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1201-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Dec 15, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Norwegian Wood … Today’s grid includes the opening line of the Beatles hit “Norwegian Wood”.
55A. Beatles song released on 12/3/1965 : NORWEGIAN WOOD

20A. Start of the opening line of 55-Across : I ONCE HAD A GIRL ...
33A. Opening line, continued : … OR SHOULD I SAY ...
41A. End of the opening line : … SHE ONCE HAD ME
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Tech debut of 1998 : IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

14. One of the Seven Dwarfs : HAPPY
In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale called "Snow White", the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic Disney film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs". The seven dwarfs are:
- Doc (the leader of the group)
- Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife ...)
- Happy
- Sleepy
- Bashful
- Sneezy
- Dopey

15. Something that might come to light? : MOTH
It isn't really understood why moths are attracted to artificial lights. There is one theory that sounds plausible to me though. It is suggested that moths navigate at night by maintaining the moon (the brightest celestial object) at a fixed angle. When a moth finds a brighter light source, like an artificial light, it gets confused.

16. 1952 Hope/Crosby "Road" movie destination : BALI
“Road to Bali” is a is the sixth in the seven “Road to …” movies that star Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour. “Road to Bali” is unique among the other films in the series in that it was the only one filmed in color.

17. Doe follower, in song : A DEER
Doe, a deer, a female deer
Ray, a drop of golden sun
Me, a name I call myself
Far, a long, long way to run
Sew, a needle pulling thread
La, a note to follow Sew
Tea, a drink with jam and bread
That will bring us back to Do

18. When doubled, a South Pacific isle : BORA
Bora Bora is one of the Society Islands of French Polynesia. The name “Bora Bora” is imitative of the Tahitian name for the island and should really be pronounced "pora pora". "Bora bora" translates as "first born".

19. Cameo material : ONYX
Onyx is a form of banded quartz that comes in many different shades, but most often it's the black version that's used for jewelry. The name "onyx" comes from the Greek word for "fingernail", as onyx in the flesh color is said to resemble a fingernail.

Cameo is a method of carving, often the carving of a gemstone or a piece of jewelry. The resulting image is in relief (sits proud of the background), whereas an engraved image would be produced by the similar carving method known as intaglio. Nowadays, the term cameo is used for any piece of oval-shaped jewelry that contains the image of a head, usually in profile (maybe even a photograph).

31. The Browns, on scoreboards : CLE
The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted nor sent a team to the Super Bowl.

32. Squeeze (out) : EKE
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses.

37. Radius's neighbor : ULNA
The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm. The bones in the forearm are the radius and ulna. “Ulna” is the Latin word for “elbow”, and “radius” is Latin for “ray”.

39. ___ port : USB
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

45. He's no gentleman : CAD
Our word "cad", meaning "a person lacking in finer feelings", is a shortening of the word "cadet". "Cad" was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used "cad" as a term for a boy from the local town. "Cad" took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

46. Become hardened : OSSIFY
To ossify is to become rigid or inflexible in attitude. The original and alternative meaning of the verb is to cause to harden like bone, from the Latin “os” meaning “bone”.

55. Beatles song released on 12/3/1965 : NORWEGIAN WOOD
“Norwegian Wood” is a Beatles song from 1965. “Norwegian Wood” is somewhat groundbreaking in that George Harrison is playing a sitar, the first time the sitar was used by a rock band on a record. And, if you like to waltz around the dance floor, this is one of the few Beatles records that is in triple time.

62. Maker of a famous 1969 landing : EAGLE
We always seem to remember the phrase "The Eagle has landed", historic words spoken by Neil Armstrong when he put down Apollo 11's Lunar Excursion Module on the surface of the moon. Looking back I have to say that the words preceding "The Eagle has landed" seem to have even more impact. During the descent to the moon's surface Armstrong used the call sign "Eagle", indicating that he was communicating from the LEM. After he killed the engines on touching down, Armstrong's first words home to Earth were "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." That switch of call sign from "Eagle" to "Tranquility Base" always sends shivers down my spine ...

63. Do one-third of a triathlon : BIKE
An Ironman Triathlon is a race involving a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride, and a marathon run of just over 26 miles. The idea for the race came out of a debate between some runners in the 1977 Oahu Perimeter Relay. They were questioning whether runners, swimmers or bikers were the most fit athletes. The debaters decided to combine three local events to determine the answer, inviting athletes from all three disciplines. The events that were mimicked to come up with the first triathlon were the Waikiki Roughwater swim (2.4 miles), the Around-Oahu Bike Race (115 miles) and the Honolulu Marathon (26.2 miles). The idea was that whoever finished first would be called "the Iron Man". The first triathlon was run in 1978, with fifteen starters and only twelve finishers. The race format is used all over the world now, but the Hawaiian Ironman is the event that everyone wants to win.

64. Kind of rug : SHAG
Shag carpet is one with a deep pile, one with a “shaggy” appearance.

Down
1. McDonald's and Burger King : CHAINS
McDonald's really popularized the concept of “fast food” when they introduced their Speedee Service System in 1948. Soon after, the company introduced its first mascot, a man with a hamburger head called Speedee. Speedee was replaced with Ronald McDonald in 1967.

If you were in Japan at the end of 2009 and went to Burger King, you might have ordered a Windows 7 Whopper, a promotion for the Windows 7 Operating System. The sandwich was 5 inches in height, and contained seven beef patties!

5. Jane who said "I can live alone, if self-respect and circumstances require me so to do" : EYRE
"Jane Eyre" is a celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

6. 1987 declaration from Michael Jackson : I’M BAD
The song "Bad" was written and sung by Michael Jackson, and released in 1987. The song is about being tough on the streets, being “bad”.

8. Mach3 forerunner : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

9. Marc who painted "Russian Village Under the Moon" : CHAGALL
Marc Chagall was a Russian-French artist, one of the most successful of the 20th century. Unlike so many painters, Chagall was able to achieve wealth and notoriety for his work during his own lifetime. It did help that Chagall lived to a ripe old age though. He passed away in 1985, when he was 97 years young. One of Chagall’s most famous works is the ceiling of the Paris Opera. The new ceiling for the beautiful 19th-century building was commissioned in 1963, and took Chagall a year to complete. Chagall was 77 years old when he worked on the Paris Opera project.

“Russian Village Under the Moon” is a 1911 Cubist work by Russian-French artist Marc Chagall. You can go see the real thing on display at the Staatsgalerie Moderner Kunst in Munich, Germany.

11. Exhibiting the most machismo : MANLIEST
“Machismo”, meaning “manliness”, is an American Spanish word. The term comes from the Spanish “macho” (male)

13. Top roll of a die : SIX
The numbers on dice are arranged so that the opposite faces add up to seven. Given this arrangement, the numbers 1, 2 and 3 all meet at a common vertex. There are two ways of arranging the 1, 2 and 3 around the common vertex, a so called right-handed die (clockwise 1-2-3) or a left-handed die (counterclockwise 1-2-3). Traditionally, dice used in Western cultures are right-handed, whereas Chinese dice are left-handed. Quite interesting ...

27. Marshal under Napoleon : NEY
Michel Ney was one of the first 18 Marshals of France created by Napoleon. When Bonaparte was eventually defeated for the last time, Ney was arrested and sentenced to death. He was executed in Paris by firing squad. Nay refused to wear a blindfold, and demanded that he himself be allowed to give the order to fire.

29. Pre-stereo format : MONO
Monophonic sound ("mono") is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

30. Partner of Vixen in "A Visit From St. Nicholas" : PRANCER
We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:
- Dasher
- Dancer
- Prancer
- Vixen
- Comet
- Cupid
- Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
- Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)
Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

The poem "A Visit from St. Nicholas" was published anonymously in 1823, and is better known today by its first line "'Twas the night before Christmas". Most scholars believe that the poem was written by Clement Clarke Moore, a theologian from New York City. Others say that it was written by Henry Livingston, Jr. a poet from Upstate New York.
'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse;
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there;
The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads;
And mamma in her ’kerchief, and I in my cap,
Had just settled our brains for a long winter’s nap,
When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash ...

31. Guantánamo Bay locale : CUBA
The Guantánamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba is often referred to by using abbreviation "GTMO" or simply "Gitmo". Gitmo is the oldest overseas base operated by the navy and dates back to the Cuban-American Treaty of 1903, at which time the US leased the facility as a fueling station. A perpetual lease was offered by Tomas Estrada Palma, the first President of Cuba, after the US took over control of Cuba from Spain following the Spanish-American War of 1898.

35. ___Kosh B'Gosh : OSH-
OshKosh B'gosh is a company that produces and sells children's clothes. The trademark OshKosh bib-overalls remind us of the company's roots, as it was originally a manufacturer of adult work clothes based in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

38. The Monica of "Monicagate" : LEWINSKY
After White House intern Monica Lewinsky had an “inappropriate relationship” with President Bill Clinton, Lewinsky spent a few years in the limelight using her celebrity status. She made some serious money helping Andrew Morton as he wrote her biography “Monica’s Story”, and was also paid a million dollars for a televised interview with Barbara Walters. Reportedly, most of the money she earned was gobbled up by legal costs. She then sold a line of handbags using the brand “The Real Monica”, and also turned out as a spokesperson for the Jenny Craig dieting company. In 2005, Lewinsky managed to find some relative privacy by moving to England to pursue a postgraduate degree at the London School of Economics.

41. Soon-to-be grads: Abbr. : SRS
Senior (sr.)

43. Capital of Qatar : DOHA
Doha is the capital city of the state of Qatar located on the Persian Gulf. The name "Doha" translates from Arabic as "the big tree".

47. Daughter of King Cymbeline in Shakespeare's "Cymbeline" : IMOGEN
“Cymbeline” is an early play written by William Shakespeare that is classified these days as a romance. The play takes place in Ancient Britain and is inspired by legends of an early Celtic king called Cunobeline. The main character in the work is Cymbeline’s daughter Imogen, who secretly marries Posthumus Leonatus, someone in her father’s court. There is a movie in the works starring Ethan Hawke and Dakota Johnson.

52. Turkish pooh-bahs : AGHAS
"Aga" (also "agha") is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

The term "pooh-bah" (also “poobah”), meaning an ostentatious official, comes from the world of opera. Pooh-Bah is a character in the wonderful Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera "The Mikado". Famously, Pooh-Bah holds many, many offices, including that of "Lord High Everything Else".

53. Prolonged attack : SIEGE
Our word "siege" comes from a 13th century word for a "seat". The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force "sitting down" outside a fortress until it falls.

57. Kind of tide : NEAP
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

58. Ending with metal or mal- : -WARE
“Malware” is a collective term for software and program code that is created to intentionally disrupt and exploit computer systems. Viruses, worms, trojan horses and spyware are all covered by the term. “Malware” is short for “malicious software”.

60. 1947 Hope/Crosby "Road" movie destination : RIO
“Road to Rio” is the fifth of the “Road” series of films that starred Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour. “Road to Rio” was released in 1947, and was the only movie in which Bing Crosby and the Andrew Sisters appeared on screen together.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Picked : CHOSE
6. Tech debut of 1998 : IMAC
10. Energizes, with "up" : AMPS
14. One of the Seven Dwarfs : HAPPY
15. Something that might come to light? : MOTH
16. 1952 Hope/Crosby "Road" movie destination : BALI
17. Doe follower, in song : A DEER
18. When doubled, a South Pacific isle : BORA
19. Cameo material : ONYX
20. Start of the opening line of 55-Across : I ONCE HAD A GIRL ...
23. Wackadoodle : NUT
24. Things bouncers check : IDS
25. Director's cry : ACTION
28. Defeats soundly : STOMPS
31. The Browns, on scoreboards : CLE
32. Squeeze (out) : EKE
33. Opening line, continued : … OR SHOULD I SAY ...
37. Radius's neighbor : ULNA
39. ___ port : USB
40. Pretentious : ARTY
41. End of the opening line : … SHE ONCE HAD ME
44. Dustup : ROW
45. He's no gentleman : CAD
46. Become hardened : OSSIFY
50. [Brrrr!] : SHIVER
52. Gray shade : ASH
54. Sound in a roundup : MOO!
55. Beatles song released on 12/3/1965 : NORWEGIAN WOOD
59. Long ago, long ago : ERST
61. Feel it the next day, say : ACHE
62. Maker of a famous 1969 landing : EAGLE
63. Do one-third of a triathlon : BIKE
64. Kind of rug : SHAG
65. Staggering : AREEL
66. Word before and after "will be" : BOYS
67. It might have some kinks in it : HOSE
68. Awaits decision : PENDS

Down
1. McDonald's and Burger King : CHAINS
2. Borrowed, as a library book : HAD OUT
3. Not rejecting out of hand : OPEN TO
4. Design detail : SPEC
5. Jane who said "I can live alone, if self-respect and circumstances require me so to do" : EYRE
6. 1987 declaration from Michael Jackson : I’M BAD
7. Dispositions : MOODS
8. Mach3 forerunner : ATRA
9. Marc who painted "Russian Village Under the Moon" : CHAGALL
10. Cancel, as a mission : ABORT
11. Exhibiting the most machismo : MANLIEST
12. Wield : PLY
13. Top roll of a die : SIX
21. Radiator sound : HISS
22. They form when water freezes at a roof's edge : ICE DAMS
26. "Fine by me" : OKAY
27. Marshal under Napoleon : NEY
29. Pre-stereo format : MONO
30. Partner of Vixen in "A Visit From St. Nicholas" : PRANCER
31. Guantánamo Bay locale : CUBA
34. Tinged : HUED
35. ___Kosh B'Gosh : OSH-
36. Angers : IRES
37. "Looks like trouble!" : UH-OH!
38. The Monica of "Monicagate" : LEWINSKY
41. Soon-to-be grads: Abbr. : SRS
42. Something to roll up your windows for : CAR WASH
43. Capital of Qatar : DOHA
47. Daughter of King Cymbeline in Shakespeare's "Cymbeline" : IMOGEN
48. Pulled a fast one on : FOOLED
49. Alpine shouts : YODELS
51. Yea and nay : VOTES
52. Turkish pooh-bahs : AGHAS
53. Prolonged attack : SIEGE
56. Something perfect acoustics eliminate : ECHO
57. Kind of tide : NEAP
58. Ending with metal or mal- : -WARE
59. Kind of tide : EBB
60. 1947 Hope/Crosby "Road" movie destination : RIO


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1130-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 15, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood
THEME: Mid As Touch … today’s themed answers comprise two words, the first ending in A, and the second starting with A. So we have As (letters A) touching mid-answer, a MID AS TOUCH:
64A. Moneymaking skill ... or, when read as three words, what happens in 17-, 21-, 35-, 45- and 54-Across : MIDAS TOUCH (or “mid As touch”)

17A. Songs for divas : OPERA ARIAS
21A. 1997 Grammy-winning artist whose last name is a fruit : FIONA APPLE
35A. Tibetan watchdogs : LHASA APSOS
45A. Former "American Idol" judge : PAULA ABDUL
54A. Noted California horse-racing venue : SANTA ANITA
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Add alcohol to, as punch : SPIKE
Punch is a drink containing fruit or fruit juice, with or without alcohol. The term “punch” comes from the Sanskrit “pañc” meaning “five”. The original punch came from India, contained the five ingredients: alcohol, sugar, lemon, water and tea or spices.

6. Caesar dressing? : TOGA
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a "stola".

10. Letters on a Soviet rocket : CCCP
The abbreviation CCCP stands for "Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик", which translates from Russian as “Union of Soviet Socialist Republics”, the USSR.

16. ___ vera : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

17. Songs for divas : OPERA ARIAS
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

19. Read the ___ act : RIOT
The Riot Act was a British law that was in force from 1715 to 1967. According to the Riot Act, government entities could declare any gathering of twelve or more people “unlawful”. Our expression “read the Riot Act” is derived from the requirement for the authorities to read out the Riot Act proclamation to an unlawful assembly before the Act could be enforced.

21. 1997 Grammy-winning artist whose last name is a fruit : FIONA APPLE
Fiona Apple is a singer-songwriter and pianist from New York City.

25. Dull-colored : DRAB
We use the word “drab” to mean “dull, cheerless”. Back in the late 17th century, “drab” was the color of natural, undyed cloth.

26. Pods of cotton : BOLLS
A boll is a seed-bearing capsule of some plants, particularly of flax and cotton.

35. Tibetan watchdogs : LHASA APSOS
The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning "bearded"). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

38. Orson Welles's "Citizen ___" : KANE
"Citizen Kane" was the first film made by Orson Welles, one considered by many to be the finest film ever made. It's a remarkable achievement by Wells, as he played the lead, and also produced and directed. Despite all the accolades for "Citizen Kane" over the decades, the movie was far from a commercial success in its early run and actually lost money at the box office.

40. Elvis who was "all shook up" : PRESLEY
“All Shook Up” is a song composed by Otis Blackwell and recorded by Elvis Presley in 1957. It was the first Elvis recording to top the UK charts.

43. Bauxite and magnetite : ORES
Bauxite is an aluminum ore. It takes its name from the absolutely beautiful village of Les Baux in southern France, the home of the geologist who first recognized that the mineral was a useful source of the metal.

Iron ore comes in a number of different forms, like magnetite (the most magnetic of all minerals) and hematite (the most commonly exploited iron ore).

45. Former "American Idol" judge : PAULA ABDUL
Paula Abdul is primarily a singer and dancer, and someone who endeared herself even more to the American public in recent years as a judge on "American Idol". Abdul had a famous husband for a couple of years, as she was married to actor Emilio Estevez from 1992-94.

49. C minor, for Beethoven's Fifth : KEY
If I had to name which of Beethoven’s symphonies I listen to most often, at the top of the list comes the 7th followed closely by the 9th, and then the 5th a little further down. But that four-note opening of the 5th … that is superb …

53. Writer ___ Du Bois : WEB
W. E. B. Du Bois was sociologist and civil rights activist from Massachusetts. Du Bois was the first African American to receive a doctorate from Harvard, and went on to become a professor at Atlanta University. In 1909, he was a co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

54. Noted California horse-racing venue : SANTA ANITA
Santa Anita Park is a racetrack for horses located in Arcadia, California. The most famous races on the track’s calendar are the Santa Anita Derby and the Santa Anita Handicap.

59. "Fiddlesticks!" : DRAT!
We’ve been using “fiddlesticks” to mean “nonsense” since the early 17th century. Prior to that time, “fiddlestick” referred to the bow of a fiddle.

64. Moneymaking skill ... or, when read as three words, what happens in 17-, 21-, 35-, 45- and 54-Across : MIDAS TOUCH (or “mid As touch”)
King Midas of Greek mythology might be termed an alchemist as he had the power to turn everything he touched into gold i.e. the Midas touch. The power that he was given became be a curse, as everything he touched turned to gold, including his food and drink, and even his children.

66. Icicle's place : EAVE
The eaves are the overhanging edges of a roof that project beyond the supporting wall. The term “eaves” evolved from the Old English “efes” meaning “edge.

70. Library carrel, basically : DESK
A “carrel” is a nook located near the stacks in a library. A cerrel is usually partially partitioned off to allow private study.

Down
1. "24" or "48 Hours" : SHOW
“24” is an action-packed TV show starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter terrorism agent Jack Bauer. The show’s title refers to the structure of the series. Each season has 24 episodes, with each episode representing an hour of real-time action in the story. The collection of 24 episodes builds up to a plot that lasts a full 24 hours.

3. Furniture giant with a blue and yellow logo : IKEA
The IKEA furniture stores use the colors blue and yellow for brand recognition. Blue and yellow are the national colors of Sweden, where IKEA was founded and is headquartered.

6. Actress Hatcher : TERI
Teri Hatcher's most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in "Desperate Housewives". I've never seen more than a few minutes of "Housewives" but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in "Tomorrow Never Dies".

7. Mishmash : OLIO
“Olio” is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish "olla", the clay pot used for cooking.

8. Gangster catcher, informally : G-MAN
The nickname “G-men” is short for "Government Men" and refers to agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

9. Longtime Syrian strongman : ASSAD
Dr. Bashar al-Assad is the current President of the Syrian Arab Republic and the son of the former President Hafez al-Assad whom he replaced in 2001. President Assad is a medical doctor, speaks fluent English and conversational French. Assad was studying ophthalmology in London when he met his wife, who is an Englishwoman.

13. Tennis's Sampras : PETE
Pete Sampras is a retired Greek-American tennis professional. Sampras was rated number one in the world rankings for six years in a row in the nineties.

22. Buenos Aires's land: Abbr. : ARG
Buenos Aires is the capital of Argentina, located on the estuary of the Ria de la Plata. As a port city, the people of Buenos Aires are known as porteños ("people of the port").

27. Scarlett of Tara : O'HARA
Scarlett O'Hara home is the Tara plantation, in Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind". Tara was founded not far from the Georgia city of Jonesboro by Scarlett's father, Irish immigrant Gerald O'Hara. Gerald named his new abode after the Hill of Tara back in his home country, the ancient seat of the High King of Ireland.

28. Body of water between France and Switzerland : LAKE GENEVA
Lake Geneva straddles the border between France and Switzerland. The lake has a lot of “official” names!
- English: Lake Geneva
- French: Lac Léman or Lac de Genève
- German: Genfersee or Genfer See
- Italian: Lago Lemano or Lago di Ginevra

36. Dadaist Jean : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

41. Harvard rival : YALE
The oldest universities in the US are:
- Harvard (founded 1636)
- William & Mary (founded 1693)
- Yale (founded 1701)
- Princeton (founded 1746)
- Columbia (founded 1754)

46. War-hero candidate of 1996 : BOB DOLE
Despite all Bob Dole's success in the world of politics, he is remembered by many as the VP candidate who lost to Walter Mondale (and Jimmy Carter) and the presidential candidate who lost to incumbent Bill Clinton. The man is a true war hero. He joined up in 1942 and fought with the Army's 10th Mountain Division in Italy. In 1945 he was hit by machine gun fire in his right arm and back Dole was so badly injured that his comrades could only dose him up with morphine, write "M" on his forehead with his own blood (so that another, fatal dose of morphine would not be administered) and continue fighting the battle. Dole had to wait nine hours to be evacuated from the battlefield, and wait another three years before being discharged from hospital back in the States.

48. Hush-hush org. : CIA
The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is the successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) formed during WWII. The CIA was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

55. With 37-Down, shrunken body of water in Asia : ARAL
(37D. See 55-Down : SEA)
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

56. Company with a swoosh logo : NIKE
Nike was the Greek goddess of victory, often referred to as the Winged Goddess of Victory. The athletic shoe company Nike uses the “Nike swoosh” as its logo, which is based on the goddess’s wing.

57. ___ of March : IDES
Julius Caesar was assassinated on the 15th (the ides) of March, 44 BC. He was attacked by a group of sixty people in the Roman Senate, and was stabbed 23 times. The first to strike a blow was Servilius Casca, who attacked Caesar from behind and stabbed him in the neck. In Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”, Casca utters the words “Speak, hands, for me!” just before making the fatal blow. The following line, uttered by Caesar, is more famous though: “Et tu, Brute?”

61. Low-pH substance : ACID
As we all recall from chemistry class, a pH of 7 is considered neutral. Anything less than 7 is an acid, and anything above 7 is a base.

62. Rock's ___ Might Be Giants : THEY
They Might Be Giants is an alternative rock band that formed in 1982. The band’s name is lifted from the 1971 movie of the same name, starring George C. Scott.

“They Might Be Giants” is a 1971 film starring George C. Scott and Joanne Woodward. It’s all about a millionaire who retreats into a fantasy world after the death of his wife, imagining himself to be Sherlock Holmes. The title comes from the Cervantes novel in which Don Quixote mistakes windmills for evil giants.

65. 2,000 pounds : TON
Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton or sometimes a “long ton”. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a “short ton”. To further complicate matters, there is also a “metric ton” or “tonne”, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Add alcohol to, as punch : SPIKE
6. Caesar dressing? : TOGA
10. Letters on a Soviet rocket : CCCP
14. One traveling with a backpack : HIKER
15. Stately hardwoods : ELMS
16. ___ vera : ALOE
17. Songs for divas : OPERA ARIAS
19. Read the ___ act : RIOT
20. Withdraw gradually from a mother's milk : WEAN
21. 1997 Grammy-winning artist whose last name is a fruit : FIONA APPLE
23. Dine : EAT
25. Dull-colored : DRAB
26. Pods of cotton : BOLLS
29. Nurse, as a drink : SIP
32. Union man? : GROOM
35. Tibetan watchdogs : LHASA APSOS
38. Orson Welles's "Citizen ___" : KANE
39. Acorn producer : OAK
40. Elvis who was "all shook up" : PRESLEY
42. 40-Across's record label : RCA
43. Bauxite and magnetite : ORES
45. Former "American Idol" judge : PAULA ABDUL
47. Pulling a rabbit out of a hat, e.g. : MAGIC
49. C minor, for Beethoven's Fifth : KEY
50. Gets the booby prize : LOSES
51. Lit sign in a theater : EXIT
53. Writer ___ Du Bois : WEB
54. Noted California horse-racing venue : SANTA ANITA
59. "Fiddlesticks!" : DRAT!
63. 39-Across, e.g. : TREE
64. Moneymaking skill ... or, when read as three words, what happens in 17-, 21-, 35-, 45- and 54-Across : MIDAS TOUCH (or “mid As touch”)
66. Icicle's place : EAVE
67. ___ out a living (gets by) : EKES
68. Song from way back : OLDIE
69. Strategize : PLAN
70. Library carrel, basically : DESK
71. Impoverished : NEEDY

Down
1. "24" or "48 Hours" : SHOW
2. Accessory for a snowman : PIPE
3. Furniture giant with a blue and yellow logo : IKEA
4. Corn seeds : KERNELS
5. Period in history : ERA
6. Actress Hatcher : TERI
7. Mishmash : OLIO
8. Gangster catcher, informally : G-MAN
9. Longtime Syrian strongman : ASSAD
10. Place to leave an auto, in Britain : CAR PARK
11. Ones providing backing for writers? : CLIPBOARDS
12. Air-condition : COOL
13. Tennis's Sampras : PETE
18. Toward a ship's rear : AFT
22. Buenos Aires's land: Abbr. : ARG
24. "Now!" : ASAP!
26. Begin to flower : BLOOM
27. Scarlett of Tara : O'HARA
28. Body of water between France and Switzerland : LAKE GENEVA
29. Order to a dog to bark : SPEAK
30. Immigration or the economy, in a presidential election : ISSUE
31. Stereotypical parrot's name : POLLY
33. With perfect timing : ON CUE
34. Breakfast and lunch : MEALS
36. Dadaist Jean : ARP
37. See 55-Down : SEA
41. Harvard rival : YALE
44. "Sweet" age : SIXTEEN
46. War-hero candidate of 1996 : BOB DOLE
48. Hush-hush org. : CIA
52. Domesticated : TAMED
53. "Now where ___ I?" : WAS
54. Stairs unit : STEP
55. With 37-Down, shrunken body of water in Asia : ARAL
56. Company with a swoosh logo : NIKE
57. ___ of March : IDES
58. Something on a to-do list : TASK
60. Like cutting in line : RUDE
61. Low-pH substance : ACID
62. Rock's ___ Might Be Giants : THEY
65. 2,000 pounds : TON


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1129-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 15, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alex Vratsanos
THEME: Four-Letter Words … we have four four-letter words as across-answers in the corners of the grid (OVER, HEAD, LONG, SHOT). These “key words” are then combined to form the clues for the long answers in today’s puzzle:
1A. Key word #1 : OVER
15A. Key word #2 : HEAD
122A. Key word #3 : LONG
125A. Key word #4 : SHOT

24A. 1-Across + 15-Across : EXPENSE TYPE (OVER + HEAD)
43A. 1-Across + 122-Across : BEYOND THE TIME LIMIT (OVER + LONG)
65A. 1-Across + 125-Across : WENT TOO FAR (OVER + SHOT)
70A. 15-Across + 122-Across : RECKLESSLY (HEAD + LONG)
91A. 15-Across + 125-Across : YEARBOOK PHOTOGRAPH (HEAD + SHOT)
114A. 122-Across + 125-Across : NOT A GOOD BET (LONG + SHOT)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Apologies for this very tardy and abbreviated post. Yesterday was our "Thanksgiving", when we had the whole family together at the house. As a result, I could not get to the crossword, and am only posting the basics for today's puzzle.

Everything will be back to normal tomorrow, I promise.

I hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving!

Bill



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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Key word #1 : OVER
5. Plants with intoxicating leaves : COCAS
10. Mosque no-no : SHOES
15. Key word #2 : HEAD
19. Bon ___ : JOVI
20. Songwriter Carmichael : HOAGY
21. Minor snafu : MIX-UP
22. Capital known for 300 years as Christiania : OSLO
23. Ill-fated seducer in "Tess of the D'Urbervilles" : ALEC
24. 1-Across + 15-Across : EXPENSE TYPE (OVER + HEAD)
26. Erupt : SPEW
27. What a driverless car drives : ITSELF
29. Pageant V.I.P.s : EMCEES
30. Like some soldiers in the American Revolution : HESSIAN
32. Farmyard call : BAA!
33. You may leave when it's up : LEASE
34. Endnotes? : CODA
35. Portland, Ore.-to-Boise dir. : ESE
36. Egg producer : OVARY
38. The "e" of i.e. : EST
39. ___ Olshansky, first Soviet-born N.F.L. player : IGOR
41. Villainous : NASTY
43. 1-Across + 122-Across : BEYOND THE TIME LIMIT (OVER + LONG)
48. Workers on the board : IRONERS
49. It covers everything quite clearly : SARAN
50. Decepticon's foe in "Transformers" : AUTOBOT
54. Sewing case : ETUI
55. Clio nominees : ADS
57. S.U.V. alternative : WAGON
59. Moolah : DINERO
60. Benchwarmer : SCRUB
62. Final Four round : SEMIS
64. ___ cards (items used in ESP tests) : ZENER
65. 1-Across + 125-Across : WENT TOO FAR (OVER + SHOT)
70. 15-Across + 122-Across : RECKLESSLY (HEAD + LONG)
72. Acronym on the S&P 500 : ALCOA
73. Galileo, by birth : PISAN
75. Take off, as a heavy coat? : SHEAR
76. Venice tourist attraction : RIALTO
78. S.U.V. alternative : SEDAN
80. Golfer Ernie : ELS
81. Acted like : APED
85. Goldeneye or harlequin : SEA DUCK
87. Paul who won a Nobel in Physics : DIRAC
89. 1962 Paul Anka hit : ESO BESO
91. 15-Across + 125-Across : YEARBOOK PHOTOGRAPH (HEAD + SHOT)
94. Coat fur : STOAT
97. Ammonium and others : IONS
98. Subj. for Bloomberg News : IPO
99. Puts in stitches, say : DARNS
100. Food that's an anagram of 98-Across : POI
101. Washing the dishes, e.g. : TASK
103. Plantation device : BALER
105. Subj. with many irregularities : ESL
106. Shabby : ILL-KEPT
108. Sound in "Eleanor Rigby" and "Yesterday" : VIOLIN
110. Disdainful sounds : SNIFFS
113. "Little" visitor to Slumberland, in old comics : NEMO
114. 122-Across + 125-Across : NOT A GOOD BET (LONG + SHOT)
117. Holder of small doses : VIAL
118. Former British crown colony in the Mideast : ADEN
119. TurboTax option : E-FILE
120. As old as the hills : HOARY
121. Petro-Canada competitor : ESSO
122. Key word #3 : LONG
123. Looking for : AFTER
124. Go well together : AGREE
125. Key word #4 : SHOT

Down
1. California resort town : OJAI
2. V, in physics : VOLT
3. 1997 Samuel L. Jackson film : EVE'S BAYOU
4. Pilaf-like product : RICE-A-RONI
5. Pot user? : CHEF
6. Tic-tac-toe failure : OOX
7. "Understand?" : CAPEESH?
8. Fellow students, generally : AGEMATES
9. Brings together : SYNCS
10. "Hook" role : SMEE
11. Successes in the game Battleship : HITS
12. Sister brand of Phisoderm : OXY
13. Elation : EUPHORIA
14. It helps you get ahead : SPEED
15. Pardner's mount : HOSS
16. Glimpses : ESPIES
17. Orioles' div. : AL EAST
18. He played Chaplin in "Chaplin" : DOWNEY
25. Date : SEE
28. QB Bobby who purportedly put a curse on the Detroit Lions : LAYNE
31. Germophobe's need : SANITIZER
33. Doesn't pursue : LETS DROP
34. Mustard, but not ketchup: Abbr. : COL
36. Stage prize : OBIE
37. Old TV adjustment: Abbr. : VERT
39. Radiologist, e.g. : IMAGER
40. Biological blueprints : GENOMES
42. Makes up (for) : ATONES
44. Lucius's son, in Harry Potter : DRACO
45. Fancy marble : TAW
46. Fidelity offerings, for short : IRAS
47. Political insults, so to speak : MUD
51. Uncle ___ : BEN’S
52. Hershiser who was Sports Illustrated's 1988 Sportsman of the Year : OREL
53. Major ally? : TORY
56. Islamic mystics : SUFIS
58. Place for a bust : NICHE
60. Figurine : STATUETTE
61. Stemming from : BASED ON
63. Archenemy of Mattel's He-Man : SKELETOR
65. General interests? : WARS
66. Author Wiesel : ELIE
67. Tournament organizer since '39 : NCAA
68. "Ha! I was right!" : TOLD YA!
69. Says "Read you loud and clear ... over," say : RADIOS
71. Rope in : LASSO
74. Informer, informally : NARK
77. South American tuber : OCA
79. Recharge midday : NAP
81. Sandpaper and such : ABRASIVES
82. Creatures that may live inside oysters - hence the name : PEARLFISH
83. Cable's ___ Classic : ESPN
84. Springfield exclamations : D’OHS
86. Male lead in Disney's "Frozen" : KRISTOFF
88. Messy food order at a carnival : CHILI DOG
90. Witty Nash : OGDEN
92. ___ choy : BOK
93. Common wedding reception feature : OPEN BAR
94. Kind of column : SPINAL
95. "Holy ___!" : TOLEDO
96. J. Paul Getty and others : OILMEN
102. Literally, "breathless" : APNEA
103. [You stink!] : BOO!
104. Ho hi : ALOHA
107. Beast on Skull Island, informally : KONG
108. Low-lying area : VALE
109. Robert who oversaw the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm : IGER
110. Ophthalmologist's concern : STYE
111. Burkina ___ (African land) : FASO
112. Vending machine feature : SLOT
115. Small songbird : TIT
116. Burns's "before" : ERE


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1128-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Nov 15, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ned White
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Brand with the old slogan "Just the kiss of the hops" : SCHLITZ
The Joseph Schlitz brewery in MIlwaukee was once the largest beer producer in the country. The brewery was founded in 1849, and was acquired by Joseph Schlitz in 1858. Schlitz had worked in the brewery as a bookkeeper and took over management of the company after the founder, August Krug, passed away. A few years later, Schlitz married the founder’s widow and changed the company name to his own.

8. Official cocktail of New Orleans : SAZERAC
The New Orleans cocktail known as a Sazerac is a mixture of rye, absinthe, bitters and sugar. The use of rye is a little incongruous given that the cocktail is named for Sazerac de Forge et Fils brand of Cognac that was originally the base spirit.

15. Unblinking gazer in Egyptian mythology : EYE OF RA
In Egyptian mythology, the Eye of Ra is a being that serves as the mother, sibling, consort and daughter of the sun god Ra.

18. Juicer : TOSSPOT
A “juicer” or “tosspot” is a drunk.

20. Germane : ON POINT
Something that is “germane” is relevant. “Germane” originally meant “having the same parents”, but it was used more figuratively as “on topic” by William Shakespeare in “Hamlet”. And that’s the way we’ve been using it ever since "Hamlet" was first performed in the 1600s.

23. Bussing requirement : LIPS
“To buss” is “to kiss”.

25. Clinton's successor : KERRY
(56A. Where 25-Across served in the late '60s : NAM)
Secretary of State John Kerry enlisted in the Naval Reserve in 1966 and went straight into Officer Candidate School. Kerry's first post was as an ensign on a frigate in the Vietnam theater, mainly working on rescue missions picking up downed pilots. He requested a transfer to Swift boat duty. While serving on Swift boats Kerry was awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star and three Purple Hearts.

When Hillary Rodham Clinton was appointed US Secretary of State, she became the first former First Lady to serve in a president’s cabinet. Hillary met her husband, President Bill Clinton, when the two were studying at Yale law school.

27. Agent 86 player : ADAMS
The satirical comedy series called "Get Smart" was the creation of Mel Brooks and Buck Henry, and starred Don Adams as Agent 86, Maxwell Smart. Agent 86 worked for the spy agency CONTROL, alongside the lovely Agent 99. CONTROL’s sworn enemy was the criminal organization called KAOS. Smart's shoe phone was a hilarious prop used in almost every episode. When Smart dialed the number 117, the shoe converted into a gun. Cool stuff ...

29. One of Aaron's 86 in '68 : RBI
Run batted in (RBI)

The great Hank Aaron (“Hammerin' Hank” or “the Hammer”) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

30. Where Alfa Romeo is based : TURIN
Turin (“Torino” in Italian) is a major city in the north of Italy that sits on the Po River. Back in 1861, when the Kingdom of Italy was formed, Turin was chosen as the first capital of the country.

The “Alfa” in Alfa Romeo is actually an acronym, standing for Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili ("Lombard Automobile Factory, Public Company"). ALFA was an enterprise founded in 1909 and which was taken over by Nicola Romeo in 1915. In 1920 the company name was changed to Alfa Romeo.

33. One of the three on "Three's Company" : CHRISSY
Suzanne Somers is the actress whose big break came playing the ditzy Chrissy Snow on the sitcom “Three’s Company”. When contracts came up for renewal for the cast in the fifth season, the relationship between Somers and the producers soured rapidly. Somers went on a strike of sorts and for most of the fifth season made only token appearances in the show in scenes that were filmed without other members of the regular cast. The Chrissy Snow character was replaced in the sixth season.

35. Delta hub, briefly : LGA
Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia's name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to "New York" and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city's limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called "LaGuardia" as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as "LaGuardia" (LGA) in 1947.

Delta was the world's largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta's roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

36. John, abroad : IAN
The name “John” translates into Scottish as “Ian”, and into Irish as “Seán”.

41. Fourth-largest city on Lake Michigan : KENOSHA
Kenosha, Wisconsin is a city on the western shore of Lake Michigan. Given its location, Kenosha has strong ties with both Milwaukee and Chicago. The name Kenosha is an anglicized form of “gnozhé”, the Native American name for an early settlement in the area that translates as “place of the pike”.

46. Porto, par exemple : VIN
In French, “porto, par exemple” (port, for example) is a type of “vin” (wine).

48. Powerful board member : QUEEN
That would be a queen on a chessboard.

49. Feldshuh's role in "O Jerusalem" : MEIR
Golda Meir was known as the "Iron Lady" when she was Prime Minister of Israel, long before that sobriquet came to be associated with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Golda Meir was born Golda Mabovitch in Kiev (in modern-day Ukraine), and when she was a young girl she moved with her family to the United States and settled in Milwaukee. As a teenager she relocated to Denver where she met and married Morris Meyerson, at the age of 19. She and her husband joined a kibbutz in Palestine in 1921, when she was in her twenties. Meir had been active in politics in the US, and continued her political work in Palestine. She was very influential during WWII, and played a leading role in negotiations after the war leading to the setting up of the state of Israel. By the time she was called on to lead the country, Meir had already retired, citing exhaustion and ill health. But serve she did, and led Israel during turbulent times (e.g. the massacre at the Munich Olympics, and the Yom Kippur War). She eventually resigned in 1974, saying that was what the people wanted.

Tovah Feldshuh is an American actress, who first experienced real celebrity after playing Helena Slomova in the miniseries "Holocaust" in 1978. She had the leading role in "Yentl" on Broadway, a role later to be played by Barbra Streisand on the big screen. She also appeared in the 1985 movie version of "Brewster's Millions" alongside Richard Pryor.

“O Jerusalem” is a 2006 movie based on the documentary novel “O Jerusalem!” by Dominique Lapierre and Larry Collins. Both novel and film are set around the end of the British Mandate of Palestine and the Israeli War of Independence.

50. Language created in 1959 : COBOL
COBOL is one of the oldest computer programming languages, with the acronym standing for COmmon Business-Oriented Language. COBOL was developed in 1959 by “the mother of the COBOL language”, programmer Grace Hopper.

53. Brand with a Honey Graham variety : OH’S
There used to be two varieties of Oh's made by Quaker Oats Company. One was Honey Nut Oh's, later known as Crunchy Nut Oh's, but it was phased out. The second type was called Crunchy Graham Oh's, and it is still available today as Honey Graham Oh's.

59. It features the silhouette of hoops legend Jerry West : NBA LOGO
Jerry West is a retired basketball player who played for 14 years with the LA Lakers. One of West’s nicknames is “The Logo” as it is his silhouette that is used in the famous NBA logo.

61. In style : A LA MODE
In French, "à la mode" simply means "fashionable". In America, the term has also come to describe a way of serving pie, usually with ice cream, or as I recall from when I lived in Upstate New York, with cheese.

62. Faucet accessory : AERATOR
A faucet aerator is a device screwed onto the tip of a faucet to deliver a mixture of air and water. The main purpose of faucet aerators in these days of dwindling water supplies is to increase the perceived water pressure.

64. Neighbor of an Italian : SLOVENE
The Republic of Slovenia is a country in Central Europe, bordered by Italy, Austria, Croatia and Hungary. Given its geographic location, the country has been part of various realms over the centuries, most recently being part of Yugoslavia. Slovenia declared independence from former Yugoslavia in 1991, and is now a member of the European Union.

Down
1. Like Labor Day, but not Christmas : SECULAR
Labor Day is a federal holiday observed every year on the first Monday in September. The tradition of honoring workers with a holiday started in Boston in 1878, when a day of observance was organized by the Central Labor Union, the major trade union at the time. There was a bloody dispute in 1894 between labor unions and the railroads called the Pullman Strike, which led to the death of some workers when the US Military and US Marshals were instructed to maintain order. President Grover Cleveland submitted a "Labor Day" bill to Congress which was signed into law just six days after the end of the strike. The introduction of a federal holiday to honor the worker was a move designed to promote reconciliation between management and unions after the bitter conflict.

2. Compound in apricot pits : CYANIDE
Cyanide poisoning is caused by exposure to cyanide (CN) ions. The cyanide ions inhibit respiration at the cellular level, making the organism unable to use oxygen. “Cyanide” comes from the Greek “kyanos” meaning “dark blue”. The name was applied as cyanide was first obtained from the pigment called Prussian Blue.

4. Palindromic bit of textspeak : LOL
Laugh out loud (LOL, in text-speak)

8. Like many segments on "The Daily Show" : SATIRIC
“The Daily Show" is a satirical news program on the Comedy Central that first aired in 1996. The show was presented by Craig Kilborn from 1996 until 1998, and then very successfully by Jon Stewart from 1999 until 2015. Trevor Noah has been hosting the show since Jon Stewart left.

12. Hawks, e.g. : RAPTORS
"Raptor" is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

13. Cousins of capybaras : AGOUTIS
The term “agouti” is used for some rodents in Central and south America who have fur with bands of light and dark pigmentation.

The capybara is the largest rodent in the world, a native of South America. This huge animal is related to the tiny little guinea pig, a remarkable relationship given that a fully grown adult capybara can be over four feet long, and weigh up to 140 pounds.

24. Ironman? : SMELTER
Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and of course, a greenhouse gas).

28. "Anyhoo," e.g. : SEGUE
A “segue” is a transition from one topic to the next. "Segue" is an Italian word that literally means "now follows". It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break.

30. Downer, for short : TRANQ
A tranquilizer (familiarly “tranq, trank”) is a downer, a drug designed to reduce tension or anxiety.

32. Not bien : MAL
In French, when things are not “bien” (good), they are “mal” (bad).

34. Tear, quaintly : HIE
"To hie" is to move quickly, to bolt.

37. Tea server : SAMOVAR
The samovar originated in Russia, and is often a very elegant water boiler, usually for making tea. As such, there is often an attachment on top of a samovar to keep a teapot warm.

39. Vessel whose name meant "friendship," ironically : AMISTAD
La Amistad was a slave ship that operated in the 19th-century. On one voyage in 1839, La Amistad was transporting slaves abducted in West Africa from Havana, Cuba to Puerto Principe, Cuba. The newly captured slaves on board escaped and took over the ship. La Amistad was then captured by a US military vessel and the slaves taken into custody. The captives were eventually freed when their case was decided in the US Supreme Court, with John Quincy Adams pleading for the imprisoned Africans.

40. Like pariahs : AVOIDED
“Pariah” is an anglicized version of the Tamil word “Paraiyar”. The Paraiyar are a social group of about 9 million people found in some Indian states and in Sri Lanka. The term “pariah” came to be a general term for members of the lowest caste in society, outcasts.

47. Arabic name part : IBN
In Arabic names, “ibn” is a word meaning “son of”. The words “bin” and “ben” are also used for “son of”. The word “bint” means “daughter of”. Similarly, in Hebrew “ben” is used to mean “son of”, and “bat” is used to mean “daughter of”.

51. Clotheshorse's concern : LABEL
“Clotheshorse” is an informal term used for a person who is into dressing fashionably. Not a term ever used to describe me, I must say …

54. Large snapper : CROC
Crocodiles and alligators do indeed bear a resemblance to each other, although they belong to distinct biological families. One of the main ways used to distinguish them is by their teeth and jaws. Both the upper and lower sets of teeth of a crocodile are visible when its mouth is closed, whereas only the upper teeth of an alligator are visible with the mouth shut.

55. 1960s-'80s placekicker Yepremian, who helped the Dolphins win consecutive Super Bowls : GARO
Garo Yepremian was a football placekicker who played in the NFL from 1966 until 1981. One of Yepremian’s claims to fame was that he kicked a field goal on Christmas Day in 1971 in double overtime that ended the longest game in the history of the NFL.

58. Source of jumbo eggs : EMU
Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs.

60. John : LAV
Our word “lavatory” originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s a "lavatory" came to mean a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

Sir John Harington was an author and a member of the court of Queen Elizabeth I of England. However, Harington is perhaps best remembered as the inventor of the flush toilet. Our slang term “john” meaning “toilet”, is thought to be a reference to John Harington.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Brand with the old slogan "Just the kiss of the hops" : SCHLITZ
8. Official cocktail of New Orleans : SAZERAC
15. Unblinking gazer in Egyptian mythology : EYE OF RA
16. Way in the past : AGES AGO
17. Evokes : CALLS UP
18. Juicer : TOSSPOT
19. Verse starter? : UNI-
20. Germane : ON POINT
22. Bit of a rebuke : TUT
23. Bussing requirement : LIPS
25. Clinton's successor : KERRY
26. Spinning: Prefix : ROTO-
27. Agent 86 player : ADAMS
29. One of Aaron's 86 in '68 : RBI
30. Where Alfa Romeo is based : TURIN
31. Turns in : REDEEMS
33. One of the three on "Three's Company" : CHRISSY
35. Delta hub, briefly : LGA
36. John, abroad : IAN
37. Flipper? : SPATULA
41. Fourth-largest city on Lake Michigan : KENOSHA
45. Name that means "loved" : AIMEE
46. Porto, par exemple : VIN
48. Powerful board member : QUEEN
49. Feldshuh's role in "O Jerusalem" : MEIR
50. Language created in 1959 : COBOL
52. 10-ish? : SEXY
53. Brand with a Honey Graham variety : OH’S
54. Yak : CHINWAG
56. Where 25-Across served in the late '60s : NAM
57. Request from a poll worker : VOTER ID
59. It features the silhouette of hoops legend Jerry West : NBA LOGO
61. In style : A LA MODE
62. Faucet accessory : AERATOR
63. Like some sentences and fat : REDUCED
64. Neighbor of an Italian : SLOVENE

Down
1. Like Labor Day, but not Christmas : SECULAR
2. Compound in apricot pits : CYANIDE
3. Special touchdown point? : HELIPAD
4. Palindromic bit of textspeak : LOL
5. Hypothetical phrase : IF SO ...
6. Jack holder : TRUNK
7. Debuggers? : ZAPPERS
8. Like many segments on "The Daily Show" : SATIRIC
9. Hell : AGONY
10. Marmalade ingredient : ZEST
11. Part of a skier's run : ESS
12. Hawks, e.g. : RAPTORS
13. Cousins of capybaras : AGOUTIS
14. Soft and delicate : COTTONY
21. Bit of regalia : ORB
24. Ironman? : SMELTER
26. Devastating : RUINOUS
28. "Anyhoo," e.g. : SEGUE
30. Downer, for short : TRANQ
32. Not bien : MAL
34. Tear, quaintly : HIE
37. Tea server : SAMOVAR
38. Big fat mouth : PIE HOLE
39. Vessel whose name meant "friendship," ironically : AMISTAD
40. Like pariahs : AVOIDED
41. Called : KNOWN AS
42. Often-bracketed direction : SEE NOTE
43. Cross-section of a pencil : HEXAGON
44. These days : ANYMORE
47. Arabic name part : IBN
50. 22-Across-22-Across, say : CHIDE
51. Clotheshorse's concern : LABEL
54. Large snapper : CROC
55. 1960s-'80s placekicker Yepremian, who helped the Dolphins win consecutive Super Bowls : GARO
58. Source of jumbo eggs : EMU
60. John : LAV


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1127-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Nov 15, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter Wentz
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Napa options, informally : CABS
The Cabernet Sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc grapes.

The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

15. Browse without comment : LURK
A "lurker" is someone who visits websites, especially a discussion forum, and who just reads but does not make a contribution or leave a comment. In other words, someone who just lurks in the background. I know you’re out there … :-)

17. "Paris is always a good ___" (line from the film "Sabrina") : IDEA
“Sabrina” is a fabulous romantic comedy directed by Billy Wilder from 1954. A real favorite of mine, it stars Audrey Hepburn in the title role, opposite Humphrey Bogart in an unusual role for him. William Holden plays the inevitable second love interest. There’s a nice scene in the movie where Hepburn performs a lovely rendition of “La Vie en rose”. “Sabrina was remade in 1995 in a version that’s almost as good as the original, starring Julia Ormond, Harrison Ford and Greg Kinnear.

19. "Bad Girls" rapper : MIA
M.I.A. is the stage name of British rap artist Maya Arulpragasam.

20. Fix, as a toy : SPAY
Our verb “to spay”, meaning “to surgically remove the ovaries of” (an animal) comes from an old Anglo-French word “espeier” meaning “to cut with a sword”.

The toy group of dogs is made up of the smallest breeds. The smallest breeds are sometimes called “teacup” breeds.

22. Chinese cabbage : BOK CHOY
Bok choy is a variety of Chinese cabbage. “Bok choy” translates as “white vegetable”.

30. John who wrote "BUtterfield 8" : O’HARA
“BUtterfield 8” (note the capitalization of both the “B” and the “U”) is a film released in 1960 starring Elizabeth Taylor and Laurence Harvey. The title of the movie, and of the John O’Hara novel on which the film is based, is actually a telephone number. Up to the mid-sixties, telephone exchanges were given names rather than numbers. BUtterfield 8 was an exchange in the wealthy Upper East Side of Manhattan, and dialling of BU-8 was equivalent to 28-8, the first three digits of a 7-digit phone number.

31. Michael who played Alfred Pennyworth in three Batman movies : CAINE
There have been only two actors who have been nominated for an Academy Award in every decade from the 1960s to the 2000s. One is Jack Nicholson, and the other is Michael Caine. Caine is now known as Sir Michael Caine, as he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in the year 2000.

Alfred J. Pennyworth is the loyal butler to Bruce Wayne, aka Batman. Alfred is sometimes referred to as “Batman’s batman”. Sir Michael Caine played Alfred in three movies: “Batman Begins”, “The Dark Knight” and “The Dark Knight Rises”.

33. 2012 Twitter acquisition : VINE
Vine is a video sharing service. Videos are limited to six-seconds in length, although each clip loops. Twitter acquired Vine in 2012, just before the service went live.

35. Stola : woman :: ___ : man : TOGA
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a "stola".

36. Logo for the Hartford : ELK
Exactly when the Hartford Stag (or Elk, or Hart) logo first appeared isn’t precisely known. The oldest extant representation of the Hartford Stag is found on a policy that the company issued to Abraham Lincoln in 1861.

The Hartford investment and insurance company was founded in Hartford, Connecticut in 1810. The company was started by a group of local merchants as a Fire Insurance Company with an initial cash injection of $15,000. The Hartford had an annual revenue of over $26 billion in 2012.

37. Greenlanders, by citizenship : DANES
Greenland is the largest island in the world. Geographically, Greenland is part of the continent of North America, but culturally and politically is considered part of Europe. The island became a Danish colony in 1815, and joined the European Economic Community (EEC) with Denmark. Greenland withdrew from the EEC after a referendum in 1983. Since 2009, Greenland has been relatively autonomous, with the Danish government retaining control of foreign affairs, defence and the judicial system.

41. Dresden's state : SAXONY
Saxony is the most westerly of Germany’s sixteen states. The state’s largest city is Leipzig, and its capital is Dresden.

42. Fashion designer Marc : ECKO
Marc Ecko is a fashion designer from New Jersey. Marc was born Marc Milecofsky. In college he became a fan of graffiti and used the name “Ecko” to tag his drawings.

43. Halluces : BIG TOES
The big toe is referred to anatomically as the hallux (plural “halluces”). The thumbs is referred to as the pollex (plural “pollices”).

46. Curiosity's locale : MARS
NASA’s Curiosity rover is the fourth in a series of unmanned surface rovers that NASA has sent to Mars. Previous rovers are the Sojourner rover (1997), Spirit rover (2004-2010) and Opportunity rover (2004-present). Curiosity rover was launched in November of 2011, and landed on Mars in August 2012 after having travelled 350 million miles. After that long journey, Curiosity landed just 1½ miles from its targeted touchdown spot.

47. Onetime Ice Cube collaborator, informally : DRE
N.W.A was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton". I hear that the movie is being well received, although I probably won’t be seeing it …

52. Target for a snake : CLOG
A plumber’s snake might be used to clear a clog.

54. Adventurer in Grouchland in a 1999 film : ELMO
The man behind/under the character Elmo on “Sesame Street” is Kevin Clash. If you want to learn more about Elmo and Clash, you can watch the 2011 documentary “Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey”.

Down
4. Genre for the band Sublime : SKA
Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term "ska", but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

8. Abbr. next to a chart : FIG
Figure (fig.)

9. Tops off : FRESHENS
To freshen a drink is to top it off.

10. Orbit alternative : DENTYNE
Dentyne chewing gum was formulated back in 1899 by a druggist in New York called Franklin Canning. He came up with the name of his new gum by combining the words “dental” and “hygiene”.

Orbit is a sugarless gum made by Wrigley’s. Orbit was first introduced during WWII, but was taken off the shelves in the 1980s when there was a concern that the gum’s sweetener was carcinogenic. Orbit was relaunched in 2001.

12. [See above] : IBID
Ibid. is short for the Latin word "ibidem" and is typically found in footnotes and bibliographies. Ibid. is used to refer the reader to the prior citation, instead of giving the same information all over again (title, author etc.).

14. Computer memory units: Abbr. : KBS
In the world of computers, a "bit" is the basic unit of information. It has a value of 0 or 1. A "byte" is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text. The prefix mega- stands for 10 to the power of 6, so a megabyte (meg) is 1,000,000 bytes. And the prefix giga- means 10 to the power of 9, so a gigabyte (gig) is 1,000,000,000 bytes. Well, those are the SI definitions of megabyte and kilobyte. The purists still use 2 to the power of 20 for a megabyte (i.e. 1,048,576), and 2 to the power of 30 for a gigabyte.

20. Sect opposed to ISIS : SHIA
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

ISIS is an extremist Sunni rebel group, with the acronym standing for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. The organization is also referred to as ISIL, standing for the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or simply IS, for the Islamic State.

23. Pains : CARE
To take pains is to take care.

26. Land known to locals as Cymru : WALES
The Welsh language is a Celtic tongue that is known as “Cymraeg” by its native speakers. The country of Wales is known as “Cymru” in Welsh.

27. One stuck abroad? : VOODOO DOLL
Voodoo is a religion that originated the French slave colony of Saint-Domingue on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola.

28. Scotty's domain on "Star Trek" : ENGINE ROOM
In the “Star Trek” series on television and in the movies, the colorful character of “Scotty” was played by the Canadian actor James Doohan. Doohan joined the Royal Canadian Artillery at the start of WWII, and participated in the D-Day Invasion of Normandy. After surviving the landing, that same day Doohan was shot by one of his own men in a tragic mishap. Doohan was hit six times, with a bullet to his chest stopped by a silver cigarette case he was carrying. One of Doohan’s fingers was shot off in the incident, an injury that he successfully concealed during his acting career.

31. Part of Dante's "Inferno" : CANTO
A canto is a section of a long poem, and is a term first used by the Italian poet Dante. "Canto" is the Italian for "song".

Dante Alighieri's "Divine Comedy" is an epic poem dating back to the 14th century. The first part of that epic is "Inferno", which is the Italian word for "Hell". In the poem, Dante is led on a journey by the poet Virgil, starting at the gates of Hell on which are written the famous words "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here".

34. It's usually devoted to sports in a tabloid newspaper : BACK PAGE
"Tabloid" is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

40. Small bomb used for breaking down gates : PETARD
In days of old, a petard was a small bomb that was used to breach fortified gates and walls. The phrase “hoisted by his own petard” comes from Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, and is a reference to a petard detonating prematurely and blowing up (“hoisting”) the bomber.

41. Mythical nautical dangers : SIRENS
In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed closed to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song Odysseus begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and and the whole crew sailed away unharmed.

43. Follower of Able : BAKER
There are several phonetic alphabets, including what is called the RAF (Royal Air Force) phonetic alphabet that dates back to before 1956. The RAF phonetic alphabet starts off Able, Baker, Charlie (A, B, C).

44. Massive explosion : NOVA
A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

46. Home of "Christina's World," familiarly : MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

“Christina's World” is an Andrew Wyeth painting that dates back to 1948. The subject of the work is Christina Olson, a woman who suffered from polio that paralyzed her lower body. In the picture, Wyeth painted Christina crawling across a field towards a house in the distance.

49. Presidential son and brother : JEB
Jeb Bush is the son of President George H. W. Bush, and the brother of President George W. Bush.

I always thought that Jeb was an American nickname for James or Joseph but I must be wrong, because George and Barbara's son John Ellis Bush is called "Jeb". A kind blog reader has suggested the the name "Jeb" may have been chosen as JEB are the initials of John Ellis Bush.

50. Dating inits. : BCE
The designations Anno Domini (AD, "year of Our Lord") and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year "0" in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Napa options, informally : CABS
5. Request after a tough day, perhaps : STIFF DRINK
15. Browse without comment : LURK
16. "Ain't gonna happen!" : NO SIREE BOB!
17. "Paris is always a good ___" (line from the film "Sabrina") : IDEA
18. They get spots out : AD AGENCIES
19. "Bad Girls" rapper : MIA
20. Fix, as a toy : SPAY
21. Supports for gypsum boards : STUDS
22. Chinese cabbage : BOK CHOY
24. Reasons : WHYS
25. Reason for icing : SPRAIN
26. "Anytime" : WHENEVER
30. John who wrote "BUtterfield 8" : O’HARA
31. Michael who played Alfred Pennyworth in three Batman movies : CAINE
32. Solitary : ONE
33. 2012 Twitter acquisition : VINE
34. They come as a relief : BALMS
35. Stola : woman :: ___ : man : TOGA
36. Logo for the Hartford : ELK
37. Greenlanders, by citizenship : DANES
38. Covered, as a song : REDID
39. They might be paid at a memorial : RESPECTS
41. Dresden's state : SAXONY
42. Fashion designer Marc : ECKO
43. Halluces : BIG TOES
44. Poor service penalty, possibly : NO TIP
46. Curiosity's locale : MARS
47. Onetime Ice Cube collaborator, informally : DRE
48. It might involve someone "so fat" or "so old" : YO MAMA JOKE
50. Throw out unceremoniously : BOOT
51. Regular joes : AVERAGE MEN
52. Target for a snake : CLOG
53. What to grab for the road? : HANDLEBARS
54. Adventurer in Grouchland in a 1999 film : ELMO

Down
1. Crosses, as a range : CLIMBS OVER
2. One making a sound investment? : AUDIOPHILE
3. Fall out of line : BREAK RANKS
4. Genre for the band Sublime : SKA
5. Easily attached : SNAP-ON
6. Present time : TODAY
7. "Goodness!" : I SAY!
8. Abbr. next to a chart : FIG
9. Tops off : FRESHENS
10. Orbit alternative : DENTYNE
11. Disqualify (oneself) : RECUSE
12. [See above] : IBID
13. All those against : NOES
14. Computer memory units: Abbr. : KBS
20. Sect opposed to ISIS : SHIA
23. Pains : CARE
24. Sudden notions : WHIMS
26. Land known to locals as Cymru : WALES
27. One stuck abroad? : VOODOO DOLL
28. Scotty's domain on "Star Trek" : ENGINE ROOM
29. Starting line : READY, SET, GO!
31. Part of Dante's "Inferno" : CANTO
34. It's usually devoted to sports in a tabloid newspaper : BACK PAGE
35. Exchange between cell mates? : TEXT
37. What's the point? : DECIMAL
38. Car wash supply : RAGS
40. Small bomb used for breaking down gates : PETARD
41. Mythical nautical dangers : SIRENS
43. Follower of Able : BAKER
44. Massive explosion : NOVA
45. Foreshadowing : OMEN
46. Home of "Christina's World," familiarly : MOMA
48. "Oh, sure" : YAH
49. Presidential son and brother : JEB
50. Dating inits. : BCE


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1126-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Nov 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Mispelled (!) Clues … Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! We have ten clues that are misspelled today, and I “think” they are as follows:
71A. Number of mispelled words in this puzzle's clues (oh, by the way, watch out for those tricky circled squares!) : TEN (should be “misspelled”)

37A. Kindergarden song beginning : ABC (should be “Kindergarten”)
43A. Very indignent : IRATE (should be “indignant”)
63A. Secretery, e.g. : AIDE (should be “secretary”)
25D. Accomodations along the Black Sea : DACHA (should be “accommodations”)
32D. Kiester : ASS (should be “keister”)
46D. Claude who painted "Water Lillies" : MONET (should be “lilies”)
48D. Coloseums : STADIA (should be “colosseums”)
55D. Occassion : EVENT (should be “occasion”)
61D. Foriegn traveler's need : VISA (should be “foreign”)
We also have five answers in the grid that are commonly misspelled, but the circled letters are there to warn us to be careful. We have to be especially careful, as the common misspellings actually work in the grid:
17A. Incident : OCCURRENCE (often OCCURANCE in error)
6D. Set pencil to paper, in a way : DREW (or DRAW)

40A. Exodus figure : PHARAOH (often PHAROAH in error)
35D. ___-faced lie : BALD (or BOLD)
41D. Exclamations of surprise : OHS (or AHS)

64A. Without a doubt : DEFINITELY (often DEFINATELY in error)
56D. Quick, sharp sound : CLICK (or CLACK)

11D. Disconnect : SEPARATE (often SEPERATE in error)
22A. Gently strokes, as a dog : PATS (or PETS)

39D. It's good for 12 months : CALENDAR (often CALENDER in error)
66A. Neutral hue : GRAY (or GREY)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 49s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Health-promoting org. : CDC
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days ...

4. One of a pair of grillers : BAD COP
Two officers grilling a suspect might play “good cop, bad cop”.

10. H.S. exam : PSAT
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

14. Major American Spanish-language newspaper : HOY
“Hoy” is a Spanish-language newspaper published here in the US. “Hoy” is Spanish for “today”.

19. "Odyssey," for one : EPOS
“Epos” is the Greek word for a story or a poem. We have absorbed it into English as "epic", a long narrative poetic work describing heroic deeds and ventures.

“The Odyssey” is one of two epic poems from ancient Greece that is attributed to Homer. “The Odyssey” is largely a sequel to Homer’s other epic, “The Iliad”. “The Odyssey” centers on the heroic figure Odysseus, and his adventures on his journey home to Greece following the fall of Troy.

23. Musical character who sings "Wouldn't it be loverly?" : ELIZA
“Wouldn't It Be Loverly” is song by Lerner and Loewe from the Broadway musical “My Fair Lady”. It is sung by the character Eliza Doolittle in her Cockney accent (hence the “loverly” spelling). “Wouldn't It Be Loverly” was performed by Julie Andrews in the original stage production, and ostensibly by Audrey Hepburn in the 1964 film. Actually, Marni Nixon dubbed Hepburn’s voice, as Nixon did for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I”, and for Natalie Wood in “West Side Story”.

27. Long March leader : MAO
“The Long March” was a retreat by the Communist Red Army through much of China, falling back from the advances of the army of the Chinese Nationalist Party. Taking place in 1934-1935, the Long March is famous for the ascent to power of Mao Zedong as he led the retreating forces. As a result of the Long March, the Communist Party was able to recover and rebuild in the northern part of the county. The orderly retreat and respect shown for the Chinese peasantry led to the rise of popularity of the Communist Party with the populace.

30. Lead-in to "boom-de-ay" : TA-RA-RA
"Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay" is an old music hall song from the late 1800s. The tune was used in 20th century for the theme song for the children’s TV show “Howdy Doody”, using the title “It’s Howdy Doody Time”.

33. Beer can feature : POP TAB
The oldest method of opening a can with a device included in the can’s design is the pull-tab or ring pull, invented in Canada in 1956. The design was long-lived but it had its problems, so the world heaved a sigh of relief with the invention of the stay-on-tab in 1975. The new design led to less injuries and eliminated all those used pull-tabs that littered the streets.

36. Whale constellation : CETUS
Cetus is a constellation named after a sea monster from Greek mythology. Today, Cetus is often called “the Whale”.

37. Kindergarden song beginning : ABC
“The Alphabet Song” was copyrighted in 1835 in the US. The tune that goes with the words is the French folk song “Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman”, used by Mozart for a set of piano variations. The same tune is used for the nursery rhyme “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”.

"Kindergarten" is a German term, literally meaning “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

40. Exodus figure : PHARAOH
The pharaohs were the kings of Ancient Egypt. The term “pharaoh” translates as “great house”, and was originally the name of the king’s palace.

The Book of Exodus is the second book in the Bible, and deals with Moses leading the Hebrews out of Egypt. The name "exodus" comes from the Greek "exodos" meaning "departure".

42. 911 responder, for short : EMS
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

45. New York's ___ Bay Park : PELHAM
Pelham Bay Park is located in the Bronx, and is the largest park in New York City.

47. Meat grinders : MOLARS
Molars are grinding teeth. The term “molar” comes from the Latin “mola” meaning “millstone”.

49. One concerned with 47-Across, for short : DDS
Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)

50. Trans-Siberian Railway hub : OMSK
Omsk is a city in southwest Siberia. It is located over 1400 miles from Moscow and was chosen as the destination for many internal exiles in the mid-1900s. Perhaps the most famous of these exiles was the author Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Siberia is a vast area in Northern Asia. The region's industrial development started with the construction of the Trans-Siberian railway from 1891 to 1916, which linked Siberia to Russia in the west.

56. Benjamin : C-NOTE
Benjamin Franklin is featured on one side of the hundred-dollar bill, and Philadelphia's Independence Hall on the other side. There is a famous "error" in the image of Independence Hall. If you look closely at the clock face at the top of the building you can see that the "four" is written in Roman numerals as "IV" as perhaps one might expect. However, on the actual clock on Independence Hall, the "four" is denoted by "IIII".

57. Carom : BANK
A carom is a ricochet, the bouncing of some projectile off a surface. Carom has come to mean the banking of a billiard ball, the bouncing of the ball off the side of the table.

59. Tel ___ : AVIV
The full name of Israel's second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into "Spring Mound", a name chosen in 1910.

62. "Rosemary's Baby" author : LEVIN
As well as writing novels, Ira Levin was a dramatist and a songwriter. Levin's first novel was "A Kiss Before Dying", and his most famous work was "Rosemary's Baby" which became a Hollywood hit. His best known play is "Deathtrap", a production that is often seen in local theater (I've seen it a couple of times around here). "Deathtrap" was also was a successful movie, starring Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve. My favorite of Levin's novels though are "The Boys from Brazil" and "The Stepford Wives".

“Rosemary’s Baby” is a novel by Ira Levin. It is a horror story, and was made into a very creepy 1968 film of the same name starring Mia Farrow. Levin published a sequel in 1997 titled “Son of Rosemary”. He dedicated the sequel to Mia Farrow.

68. Dockworkers' grp. : ILA
International Longshoremen's Association (ILA)

69. Moldova and Belarus, once: Abbr. : SSRS
The Republic of Moldova (usually referred to as “Moldova”) was the Moldavian Socialist Republic before the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

The Republic of Belarus is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, located east of Poland and north of Ukraine. Belarus didn’t exist as an entity until the Russian Revolution when it was created as one of the Soviet Socialist Republics (SSR) that made up the USSR. The Republic of Belarus was formed soon after the USSR dissolved in 1990, but unlike many of the former Soviet Republics, Belarus has retained many of the old Soviet policies. Alexander Lukashenko is the country’s president and he believes in state ownership of the economy. Belarus and Russia have formal agreements in place that pledge cooperation.

Down
4. Fluid-filled sac near a joint : BURSA
The synovial fluid that lubricate joints is contained within membrane-lined sacs called bursae. “Bursa” is Latin for “purse”.

5. Showery mo. : APR
The phenomenon of “April Showers” really applies to the UK and Ireland. Increased occurrence of rain during April is largely due to an annual change in the position of the jet stream.

7. Film : CINE
“Cine” is the French for “cinema”.

8. Film award : OSCAR
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the "Oscars". The root of the name "Oscar" is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named "Oscar" in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days ...

18. Drop, like flies? : UNZIP
The term "fly" is used to describe the flap covering the buttons or zipper in the front of a pair of pants. Before "fly" was used for pants, it was the name given to a tent flap.

25. Accomodations along the Black Sea : DACHA
Dachas are usually second homes in Russia and the former Soviet Union that are located outside the city limits in rural areas. Residents/tenants of dachas are often called dachniks.

27. Speed trap datum: Abbr. : MPH
Miles per hour (mph)

32. Kiester : ASS
Back in the early 1900s a “keister” was a safe or a strongbox. It has been suggested that this term was then used as slang by pickpockets for the rear trouser pocket in which one might keep a wallet. From this usage, keister appeared as a slang term for the buttocks in the early 1930s.

34. "What's ___, Doc?" (classic Bugs Bunny short) : OPERA
“What’s Opera, Doc?” is one of my favorite cartoons of all time. It’s all about Elmer Fudd chasing Bugs Bunny to musical extracts from Wagnerian operas. The most famous line from the cartoon if “Kill the Wabbit”, which Elmer sings to the main theme from “Ride of the Valkyries”. “What’s Opera, Doc?” cost Warner Bros. about six times as much as any other cartoon the studio had produced up to that time.

35. ___-faced lie : BALD
Our “bald-faced” lies here in the US are “bare-faced” lies on the other side of the Atlantic. The original expression was indeed “bare-faced”, which portrays the concept of lying with an uncovered face, unashamedly.

44. Computer cursor advancers : TAB KEYS
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to "jump" across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

46. Claude who painted "Water Lillies" : MONET
“Water Lilies” by French Impressionist Claude Monet is actually a whole series of paintings, numbering about 250 in total. The subjects of the works were the water lilies in Monet’s flower garden at Giverny in northern France.

48. Coloseums : STADIA
The Greek word “stadion” was a measure of length, about 600 feet. The name “stadion” then came to be used for a running track of that length. That “running track” meaning became our contemporary word “stadium”.

The Colosseum of Rome was the largest amphitheater in the whole of the Roman Empire in its day, and could seat about 50,000 people. Even today, it is the largest amphitheater in the world. The structure was originally called the “Amphitheatrum Flavium” but the name changed to “Colosseum” when a colossal statue of Emperor Nero was located nearby.

51. Words to a slowpoke : MOVE IT!
Back in the early 1800s, a “poke” was a device attached to domestic animals such as pugs or sheep to keep them from escaping their enclosures. The poke was like a yoke with a pole, and slowed the animal down, hence the term “slowpoke”.

52. "___ Nacht" (German carol) : STILLE
The beautiful Christmas Carol "Silent Night" was first performed in Austria in 1818, with words by a priest, Father Joseph Mohr, and melody by an Austrian headmaster, Franz Xaver Gruber. The carol was in German and called "Stille Nacht". The English translation that we use today was provided to us by an American bishop in 1859, John Freeman Young from Florida.

53. Many a New York City Marathon winner : KENYAN
The annual New York City Marathon has more competitors than any other marathon run in the world, with over 50,000 racers completing the course in 2013. The race has been held every year since 1970, except for 2012 when it was canceled due to Hurricane Sandy.

61. Foriegn traveler's need : VISA
A visa is a usually a stamp in one's passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter a particular country. The word "visa" comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression "charta visa" meaning "paper that has been seen", or "verified paper".

65. Japanese tech giant : NEC
NEC is the name that the Nippon Electric Company chose for itself outside of Japan after a rebranding exercise in 1983.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Health-promoting org. : CDC
4. One of a pair of grillers : BAD COP
10. H.S. exam : PSAT
14. Major American Spanish-language newspaper : HOY
15. Revolt : UPRISE
16. It might be needed for a new job, informally : RELO
17. Incident : OCCURRENCE
19. "Odyssey," for one : EPOS
20. Where firings take place : KILNS
21. Watery, say : WEAK
22. Gently strokes, as a dog : PATS
23. Musical character who sings "Wouldn't it be loverly?" : ELIZA
24. Perception, figuratively : RADAR
26. Numerical prefix : DECI-
27. Long March leader : MAO
30. Lead-in to "boom-de-ay" : TA-RA-RA
33. Beer can feature : POP TAB
36. Whale constellation : CETUS
37. Kindergarden song beginning : ABC
40. Exodus figure : PHARAOH
42. 911 responder, for short : EMS
43. Very indignent : IRATE
45. New York's ___ Bay Park : PELHAM
47. Meat grinders : MOLARS
49. One concerned with 47-Across, for short : DDS
50. Trans-Siberian Railway hub : OMSK
54. Web discount : E-BATE
56. Benjamin : C-NOTE
57. Carom : BANK
59. Tel ___ : AVIV
62. "Rosemary's Baby" author : LEVIN
63. Secretery, e.g. : AIDE
64. Without a doubt : DEFINITELY
66. Neutral hue : GRAY
67. "Be there shortly!" : IN A SEC!
68. Dockworkers' grp. : ILA
69. Moldova and Belarus, once: Abbr. : SSRS
70. Go on the offensive : ATTACK
71. Number of mispelled words in this puzzle's clues (oh, by the way, watch out for those tricky circled squares!) : TEN

Down
1. Lost an easy win : CHOKED
2. Lamblike : DOCILE
3. Like economic booms and busts : CYCLIC
4. Fluid-filled sac near a joint : BURSA
5. Showery mo. : APR
6. Set pencil to paper, in a way : DREW
7. Film : CINE
8. Film award : OSCAR
9. Eye quickly : PEEK AT
10. Put together : PREPARE
11. Disconnect : SEPARATE
12. Much : A LOT
13. Give the boot : TOSS
18. Drop, like flies? : UNZIP
25. Accomodations along the Black Sea : DACHA
27. Speed trap datum: Abbr. : MPH
28. Give ___ on the shoulder : A TAP
29. Propelled, as a boat : OARED
31. Pirate's swig : RUM
32. Kiester : ASS
34. "What's ___, Doc?" (classic Bugs Bunny short) : OPERA
35. ___-faced lie : BALD
37. Charge before firing? : AIM
38. Old buddy, old pal : BRO
39. It's good for 12 months : CALENDAR
41. Exclamations of surprise : OHS
44. Computer cursor advancers : TAB KEYS
46. Claude who painted "Water Lillies" : MONET
48. Coloseums : STADIA
51. Words to a slowpoke : MOVE IT!
52. "___ Nacht" (German carol) : STILLE
53. Many a New York City Marathon winner : KENYAN
55. Occassion : EVENT
56. Quick, sharp sound : CLICK
57. Luggage : BAGS
58. Broadcasts : AIRS
60. "___ first you don't succeed ..." : IF AT
61. Foriegn traveler's need : VISA
65. Japanese tech giant : NEC


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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