, Carroll or Oates : READS
Regular readers will know that I am unashamedly supportive of my native Irish culture, but I have to tell you that I can't handle the works of James Joyce. I have spent many a fine day traipsing around Ireland learning about his life, but I have yet to appreciate one of his books. To me, his life is more absorbing than his writing. Having said that, "Ulysses" is an interesting novel in that it chronicles just one ordinary day in the life of a Dubliner named Leopold Bloom. There's a huge celebration of "Ulysses" in Dublin every year on June 16th, called Bloomsday. The festivities vary from readings and performances of the storyline, to good old pub crawls. “Ulysses” was made into a film of the same name in 1967 starring Milo O’Shea.

Lewis Carroll was actually a pseudonym, for English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. His most famous novels are of course "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Alice Through the Looking Glass", and his most famous poems are the two nonsense pieces "Jabberwocky" and "The Hunting of the Snark".

Joyce Carol Oates is a remarkable writer, not just for the quality of her work (her 1969 novel "them" won a National Book Award, for example) but also for how prolific is her output. She published her first book in 1963 and since then has published over fifty novels as well as many other written works.

18. U.S.S. ___ (aircraft carrier named for a former admiral) : NIMITZ
The USS Nimitz is a supercarrier that was launched in 1972. The Nimitz is now the oldest active combat ship in the US Navy.

Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz is perhaps best remembered as the commander of fleet operations in the Pacific in WWII. Above and beyond the many honors formally awarded to Admiral Nimitz, he was chosen in 1945 to sign the Japanese Instrument of Surrender on the decks of the Missouri, as the official representative of his country.

32. "One Love" singer : BOB MARLEY
Bob Marley is the most widely known reggae performer, with big hits such as “I Shot the Sheriff”, “Woman, No Cry” and “One Love”. A little sadly perhaps, Marley’s best selling album was released three years after he died. That album would be the “legendary” album called “Legend”.

“One Love” is a classic reggae song from 1977 recorded by Bob Marley and the Wailers. A ska version of “One Love” had been released by the Wailers as early as 1965, but it is the 1977 release that we all remember, I am sure.

33. Suffix with ranch : -ERO
A ranchero is someone employed on a ranch, and is a word with Spanish roots.

34. Sauce thickener : ROUX
A roux is a mixture of wheat flour and clarified butter (or other fat) cooked together until it can be used as a thickening agent. Roux is an essential ingredient in French cooking, although "healthier" versions of roux are being used more and more these days.

36. Doublemint, for one : GUM
Doublemint is a variety of chewing that was launched by Wrigley way back in 1914. Famously, Wrigley’s used twins in their advertising as spokespersons, starting in 1956.

37. Juillet's season : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France, and "juillet" is French for July (note that the name of months aren't capitalized in French).

47. Jeanne d'Arc, for one: Abbr. : STE
“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a female.

Joan of Arc (also Jeanne d’Arc, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

49. Muppet maker Jim : HENSON
Jim Henson was a puppeteer, and most famously the creator the Muppets characters. Henson produced his first puppets for a local television station in Hyattsville, Maryland while he was still in high school. As well as the famous Muppet characters, Henson created, operated and voiced the character Yoda in most of the “Star Wars” movies. Henson died from a streptococcal infection in 1990, on the same day Sammy Davis, Jr. passed away.

53. Maudlin : SOPPY
To be maudlin is to be excessively sentimental. The term comes into English from the tearful and repentant sinner Mary Magdalene who was forgiven by Jesus. Mary’s surname “Magdalene” became the name “Maudelen” in Middle English, and then “maudlin” meaning “tearful”.

58. Fills up : SATES
"Sate" is a variant of the older word "satiate". Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

61. Fr. girl : MLLE
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish, and mademoiselle (Mlle.), is French for “Miss”, a form of address to a female.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Titanic victim John Jacob ___ : ASTOR
6. Diner's card : MENU
10. Put-down : SLUR
14. Havana hero José : MARTI
15. Getting ___ years : ON IN
16. Musical pitch : TONE
17. *What a good speaker maintains with the audience : EYE CONTACT (giving the letter “I”)
19. Female org. since the 1850s : YWCA
20. U.S. intelligence org. : NSA
21. ___ nut (Chinese fruit) : LITCHI
22. Opposite of spicy : MILD
23. Internet business : DOT-COM
25. *Golfers' bookings : TEE TIMES (giving the letter “T”)
27. Somewhat : A BIT
29. Fox News anchor Smith : SHEP
30. *"Man!" : OH BROTHER! (giving the letter “O”)
35. "August: ___ County" (2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning play) : OSAGE
38. Twosome : DUO
39. Weightless state, informally : ZERO-G
41. Director's end-of-scene cry : CUT!
42. What i.o.u.'s represent : DEBTS
45. *"Wait, wait ... go back" : YOU LOST ME (giving the letter “U”)
48. Lansing's home: Abbr. : MICH
50. Cross through : X OUT
51. *Bit of Boston Harbor debris in 1773 : TEA CHEST (giving the letter “T”)
55. Second-stringers : B-TEAMS
59. "___! The Herald Angels Sing" : HARK
60. Regular : NORMAL
62. ___ constrictor : BOA
63. ___ of Wight : ISLE
64. Leave no room for misinterpretation ... or what the first words of the answers to the five starred clues do, literally : SPELL IT OUT (spell “it out”)
66. Putin's refusal : NYET
67. German automaker : OPEL
68. Vikings, e.g. : NORSE
69. Letters between jays and ells : KAYS
70. Wall Street inits. : NYSE
71. ___ Park, Colo. : ESTES

Down
1. Change, as the Constitution : AMEND
2. Final approval : SAY-SO
3. October 31 option : TREAT
4. Needing no Rx : OTC
5. 1970 John Wayne film : RIO LOBO
6. Glam rock band ___ the Hoople : MOTT
7. Put into law : ENACT
8. Small recess : NICHE
9. Loosens, as laces : UNTIES
10. Thwarts : STYMIES
11. Not joint-pounding, as aerobics : LOW-IMPACT
12. Title for Sam or Ben : UNCLE
13. Enjoys Joyce, Carroll or Oates : READS
18. U.S.S. ___ (aircraft carrier named for a former admiral) : NIMITZ
24. Pace or race follower : CAR
26. Howe'er : THO’
28. Unnamed others : THEY
30. Like integers of the form 2n + 1 : ODD
31. Shade : HUE
32. "One Love" singer : BOB MARLEY
33. Suffix with ranch : -ERO
34. Sauce thickener : ROUX
36. Doublemint, for one : GUM
37. Juillet's season : ETE
40. Worldwide : GLOBAL
43. Lottery buys : TICKETS
44. Univ., e.g. : SCH
46. Writer's plan : OUTLINE
47. Jeanne d'Arc, for one: Abbr. : STE
49. Muppet maker Jim : HENSON
51. "Use your head!" : THINK!
52. Course for which you hardly need to 51-Down : EASY A
53. Maudlin : SOPPY
54. Forest units : TREES
56. Call off, as a mission : ABORT
57. One just squeaking by? : MOUSE
58. Fills up : SATES
61. Fr. girl : MLLE
65. Lean-___ (rude shelters) : TOS


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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