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0531-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 May 15, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: Making Projections … there’s a note with today’s puzzle that reads:
When this puzzle is completed, an apt phrase can be found by starting at the top central letter and reading clockwise.
That “apt phrase” is SORE THUMB, so we have a set of letters outside of the grid proper, sticking out like a SORE THUMB. We need those letters to make sense of several of the clues:
9A. Seafood soup base : (S)HARK FIN
12A. Attraction that operates under its own steam? : (O)LD FAITHFUL
15A. Catcher of some waves : (R)ADIO ANTENNA
59A. Words below an orange on a license plate : SUNSHINE STAT(E)
72A. Hematophagous creature : VAMPIRE BA(T)
67A. Mariana, e.g. : OCEAN TRENC(H)
62A. It might contain a list of postal abbreviations : DROP-DOWN MEN(U)
4A. Peak that's known as "The Great One" : (M)OUNT MCKINLEY
6A. Crisp bit in a stir-fry : (B)EAN SPROUT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … ALBUM (albus!!!), MOREL (sorel)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Choco ___ (Klondike treat) : TACO
A Choco Taco is an elaborate ice cream dessert that was created in the eighties by the Jack and Jill Ice Cream Company in Philadelphia.

10. Items that may be labeled SMTWTFS : PILLS
A pill that is taken daily might be labeled with the days of the week: SMTWTFS.

20. Kurt Vonnegut's "Happy Birthday, ___ June" : WANDA
“Happy Birthday, Wanda June” is a 1971 play by Kurt Vonnegut that was adapted into a film released the same year. The film version stars Rod Steiger and Susannah York in the lead roles. The title character is a young girl who is run over by an ice cream truck and dies, just before she can celebrate her birthday.

21. Former part of the British Empire : INDIA
The period of colonial rule by the British in South Asia from 1858 to 1947 is referred to as the British Raj. Prior to 1858, the area was ruled by a private enterprise, the British East India Company. “Raj” is the Hindi word for “reign”.

22. Joe Biden's home: Abbr. : DEL
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

28. Currency which, in one denomination, features a portrait of Linnaeus : KRONA
"Krona" translates in English as "crown", and is the currency of Sweden. As a member of the European Union, Sweden is required to adopt the euro as its official currency. Such a move isn’t really popular in Sweden and so the Swedish government has been using a legal loophole to allow the country to retain the krona.

Carl Linnaeus was a botanist and physician from Sweden. Linnaeus who developed the system of biological classification that we still use today. He introduced us to kingdoms, classes, orders, families, genera and species in his 1735 publication “Systema Naturae”.

30. Garment for tennis, perhaps : SKORT
The garment called a “skort” is a hybrid between shorts and a skirt.

37. When blacksmithing began : IRON AGE
Ancient societies can be classified by the "three-age system", which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:
- The Stone Age
- The Bronze Age
- The Iron Age
The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

41. 66, e.g.: Abbr. : RTE
The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the "Main Street of America". The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole's song "(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66", and also because of the sixties TV show called "Route 66".

42. Nav. rank : ENS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

43. Run ___ : AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

50. Shenanigans : TOMFOOLERY
In Middle English, in the middle of the 14th century, a mentally deficient man would be called a Thom Foole, sort of a nickname. We retain the name today in our word "tomfoolery" meaning "clowning around".

I suppose one could be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation but was coined in San Francisco and Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

53. Dietary no-no : TRANS FAT
Trans fat is an ingredient in some of our food that is known to greatly increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Trans fats are very difficult to find in nature and instead are the product of the hydrogenation process that many oils undergo in making some of our less healthy foodstuffs.

57. Park opened in 1964 : SEAWORLD
SeaWorld was started in San Diego in 1964. The original plan was build an underwater restaurant with a marine life show. Eventually the founders dropped the idea of the eating establishment and just went with a theme park. SeaWorld has been mired in controversy since the 2013 release of the documentary “Blackfish”, which tells of the involvement of a particular orca (killer whale) in the death of two SeaWorld employees and one SeaWorld visitor.

60. Chocolate mint brand with peaks in its logo : ANDES
Andes Chocolate Mints were first produced by a company called Andy’s Candies, established in 1921 by Andrew Kanelos in Chicago. Kanelos learned that men didn’t like giving boxes of candy to their wives and girlfriends if there was another man’s name on the box, so he changed his business to Andes Candies.

63. Temperature units : KELVINS
The kelvin is a unit of measurement for temperature, named after William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin.

64. Muscles worked by leg presses : QUADS
The quadriceps femoris is the muscle group at the front of the thigh. It is the strongest muscle in the human body, and is also the leanest. The “quads” are actually a group of four muscles in the upper leg, hence the use of the prefix “quad-”.

65. Anti-Revolutionary of 1776 : TORY
During the American Revolution, those advocating Independence were known as Patriots. Those who stayed loyal to Britain were called Loyalists or Tories.

68. An example of itself : NOUN
Our word “noun” is itself a noun.

70. Lacto-___ vegetarian : OVO
A lacto-ovo vegetarian is someone who does not consume meat or fish, but does eat eggs (ovo) and dairy (lacto) products.

76. Hockey team with a patriotic name : MAPLE LEAFS
The Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team was founded way back in 1917. As members of the National Hockey League, the Maple leafs have won the Stanley Cup championships thirteen times, the second best record in the league. Having said that, the last championship the team won was in 1967, and the resulting “drought” is the longest in NHL today.

The current design of the Canadian National Flag, known as “the Maple Leaf”, has been in place since 1965. The design made its first appearance on February 15th of that year, and so that date is celebrated annually as National Flag of Canada Day.

81. Capacious : ROOMY
Something described as “capacious” is spacious, capable of holding much.

82. Apple desktop : IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

83. National Novel Writing Mo. : NOV
National Novel Writing Month is creatively shortened to “NaNoWriMo”, and takes place in November each year. Participants in NaNoWriMo are encouraged to write a minimum of 50,000 words from from midnight on November 1st until 11:59PM on November 30th. The activity is managed through the website NaNoWriMo.org. The focus is completion rather than perfection, so that a complete first draft is finished and ready for editing at a later time.

84. Havana-to-Palm Beach dir. : NNE
Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

Palm Beach is the most easterly town in Florida, and is located on a barrier island. Palm Beach is separated from the cities of West Palm Beach and Lake Worth by the Intracoastal Waterway.

86. See 92-Across : ST NICK
(92A. Portrayer of 86-Across in "Elf" : ASNER)
Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

90. Japanese for "teacher" : SENSEI
“Sensei” is a Japanese form of address used for figures of authority, from lawyers to martial arts instructors.

91. Message to one's followers : TWEET
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so (but one should never say “never”). Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

92. Portrayer of 86-Across in "Elf" : ASNER
(86A. See 92-Across : ST NICK)
Ed Asner is most famous for playing the irascible but lovable Lou Grant on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and on the spin-off drama "Lou Grant". Off-screen, Asner is noted for his political activism. He served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and was very involved in the 1980 SAG strike. When "Lou Grant" was cancelled in 1982, despite decent ratings, there was a lot of talk that the cancellation was a move by the network against Asner personally. In fact one of Asner's activist colleagues, Howard Hesseman (who played Johnny Fever), found that his show "WKRP in Cincinnati" was also cancelled ... on the very same day.

“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role with James Caan supporting. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City.

95. Rakes : ROUES
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

A "rake" (short for “rakehell”) is defined as a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn’t it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie "Bridget Jones’s Diary". "Rake" comes from the Old Norse "reikall", meaning "vagrant or a wanderer".

97. Cooking spray brand : PAM
PAM cooking oil was introduced in 1961 by Leon Rubin and Arthur Meyerhoff. The name “PAM” is an acronym ... standing for “Product of Arthur Meyerhoff”. Who’d a thunk it …?

98. "The Downeaster '___'" (Billy Joel song) : ALEXA
“The Downeaster ‘Alexa’” is a 1990 song written and performed by Billy Joel. The title refers to a vessel called the Alexa, a Maine lobster boat known as a “downeaster”.

110. Hyphenated fig. : SSN
A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

Down
1. Mai ___ : TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

3. Capt. Kangaroo's network : CBS
“Captain Kangaroo” is a TV series for children that CBS aired for a long, long time. The show was first broadcast in 1955, and the last show was aired nearly 30 years later in 1984. The title character was played by Bob Keeshan. Apparently Keeshan had to wear heavy makeup in the early years to make him old enough for his role. The show ran so long that Keeshan had to use makeup to look younger in the latter years.

4. Peak that's known as "The Great One" : MOUNT MCKINLEY
Denali means "the high one, great one" in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

5. Rare notes : TWOS
The US two-dollar bill features a portrait of Thomas Jefferson. The bill was introduced in 1862, and withdrawn in 1966. It was reintroduced in 1976, and is still legal tender. That said, there are relatively few two-dollar bills in circulation. Some people even hold that possession of a two-dollar bill is bad luck.

9. Seafood soup base : SHARK FIN
Shark finning is a cruel fishing practice driven by the demand for Chinese shark fin soup. Millions of sharks every year are captured, have their fins sliced off at sea and are then thrown back into the ocean still alive. The mutilated sharks don’t last very long and are usually eaten because they cannot maneuver very easily without their dorsal fins.

12. Attraction that operates under its own steam? : OLD FAITHFUL
Old Faithful is a geyser in Yellowstone National Park. It erupts almost every 63 minutes on the nose, making it one of the most predictable geographic features on the planet. It was this predictability that led to the name “Old Faithful”. In the early days of Yellowstone’s existence as a park, the geyser was used as a laundry. Dirty linen clothing was placed in the geyser’s crater during the quiet period. The clothing was ejected during the eruption, thoroughly washed.

15. Catcher of some waves : RADIO ANTENNA
An antenna’s job is to convert electrical power into radio waves, and radio waves into an electrical signal. The first antennas were built by the German physicist Heinrich Hertz in 1888.

17. Champagne holder : FLUTE
The narrow bowl of a champagne flute is preferred over the wide bowl of a champagne coupe as the smaller surface area of the wine helps retain its carbonation.

19. Seasonal linguine topper : MOREL
The morel is that genus of mushroom with the honeycomb-like structure on the cap. They're highly prized, especially in French cuisine. Morels should never be eaten raw as they are toxic, with the toxins being removed by thorough cooking.

Linguine is a type of pasta that is similar to spaghetti, except that in cross-section linguine is elliptical whereas spaghetti is round. The correct name for the dish is “linguine” meaning “little tongues” in Italian. That said, the misspelling “linguini” is given in some dictionaries as an acceptable Americanized variant..

33. Redolence : AROMA
Something that is redolent is aromatic, emits a fragrance. Redolent is an Old French word.

35. Pro ___ : RATA
"Pro rata" is a Latin phrase meaning "in proportion".

36. Coin to pay for passage across the River Styx : OBOL
An obol is also known as an obolus. The obol was a silver coin used in Greece that was worth one sixth of a drachma.

The River Styx of Greek mythology was the river that formed the boundary between the Earth and the Underworld (or “Hades”). The souls of the newly dead had to cross the River Styx in a ferry boat piloted by Charon. Traditionally, a coin would be placed in the mouths of the dead "to pay the ferryman".

41. Fodder for tabloids : RUMORS
"Tabloid" is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

45. Wise ones : SOLONS
Solon was an Athenian statesman and lawmaker in Ancient Greece. He gave his name to our contemporary word "solon" meaning "a wise lawmaker".

46. Daughter of Hyperion : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

Hyperion was one of the Titan deities, and was the personification of the Earth.

57. Ends of letters : SERIFS
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif (using the French word "sans" meaning "without"). Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I'm not so sure though ...

59. Words below an orange on a license plate : SUNSHINE STATE
Florida is known as the Sunshine State, although it is also the lightning capital of the US, experiencing more lightning strikes than the rest of the country. Florida is also the nation’s fourth-rainiest state, after Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.

60. One of 24 in a glucose molecule : ATOM
Glucose is a simple sugar that is also known as dextrose or grape sugar. It is widely found in nature as glucose is made by plants from carbon dioxide and water during photosynthesis.

61. Bagel topper : NOVA
Nova lox is salmon that has been cured with a mild brine and then cold-smoked. The term originally applied to salmon from Nova Scotia.

63. Something you might get a kick out of? : KARATE
The Japanese word "karate", means "open hand", and the related word "karaoke" means "open orchestra".

64. Steven Wright's "I intend to live forever. So far, so good," e.g. : QUIP
Steven Wright is a remarkable and droll comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wright is very, very quotable:
- What's another word for Thesaurus?
- If a word in the dictionary were misspelled, how would we know?
- I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
- When I was a little kid we had a sand box. It was a quicksand box. I was an only child... eventually.

66. Capital city founded during a gold rush : HELENA
Helena is the capital of the state of Montana, and is known as the Queen City of the Rockies. Helena's main street has a very colorful name, namely Last Chance Gulch.

67. Mariana, e.g. : OCEAN TRENCH
The Mariana Trench is the lowest elevation on the surface of the Earth's crust. The Mariana Trench takes its name from the nearby Mariana Islands in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

68. ___ a one : NARY
The adjective "nary" means "not one", as in “nary a soul”.

69. What's superior to Lake Superior: Abbr. : ONT
Lake Superior is the largest of the Great Lakes, and the largest freshwater lake in the world by area. The lake was referred to by the first French explorers as “le lac supérieur”, which translates literally as “the upper lake”. The British anglicized the name to “Lake Superior”.

71. Hip-hop's Mos ___ : DEF
Mos Def is the former stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay, now known as Yasiin Bey. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003's "The Italian Job" , 2005's "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", and for a featured role in an episode of television's "House".

72. Hematophagous creature : VAMPIRE BAT
Vampire bats feed mostly in the blood of mammals, including humans. When they find a suitable "victim", often one that is asleep, the bat usually lands close by and approaches its "meal" on the ground. It makes a small cut with its razor-sharp teeth and laps up the blood. The blood tends to flow freely as the bat's saliva contains anticoagulants. Reports of bats biting the neck of humans are very rare in the real world, but the neck is the preferred location of attack in the fantasy world of vampires.

An animal described as “hematophagous” feeds on blood.

75. Hand source : DECK
Hands are dealt from decks of cards.

77. Bank to rely on : LEVEE
A levee is an artificial bank usually made of earth, running along the length of a river. A levee is designed to hold back river water at a time of potential flooding. "Levée" is the French word for "raised" and is an American term that originated in French-speaking New Orleans around 1720.

79. Pouting expression : MOUE
The term “moue” comes from French, and means a small grimace or a pout.

85. Hula hoop? : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

88. June honorees : PAPAS
Father’s Day was added as an official holiday in 1972, although bills to create the holiday had been with Congress since 1913. By rights, the holiday should be called “Fathers’ Day” (note the punctuation), but the Bill that was introduced in 1913 used the “Father’s Day” spelling, and that’s the one that has stuck.

96. Variety of antelope : ORYX
The oryx is a large antelope species, mainly found in Africa but also in the Arabian Peninsula. One species was introduced by man into the White Sands Missile Range. As a result, the oryx is now considered an invasive species in the neighboring White Sands National Monument.

101. Old White House moniker : IKE
“I Like Ike” was a political slogan that originated with the grassroots movement to get Dwight D. Eisenhower to run for president in the 1952 presidential election.

102. Unit usually seen with the prefix deci- : BEL
In the world of acoustics, one bel is equal to ten decibels.

104. Big name in current research? : OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

105. Point of writing? : NIB
"Nib" is a Scottish variant of the Old English word "neb", with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of "nib" as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with "nib" meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Choco ___ (Klondike treat) : TACO
5. School : TEACH
10. Items that may be labeled SMTWTFS : PILLS
15. Dog sound : ARF!
18. Series of numbers? : ALBUM
20. Kurt Vonnegut's "Happy Birthday, ___ June" : WANDA
21. Former part of the British Empire : INDIA
22. Joe Biden's home: Abbr. : DEL
23. "I expected as much" : IT'S NO WONDER
25. Towering : LOFTY
26. Letters of obligation : IOU
27. Hair piece : TRESS
28. Currency which, in one denomination, features a portrait of Linnaeus : KRONA
30. Garment for tennis, perhaps : SKORT
32. Not as exciting : TAMER
34. Return from a store : PROFIT
37. When blacksmithing began : IRON AGE
39. Perfect orbit : CIRCLE
40. Fanatical : RABID
41. 66, e.g.: Abbr. : RTE
42. Nav. rank : ENS
43. Run ___ : AMOK
44. Boarded : GOT ON
45. "Awe-SOME!" : SUH-WEET!
47. Occurring in March and September, say : SEMIANNUAL
50. Shenanigans : TOMFOOLERY
53. Dietary no-no : TRANS FAT
54. Grey and ochre : COLOURS
55. "There is ___ in team" : NO I
56. Pleasant inflection : LILT
57. Park opened in 1964 : SEAWORLD
59. Easy-peasy task : SNAP
60. Chocolate mint brand with peaks in its logo : ANDES
63. Temperature units : KELVINS
64. Muscles worked by leg presses : QUADS
65. Anti-Revolutionary of 1776 : TORY
66. Gets harsher : HOARSENS
68. An example of itself : NOUN
70. Lacto-___ vegetarian : OVO
71. Condemned : DECRIED
72. Gone : VANISHED
76. Hockey team with a patriotic name : MAPLE LEAFS
78. Distraction for many an idle person : SMARTPHONE
80. Bests : DEFEATS
81. Capacious : ROOMY
82. Apple desktop : IMAC
83. National Novel Writing Mo. : NOV
84. Havana-to-Palm Beach dir. : NNE
85. Eagerly accept : LAP UP
86. See 92-Across : ST NICK
88. Handled roughly : PAWED AT
90. Japanese for "teacher" : SENSEI
91. Message to one's followers : TWEET
92. Portrayer of 86-Across in "Elf" : ASNER
93. Artifact : RELIC
95. Rakes : ROUES
97. Cooking spray brand : PAM
98. "The Downeaster '___'" (Billy Joel song) : ALEXA
100. Sleep mode? : HIBERNATION
106. Malt product : ALE
107. Bring home the gold : WIN IT
108. Barely manage : EKE BY
109. Breakfast cereal maker : KASHI
110. Hyphenated fig. : SSN
111. Factions : SECTS
112. "It was just a joke!" : RELAX!
113. Where writing is on the wall? : TOMB

Down
1. Mai ___ : TAI
2. Bottom-row key : ALT
3. Capt. Kangaroo's network : CBS
4. Peak that's known as "The Great One" : MOUNT MCKINLEY
5. Rare notes : TWOS
6. Crisp bit in a stir-fry : BEAN SPROUT
7. Further : AND
8. String after B : CDE
9. Seafood soup base : SHARK FIN
10. Series opener : PILOT
11. Privy to : IN ON
12. Attraction that operates under its own steam? : OLD FAITHFUL
13. Not in the dark : LIT
14. Authorization : SAY-SO
15. Catcher of some waves : RADIO ANTENNA
16. Shake-ups in corps. : REORGS
17. Champagne holder : FLUTE
19. Seasonal linguine topper : MOREL
24. "___ even" : WE’RE
29. Expunge : RID
31. Prepare to tie a shoelace, say : KNEEL
32. Staple of quiz bowls : TIMER
33. Redolence : AROMA
35. Pro ___ : RATA
36. Coin to pay for passage across the River Styx : OBOL
38. Put another way : REWORD
39. Strewn : CAST
41. Fodder for tabloids : RUMORS
44. Little bugger : GNAT
45. Wise ones : SOLONS
46. Daughter of Hyperion : EOS
48. Condition of sale : AS IS
49. TV's "The ___ Today" : NFL
50. Bring, as to a repair shop : TOW IN
51. Thoroughfare : ROAD
52. Dog sounds : YIPS
54. Collapsed, with "in" : CAVED
57. Ends of letters : SERIFS
58. Somebody ___ : ELSE’S
59. Words below an orange on a license plate : SUNSHINE STATE
60. One of 24 in a glucose molecule : ATOM
61. Bagel topper : NOVA
62. It might contain a list of postal abbreviations : DROP-DOWN MENU
63. Something you might get a kick out of? : KARATE
64. Steven Wright's "I intend to live forever. So far, so good," e.g. : QUIP
66. Capital city founded during a gold rush : HELENA
67. Mariana, e.g. : OCEAN TRENCH
68. ___ a one : NARY
69. What's superior to Lake Superior: Abbr. : ONT
71. Hip-hop's Mos ___ : DEF
72. Hematophagous creature : VAMPIRE BAT
73. Buddy : HOMIE
74. Pass : ENACT
75. Hand source : DECK
77. Bank to rely on : LEVEE
78. Soaks (up) : SOPS
79. Pouting expression : MOUE
81. Major stockholder? : RANCHER
83. "m" and "n" : NASALS
85. Hula hoop? : LEI
86. Dumbfound : STUN
87. Small change : TWEAK
88. June honorees : PAPAS
89. Parts, as blinds : DRAWS
90. Blind parts : SLATS
94. Highway number : EXIT
96. Variety of antelope : ORYX
99. Fiction : LIE
101. Old Whitehouse moniker : IKE
102. Unit usually seen with the prefix deci- : BEL
103. Equal: Prefix : ISO-
104. Big name in current research? : OHM
105. Point of writing? : NIB


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

8 comments :

Willie D said...

I sensed there was either a rebus (not likely) or the "outside the box" grid that poppsed up on a recent Thursday. But DNF for me.

Anonymous said...

98A Is it relevant that Billy Joel's daughter is named Alexa? Or a coincidence?

BruceB said...

43:49 for me today. Missed 2, HOARSENS (COARSENS), HELENA (CELENA). Puzzle theme made no sense to me, until I saw Bill's explanation.

Anonymous said...

I actually got this one (and no errors, although I don't know my time). I started out thinking it was hopeless--not sure what finally inspired me to add the letters outside the grid. It's supposed to be a challenge, right?

Dave Kennison said...

The Denver Post didn't bother to publish the little explanatory note, so, after I finished the puzzle, I stared at it for awhile without seeing the "hidden" message. A disadvantage of using the syndicated version, I guess ...

For the first time ever, I did both the NYT and LAT crosswords in red ink without having to correct anything in black ink. I'd best enjoy it, as it'll probably never happen again ... :-)

jimmyd said...

I ALWAYS come to Bill's blog to "check my work" and put my mind at rest so I can sleep. I missed SKORT and that led to my being stuck on the "bonus" message. As always, it took me all week to slog through this thing but that's part of the attraction for me. I do it in the can haha!

JaJaJoe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
JaJaJoe said...

About 20A Kurt Vonnegut's "Happy Birthday, WANDA June", in addition to
Bill's blurb on it, I enjoyed the rest of Kurt's zany plot as via
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Birthday,_Wanda_June

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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