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0614-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Jun 15, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Randolph Ross
THEME: The In Crowd … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase that includes a word starting with “IN-”. Each answer has been clued as though that “IN” is a separate word of its own:
23A. Dispute between Loretta Lynch and her co-workers? : FIGHT IN JUSTICE (from “fight injustice”)
37A. Army V.I.P. at a military parade? : GENERAL IN FORMATION (from “general information”)
48A. Smartest one to consider a case? : BRAIN IN JURY (from “brain injury”)
64A. Municipal building located where major roads intersect? : COURT IN JUNCTION (from “court injunction)
83A. Nun for the defense? : SISTER IN LAW (from “sister-in-law”)
90A. G.I. dressed like a priest? : PRIVATE IN VESTMENTS (from “private investments”)
110A. Felon at a campground? : CRIMINAL IN TENT (from “criminal intent”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … LAMAR (Lamav), RIAL (vial!!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Creator of Stupefyin' Jones : AL CAPP
Stupefyin' Jones is a character in AL Capp’s famous comic strip “Li'l Abner”. Stupefyin' was just that, a stunning-looking young lady who stupefied all males who caught sight of her.

23. Dispute between Loretta Lynch and her co-workers? : FIGHT IN JUSTICE (from “fight injustice”)
Loretta Lynch is the current Attorney General of the US, having assumed office in April of 2015. Lynch is the first African-American woman to hold the post, and only the second woman (Janet Reno was the first).

25. 1994 movie based on an "S.N.L." character : IT’S PAT
The androgynous character known as “Pat” on “Saturday Night Live” was played by the comedienne Julia Sweeney. Pat appeared in a 1994 movie called “It’s Pat”, which is one of the worst films of all time, I am told ...

26. Nike competitor : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

29. Manila moolah : PESOS
The writing on bank notes in the Philippines used to be in English, so the currency was recorded as the “peso”. Since 1967 the language on the notes has been Filipino, and now the name of the currency is written as “Piso”.

Many moons ago I spent a couple of very happy years living in Manila in the Philippines. I had an apartment there, and residing in the apartment building next door was Imelda Marcos, along with all of her shoes I assume ...

30. Words before "Be" and "Go" in two hit songs : LET IT …
"Let It Be" was the last album that the Beatles released as an active group playing together. The title song “Let It Be” was written by Paul McCartney, and it is clearly one of his own favorites. McCartney says that he was inspired to write the song after having had a dream about his mother (who had died some years earlier from cancer). In fact he refers to her (Mary McCartney) in the line "Mother Mary comes to me". Paul's first wife, Linda, is singing backing vocals on the song, the only time she is known to have done so in a Beatles recording. 18 years after that 1970 recording was made, Paul, George and Ringo sang "Let It Be" at a memorial service for Linda, who was also lost to cancer. Sad stuff, but a lovely song ...

“Let It Go” is a highly successful song from the Disney animated film “Frozen” released in 2013. It was performed in the movie by Idina Menzel, who also was the voice actor for the character Elsa. “Let It Go” is one of the very few Disney songs to make it into the Billboard Top Ten.

32. Option for a non-grad : GED
The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of five tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

35. Rank above bey : PASHA
A “pasha” was a high-ranking official in the Ottoman Empire, roughly equivalent to the English rank of “lord”.

“Bey” is a Turkish title for a chieftain. In the days of the Ottoman Empire, the term “bey” was used for many different officials, but traditionally it referred to the leader of a small tribal group. Today “bey” is used very much like “mister”.

41. Chemistry unit: Abbr. : MOL
Molecule (mol.)

45. Early times, for short : AMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

46. "Voulez-___" ("Mamma Mia!" song) : VOUS
The 1979 ABBA song “Voulez-Vous” was recorded in Miami, making it the group’s only song that was recorded in a studio outside of their native Sweden.

The hit musical “Mamma Mia!” was written to showcase the songs of ABBA. I’m a big fan of ABBA’s music, so I’ve seen this show a couple of times and just love it. “Mamma Mia!” is such a big hit on the stage that on any given day there are at least seven performances going on somewhere in the world. There is a really interesting film version of the show that was released in 2008. I think the female lead Meryl Streep is wonderful in the movie, but the male leads … not so much! By the way, one can tell the difference between “Mamma Mia” the ABBA song and “Mamma Mia!” the musical, by noting the difference in the punctuation in the titles.

47. Deck (out) : TOG
The verb "tog", meaning to dress up, comes from the Latin "toga", the garment worn in Ancient Rome. "Tog" can be use as an informal word for a coat or a cloak. Back in Ireland, togs are what we call swimming shorts.

52. Ballet jumps : JETES
A jeté is a leap in ballet, coming from the French word "jeter" meaning "to throw". A “jeté en avant” is a “leap to the front”, towards the audience. A “grand jeté” is a long horizontal jump, a split in the air, leaping from one foot to the other.

53. Suffix with Manhattan : -ITE
The island we know as Manhattan was inhabited by the Lenape Indians when the first Europeans explorers arrived in the area. According to the logbook of one of the officers on explorer Henry Hudson's yacht, the island was called "Manna-hata" in the local language, from which the modern name derives.

54. Dreamboat : ADONIS
In Greek mythology, Adonis is a beautiful young god loved by Aphrodite. Adonis dies in a hunting accident (gored by a boar), but not before he gives Aphrodite a child. Adonis was originally a Phoenician god "absorbed" into Greek lore (Phoenicia is modern day Lebanon). The child born of Adonis to Aphrodite was called Beroe, after which is named Beirut, the capital city of Lebanon. We also use the term “adonis” to mean “beautiful male”.

55. Org. that regulates arsenic and asbestos : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

56. Oscar Wilde poem "The Garden of ___" : EROS
“The Garden of Eros” is an 1881 poem by Irish author Oscar Wilde. The first verse is:
It is full summer now, the heart of June,
Not yet the sun-burnt reapers are a-stir
Upon the upland meadow where too soon
Rich autumn time, the season’s usurer,
Will lend his hoarded gold to all the trees,
And see his treasure scattered by the wild and spendthrift breeze.

59. Loafer, e.g. : SLIP-ON
The type of slip-on shoe called a "loafer" dates back to 1939. "Loafer" was originally a brand name introduced by the Fortnum and Mason's store in London.

62. Winter coats : ULSTERS
If you've watched Victorian dramas you might have seen the original Ulster coat, which is very distinctive. It is a full length, heavy coat, with an attached cape made from the same material that hangs down as far as the waist. The cape was dropped in the 20th century, and now an Ulster a relatively simple, hard-wearing, double-breasted overcoat.

72. One fry short of a Happy Meal : LOOPY
The McDonald’s Happy Meal was introduced in 1977. The Happy Meal was inspired by a selection of food designed in a Guatemalan McDonald’s to suit children that was called “Menu Ronald”.

76. Sally ___ (sweet bun) : LUNN
A Sally Lunn bun is something that I have enjoyed in Bath in England, the town in which it originated. You can eat Sally Lunn buns at Sally Lunn's House in Bath, a bakery in the town that has a dining room. The name supposedly comes from Sillie Luyon, a Huguenot immigrant that ended up in Bath in 1680, bringing her recipe for with her.

79. Religious title : FRA
The title "Fra" (brother) is used by Italian monks.

81. Dorm V.I.P.s : RAS
RAs are resident assistants or resident advisers, the peer leaders found in residence halls, particularly on a college campus.

85. Sch. in Norfolk, Va. : ODU
Old Dominion University (ODU) is a public school in Norfolk, Virginia. ODU was established in 1930 as a two year branch division of the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg. The school was granted independence in 1962 as Old Dominion College, and became Old Dominion University in 1969. “The Old Dominion” was a nickname given to Virginia by King Charles II in recognition of the loyalty shown by the colony during the English Civil War.

86. Abbr. on a town's welcome sign : ESTD
Established (estd.)

89. Dummkopf : ASS
"Dummkopf" is a German word that translates literally as "dumb head".

98. Play ___ with (harm) : HOB
“To play hob” is to make mischief, to play the clown. “Hob” is short for “hobgoblin”.

99. Standard deviation symbol : SIGMA
In the world of statistics, the standard deviation (std. dev.) is a measure of how closely data points are clustered around the mean value. A low standard deviation indicates a relatively tight distribution. A standard deviation is usually represented by the Greek letter sigma in lower case.

105. Where It.'s at : EUR
Italy (It.) is in Europe (Eur.)

106. Truman's Missouri birthplace : LAMAR
Lamar, Missouri was named for Mirabeau B. Lamar, the second President of the Republic of Texas. Most notably, Lamar was the birthplace of President Harry S. Truman.

Harry Truman wanted to go to West Point having served with the Missouri Army National Guard on active duty in WWI, but he couldn't get in because of his poor eyesight. Young Truman didn't have the money to pay for college anywhere else. He did manage to study for two years towards a law degree at the Kansas City Law School in the twenties, but he never finished his schooling. So, Harry S. Truman was the last US President (out of a list of ten) who did not have a college degree.

109. Dick ___, Pro Football Hall of Fame coach who popularized the zone blitz : LEBEAU
Dick LeBeau is considered by many to be one of the football's greatest defensive coordinators. Part of LeBeau's legacy is his refinement and use of the "zone blitz" in the late 1980s when he was on the staff of the Cincinnati Bengals. The zone blitz itself had been created in 1971 by Bill Arnsparger while with the Miami Dolphins.

115. New parent's purchase : LAYETTE
A newborn baby’s collection of clothing and accessories is called a layette.

116. Early online forum : USENET
Remember the good old days, when you read messages online in "newsgroups"? Well, that system of aggregating public messages is known as Usenet, and it's still around today. Usenet started operating in 1980, some ten years before the World Wide Web was introduced (which system has displaced Usenet in terms of popularity). Usenet definitely played a significant part in the history of the Internet. For instance, the terms "FAQ" and "spam" were both born on Usenet.

Down
1. Slaughterhouse scraps : OFFAL
The internal organs and entrails of a butchered animal is referred to as “offal”. Examples of dishes that make use of offal would be sausages, foie gras, sweetbreads and haggis. The term is a melding of the words “off” and “fall”, and dates back to the 14th century. The idea is that offal is what “falls off” a butcher’s block.

4. Secretary of state after Ed Muskie : AL HAIG
Alexander Haig was Secretary of State under President Reagan, and White House Chief of Staff under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Famously, Haig took over temporary control of the country immediately after President Reagan was shot in 1981. To do so was a pragmatic move, while waiting on Vice President Bush to arrive in Washington. There was much debate at the time about the legality of the steps taken, as the presidential line of succession called out in the US Constitution is President, Vice President, Speaker of the House, President pro tempore of the US Senate, and then Secretary of State.

Ed Muskie was Governor of Maine in the late fifties. Muskie was born in Rumford, Maine and was a Polish-American. When he served as Secretary of State in the Carter administration, Muskie held the highest office in the US for any Polish-American.

5. Wall Street order : PUT
A “put option” is the name given to a contract in which the buyer of the put has the option to sell something at a future date should it’s market price fall to a predetermined level. The seller of the put is obliged to purchase the security at that price.

6. Tenor in "The Flying Dutchman" : ERIK
The reference here is to Richard Wagner's opera "The Flying Dutchman". Erik is a hunter, and the main tenor role. He chases after his ex-love Senta, the soprano in the piece.

10. Flight stat. : ALT
Altitude (alt.)

11. Spiral seashells : TRITONS
Tritons are large sea snails, sometimes referred to as “Triton’s trumpets”. Triton, the Greek god of the sea, is sometimes portrayed using a large seashell as a trumpet, hence the name.

15. Vituperate, informally : CUSS AT
Vituperation is sustained, abusive language.

16. Best blood type for a transfusion recipient : AB-POSITIVE
In general, a person with type O-negative blood is a universal donor, meaning that his or her blood can be used for a transfusion into persons with any other blood type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive (although there are other considerations). Also in general, a person with type AB-positive blood is a universal recipient, meaning that he or she can receive a transfusion of blood of any type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive.

24. Raspberry : JEER
Not so much here in America, but over in the British Isles "blowing a raspberry" is a way of insulting someone (I think it's called "a Bronx cheer" in the US). The verb "to razz" comes from a shortened form of "raspberry".

31. Any member of One Direction : TEEN IDOL
One Direction is a UK-based boy band. Each member of the band competed in the reality show “The X Factor”, and didn’t do very well. The five were then combined in a boy band at a later stage of the competition. They only finished in third place, but I don’t think they care. They’re doing very, very well for “losers” …

33. Frost-covered : RIMY
Rime is that beautiful coating of ice that forms on surfaces like roofs, trees and grass, when cold water freezes instantly under the right conditions.

38. Most-watched TV series of 2012-13 : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon.

39. "S.N.L." castmate of John, Dan and Gilda : LARAINE
Laraine Newman is a comedian, one of the original members of the “Saturday Night Live” team. On the show she played several recurring characters including Sheri the Valley Girl and Connie Conehead.

40. Breakfast cereal : MUESLI
"Muesli" is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. “Muesli” is a diminutive of the German word “Mues” meaning “puree”. Delicious ...

42. Great Seal word : ORDO
The Latin phrase “novus ordo seclorum” means "new order of the ages”. These words appear on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, a device used to authenticate some US federal documents. “Novus ordo seclorum” also appears on the back of one-dollar bills. The phrase itself is lifted from one of the works of the ancient Roman poet Virgil.

43. Landlocked Asian land : LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country's name is "Meuang Lao". The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of "Lao" entities united into one, the French added the "S" and so today we tend to use "Laos" instead of "Lao".

49. How most Campbell's soup comes : IN A CAN
The Campbell’s Soup company is named for one of the enterprise's two founders, Joseph A. Campbell. He and Abraham Anderson started the business in 1869. The iconic design of the Campbell’s can was introduced in 1989 and has hardly changed since then. The gold seal in the design comes from the 1900 Paris Exhibition.

52. Longtime reality TV family on the E! channel : JENNERS
Kris Kardashian is the matriarch of the Kardashian clan. She was married to the lawyer Robert Kardashian who was one of O. J. Simpson’s lawyers in his 1995 murder trial. The couple divorced in 1990 and Kris then married the celebrated decathlete from the 1976 Olympic Games, Bruce Jenner. That marriage ended in divorce as well, in 2015.

57. When there's "darkness" in a classic Arthur Koestler novel : AT NOON
The novel “Darkness at Noon” is the best-known work by Hungarian-British author Arthur Koestler. Koestler live the last four decades of his life in Britain, before committing suicide with his wife in their home in London in 1983.

60. Sleepers, for short : PJS
Our word "pajamas" (“PJs” for short) comes to us from the Indian subcontinent, where "pai jamahs" were loose fitting pants tied at the waist and worn at night by locals and ultimately by the Europeans living there. And "pajamas" is another of those words that I had to learn to spell differently when I came to America. In the British Isles the spelling is "pyjamas".

61. Closet collection : OUTFITS
In old French a “clos” was an enclosure, with the diminutive form “closet” describing a small enclosure or private room. Over time this evolved into our modern usage, to describe a cabinet or cupboard.

68. Cheap smoke, in slang : EL ROPO
“El ropo” is American slang not only for a big cheap cigar, but also for a cannabis cigarette, so I am told ...

73. Home of Broken Arrow and Broken Bow: Abbr. : OKLA
The city of Broken Arrow is the largest suburb of Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma city called Broken Bow is located in the very southeast of the state.

74. Mom-and-pop orgs. : PTAS
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

80. 1982 Disney film : TRON
Released in 1982, Disney’s "Tron" was one of the first mainstream films to make extensive use of computer graphics. The main role in the movie is played by Jeff Bridges.

87. It's a sin : AVARICE
Our word “avarice”, meaning a desire for wealth, ultimately derives from the Latin word for crave, “avere”.

91. Tony winner for "Pippin" : VEREEN
Ben Vereen is an American actor and dancer who is probably best known for playing Chicken George in the magnificent television miniseries "Roots". When he was applying for a passport in the sixties, Vereen discovered that he was adopted. He then went looking for his birth parents and identified his birth mother (who had passed away by this time). She went away on a trip when Ben was very young only to return and find that her child and the person minding him had disappeared. She never saw her son again.

“Pippin” is a stage musical by Stephen Schwartz that was first produced in 1972, on Broadway. The original Broadway production was directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse, for which work Fosse won two Tony Awards in 1973. The title character’s father in “Pippin” is named Charlemagne. The father-son characters are inspired by the Holy Roman Emperors Charlemagne and Pepin.

92. One making cell transmissions : NEURON
A nerve cell is more correctly called a neuron, and the long nerve fiber that is part of a neuron is called the axon.

93. Macbeth and Macduff : THANES
Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in "Macbeth" are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

94. Where to see a van Gogh in N.Y.C. : MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

100. Bernhard ___, so-called "Subway Vigilante" of 1984 : GOETZ
Bernhard Goetz is a resident of New York City who shot four African-American males who tried to mug him on a Manhattan Subway train in 1984. After the incident, Goetz was charged with several offenses, including attempted murder. He was cleared by a jury of all charges, except that of carrying an unlicensed firearm, for which he served eight months in jail. Over ten years later, one of the attackers, a brain-damaged paraplegic as a result of the shooting, obtained a civil judgement of $43 million against Goetz.

101. Con game : MONTE
Three-card Monte is a confidence trick in which someone is goaded into betting money on the assumption that he or she can find the “money card” (usually a queen) among three cards placed face down. The “mark” who is being duped has all sorts of ways to lose and there are usually several people in on the scam, including others playing who seem to be winning.

102. Song and dance, in Seville : ARTES
The city of Seville is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including "The Barber of Seville" by Rossini, "Fidelio" by Beethoven and Mozart's "Don Giovanni" and "The Marriage of Figaro".

104. Jabba, for one, in "Star Wars" : HUTT
Jabba the Hutt is the big blob of an alien that appears in the "Star Wars" movie "The Return of the Jedi". Jabba's claim to fame is that he enslaved Princess Leia and kitted her out in that celebrated metal bikini.

106. Portray : LIMN
“To limn” is to describe, or portray in a painting or a drawing. “Limn” has the same root as “illuminate”, in the sense of illuminating a manuscript.

107. Unit of currency for some oil : RIAL
The "Rial" is name of the currency of Iran (as well as Yemen, Oman, Cambodia and Tunisia).

109. Lucy of TV's "Elementary" : LIU
Lucy Liu is an actress from Queens, New York. Liu's big break came when she was chosen to play the Ling Woo character in "Ally McBeal". I liked her in the 2000 film "Charlie's Angels" but as I am no fan of Quentin Tarantino, I did not enjoy the movie "Kill Bill". I am having fun watching one of Liu’s more recent projects, in which she plays Joan Watson, one of the two lead characters in the TV crime drama “Elementary”.

If you’ve seen the American television show “Elementary”, you will know that it is an adaptation of the classic tales by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that are set in the present day. “Elementary” is similar in look and feel to the excellent BBC series “Sherlock”, which stars Benedict Cumberbatch as a modern-day Holmes. We can pick up “Sherlock” in some parts of the country as part of “Masterpiece Mystery” on PBS.

111. ___ shu pork : MOO
Moo shu pork is a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg.

112. Science advocate Bill : NYE
That would be "Bill Nye the Science Guy". Bill's show ran on Disney for 4 years from 1993-97. I was surprised to learn that Bill Nye was married briefly to Blair Tindall, the author of "Mozart in the Jungle". That's a great book, if anyone is interested ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Theoretically, at least : ON PAPER
8. Social exchanges : CHATS
13. Creator of Stupefyin' Jones : AL CAPP
19. It's said to be "the mother of success" : FAILURE
20. Offshore sight : OIL RIG
22. Painted amateurishly : DAUBED
23. Dispute between Loretta Lynch and her co-workers? : FIGHT IN JUSTICE (from “fight injustice”)
25. 1994 movie based on an "S.N.L." character : IT’S PAT
26. Nike competitor : AVIA
27. Naval bases? : KEELS
28. B'way buy : TKT
29. Manila moolah : PESOS
30. Words before "Be" and "Go" in two hit songs : LET IT ...
32. Option for a non-grad : GED
33. Fowl pole? : ROOST
35. Rank above bey : PASHA
37. Army V.I.P. at a military parade? : GENERAL IN FORMATION (from “general information”)
41. Chemistry unit: Abbr. : MOL
44. System starter? : ECO-
45. Early times, for short : AMS
46. "Voulez-___" ("Mamma Mia!" song) : VOUS
47. Deck (out) : TOG
48. Smartest one to consider a case? : BRAIN IN JURY (from “brain injury”)
52. Ballet jumps : JETES
53. Suffix with Manhattan : -ITE
54. Dreamboat : ADONIS
55. Org. that regulates arsenic and asbestos : EPA
56. Oscar Wilde poem "The Garden of ___" : EROS
57. Say for sure : AVER
58. "It brings tears to my eyes" : SO SAD
59. Loafer, e.g. : SLIP-ON
62. Winter coats : ULSTERS
64. Municipal building located where major roads intersect? : COURT IN JUNCTION (from “court injunction)
68. The same as : EQUAL TO
71. Empty ___ : NESTER
72. One fry short of a Happy Meal : LOOPY
76. Sally ___ (sweet bun) : LUNN
77. Letter from the teacher : MARK
79. Religious title : FRA
80. Became enamored with : TOOK TO
81. Dorm V.I.P.s : RAS
82. Sprays, with "down" : HOSES
83. Nun for the defense? : SISTER IN LAW (from “sister-in-law”)
85. Sch. in Norfolk, Va. : ODU
86. Abbr. on a town's welcome sign : ESTD
87. Dead-on : APT
88. Attention getters : YOS
89. Dummkopf : ASS
90. G.I. dressed like a priest? : PRIVATE IN VESTMENTS (from “private investments”)
96. Exposed : OUTED
97. Not look forward to at all : DREAD
98. Play ___ with (harm) : HOB
99. Standard deviation symbol : SIGMA
103. Desiccate : PARCH
105. Where It.'s at : EUR
106. Truman's Missouri birthplace : LAMAR
108. Third-class : POOR
109. Dick ___, Pro Football Hall of Fame coach who popularized the zone blitz : LEBEAU
110. Felon at a campground? : CRIMINAL IN TENT (from “criminal intent”)
113. Least active : IDLEST
114. In the future : TO COME
115. New parent's purchase : LAYETTE
116. Early online forum : USENET
117. Night lights : NEONS
118. Lowlifes : SLEAZES

Down
1. Slaughterhouse scraps : OFFAL
2. Green : NAIVE
3. Live in squalor, informally : PIG IT
4. Secretary of state after Ed Muskie : AL HAIG
5. Wall Street order : PUT
6. Tenor in "The Flying Dutchman" : ERIK
7. Back away from : RENEGE ON
8. Might have, informally : COULDA
9. Blow off steam? : HISS
10. Flight stat. : ALT
11. Spiral seashells : TRITONS
12. Fed up with : SICK OF
13. Go for ___ (swim) : A DIP
14. It might allow a student to avoid detention : LATE PASS
15. Vituperate, informally : CUSS AT
16. Best blood type for a transfusion recipient : AB-POSITIVE
17. Toy blowgun : PEASHOOTER
18. Summer hours in L.A. : PDT
21. Recovers from : GETS OVER
24. Raspberry : JEER
31. Any member of One Direction : TEEN IDOL
33. Frost-covered : RIMY
34. Bring forward : TROT OUT
36. Ticks off : ANGERS
38. Most-watched TV series of 2012-13 : NCIS
39. "S.N.L." castmate of John, Dan and Gilda : LARAINE
40. Breakfast cereal : MUESLI
41. Degs. for future financiers : MBAS
42. Great Seal word : ORDO
43. Landlocked Asian land : LAOS
49. How most Campbell's soup comes : IN A CAN
50. Kid : JEST
51. Satellite connections : UPLINKS
52. Longtime reality TV family on the E! channel : JENNERS
57. When there's "darkness" in a classic Arthur Koestler novel : AT NOON
60. Sleepers, for short : PJS
61. Closet collection : OUTFITS
63. Featured musicians : SOLOISTS
65. Maximum : UTMOST
66. Like some peanuts and celebrities : ROASTED
67. Political suffix : -CRAT
68. Cheap smoke, in slang : EL ROPO
69. Most mammals : QUADRUPEDS
70. Not appropriate : UNSUITABLE
73. Home of Broken Arrow and Broken Bow: Abbr. : OKLA
74. Mom-and-pop orgs. : PTAS
75. Pained plaints : YOWS
78. Follow-up to a cross-examination : REDIRECT
80. 1982 Disney film : TRON
82. Nut job : HEADCASE
83. Earned a citation, maybe : SPED
84. Watches : EYEBALLS
87. It's a sin : AVARICE
91. Tony winner for "Pippin" : VEREEN
92. One making cell transmissions : NEURON
93. Macbeth and Macduff : THANES
94. Where to see a van Gogh in N.Y.C. : MOMA
95. What many English do in the afternoon : SIP TEA
100. Bernhard ___, so-called "Subway Vigilante" of 1984 : GOETZ
101. Con game : MONTE
102. Song and dance, in Seville : ARTES
104. Jabba, for one, in "Star Wars" : HUTT
106. Portray : LIMN
107. Unit of currency for some oil : RIAL
109. Lucy of TV's "Elementary" : LIU
111. ___ shu pork : MOO
112. Science advocate Bill : NYE


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14 comments :

Anonymous said...

My clue for 52D is "Kris of reality TV". "Jenners" didn't make sense. ???

Anonymous said...

Dick LeBeau and the Steelers have parted company

Bill Butler said...

I've fixed that LeBeau blurb, thanks to your (much appreciated) help. I am afraid that my sports knowledge, or lack thereof, lets me down every time.

Willie D said...

:40 for me, no errors, woohoo! This was a nice grid until the Kar-trash-ians showed up. So SICK_OF them. Their AVARICE clearly outpaces the ability of their NEURONS. Why did my memory recall Bernard GOETZ had a screwdriver, not a gun? Must've been some other subway vigilante.

Anonymous said...

The Pittsburgh Post Gazette which publishes the NYT's crossword puzzle and which by the way Dick LeBeau probably read while with the Steelers, showed the clue to 52 across to read "Kris of reality TV" which was quite confusing.

Anonymous said...

I believe that 41 across "chemistry unit abbr." refers to a mole, which is an SI unit of measurement.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(unit)

BruceB said...

43:47 for me today, no errors. 41A MOL. can be the abbreviation for MOLE or MOLECULE, both of which are units of chemistry. Bernard Goetz had a gun, the thugs that were mugging people on the subway carried screwdrivers. Guns were (are) illegal in New York City, screwdrivers are OK.

Ray o sunshine said...

It's not "Bruce" Jenner anymore

S Jones said...

23 across you said, "Loretta Lynch is the current Attorney General of the US, having assumed office in April of 2015. Lynch is the first African-American to hold the post, and only the second woman (Janet Reno was the first)".
Wasn't Eric Holder African-American?

Bill Butler said...

@S Jones
Thx for pointing out that slip. I meant to say "first African-American woman". All fixed now.

JaJaJoe said...

Though not literally explained -- "72. One fry short of a Happy Meal : LOOPY" -- I infer / like it!-)

JaJaJoe said...

So how does "Frost-covered : RIMY [become] Rime"
(which is what it's known as down here in/on
the Southern Appalachian Mountains)?

JaJaJoe said...

'Sure thought you woulda waxed about your fellow Hibernian here.-)

"56A. Oscar Wilde poem 'The Garden of ... EROS', 1881 poem
http://www.bartleby.com/143/10.html
The first verse [of 50+] ..."

JaJaJoe said...

Regarding "111D ... Moo shu pork is (a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg.") about my favorite Chinese dish; because I've known / love it served with / wrapped in mandarin pancakes.
http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/moo-shu-pork-with-mandarin-pancakes

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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