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0201-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Feb 15, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: This n’ That … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase that’s in the format “this and that”.
23A. Content of a demand to attend? : SUMMON SUBSTANCE (sounds like “sum and substance”)
32A. Freaky funeral noise? : COFFIN WHEEZE (sounds like “cough and wheeze”)
49A. Dive from a fire-breathing creature? : DRAGON DROP (sounds like “drag and drop”)
71A. Venti, vingt or zwanzig? : FOREIGN TWENTY (sounds like “four and twenty”)
93A. Woe for a sunburned sea monster? : KRAKEN PEEL (sounds like “crack and peel”)
110A. Intel products used at a nuclear facility? : FISSION CHIPS (sounds like “fish and chips”)
119A. Overseeing a work crew, e.g.? : FOREMAN FUNCTION (sounds like “form and function”)
17D. Feathers, pointy bill, long legs, etc.? : HERON MAKEUP (sounds like “hair and makeup”)
70D. Period when rabbits stop fighting? : WARREN PEACE (sounds like “War and Peace”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 43m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3 … ARABICA (ararica), MARACAIBO (Marucaibo), BABES (rubes!!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Filling entrees? : MEAT PIES
"Entrée" means "entry" in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in", an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the "entry" to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

20. Former Diet Pepsi spokesmodel : CAROL ALT
Carol Alt is a model from Queens, New York. Alt’s big break came when was featured on the cover of the 1982 “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue”.

21. Nymph jilted by Paris : OENONE
According to Greek mythology, Oenone was the wife of Paris, the wife that he abandoned for Helen of Sparta (also known as “Helen of Troy”). The name “Oenone” translates from Greek as “wine woman”. My just wife told me (she said it, not me!) that she might hers to that name …

22. "The Vampire Diaries" protagonist : ELENA
“The Vampire Diaries” is a series of horror novels aimed at teens, with a spinoff television series of the same name. I don’t do vampires …

23. Content of a demand to attend? : SUMMON SUBSTANCE (sounds like “sum and substance”)
The “sum and substance” is the main idea, say of an argument or proposition.

27. Hullabaloo : FUSS
Our word “hullabaloo” meaning a “commotion” is a derivative of an older term “hollo-ballo”. “Hollo-ballo” was a word used for an uproar in the north of England and Scotland.

37. Tornado Alley state: Abbr. : NEB
Nebraska (Neb.) gets its name from the Platte River which flows through the state. “Nebraska” is an anglicized version of Otoe or Omaha words meaning “flat water”.

Tornado Alley has no precisely defined area, but generally lies between the Rockies and the Appalachians. It is of course the area in the US where tornadoes occur most frequently.

38. Smirnoff Ice, e.g. : ALCOPOP
“Alcopops” are flavored alcoholic drinks, with the term being a portmanteau of “alcohol” and “pop”. Examples are Smirnoff Ice, Bacardi Breezer, and Jack Daniel’s Hard Cola.

41. View from Big Ben : THAMES
The River Thames flowing though London is the longest river entirely located in England.

Big Ben is the name commonly used for the large bell in the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster (aka the Houses of Parliament). Big Ben's official name is the Great Bell, and there is some debate about the origins of the nickname. It may be named after Sir Benjamin Hall who oversaw the bell's installation, or perhaps the English heavyweight champion of the day Benjamin Caunt.

43. Patriots' and Seahawks' org. : NFL
The New England Patriots football team was founded in 1959 as the Boston Patriots. The “Patriots” name was selected from suggestions made by football fans in Boston. The team played at several different stadiums in the Boston area for just over ten years, before moving to their current home base in Foxborough, Massachusetts. At the time of the move, the “Boston” name was dropped and changed to “New England”.

The Seahawks are Seattle’s NFL franchise, having joined the league as an expansion team in 1976 along with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The team is owned by Paul Allen, the man who founded Microsoft along with Bill Gates. The Seahawks fans are particularly enthusiastic and noisy, earning themselves the nickname “the 12th Man”. These fans twice set the Guinness World record for the loudest crowd noise at a sporting event in 2013.

44. "Castaway" director, 1986 : ROEG
Nicolas Roeg is film director from England with quite the pedigree when it comes to association with great movies. He contributed to 1962’s “Lawrence of Arabia”, and he himself directed noted films like “Walkabout” (1972), “Don’t Look Now” (1973) and “The Man Who Fell to Earth” (1976).

“Castaway” is a 1986 film starring Amanda Donohoe and Oliver Reed that was adapted from a 1984 book of the same name by Lucy Irvine. I haven’t seen this one, but the plot sounds intriguing. It’s about an author who advertises for a “wife” to live with him on the isolated island of Tuin in the South Pacific. The pair had to marry in order to satisfy immigration laws.

48. W.W. II rationing agcy. : OPA
President Franklin D. Roosevelt set up the Office of Price Administration (OPA) during WWII, with the intent of stabilizing prices and rents during the emergency.

53. Al Qaeda stronghold : YEMEN
Osama bin Laden founded his militant Islamist group called al-Qaeda in the late eighties. “Al-Qaeda” translates as “the base”, and can refer to a military base. It was originally the name of a training camp set up for mujahideen fighters opposing the Russians who occupied Afghanistan at the time.

58. Place first, second or third, say : MEDAL
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

59. Man of letters? : SAJAK
Pat Sajak took over the hosting of "Wheel of Fortune" from Chuck Woolery back in 1983 and has been doing the job ever since. Sajak had a short run as a talk show host in 1989/1990 and used to sub quite often for Larry King and Regis Philbin.

61. "The Bridge on the River Kwai" director : DAVID LEAN
British movie director Sir David Lean has an impressive list of epic films on his resume including “The Bridge on the River Kwai” (1957), “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962), “Doctor Zhivago” (1965) and “A Passage to India” (1984). My favorite of his films though is the romantic drama from 1945 called “Brief Encounter”.

The river referred to in the movie (and novel) "The Bridge on the River Kwai" is actually called the Khwae Yai River, and is in western Thailand. The original novel by Pierre Boulle was published in French in 1952, and the wonderful movie released in 1957. Both tell the story of construction of part of the Burma Railway and a bridge over the river, using prisoners of war as laborers. The film stars William Holden, Alec Guinness and Jack Hawkins.

63. Certain embedded Internet video : GIF
A bitmap is an image file format used to store digital images. Basically, each pixel in a bitmap file is stored as a “bit” of information, hence the name “bitmap”. In 1987, CompuServe introduced a new type of image file called the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). A GIF image takes the same information as a bitmap and then compresses it, resulting in a smaller file size. However, during compression the image may lose some resolution. The GIF format also handles short video clips, usually animations.

65. ___ lupus (gray wolf) : CANIS
The timber wolf is also known as the gray wolf, tundra wolf or lobo.

67. Not there yet : EN ROUTE
“En route” is a French term that means “on the way”.

68. Company that introduced Saran Wrap : DOW
Dow Chemical Company was founded back in 1897 by a chemist called Herbert Henry Dow, and initially manufactured and sold bleach and potassium bromide. Dow is now the second-largest chemical manufacturer in the world according to revenue, second only to the German company BASF.

What's known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

71. Venti, vingt or zwanzig? : FOREIGN TWENTY (sounds like “four and twenty”)
“Sing a Song of Sixpence” is an English nursery rhyme that dates back to the 1700s. In the rhyme there are a couple of lines that go :
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie
This seems to be a reference to the practice in the 16th century of “baking” live birds into a pie for special occasions. When the crust was cut open the birds would fly away, much to the amusement of the diners.

Our number “twenty” translates as “venti” (Italian), “vingt” (French) and “zwanzig” (German).

75. Missal storage site : PEW
A pew is a bench in a church, usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

Missals came into being in medieval times and were used primarily by priests and ministers. A missal is a book containing all the texts necessary for the celebration of Mass through the liturgical year. Nowadays missals are used by the congregation and not just by the celebrants. The term “missal” comes from the Latin for “Mass book”.

76. Coffee bean variety : ARABICA
The species Coffea arabica is thought be the first plant cultivated for coffee. Today, 75-80% of the world’s coffee comes from Coffea arabica.

79. 43-Across ball carriers: Abbr. : HBS
HB is short for “halfback” in American football.

81. Lake ___, biggest lake in South America : MARACAIBO
Lake Maracaibo isn’t actually a “lake” as such, but rather a brackish bay or lagoon with a very narrow entrance into the Gulf of Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea. Paradoxically, Maracaibo was a true lake in the past, and at 20-36 million years old can be considered one of the oldest “lakes” on the planet.

90. Workers' rights org. : NLRB
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) was set up in 1935. The NLRB is an independent government agency with the roles of conducting elections for labor unions as well as investigating and rooting out any labor practices that are deemed to be unfair.

91. Wool source : LLAMA
The wool from a llama is much softer than that from a sheep, and it is also free from lanolin.

93. Woe for a sunburned sea monster? : KRAKEN PEEL (sounds like “crack and peel”)
Kraken are huge sea monsters of legend that were reputed to live off the coasts of Iceland and Norway. It’s possible that the kraken legend was inspired by real-life giant squid.

95. Northern California's ___ River : EEL
The Eel River in California was named in 1850 by an explorer Josiah Gregg after he made a trade with some Native Americans, swapping a frying pan for a large catch of eels.

100. ___-Magnon : CRO
Remains of early man, dating back to 35,000 years ago, were found in Abri de Cro-Magnon in southwest France, giving the name to those early humans. Cro-Magnon remains are the oldest human relics that have been discovered in Europe.

107. Faux pas : MISSTEP
The term "faux pas" is French in origin, and translates literally as "false step" (or "false steps", as the plural has the same spelling in French).

109. Symbol on a sarcophagus : ASP
A sarcophagus is a stone or wooden box in which a body is interred. "Sarcophagus" is Greek for “flesh eating stones”. The name was applied as a sarcophagus was often made from a kind of limestone that was believed to cause the flesh of corpses to decompose.

110. Intel products used at a nuclear facility? : FISSION CHIPS (sounds like “fish and chips”)
Intel is the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The company was founded in 1968, and the name “Intel” is a derived from the term "int(egrated) el(ectronics)". Recognition of the Intel brand has been greatly helped by the success of the “Intel Inside” campaign that started back in 1991.

113. Hit with a charge : TASE
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called "Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle". The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for "Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle".

114. Seiji Ozawa, e.g. : MAESTRO
“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

Seiji Ozawa is most famous for his work as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, although he is also the principal conductor of the Vienna State Opera. Ozawa is renowned for wearing a white turtleneck under his dress suit when he conducts, rather than the traditional starched shirt and white tie.

116. "Argo" setting : IRAN
“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I saw “Argo” recently and recommend it highly, although I found the scenes of religious fervor pretty frightening …

117. Roman guardian spirit : LAR
In ancient Rome, the Lares were guardian deities, sometimes described as “household deities” to distinguish them from the major deities. Ancient Romans heading home might described as “ad Larem” i.e. to the Lar.

127. Cause of radioactivity : DECAY
The nucleus of an unstable atom might emit particles of ionizing radiation in the process known as “radioactive decay”. Such a material is termed “radioactive”.

130. Coeur d'___ : ALENE
The city, lake and river in Idaho called Coeur d'Alene are all named for the Coeur d'Alene People, Native Americans who lived in the area when it was first explored by French Canadian fur traders. “Coeur d'Alene” translates from French as “heart of an awl”. The Native American people were given this name as they were perceived as shrewd traders by their Canadian counterparts.

Down
1. Game show V.I.P.'s : MCS
Master or mistress of ceremonies (MC)

2. Three-vowel word that sounds like a fourth vowel : EAU
“Eau” is French for “water”. The word “eau” sounds like the letter O.

6. Golfer Woosnam : IAN
I’ve always thought Ian Woosnam to be the most unlikely-looking of golfers. He is just over 5’ 4” tall and yet is noted as a very powerful hitter of the ball. Woosnam is a Welshman, and was ranked the world’s number one golfer for most of 1991.

7. Chi-town circlers : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

11. Santa ___ winds : ANA
The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically "falls" down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

13. Envelope abbr. : ENC
Enclosure (enc.)

14. Handle of a plow? : DEERE
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere's invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of "stickiness".

16. Half a game name that rhymes : ALAI
Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip. Although, as a blog reader once pointed out to me, you don’t have to catch a golf ball …

18. "Life of Pi" director : ANG LEE
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".

The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy called Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

19. Old colonial masters : SAHIBS
"Sahib" is most recognized as a term of address in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use "mister" in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

24. Aficionado : BUFF
A “buff” or a “nut” is one who is extremely enthusiastic and knowledgeable about a subject.

An “aficionado” is an enthusiast, a word that came to us from Spanish. "Aficionado" was originally used in English to describe a devotee of bullfighting.

29. AIDS-fighting drug : AZT
AZT is the abbreviated name for the drug azidothymidine, much used in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. AZT was originally developed in the seventies as a potential treatment for retroviruses (cancer-causing viruses), although it was never approved for use in treatment. In 1984, it was confirmed that AIDS was caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), so scientists turned to known antiviral drugs in the search for a viable treatment. Burroughs-Wellcome came up with a treatment regime using AZT, and filed a patent in 1985. The patent was challenged in court but the patent expired anyway in 2005 without any decision being made. There are now at least four generic forms of AZT approved for sale in the US.

30. One with a colorful coat? : M AND M
Forrest Mars, Sr. was the founder of the Mars Company. Forrest invented the Mars Bar while living over in England and then developed M&M's when he returned to the US. Mars came up with the idea for M&M's when he saw soldiers in the Spanish Civil War eating chocolate pellets. Those pellets had a hard shell of tempered chocolate on the outside to prevent them from melting. Mars got some of the funding to develop the M&M from William Murrie, the son of the president of Hershey's Chocolate. It is the "M" and "M" from "Mars" and "Murrie" that give the name to the candy.

31. Woodard of "Primal Fear" : ALFRE
Alfre Woodard is an actress from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Woodard was nominated for an Oscar for her performance in the 1983 film “Cross Creek”. Off the stage and screen she is very active in the Democratic Party.

“Primal Fear" is a very enjoyable crime-thriller film released in 1996, starring Richard Gere. The most acclaimed performance in the movie came from Edward Norton in his film debut.

32. Garbage collector, informally? : COON
The raccoon is native to North America. In captivity, raccoons can live to over 20 years of age, but in the wild they only live two or three years. The main causes for the shorter lifespan are hunting and road traffic.

33. Slanted columns : OP-EDS
Op-Ed is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-Eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

34. Fay of "King Kong" : WRAY
“King Kong” really is a classic movie. It stars Fay Wray as the young woman (Ann Darrow) with whom Kong falls in love. Wray was very interested in the role as she was told that she would be playing opposite the "tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood". She thought it might be Clark Gable. At least that’s how the story goes ...

36. Plant swelling : EDEMA
Both animals and plants can suffer from edema, a swelling cause by excessive accumulation of fluid.

39. Like Isaac Asimov : PROLIFIC
Isaac Asimov was a wonderful science fiction writer, and a professor of biochemistry. He was a favorite author as I was growing up and I must admit that some hero worship on my part led me to study and work as a biochemist for a short while early in my career. My favorite of his works is the collection of short stories called “I, Robot”, although Asimov’s most famous work is probably his “Foundation” trilogy of novels.

42. Speed skater Ohno : APOLO
Speed-skater Apolo Ohno has won more Winter Olympics medals than any other American. Ohno also did a great job winning the 2007 season of television's "Dancing with the Stars".

45. Words of thanksgiving : GRACE
A “grace” is a short prayer recited before or after a meal.

47. Common craps roll : SEVEN
If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. Craps may be derived from an old English game called "hazard", also played with two dice and which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name "crapaud", a French word meaning "toad".

50. Dribble glass, e.g. : GAG
A dribble glass is prop used in a classic prank. The glass has small holes that are disguised by an etched design.

51. California resort town : OJAI
The city of Ojai, California is located just northwest of Los Angeles. One of the city's claims to fame is that according to the TV shows “The Bionic Woman” and “The Six Million Dollar Man”, Jaime Sommers and Steve Austin grew up in Ojai and were childhood sweethearts!

54. What I will always be, alphabetically : NINTH
I is the ninth letter in the alphabet.

62. Skeletal enemy in Mario games : DRY BONES
In the “Mario Bros” video game universe, Dry Bones are skeletal undead. Not my cup of tea …

69. Kind of contraception : ORAL
“The Pill” is more correctly called “the combined oral contraceptive pill”. The formulation is a combination of an estrogen called estradiol and a progestogen called progestin.

70. Period when rabbits stop fighting? : WARREN PEACE (sounds like “War and Peace”)
We tend to think of a “warren” today as a place where rabbits are bred, or where rabbits are found in abundance in the wild. Back in the 1300s, a warren was a more general term for an enclosed piece of land used for breeding any domestic animals. We also use “warren” figuratively now, to describe a cluster of densely populated living spaces.

I have to confess that I have tried to read Leo Tolstoy's "War and Peace" twice in my life, and failed both times (it is l-o-n-g). Even though the 1956 movie adaptation runs for 3 1/2 hours, it's still the easy way out! The film version stars Audrey Hepburn as Natasha Rostova and Henry Fonda as Count Pierre Bezukhov.

74. Mystery prize : EDGAR
The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (the Edgars) are presented annually by the Mystery Writers of America.

77. Naïfs : BABES
A naïf is someone who is naive, as "naïf" is the French word for "naive".

80. Slangy greeting : SUP?
I think “sup?” is slang for “what’s up?”

82. Salad bar morsels : BAC~OS
Bac~Os are a brand of bacon bits.

83. Like the world's largest sultanate : OMANI
Qaboos bin Said al Said is the current Sultan of Oman, who came to power in a coup in 1970 by deposing his own father. Qaboos has no children, and no agreed heir. His current instructions are for the royal family to agree on a successor after his death. Qaboos has also specified that should the royal not be able to agree on a successor, then the country’s Defense Council will make the decision, choosing between two names that the Sultan placed in a sealed envelope to be opened after his passing.

87. Juicy fruit : NECTARINE
A nectarine is a cultivar of a peach, notable for its smooth skin (as opposed to the fuzzy skin of the traditional peach).

88. Destination of NASA's Dawn probe : CERES
Ceres is the smallest dwarf planet in our solar system. Ceres was discovered in 1801 and is the largest body in the asteroid belt. For fifty years Ceres was classified as the eighth planet circling our sun. The Dawn space probe launched by NASA in 2007 is expected to encounter and study Ceres in 2015.

89. What Othello and Desdemona do in "Othello" : ELOPE
Shakespeare’s “Othello” was first performed in 1604. The main characters in the play are:
- Othello, a general in the army of Venice
- Desdemona, Othello’s wife
- Cassio, Othello’s trusted ensign
- Iago, the villain of the piece

92. Prime Cuts brand : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

94. Site of ancient Greek Olympics : ELIS
Elis is a region of Ancient Greece, in the south of the country. It was home to the first Olympic Games, supposedly held in 776 BCE, at Olympia.

96. What the jack of spades lacks : LEFT EYE
There is a poker game that’s popular in home games in which one-eyed jacks are chosen as wild cards. The one-eyed jacks are the Jack of Spades and the Jack of Hearts.

98. Howard Stern rival : DON IMUS
Don Imus's syndicated radio show "Imus in the Morning" broadcasts from New York City. Imus has been described as a “shock jock”, a disc jockey who deliberately uses provocative language and humor that many would find offensive . I don’t like shock jocks ...

Howard Stern is one of the original "shock jocks" who seems now to have found his niche on uncensored satellite radio (Sirius XM). Apparently Stern is quite a chess player, and was invited to play in the 2010 US Chess Championships.

101. Howard Johnson rival : RAMADA
The Ramada Inn hotel chain takes its name from the Spanish word for a shady resting place. A ramada is a shelter with a roof and no walls, mainly found in the American southwest. Nowadays a ramada can be temporary or permanent, but originally ramadas were makeshift shelters constructed by aboriginal Indians from branches or bushes.

The Howard Johnson (sometimes “HoJo”) chain of hotels and restaurants was the largest restaurant chain in the US in the sixties and seventies. There are only two HoJo restaurants left now. One is in Bangor, Maine and the other is in Lake Placid, New York. I am proud to say that I’ve been in both ...

102. Chilean author Allende : ISABEL
Isabel Allende is a Chilean writer, apparently the world’s most widely-read, Spanish-language author. Isabel is related to Salvador Allende, the ex-President of Chile.

108. New York's ___ Island : STATEN
Staten Island is part of New York City and is the least populous of the city's five boroughs. The island was originally called Staaten Eylandt by Henry Hudson and was named after the Dutch parliament, the Staaten Generaal.

111. Circular opening? : SOFT C
The opening letter in the word “circular” is the letter C.

115. "South Park" boy : STAN
“South Park” is an adult-oriented cartoon series on Comedy Central. I don’t do “South Park” …

117. Some PC screens : LCDS
Liquid crystal display (LCD)

121. Cellular messenger : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

122. Bit of old French bread : ECU
The ecu is an Old French coin. When introduced in 1640, the ecu was worth three livres (an older coin, called a "pound" in English). The word "ecu" comes from the Latin "scutum" meaning "shield". The original ecu had a coat of arms on it, a shield.

123. Charlottesville inst. : UVA
The University of Virginia (UVA) was founded by Thomas Jefferson, who sat on the original Board of Visitors alongside former US Presidents James Madison and James Monroe. In fact, the original UVA campus was built on land that was once a farm belonging to President Monroe.

The city of Charlottesville, Virginia was named for Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III. George’s queen consort also lent her name to the city of Charlotte, North Carolina.

124. Picayune quibble : NIT
Something described as “picayune” is of little value or importance. The original picayune was a Spanish coin worth half a real, not a lot of money.

125. Brass producer, briefly : OCS
Officer Candidate School (OCS)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Filling entrees? : MEAT PIES
9. Imperfect : FLAWED
15. Laugh track content : HA-HAS
20. Former Diet Pepsi spokesmodel : CAROL ALT
21. Nymph jilted by Paris : OENONE
22. "The Vampire Diaries" protagonist : ELENA
23. Content of a demand to attend? : SUMMON SUBSTANCE (sounds like “sum and substance”)
25. Cry of frustration : AARGH!
26. ___ flakes : OAT
27. Hullabaloo : FUSS
28. Square meal? : RAVIOLI
30. Gas station adjunct : MART
32. Freaky funeral noise? : COFFIN WHEEZE (sounds like “cough and wheeze”)
37. Tornado Alley state: Abbr. : NEB
38. Smirnoff Ice, e.g. : ALCOPOP
40. Red-faced : FLORID
41. View from Big Ben : THAMES
43. Patriots' and Seahawks' org. : NFL
44. "Castaway" director, 1986 : ROEG
46. Points of view : TAKES
48. W.W. II rationing agcy. : OPA
49. Dive from a fire-breathing creature? : DRAGON DROP (sounds like “drag and drop”)
53. Al Qaeda stronghold : YEMEN
55. Vegetable that's often fried : OKRA
58. Place first, second or third, say : MEDAL
59. Man of letters? : SAJAK
61. "The Bridge on the River Kwai" director : DAVID LEAN
63. Certain embedded Internet video : GIF
65. ___ lupus (gray wolf) : CANIS
67. Not there yet : EN ROUTE
68. Company that introduced Saran Wrap : DOW
71. Venti, vingt or zwanzig? : FOREIGN TWENTY (sounds like “four and twenty”)
75. Missal storage site : PEW
76. Coffee bean variety : ARABICA
78. Went on a run? : SKIED
79. 43-Across ball carriers: Abbr. : HBS
81. Lake ___, biggest lake in South America : MARACAIBO
84. Holdups : SNAGS
86. Perfumery measure : OUNCE
90. Workers' rights org. : NLRB
91. Wool source : LLAMA
93. Woe for a sunburned sea monster? : KRAKEN PEEL (sounds like “crack and peel”)
95. Northern California's ___ River : EEL
97. Burn : SCALD
99. Make hot : RILE
100. ___-Magnon : CRO
101. Uses mouthwash, e.g. : RINSES
104. Like a dutiful sentry : ON POST
107. Faux pas : MISSTEP
109. Symbol on a sarcophagus : ASP
110. Intel products used at a nuclear facility? : FISSION CHIPS (sounds like “fish and chips”)
113. Hit with a charge : TASE
114. Seiji Ozawa, e.g. : MAESTRO
116. "Argo" setting : IRAN
117. Roman guardian spirit : LAR
118. Diminish in strength : ABATE
119. Overseeing a work crew, e.g.? : FOREMAN FUNCTION (sounds like “form and function”)
127. Cause of radioactivity : DECAY
128. Beggar's receptacle : TIN CUP
129. Attorney's presentation : EVIDENCE
130. Coeur d'___ : ALENE
131. Part of a contract : CLAUSE
132. Mess : RAT’S NEST

Down
1. Game show V.I.P.'s : MCS
2. Three-vowel word that sounds like a fourth vowel : EAU
3. Like some knights and warships : ARMOR-CLAD
4. Kind of paste : TOMATO
5. What a spoiler might spoil : PLOT
6. Golfer Woosnam : IAN
7. Chi-town circlers : ELS
8. Possessions : STUFF
9. Old fogy : FOSSIL
10. "We'd better skip it" : LET’S NOT
11. Santa ___ winds : ANA
12. Got the gold : WON
13. Envelope abbr. : ENC
14. Handle of a plow? : DEERE
15. Unceremonious removal : HEAVE-HO
16. Half a game name that rhymes : ALAI
17. Feathers, pointy bill, long legs, etc.? : HERON MAKEUP (sounds like “hair and makeup”)
18. "Life of Pi" director : ANG LEE
19. Old colonial masters : SAHIBS
24. Aficionado : BUFF
29. AIDS-fighting drug : AZT
30. One with a colorful coat? : M AND M
31. Woodard of "Primal Fear" : ALFRE
32. Garbage collector, informally? : COON
33. Slanted columns : OP-EDS
34. Fay of "King Kong" : WRAY
35. Upped : HIKED
36. Plant swelling : EDEMA
39. Like Isaac Asimov : PROLIFIC
42. Speed skater Ohno : APOLO
45. Words of thanksgiving : GRACE
47. Common craps roll : SEVEN
50. Dribble glass, e.g. : GAG
51. California resort town : OJAI
52. Feelings of guilt : PANGS
54. What I will always be, alphabetically : NINTH
56. Parking lot figure : RATE
57. From square one : ANEW
60. Problems with hoses : KINKS
62. Skeletal enemy in Mario games : DRY BONES
64. ___ point : FOCAL
66. Perform terribly : STINK
68. "Lookin' good!" : DAMN!
69. Kind of contraception : ORAL
70. Period when rabbits stop fighting? : WARREN PEACE (sounds like “War and Peace”)
72. Harangues, with "at" : RAILS
73. Sport : WEAR
74. Mystery prize : EDGAR
77. Naïfs : BABES
80. Slangy greeting : SUP?
82. Salad bar morsels : BACOS
83. Like the world's largest sultanate : OMANI
85. Economize to a fault : SKIMP
87. Juicy fruit : NECTARINE
88. Destination of NASA's Dawn probe : CERES
89. What Othello and Desdemona do in "Othello" : ELOPE
92. Prime Cuts brand : ALPO
94. Site of ancient Greek Olympics : ELIS
96. What the jack of spades lacks : LEFT EYE
98. Howard Stern rival : DON IMUS
101. Howard Johnson rival : RAMADA
102. Chilean author Allende : ISABEL
103. "My dear man" : SIR
105. Difficult situation : SCRAPE
106. Greater or lesser follower : THAN
108. New York's ___ Island : STATEN
111. Circular opening? : SOFT C
112. Gather (from) : INFER
115. "South Park" boy : STAN
117. Some PC screens : LCDS
120. Many an art museum piece : OIL
121. Cellular messenger : RNA
122. Bit of old French bread : ECU
123. Charlottesville inst. : UVA
124. Picayune quibble : NIT
125. Brass producer, briefly : OCS
126. Catchy thing? : NET


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0131-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 15, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tim Croce
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 55m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SKOAL (skoll), ALOHA OE (LLOHA OE!!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Thickburger seller : CARL’S JR
The Carl’s Jr. fast-food restaurant chain was founded in 1941 by Carl Karcher. Karcher’s first restaurant was a full-service establishment called Carl’s Drive-In Barbeque. He then built on his first success by opening a chain of smaller restaurants with a smaller menu and called them simply “Carl’s”, which was changed to Carl’s Jr. in 1954.

15. Iris features : AREOLAE
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

17. Alternative to a babka : NUTCAKE
Babka is a sweet yeast cake that can also be called Bobka or baba. Babka originated in Eastern Europe and is served traditionally in Easter Sunday.

22. Beethoven's fifth? : SOL
Do, re, me, fa, sol …

26. Shortening for shortcuts : CTRL
Control (CRTL) key

27. It means everything to Erhard : ALLES
“Alles” is German for “all”.

29. Obituary word : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

The term "obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

31. He began his third presidential term in 2014 : ASSAD
Dr. Bashar al-Assad is the current President of the Syrian Arab Republic and the son of the former President Hafez al-Assad whom he replaced in 2001. President Assad is a medical doctor, speaks fluent English and conversational French. Assad was studying ophthalmology in London when he met his wife, who is an Englishwoman.

33. Part of a goth dude's look : GUYLINER
“Guyliner” is an informal word for eyeliner, when worn by a male.

35. Party rule, for short : BYOB
Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB)

42. Cry before some clinking : SKOAL
Skoal is a Swedish toast, with roots in the old Norse word "skaal" meaning "cup".

45. Like Grieg, to Grieg : NORSK
“Norsk” is the Norwegian word for “Norwegian”.

Edvard Grieg is Norway's best known composer, active in the Romantic Era. Grieg’s most famous works are the gorgeous “Piano Concerto in A minor:”, and his incidental music for the play "Peer Gynt" by Henrik Ibsen.

46. Common combo vaccine : DPT
The DPT vaccine is combination vaccine providing protection against diphtheria (D), pertussis (P, also known as whooping cough) and tetanus (T).

50. Conjugation part between "sommes" and "sont" : ETES
In French, we are (nous somes), you are (vous êtes), they are (ils/elles sont).

51. Seeds often have them : BYES
The word "bye", as used in sport, originated in cricket. A bye is a run scored due to an error by the wicketkeeper (similar to a catcher in baseball) when he fails to stop a ball bowled by the bowler (like a pitcher in baseball). Later the word "bye" in sport came to mean the position of a player in a tournament who is left without a competitor when the rest have drawn pairs. In these commercial times, those byes tend to be awarded to the best (seeded) players, so that the most popular players advance past the first round of competition.

54. Himalayan food, maybe : CAT CHOW
The Himalayan breed of cat has long hair and is identical to the Persian, but with blue eyes and different colors at the extreme points of its coat.

57. In a lather, with "up" : HET
Someone who is “het up” is “heated up, angry”.

64. It's measured in points : EM SPACE
In typography, there are em dashes and en dashes (and spaces). The em dash is about the width of an "m" character, and an en dash about half that, the width of an "n' character. An en dash is used, for example, to separate numbers designating a range, as in 5-10 years. Th em dash seems to be going out of style, and indeed the application I am using to write this paragraph won't let me show you one!

65. Warriors in l'Iliade : TROYENS
In French, the Trojans (Troyens) pay a big part in the Iliad (l'Iliade).

“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

Down
1. Its motto is "From sea to sea" : CANADA
The Canadian national motto is “A Mari Usque Ad Mare” (Latin), “From Sea to Sea” (English”), “D'un océan à l'autre” (French).

2. Plant called "rocket" outside the U.S. : ARUGULA
Eruca sativa is an edible plant that is known as arugula in the US, and rocket in the British Isles and Canada. The Italian name for the plant is “rucola”, from the Latin name. It is “rucula” that evolved into the American term “arugula”.

4. Footnote abbr. : LOC
Loc. cit. is short for "loco citato" meaning "in the place cited". Loc. cit. is used in a footnote instead of op. cit. as it refers not only to a prior work, but also to the same page in that work.

6. Copacetic : JAKE
Both "jake" and "dandy" are slang words meaning "fine", as in “things are just dandy”.

Something described as “copacetic” is very fine, very acceptable.

9. Cousins of harriers : ERNES
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle, and the sea-eagle.

The name harrier applies to several species of hawks.

11. Ketchup, e.g. : RED
The term “ketchup” may be of Chinese origin. One suggestion is that the name comes from “kôe-chiap”, meaning the brine of pickled fish. The name may also come from the Chinese “jyutping”, meaning “tomato sauce”.

12. His servant is Kurwenal, in opera : TRISTAN
"Tristan und Isolde" is an epic opera by Richard Wagner (Wagner ... not one of my favorites!). Many see it as the first serious move away from the traditional harmony and tonality of the classical and romantic eras.

14. Person breaking his word? : SPELLER
A speller, a person spelling out a word, breaks that word into letters.

24. Minion's reply : YES, BOSS
A minion is a servile follower, a yes-man. The term “minion” comes from the French word “mignon” meaning “favorite, darling”.

30. Fellow : BLOKE
“Bloke” is British slang for a fellow. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

38. 80 chains or 8,000 links : ONE MILE
A chain is a unit of length, equal to 100 links. There are 10 chains in furlong, and 80 chains in a mile. The original chain was known as Gunter’s chain, and was literally a length of chain used by clergyman Edmund Gunter in 1620 in the surveying of land.

41. Carlos the Jackal raided its HQ : OPEC
Carlos the Jackal (real name “Ilich Sánchez”) is a terrorist from Venezuela who is serving a life sentence in a French jail. One of the most famous operations executed by Sánchez was a 1975 raid on the OPEC headquarters in Vienna in which three people were killed. Sánchez was given the codename “Carlos” by one of the terrorist organizations that he he joined, because of his South American roots. Carlos was then nicknamed “the Jackal” by a British newspaper when it was reported that the terrorist was at some point carrying a copy of the novel “The Day of the Jackal”.

43. Song with the lyric "Until we meet again" : ALOHA ‘OE
"Aloha 'Oe" is a song of Hawaii composed by Liliuokalani, the last monarch of Hawaii and her only queen. The title translates as "Farewell to Thee".

49. Animistic figures : TOTEMS
Totem poles are large sculptures that have been carved from trees. Totem poles are part of the culture of Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest of North America.

51. Turning phenolphthalein pink : BASIC
Phenolphthalein is a chemical compound that is often used as an indicator in titrations, a laboratory analysis technique used to determine an unknown concentration of a solution. Phenolphthalein is pink in a basic solution, and colorless in an acidic solution.

55. Post-Passover period : OMER
In the Jewish tradition, the 49 days before Passover and before Shavuot are verbally counted in the practice known as counting of the Omer.

56. ___ siege (1993 newsmaker) : WACO
In recent years, Waco is perhaps most famous as the site of a siege and shootout between ATF agents and members of the Protestant sect known as the Branch Davidians. Shortly after ATF agents tried to execute a search warrant, shots were fired and at the end of the fight six people inside the Branch Davidian compound were dead, as were four agents. A fifty-day siege ensued at the end of which a final assault resulted in members of the community setting fire to the compound. Only nine people walked away from that fire. 50 adults and 25 children perished.

59. Special feeling? : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Thickburger seller : CARL’S JR
8. Some gathering spots : HEARTHS
15. Iris features : AREOLAE
16. Officially request : ORDER UP
17. Alternative to a babka : NUTCAKE
18. Very abruptly : ON A DIME
19. See 34-Down : AGE
20. "I can go for this!" : ME LIKEY!
22. Beethoven's fifth? : SOL
23. As is fitting : DULY
25. Many old terminals : IBMS
26. Shortening for shortcuts : CTRL
27. It means everything to Erhard : ALLES
29. Obituary word : NEE
30. It's often shifted after being laid : BLAME
31. He began his third presidential term in 2014 : ASSAD
33. Part of a goth dude's look : GUYLINER
35. Party rule, for short : BYOB
37. What holds up well? : PROP
38. "Puh-leeze, save the tears" : OH BOO HOO
42. Cry before some clinking : SKOAL
45. Like Grieg, to Grieg : NORSK
46. Common combo vaccine : DPT
48. It's not much higher than a D : E-FLAT
50. Conjugation part between "sommes" and "sont" : ETES
51. Seeds often have them : BYES
52. Something developed casually? : FOTO
53. See 54-Down : MIA
54. Himalayan food, maybe : CAT CHOW
57. In a lather, with "up" : HET
58. "No sweat!" : IT'S EASY!
60. "You don't have to tell me that" : I'M AWARE
62. Really opens up : LETS RIP
63. You might take a cue from this : REC ROOM
64. It's measured in points : EM SPACE
65. Warriors in l'Iliade : TROYENS

Down
1. Its motto is "From sea to sea" : CANADA
2. Plant called "rocket" outside the U.S. : ARUGULA
3. Hands down, in a way : RETELLS
4. Footnote abbr. : LOC
5. Tear into : SLAM
6. Copacetic : JAKE
7. Land on the sea : REEL IN
8. "I'd like some of that, bro" : HOOK ME UP
9. Cousins of harriers : ERNES
10. Take ___ off : A DAY
11. Ketchup, e.g. : RED
12. His servant is Kurwenal, in opera : TRISTAN
13. "Try it ... that's all I ask" : HUMOR ME
14. Person breaking his word? : SPELLER
21. "___ to disagree" : I BEG
24. Minion's reply : YES, BOSS
26. Shear : CLIP OFF
28. Give it a go? : SAY OK
30. Fellow : BLOKE
32. "How could I do that?!" : D’OH!
34. 19-Across units: Abbr. : YRS
36. General figure : BODY TYPE
38. 80 chains or 8,000 links : ONE MILE
39. It's in high demand : HOT ITEM
40. Chicken choices : BREASTS
41. Carlos the Jackal raided its HQ : OPEC
43. Song with the lyric "Until we meet again" : ALOHA ‘OE
44. Not quite yet : LATER ON
47. Logo displayer, maybe : T-SHIRT
49. Animistic figures : TOTEMS
51. Turning phenolphthalein pink : BASIC
54. With 53-Across, Italian sugar : CARA
55. Post-Passover period : OMER
56. ___ siege (1993 newsmaker) : WACO
59. Special feeling? : ESP
61. Like some wit : WRY


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0130-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 15, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Phillips
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … BEDELIA (Bedalia), SEGOS (sagos)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Foreign fortress : CASBAH
“Casbah” is the Arabic word for a citadel. The term usually refers to the citadel in the city of Algiers, and the area surrounding it.

13. Take for the road? : HOT-WIRE
To hot-wire a vehicle is to start it by bypassing the keyed ignition.

15. "Parenthood" actress Bonnie : BEDELIA
The actress Bonnie Bedelia is best perhaps for playing Holly McClane in the “Die Hard” series of movies (the wife of the character played by Bruce Willis). Bedelia is the aunt of the actor Macaulay Culkin, the child star of “Home Alone”.

16. Person making pointed attacks? : EPEEIST
The épée that is used in today’s sport fencing is derived from the old French dueling sword. In fact, the the sport of épée fencing is very similar to the dualing of the 19th century. The word “épée” translates from French as “sword”.

18. From overseas? : DES
The French word “des” translates as “of the”.

19. 1972 Alice Cooper hit with the lyric "we got no class" : SCHOOL’S OUT
“School’s Out” is a marvelous 1972 song written and recorded by Alice Cooper. While writing the song, Cooper was thinking about the greatest three minutes of one’s life. He came up with a choice between Christmas morning, getting ready to open presents, and the last day of school, waiting for the school bell to ring.

21. Line in the sand? : PHARAOHS
The pharaohs were the kings of Ancient Egypt. The term “pharaoh” translates as “great house”, and was originally the name of the king’s palace.

22. Worked for Mad, maybe : CARTOONED
"Mad" magazine has been around since 1952, although back them it was more of a comic book than a magazine. The original founder and editor was Harvey Kurtzman, and in order to convince him to stay, the publisher changed the format to a magazine in 1955, when the publication really took off in terms of popularity.

36. Not original, in a way : XEROXED
A xerox is a copy made on a xerograph machine. Xerography is a dry photocopying technique that was invented in 1938 by Chester Carlson, although he originally referred to the process as electrophotography. Joseph Wilson commercialized Carlson’s process some years later, coining the term “Xerography” using the Greek words for “dry” and “writing”. Wilson changed the name of his own photographic company to Xerox.

40. Chaud time : ETE
In French, summer (été) is hot (chaud).

41. Baroque dance form : ALLEMANDE
An allemande is a dance that was very popular during the Baroque period. The dance evolved out of dances that were apparently favored in Germany during the Renaissance. “Allemande” is French for “German”.

46. Setting for TV's "The Mentalist" : SACRAMENTO
“The Mentalist” is a police drama that has been airing on CBS since 2008. It’s all about a former psychic who now works as a consultant to the police. I have never watched it though …

48. Eldest sister in a classic 1868 novel : MEG
"Little Women" is a novel written by American author Louisa May Alcott. The quartet of little women is Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March. Jo is a tomboy and the main character in the story, and is based on Alcott herself.

51. Heavy-metal band with the #1 album "Far Beyond Driven" : PANTERA
Pantera was a heavy metal band formed in 1981 by two brothers with the stage names of Vinnie Paul and Dimebag Darrell. The group disbanded in 2003. Any hopes for a reunion were dashed in 2004 when Dimebag Darrell was shot dead on stage by a deranged fan.

52. "___ Girls" : GILMORE
“Gilmore Girls” is a comedy show that originally aired from 2000 to 2007 on the WB. The title characters were a mother and daughter, played by Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel.

54. Type, as a PIN : ENTER IN
One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM).

Down
2. "___ is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness": Desmond Tutu : HOPE
In a “New York Times” interview in 2010, Archbishop Desmond Tutu opined:
Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness. You see it wonderfully when you fly and the sky is overcast. Sometimes you forget that just beyond the clouds the sun is shining.

Desmond Tutu is a South African, a former Anglican bishop who is an outspoken opponent of apartheid. Tutu won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009, among other distinguished awards.

3. GPS options: Abbr. : RTES
Route (rte.)

5. Popular video game for wannabe athletes : WII SPORTS
Players of the Wii Sports video game can simulate five sports: tennis, baseball, bowling, golf and boxing.

6. Sole supporter? : DR SCHOLL’S
William Scholl worked part time as a cobbler and then in a shoe retailer in Chicago. Noting that many people had similar foot problems he went to night school and qualified as a podiatrist in 1904. Soon after he started his own company making footcare products, giving us the brand name Dr. Scholl’s.

7. Singer Green : CEELO
CeeLo Green is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. Apparently Green is one of the coaches for the contestants on the singing TV show “The Voice”. That’s all I need to know …

8. Not much, as of salt : A DASH
In cooking, a “dash” is a very small measure, one that is often undefined. However, you can in fact buy some measuring spoons that define not only a dash but also a “pinch” and a “smidgen”, as follows:
- a dash is 1/8 teaspoon
- a pinch is 1/16 teaspoon
- a smidgen is 1/32 teaspoon

9. Mariposa relatives : SEGOS
The Sego Lily is the state flower of Utah, and is a perennial plant found throughout the Western United States.

Mariposa Lilies belong to the genus Calochortus.

10. Like the sky, in France : BLEU
“Bleu” is French for “blue”.

14. Hawke of "Boyhood" : ETHAN
Ethan Hawke is a Hollywood actor who made his breakthrough in a supporting role in "Dead Poet's Society", playing opposite Robin Williams. Hawke was married to Uma Thurman, with whom he has two children.

“Boyhood” sounds like an interesting 2014 film about the coming-of-age of a young boy and his older sister. The film was actually shot over an 11-year period, so that the actors were seen to be growing up at the same time as the characters that they were playing. The critics loved this movie.

20. Ivan Turgenev's birthplace : OREL
Orel (also Oryol) is a city lying on the Oka River, just over 200 miles SSW of Moscow. Orel was one of the cities occupied by Germany during WWII. It was liberated in 1943, but had been almost completely destroyed.

Ivan Turgenev was a Russian novelist and playwright. Turgenev’s most famous works are a collection of short stories called “A Sportsman’s Sketches” (1852) and the novel “Fathers and Sons” (1862).

22. Barista's serving : CAFFE
“Caffè” is Italian for “coffee”.

The person who serves coffee in a coffee shop is often called a "barista". "Barista" is the Italian for "bartender".

24. ___-Main-Danube Canal : RHINE
The Rhine-Main-Danube Canal in Bavaria, Germany connects the Danube and Rhine basins. The waterway is just over a hundred miles long and was completed in 1992.

31. Queen of the Nile : NEFERTITI
Nefertiti was the Great Royal Wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nefertiti is relatively well-known in modern times largely due to a 3,300-year-old limestone bust that depicts her rather beautiful features. The painted bust was discovered by archaeologists in the sculptor’s workshop in 1912, and is on display in the Neues Museum in Berlin.

33. ___ Linda, Calif. : LOMA
Loma Linda is a city in California located not far from Los Angeles. The name Loma Linda translates from Spanish as “Beautiful Hill”.

38. Liqueur flavor : SLOE
The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush, and the main flavoring ingredient in sloe gin.

44. ___ Jacques : FRERE
"Frère Jacques" is a children’s song from France. The French lyrics are:
Frère Jacques, frère Jacques,
Dormez-vous ? Dormez-vous ?
Sonnez les matines ! Sonnez les matines !
Ding, daing, dong. Ding, daing, dong.
The lyrics are usually translated into English as:
Are you sleeping, are you sleeping,
Brother John? Brother John?
Morning bells are ringing! Morning bells are ringing!
Ding, dang, dong. Ding, dang, dong.

45. Anna of the "Scary Movie" films : FARIS
I had no idea who Anna Faris was until I just looked her up online. It turns out that she is one of the stars in the sitcom “Mom”, alongside the fabulous Allison Janney. The funny thing is, I’m watching the show “Mom” while I type this ...

“Scary Movie” is one of those parody movies, a film released in 2000 that pokes fun at famous horror films. It was advertised with the tagline “No mercy. No shame. No sequel”. The “no sequel” reference was a parody in itself, making fun of the fact that slasher movies in particular were made into strings of sequels. But there was in fact to be a sequel to “Scary Movie”, in fact three of them with one more on the way. “Scary Movie 2” came out in 2001, with the tagline “We lied”.

46. Capital near Aden : SANA
Sana (also Sanaa) is the capital city of Yemen. Within the bounds of today's metropolis is the old fortified city of Sana, where people have lived for over 2,500 years. The Old City is now a World Heritage Site.

47. Myrmecologists' study : ANTS
Myrmecology is the study of ants. The term derives from the Greek “myrmex” meaning “ant”.

48. Water under the bridge? : MOAT
A “moat” is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say. The moat may or may not be filled with water.

49. And so : ERGO
"Ergo" is the Latin word for "hence, therefore".

50. Fanboy or fangirl : GEEK
Fanboys (and fangirls) are fans, but fans of a very specific subject in a particular field. So, someone might be a fan of home computing, but an Intel fanboy would have an enthusiasm for CPUs made by Intel. A fanzine (also “zine”) is a fan publication with a very limited circulation, dealing with a very specific subject matter. Fanzines are usually desktop published and distributed electronically or as photocopies.

53. Provider of inside info? : MRI
A CT (or "CAT") scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful causing damage that is cumulative over time. An MRI on the other hand (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn't like the term "nuclear" because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it's just called MRI.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sharp : SHREWD
7. Foreign fortress : CASBAH
13. Take for the road? : HOT-WIRE
15. "Parenthood" actress Bonnie : BEDELIA
16. Person making pointed attacks? : EPEEIST
17. Chemical synthesis component : REAGENT
18. From overseas? : DES
19. 1972 Alice Cooper hit with the lyric "we got no class" : SCHOOL’S OUT
21. Line in the sand? : PHARAOHS
22. Worked for Mad, maybe : CARTOONED
26. Take blades to blades : MOW
29. Spinning : AWHIRL
30. Cell alternative : LANDLINE
34. How signals from outer space may be heard : FAINTLY
36. Not original, in a way : XEROXED
37. Handles deftly : FINESSES
39. Irate : FUMING
40. Chaud time : ETE
41. Baroque dance form : ALLEMANDE
43. Between 5 p.m. and 9 a.m., maybe : OFF-HOURS
46. Setting for TV's "The Mentalist" : SACRAMENTO
48. Eldest sister in a classic 1868 novel : MEG
51. Heavy-metal band with the #1 album "Far Beyond Driven" : PANTERA
52. "___ Girls" : GILMORE
54. Type, as a PIN : ENTER IN
55. Basement's use, often : STORAGE
56. Wallops : PASTES
57. "Any problem with that?" : IS IT OK?

Down
1. Drop off : SHED
2. "___ is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness": Desmond Tutu : HOPE
3. GPS options: Abbr. : RTES
4. Milk source : EWE
5. Popular video game for wannabe athletes : WII SPORTS
6. Sole supporter? : DR SCHOLL’S
7. Singer Green : CEELO
8. Not much, as of salt : A DASH
9. Mariposa relatives : SEGOS
10. Like the sky, in France : BLEU
11. "It ___ happenin'" : AIN’T
12. One getting a tip? : HAT
14. Hawke of "Boyhood" : ETHAN
15. Weapon in a fantasy role-playing game : BROADAX
20. Ivan Turgenev's birthplace : OREL
22. Barista's serving : CAFFE
23. Expect : AWAIT
24. ___-Main-Danube Canal : RHINE
25. What's the point of an eating utensil? : TINE
26. Recipe instruction : MIX IN
27. Upright : ON END
28. Sand ___ : WEDGE
31. Queen of the Nile : NEFERTITI
32. Hard-hitting musical performances? : DRUM SOLOS
33. ___ Linda, Calif. : LOMA
35. "Sure thing, dude!" : YEAH, MAN!
38. Liqueur flavor : SLOE
42. Air space? : LUNGS
43. The electrons of oxygen, e.g. : OCTET
44. ___ Jacques : FRERE
45. Anna of the "Scary Movie" films : FARIS
46. Capital near Aden : SANA
47. Myrmecologists' study : ANTS
48. Water under the bridge? : MOAT
49. And so : ERGO
50. Fanboy or fangirl : GEEK
51. Bounce : PEP
53. Provider of inside info? : MRI


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0129-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jan 15, Thursday



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Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Farmer
THEME: Cut Out the Middleman … we’ve had the word MAN cut out of three of today’s answers. I’ve added those missing “MEN” in my grid. You can see them in the MIDDLE of two other “MEN”, above and below:
17A. With 58-Across, buy or sell direct ... or what to do in this puzzle three times? : CUT OUT THE
58A. See 17-Across : MIDDLEMAN

18A. Upright type : ROMAN
20A. Best Picture between "The Last Emperor" and "Driving Miss Daisy" : RAIN MAN
23A. Archaeological discovery of the 1920s whose fossils have been missing since 1941 : PEKING MAN

32A. Offer? : HIT MAN
34A. With 37-Across, drama set in New York's Last Chance Saloon : THE ICEMAN
(37A. See 34-Across : COMETH)
40A. Procrastinator's time : MANANA

49A. Faithful servant : MAN FRIDAY
53A. Central American capital : MANAGUA
55A. "Homeland" actor Patinkin : MANDY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. General who became a secretary of state : HAIG
Alexander Haig was Secretary of State under President Reagan, and White House Chief of Staff under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Famously, Haig took over temporary control of the country immediately after President Reagan was shot in 1981. To do so was a pragmatic move, while waiting on Vice President Bush to arrive in Washington. There was much debate at the time about the legality of the steps taken, as the presidential line of succession called out in the US Constitution is President, Vice President, Speaker of the House, President pro tempore of the US Senate, and then Secretary of State.

9. Bird that's the lead character in "Rio" : MACAW
“Rio” is a 2011 animated movie about a male blue macaw who is brought to mate with a female blue macaw in Rio de Janeiro, hence the movie’s title. Fans can go see “Rio 2” that was released in 2014.

16. Bula : Fiji :: ___ : Hawaii : ALOHA
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

“Bula” is the Fijian word for “hello”.

18. Upright type : ROMAN
HIstorically there have been three classes of typeface: roman, italic and blackletter. Blackletter is quite ornate and looks somewhat archaic, so is rarely used these days. In days of yore, typefaces were either roman (upright) or italic (slanted). Today, we mix roman and italic typefaces in the same document, often using the italics for stress.

20. Best Picture between "The Last Emperor" and "Driving Miss Daisy" : RAIN MAN
“Rain Man” is an entertaining and thought-provoking film released in 1988 starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It’s all about a self-possessed yuppie (Cruise, appropriate casting!) who discovers he has a brother who is an autistic savant (Hoffman). Hoffman won the Best Actor Oscar for his performance, and “Rain Man” won the Best Picture award.

“The Last Emperor” is a 1987 biographical film about Puyi, the last Emperor of China. “The Last Emperor” was unique in that it was the first time the Chinese government allowed filming in the Forbidden City in Beijing. In fact, Queen Elizabeth II was on a state visit to China the same time that filming was taking place, and the Chinese government gave priority to filming, so the British royal party could not visit the Forbidden City.

The 1989 movie "Driving Miss Daisy" is based on the 1987 play by Alfred Uhry. Not only did Uhry win the Pulitzer for the play, he also won an Academy Award for the screenplay for the movie. In a famous scene, when Hoke, Miss Daisy's driver takes her from Atlanta to Mobile for her brother's 90th birthday party, Hoke reveals to his passenger that the journey marked the first time he had ever left his home state of Georgia.

22. Part of a historic trio : PINTA
Famously, Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted, by a sailor called Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as "the painted one". The Pinta's real name has been lost in mists of time.

23. Archaeological discovery of the 1920s whose fossils have been missing since 1941 : PEKING MAN
Back in the 1920s, fossil specimens were discovered near Beijing (Peking), China that were shown to be examples of “primitive man”. The species that was discovered became known as “Peking Man”, a human ancestor. The cast majority of the specimens found were packed up during WWII for transportation to the American Museum of Natural HIstory in New York, but the fossils vanished en route from China and have never been recovered.

29. Service break at Wimbledon? : TEATIME
The Wimbledon Championships of tennis are held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club located in Wimbledon, a district of London. The Wimbledon Championships started in 1877, and are still played on grass.

31. Like : A LA
The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

32. Offer? : HIT MAN
A hit man might “off” (kill) someone.

33. Onetime Road Runner rivals : GTOS
The Pontiac GTO was was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later was found the DeLorean Motor Company.

The Plymouth Road Runner is a classic muscle car produced by Chrysler from 1968 to 1980. Chrysler paid Warner Bros. $50,000 for the rights to use the Road Runner name, after the cartoon character. The auto manufacturer even used the cartoonish “beep, beep” sound for the Plymouth Road Runner’s horn.

34. With 37-Across, drama set in New York's Last Chance Saloon : THE ICEMAN
37. See 34-Across : COMETH
"The Iceman Cometh" is a play written by American playwright Eugene O'Neill and first performed in 1946 on Broadway. The play centers on some down-and-out men in a shabby saloon in Manhattan. The title is a reference to the "ice man", the man who would have delivered ice to homes back in the time of the play. The reference is to a bawdy joke in which the "ice man" was having an affair with someone's wife.

39. Butler, e.g. : HELP
In a large (and posh!) household, a butler is generally the most senior member of the staff. Traditionally, the butler is male, and is in charge of the male members of the household, with the housekeeper managing the female staff. The butler also has direct control of the dining room, the wine cellar and the pantry. It is the management of the wine cellar that is indicative of the roots of the term “butler”. Back in Ancient Greece and Rome, the equivalent of the butler was in charge of the wine supply. Our modern term from the Old French “botellier” meaning “bottle bearer”, and further back from the Medieval Latin “butticula”.

40. Procrastinator's time : MANANA
“Mañana” is the Spanish for “tomorrow”.

44. Where Forrest Gump attended college : ALABAMA
The epic 1994 movie “Forrest Gump” is based on a 1986 novel of the same name by Winston Groom. Groom said that he had envisioned John Goodman playing the title role, and not Tom Hanks.

46. Twit : ASS
"Twit" is a word not used very often here in America. It's a slang term that was quite common in England where it was used for "someone foolish and idiotic".

49. Faithful servant : MAN FRIDAY
In Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel “Robinson Crusoe”, the castaway encounters a companion that Crusoe calls “Friday”, because the two first met on that day. Friday soon becomes his willing servant. This character is the source of our terms “Man Friday” and “Girl Friday”, which are used to describe a particularly competent and loyal assistant.

51. Certain dressing : RANCH
Ranch dressing has been the best selling salad dressing in the country since 1992. The recipe was developed by Steve Henson who introduced it in the fifties to guests on his dude ranch, Hidden Valley Ranch in Northern California. His ranch dressing became so popular that he opened a factory to produce packets of ranch seasoning that could be mixed with mayonnaise and buttermilk. Henson sold the Hidden Valley Ranch brand for $8 million in 1972.

53. Central American capital : MANAGUA
Managua is the capital and largest city in Nicaragua. It is also the second-largest city in Central America in terms of population, with Guatemala City topping the list.

54. Vintage Ford : MODEL A
The Ford Model A was the original car produced by the Ford Motor Company. The first production run lasted from 1903 to 1904, when it was replaced by the Model C. The name “Model A” was brought back in 1927 and used for the successor to the Model T.

55. "Homeland" actor Patinkin : MANDY
Mandy Patinkin is a stage and screen actor, and a tenor vocalist. Patinkin played the part of Che in the original Broadway production of “Evita”. More recently, he has been playing Saul Berenson on the excellent Showtime series “Homeland”.

63. Piece in a rockhound's collection : GEODE
A geode is a rock in which there is a cavity lined or filled with crystal formations.

64. Certain dress : SARI
The item of clothing called a "sari" (also "saree") is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that's a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

Down
1. Caribbean vacation, e.g. : ESCAPE
The Caribbean Sea takes its name from the Carib people. The Caribs are an American Indian people that live in the Lesser Antilles islands, part of the West Indies.

2. Gulf War ally : SAUDIS
Many of us tend to use "Operation Desert Storm" as the overall name for the conflict more correctly called the Persian Gulf War. Operation Desert Storm was in fact just the air and land battle that took place between January 17th and April 11th 1991. The buildup of forces was called Operation Desert Shield, and the withdrawal of forces after the liberation of Kuwait was known as Operation Desert Farewell.

3. 2014 Broadway play based on Moss Hart's autobiography : ACT ONE
Moss Hart was a playwright and theater director from New York City. Hart wrote a memoir called “Act One” that told of his childhood and his struggle to achieve success on Broadway. The book was adapted into a 1963 film and a stage play that premiered in 2014.

4. Women's hybrid attire : SKORT
Skorts are a hybrid between shorts and a skirt.

5. "Survivor" quarters : HUTS
The reality show "Survivor" is based on a Swedish television series created in 1997 called "Expedition Robinson".

6. Queen's pawn? : ANT
The queen ant of some species can live to the ripe old age of 30 years, which is one of the longest lifespans in the insect world.

7. "___ liebe dich" : ICH
"Ich liebe dich" translates into "I love you" from German.

8. Vlasic classic : GHERKIN
Often a dill pickle is actually a pickled gherkin, as the gherkin and cucumber are different cultivars within the same species. Here in the US, dill is commonly added to the pickling vinegar or brine, but this wasn't the case when I used to eat them back in Ireland (I can't stand dill!). You might see jars labeled as "cornichons", but they're gherkins. Cornichon is just the French word for gherkin.

Apparently Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

9. ___ One (president's helicopter) : MARINE
Marine One is the call sign used by a Marine Corps helicopter when it is carrying the US president. In fact, the call sign can be used by any Marine Corps aircraft carrying the president, but usually refers either a Sea King or WhiteHawk helicopter that is used routinely in transportation to and from the White House.

23. "Jackie Brown" actress Grier : PAM
Pam Grier is an actress whose most acclaimed performance was in the 1997 Quentin Tarantino film “Jackie Brown”, in which she played the title role.

24. Chapter seven? : ETA
I guess the reference is to a chapter of a Greek fraternity, with eta being the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet.

27. Longtime Crosby partner : NASH
The supergroup Crosby, Stills & Nash (CSN) is made up of David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. The band can grow to "CSNY" when the trio is joined by Neil Young. Fans have been known to call the act “C, S, N and sometimes Y”, a play on the expression that names all the vowels, "A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y".

30. Tour de France season : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in Paris.

Back in the late 1800s, long-distance cycle races were used as promotional events, traditionally to help boost sales of newspapers. These races usually took place around tracks, but in 1902 the backers of the struggling sports publication "L'Auto" decided to stage a race that would take the competitors all around France. That first Tour de France took place in 1903, starting in Paris and passing through Lyon, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Nantes and then back to Paris.

33. TV debut of 1975, briefly : GMA
“Good Morning America” (GMA) is ABC’s morning show, and has been since 1975. There was even a spinoff show called “Good Afternoon America”, although it only lasted for a few months in 2012.

35. Goddess who competed for the apple of discord : HERA
According to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris tossed the Golden Apple of Discord into the middle of the table during the feast of the gods at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis. The Golden Apple bore the words “to the fairest”, and the goddesses Hera, Athena and Aphrodite succumbed to their vanity and fought for the title of most fair. This dispute eventually led to the Trojan War.

36. Dash : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

37. Skyping device : CAM
The main feature of the Skype application is that it allows voice communication to take place over the Internet (aka VoIP). Skype has other features such as video conferencing and instant messaging, but the application made its name from voice communication. Skype was founded by two Scandinavian entrepreneurs and the software necessary was developed by a team of engineers in Estonia. The development project was originally called "Sky peer-to-peer" so the first commercial name for the application was "Skyper". This had to be shortened to "Skype" because the skyper.com domain name was already in use.

40. Butterfly and others : MADAMES
Puccini's "Madama Butterfly" is the most-performed opera in the US. The opera that we see today is actually the second version that Puccini produced. The original version was first staged in 1904 at La Scala in Milan where it received a very poor reception. Puccini reworked the piece, breaking the second act into two new acts and making some other significant changes. The opera was relaunched a few months later and it was a resounding success.

41. Judicial ratings grp. : ABA
American Bar Association (ABA)

44. Common pattern for golf attire : ARGYLE
The argyle pattern is based on the Campbell tartan. The Campbell clan is based in the Argyll region (note the spelling) in the west of Scotland, giving the Argyle pattern its name.

45. Brooklyn-based sch. : LIU
Long Island University (LIU) is a private school that was chartered in 1926. LIU's focus has always been on providing moderately-priced, effective education to people from all walks in life. To that end, LIU opened a second campus in 1951 in Brookville in the suburbs of New York City, recognizing the need to serve families that were living outside of the metropolis.

46. Iron supplements may treat it : ANEMIA
The term “anemia” (or “anaemia” as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning "lack of blood". Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition.

47. Mercedes-Benz luxury line : S-CLASS
The S-Class is the most luxurious line of Mercedes cars, and is the world’s best-selling luxury sedan. The name “S-Class” stands for “Sonderklasse”, which translates from German as “special class”.

52. Grammy winner for "21" : ADELE
Adele is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older.

54. Year Columbus began his last voyage : MDII
Christopher Columbus made four voyages in all to the Americas. The last of these expeditions departed from Cadiz in May 1502. Columbus’s ships were damaged in a dispute with locals in Panama, and further damaged in a storm off the coast of Cuba. The members of the expedition found themselves stranded in Jamaica for a year, before they were rescued by a team sent by the Governor of Hispaniola in 1504. The party were then returned to Spain, where Columbus died two years later, in 1506.

55. Memory unit, informally : MEG
In the world of computers, a "bit" is the basic unit of information. It has a value of 0 or 1. A "byte" is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text. The prefix mega- stands for 10 to the power of 6, so a megabyte (meg) is 1,000,000 bytes. And the prefix giga- means 10 to the power of 9, so a gigabyte (gig) is 1,000,000,000 bytes. Well, those are the SI definitions of megabyte and kilobyte. The purists still use 2 to the power of 20 for a megabyte (i.e. 1,048,576), and 2 to the power of 30 for a gigabyte.

56. Grooming brand for "helping guys get the girl" : AXE
Axe is a brand of male grooming products. Axe is sold under the name Lynx in some parts of the world.

57. Sgt., e.g. : NCO
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant or a corporal.

59. "Well, ___ monkey's uncle!" : I’M A
When Charles Darwin published his theory of evolution in his book "Descent of Man", the general reception could at best be described as "skeptical". The phrase "I'll be a monkey's uncle" came out of this reaction, an expression that was designed to ridicule Darwin's theory.

60. ___ es Salaam : DAR
Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. María's "those" : ESAS
5. General who became a secretary of state : HAIG
9. Bird that's the lead character in "Rio" : MACAW
14. It might contain a sandwich and an apple : SACK LUNCH
16. Bula : Fiji :: ___ : Hawaii : ALOHA
17. With 58-Across, buy or sell direct ... or what to do in this puzzle three times? : CUT OUT THE
18. Upright type : ROMAN
19. Trims : ADORNS
20. Best Picture between "The Last Emperor" and "Driving Miss Daisy" : RAIN MAN
22. Part of a historic trio : PINTA
23. Archaeological discovery of the 1920s whose fossils have been missing since 1941 : PEKING MAN
28. Suffix with official : -ESE
29. Service break at Wimbledon? : TEATIME
31. Like : A LA
32. Offer? : HIT MAN
33. Onetime Road Runner rivals : GTOS
34. With 37-Across, drama set in New York's Last Chance Saloon : THE ICEMAN
37. See 34-Across : COMETH
39. Butler, e.g. : HELP
40. Procrastinator's time : MANANA
43. Span of attention? : ERA
44. Where Forrest Gump attended college : ALABAMA
46. Twit : ASS
49. Faithful servant : MAN FRIDAY
51. Certain dressing : RANCH
53. Central American capital : MANAGUA
54. Vintage Ford : MODEL A
55. "Homeland" actor Patinkin : MANDY
58. See 17-Across : MIDDLEMAN
61. Stand out : EXCEL
62. Aid for a club secretary nowadays : EMAIL LIST
63. Piece in a rockhound's collection : GEODE
64. Certain dress : SARI
65. "___ now" : EASY

Down
1. Caribbean vacation, e.g. : ESCAPE
2. Gulf War ally : SAUDIS
3. 2014 Broadway play based on Moss Hart's autobiography : ACT ONE
4. Women's hybrid attire : SKORT
5. "Survivor" quarters : HUTS
6. Queen's pawn? : ANT
7. "___ liebe dich" : ICH
8. Vlasic classic : GHERKIN
9. ___ One (president's helicopter) : MARINE
10. "Move ___" : ALONG
11. End of many addresses : COM
12. "So it was you!" : AHA!
13. Whitish : WAN
15. Nut : LUNATIC
21. Target : AIM
23. "Jackie Brown" actress Grier : PAM
24. Chapter seven? : ETA
25. Bud : MATE
26. Loads : A LOT
27. Longtime Crosby partner : NASH
30. Tour de France season : ETE
32. Like ripped jeans in the '90s : HIP
33. TV debut of 1975, briefly : GMA
34. Us competitor : THEM
35. Goddess who competed for the apple of discord : HERA
36. Dash : ELAN
37. Skyping device : CAM
38. Hot : ON A ROLL
40. Butterfly and others : MADAMES
41. Judicial ratings grp. : ABA
42. "Permission denied" : NAY
44. Common pattern for golf attire : ARGYLE
45. Brooklyn-based sch. : LIU
46. Iron supplements may treat it : ANEMIA
47. Mercedes-Benz luxury line : S-CLASS
48. Makeshift dwelling : SHANTY
50. Nearly forgotten : FADED
52. Grammy winner for "21" : ADELE
54. Year Columbus began his last voyage : MDII
55. Memory unit, informally : MEG
56. Grooming brand for "helping guys get the girl" : AXE
57. Sgt., e.g. : NCO
59. "Well, ___ monkey's uncle!" : I’M A
60. ___ es Salaam : DAR


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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