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0301-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Mar 15, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Finn Vigeland
THEME: Noted Anniversary … today’s themed answers commemorate the film version of “The Sound of Music”, which opened this month fifty years ago. In honor of the show tune “Do-Re-Mi”, we have the notes of the scale in rebus squares running in ascending order diagonally across the grid, from the bottom-left to the top-right:
118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC

24A. Setting of 118-Across : SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
31A. Star of 118-Across : JULIE ANDREWS
49A. Opening lyric of 118-Across : THE HILLS ARE ALIVE ...
68A. Duo behind 118-Across : RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN
91A. Honor for 118-Across : BEST PICTURE OSCAR
108A. Family upon whom 118-Across is based : THE VON TRAPPS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "u r KIDDING!" : OMG
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

10. Neighbor of a delt : PEC
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

The deltoid muscle is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

13. 1958 space monkey : GORDO
Gordo was a squirrel monkey used by NASA in its space program. Gordo was launched into space in 1958 and travelled over 1500 miles in a 15-minute flight, 8 minutes of which were spent weightless. Gordo’s capsule re-entered the atmosphere at over 10,000 miles per hour, but the parachute failed to open. The capsule went into the South Atlantic and was never recovered.

17. Site of cataracts : NILE
The Cataracts of the Nile are a series of six shallows along the river between Aswan in the north and Khartoum in the south. The flow in the cataracts ranges from relatively smooth to whitewater rapids.

19. Chillax : VEG OUT
“Chillax” is a slang term meaning “chill and relax”. Who’da thunk it …?

21. "Conversely ...," online : OTOH
On the other hand (OTOH)

24. Setting of 118-Across : SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Salzburg is a city in Austria with a great musical tradition. Salzburg was the birthplace of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was also the setting for much of “The Sound of Music”.

27. Language from which "tattoo" comes : SAMOAN
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo".

29. Mens ___ (legal term) : REA
"Mens rea" is Latin for "guilty mind" and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to "actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea" meaning "the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty". In other words, a someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a "guilty mind", intended to do wrong.

31. Star of 118-Across : JULIE ANDREWS
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
The actress and singer Julie Andrews was made a Dame in 2000 by Queen Elizabeth II. The most famous roles played by Andrews were probably the leads in “Mary Poppins” (1964) and “The Sound of Music” (1965). More recently she has had a recurring role in “The Princess Diaries” (2001) and the film's 2004 sequel. A favorite Julie Andrews film of mine is an comedy drama set in WWII called “The Americanization of Emily”, released in 1964.

35. "Roll Over Beethoven" group, briefly : ELO
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) released a fabulous cover version of Chuck Berry’s hit “Roll Over Beethoven” in 1973. The ELO version was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, and cleverly melds elements of the Chuck Berry song with elements of Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 5”.

36. Chemistry lab droppers : PIPETS
A pipette (also “pipet”) is tool used in a lab to transport an accurately measured volume of liquid. Back in my day, we would suck up the liquid into the pipette by applying our mouths to the top of the instrument. This could be quite dangerous, as one ended up with a mouthful of something unsavory if one lifted the top of pipette out of the liquid too soon. Nowadays, things are much safer.

37. Luggage checker, for short : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks. TSA personnel carry out the baggage and body searches at US airports.

43. Author LeShan : EDA
Eda LeShan wrote "When Your Child Drives You Crazy", and was host of the PBS television show "How Do Your Children Grow?"

44. Botanist Carl Linnaeus, for one : SWEDE
Carl Linnaeus was a botanist and physician from Sweden. Linnaeus who developed the system of biological classification that we still use today. He introduced us to kingdoms, classes, orders, families, genera and species in his 1735 publication “Systema Naturae”.

48. With 65-Down, 160-year-old fraternity founded at Miami University of Ohio : SIGMA …
(65D. See 48-Across : … CHI)
Sigma Chi is Greek-letter social fraternity that was founded back in 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Sigma Chi was founded by a group of students who split with the existing Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity because of a dispute over who would be elected Poet in the the Erodelphian Literary Society. Sounds serious ...

49. Opening lyric of 118-Across : THE HILLS ARE ALIVE …
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote the broadway musical “The Sound of Music”, including the title song. Patti Page agreed to record a version of the song on the same day that the show opened on Broadway in 1959. Mary Martin sang the song in the stage musical, with Julie Andrews providing the honors for the 1965 film version. More recently, Lady Gaga performed the song along with a medley of other tunes from the musical at the 87th Academy Awards ceremony. I thought she did a fabulous job, and read that she practiced almost every day for six months with a voice coach just for that one performance. I’m not a Lady Gaga fan by any means, but take my hat off to her for the tribute she made night.

57. Complaints : FLAK
"Flak" was originally an acronym from the German term for an aircraft defense cannon (FLiegerAbwehrKanone). Flak then became used in English as a general term for antiaircraft fire, and ultimately a term for verbal criticism as in "to take flak".

58. Georgetown athlete : HOYA
The athletic teams of Georgetown University are known as the Hoyas. The name is derived from "Hoya Saxa", a traditional cheer yelled out at Georgetown games as far back as 1893. The term is a mixture of Greek and Latin, with the Greek word "hoya" meaning "such" or "what", and "saxa" translating from Latin as "rocks" or "small stones". The cheer is usually rendered in English as "what rocks!".

62. Eclipses, to some : OMENS
A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes into the shadow cast by the earth from the light of the sun, in other words when the earth is positioned directly between the sun and the moon. The more spectacular solar eclipse takes place when moon passes in front of the sun, so that the earth falls into the shadow cast by the moon.

64. Raid target : ROACH
Raid insecticide has been killing bugs since 1956.

67. ___ Fridays : TGI
T.G.I. Friday's is an American restaurant chain, founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Friday's restaurants in over 50 countries. I think they have always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Friday's restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

68. Duo behind 118-Across : RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II were extremely successful writers of Broadway musicals in the forties and fifties. Rodgers composed the music and Hammerstein wrote the lyrics for hits such as “Oklahoma!”, “Carousel”, “South Pacific”, The King and I” and “The Sound of Music”.

77. Fútbol announcer's shout : GOL!
In Spanish, a football (fútbol) announcer might shout “goal!” (gol!).

80. "Così Fan Tutte," e.g. : OPERA BUFFA
The Italian term "opera seria" is "serious" opera, as opposed to "opera buffa", what we call "comic" opera.

Mozart's comic opera "Così fan tutte" is also known in English as "The School for Lovers". The literal translation of the opera's title is "Thus do all (women)", or "Women are like that".

86. "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" actress : DENCH
Dame Judi Dench is an outstanding English actress, known for decades in her home country mainly as a stage and television actress. Dench’s film career took off in the nineties with a relatively trivial role as “M” in the James Bond series of films. Since then she has played leading roles in several excellent movies including “Shakespeare in Love”, “Mrs. Brown” and “Notes on a Scandal”.

“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" is an outstanding 2012 British film about a group of pensioners who move to a retirement hotel in India. The cast alone is impressive enough, and includes Judi Dench, Celia Imrie, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson and Penelope Wilton, as well the talented Dev Patel (from “Slumdog Millionaire”) who portrays the hotel’s owner. I’ll be lining up next weekend to see the sequel, “The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”.

90. Port authority? : WINO
The city of Oporto in Portugal gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s, as it was the seaport through which most of the region's fortified red wine was exported.

91. Honor for 118-Across : BEST PICTURE OSCAR
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
At the first Academy Awards ceremony, the award for Outstanding Picture and award for Unique and Artistic Production were regarded jointly as the top honors. The latter award was dropped at the second ceremony, the following year. The award for Outstanding picture changed its name several times, to Outstanding Production, Outstanding Motion Picture, Best Motion Picture, and finally Best Picture from 1962.

97. Narnia girl : SUSAN
In the C.S. Lewis novel “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”, four siblings visit the magical land of Narnia via a wardrobe in the spare room of house in which they are living while evacuated during WWII. The children are Lucy, Edmund, Susan and Peter Pevensie.

98. Curmudgeon's review : UGH!
“Curmudgeon” is a favorite term used by my wife to describe me. A curmudgeon is a bad-tempered person full of resentment and stubborn notions. I am sure she means it very affectionately ...

99. Fish dish : SASHIMI
“Sashimi” is thinly sliced raw fish, although it can also be raw meat. The word “sashimi” translates literally as “pierced body”, which may be a reference to the practice of sticking the tail and fin to sliced fish to identify it.

106. It ends in Nov. : DST
On the other side of the Atlantic, Daylight Saving Time (DST) is known as "summer time". The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring (i.e. “spring forward”) and backwards in the fall (i.e. “fall back”) so that afternoons have more daylight.

108. Family upon whom 118-Across is based : THE VON TRAPPS
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Baron Georg Johannes von Trapp was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who achieved worldwide fame when his family became the inspiration for the musical “The Sound of Musical”.

111. Wynken, Blynken and Nod, e.g. : THREESOME
“Wynken, Blynken and Nod” is a children’s poem written by Eugene Field, first published in 1889. The original title of the work was “Dutch Lullaby”.

116. Recondite : ARCANE
Something that is “arcane” is something that is understood by only a few, something that might be described as mysterious.

Something described as “recondite” is obscure, beyond normal understanding. The term comes from the Latin verb “recondere” that means “store away, conceal”.

118. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC
"The Sound of Music" is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on "The Story of the Trapp Family Singers", a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war, and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I live in California.

124. "Wailing" instrument : SAX
The saxophone was invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax's grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

125. Big export of Myanmar : RUBIES
The Republic of the Union of Myanmar is the official name of the Asian country that some nations still recognize as the Union of Burma.

127. "Let's Make a Deal" features : DOORS
The game show "Let's Make a Deal" first aired way back in 1963. For many years the show was hosted by Monty Hall. There's a version airing right now that is hosted by Wayne Brady.

128. Figure in a Sunni/Shia dispute : ALI
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

129. Where the Potemkin Steps are : ODESSA
The Potemkin Stairs is a symbol of Odessa, Ukraine, and is a staircase with 192 steps in total. Prior names for the structure were Boulevard Steps, the Giant Staircase, the Richelieu Steps and the Primorsky Stairs. The “Potemkin” name was applied in 1955 in honor of the 30th anniversary of the Battleship Potemkin.

Down
1. Two out of 11? : ONES
The two digits in the number 11 are both ones.

2. Nicki with the 2014 hit "Anaconda" : MINAJ
Nicki Minaj is a rapper from Queens, New York who was born in Trinidad.

3. Dress to the nines : GLAM UP
The term “to the nines” means “to perfection”. The first person to use the term in literature was Robbie Burns. Apparently the idea behind the use of “nines” is figurative (pun!), with the number nine considered “ideal” as it is arrived at by multiplying three by three.

4. Rite Aid rival : CVS
The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for Consumer Value Stores, although these days the company uses the acronym to denote Convenience, Value and Service.

What we know today as Rite Aid started out as one store in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1962. Rite Aid is now the biggest chain of drugstores on the East Coast of the United States and has operations all over the country.

7. "The culminating point that beauty has attained in the sphere of music," per Tchaikovsky : MOZART
The composer Mozart’s full name was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The name “Wolfgang” translates literally as “wolf journey”. Amadeus translates as “love god”!

12. 1961 Disney villainess : CRUELLA
Cruella de Vil is the villain in the 1956 novel “The Hundred and One Dalmatians” written by Dodie Smith. Most famously perhaps, Cruella was played so ably by Glenn Close in the Disney movie adaption “101 Dalmatians”, released in 1996.

13. Crime boss John : GOTTI
John Gotti was the boss of the Gambino crime family from 1985. Gotti was known as the Teflon Don and took over leadership of the family from Paul Castellano when he was gunned down, allegedly on Gotti's orders. Gotti remained head of the New York family until he was sentenced to life in prison in 1992. Gotti died of throat cancer after ten years behind bars.

14. Not esta or esa : OTRA
In Spanish, the other (otra) is neither this (esta) nor that (esa).

16. 2022 World Cup city : DOHA
Doha is the capital city of the state of Qatar located on the Persian Gulf. The name "Doha" translates from Arabic as "the big tree".

The 2014 FIFA World Cup tournament was hosted by Brazil, the next two tournaments will be hosted by Russia (2018) and Qatar (2022).

18. Food poisoning cause : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

23. Asian capital nicknamed the City of Azaleas : TAIPEI
"Taipei" translates from Chinese as "Northern Taiwan City" and indeed is situated at the northern tip of Taiwan. The city is nicknamed “City of Azaleas” as the flower blooms better in Taipei than in any other city on the island.

28. Something a trypanophobe fears : NEEDLE
Trypanophobia is a fear of the needle, a fear of injections and inoculations. The term derives from the Greek “trypano-” meaning “borer”.

33. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

40. Citrus fruit : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

41. Official in a turban : IMAM
An imam is a Muslim leader, often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

47. Paperless party planner's option : EVITE
An "evite" is an "electronic invitation".

49. 2011 Marvel film : THOR
The 2011 movie “Thor” is yet another film based on a comic book hero. Even though I won’t be seeing it (I don’t do comics), I must admit it does have an impressive cast. Chris Hemsworth plays Thor, supported by Natalie Portman, Rene Russo and Anthony Hopkins. And to crown it all, Kenneth Branagh is the director.

50. ___ neanderthalensis : HOMO
The Homo genus includes the species Homo sapiens (modern humans), but we're the only species left in that genus. The last known species related to humans was Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal Man) which died off about 24,000 years ago. However, another species was discovered in Indonesia in 2003 that has been dubbed Homo floresiensis (Flores Man ... sometimes called "hobbit"), and it may possibly have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Watch this space ...

53. Singer Bareilles with the 2007 hit "Love Song" : SARA
Sara Bareilles achieved success with her 2007 “Love Song” with the help of the iTunes online store. In one week in June of that year, iTunes offered the song as "free single of the week" and it quickly became the most downloaded song in the store, and from there climbed to the number spot in the charts.

56. Many a Silicon Valley worker: Abbr. : ENGR
The Santa Clara Valley, just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as "Silicon Valley". The term "Silicon Valley" dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called "Electronic News" in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

63. Maker of Dreamcast games : SEGA
Sega is a Japanese video game company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

66. Cave opening? : HARD C
The opening letter in the word “cave” is a hard letter C.

69. Eldest Stark child on "Game of Thrones" : ROBB
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that was adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually made in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

75. Luzón, por ejemplo : ISLA
In Spanish, Luzon (Luzón) for example (por ejemplo), is an island (isla).

Luzon is the largest of the Philippine Islands, home to the capital city of Manila.

76. Manhattanite, e.g., for short : NYER
The island we know as Manhattan was inhabited by the Lenape Indians when the first Europeans explorers arrived in the area. According to the logbook of one of the officers on explorer Henry Hudson's yacht, the island was called "Manna-hata" in the local language, from which the modern name derives.

81. 12 points : PICA
A pica is a unit of measure used in typography. One pica is equivalent to 1/6 of an inch. Each pica unit contains 12 "points".

83. Senator William who pioneered a type of I.R.A. : ROTH
Roth Individual Retirement Accounts (Roth IRAs) were introduced in 1997 under a bill sponsored by Senator William Roth of Delaware, hence the name.

84. Seminoles' sch. : FSU
Florida State University (FSU) is located in Tallahassee, the state capital of Florida. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Seminoles (sometimes “the ‘Noles”). The team name was chosen in 1947 by the students in a vote, and alludes to the Seminole people who originally lived in the state. Most of the Seminole now live in Oklahoma, after their forced relocation by the US government in the 1840s.

85. Part of the food pyramid : FATS
The first food guide pyramid was issued in 1974, in Sweden. The food pyramid that we’re most familiar with in this country is the one published by the USDA in 1992, which was replaced in 2011. Instead of a pyramid, we now have a guide called MyPlate. MyPlate urges us to eat about 30% grains, 30% vegetables, 20% fruits, 20% proteins on our plates, accompanied by a small serving of dairy.

87. Sicilian border? : CRUST
Here in the US, Sicilian pizza is a thick-crust variety.

88. Flight from danger : HEGIRA
“Hijra” (also "hegira") is an Arabic word meaning migration or flight. In the Islamic tradition, “Hijra” is the name given to the journey of Muhammad with his followers from Mecca to Medina, a journey necessitated by a threat to assassinate the prophet.

93. About : IN RE
The term "in re" is Latin, derived from "in" (in) and "res" (thing, matter). "In re" literally means "in the matter", and is used to mean "in regard to", or "in the matter of".

100. Crown since 1952 : MISS USA
The Miss USA beauty pageant was founded in 1952 in order to select the American candidate for the Miss Universe competition.

103. Annual awards in animation : ANNIES
The Annie Awards have been presented annually for accomplishments in animation since 1972.

104. Site of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
EPCOT Center (now just called Epcot) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away before that vision could be realized.

Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

105. Kevin of "House of Cards" : SPACEY
The hit TV show “House of Cards” is a political drama starring Kevin Spacey that highlights ruthless manipulation within the corridors of power in Washington, D.C. The show is an adaptation of a BBC miniseries of the same name, which in turn is based on a novel by Michael Dobbs. My wife and I have seen both versions of the show but disagree on which is the best. I favor the US version …

107. Unlike much Schoenberg music : TONAL
Arnold Schoenberg was a champion of the use of atonality in music. I admit to having a somewhat closed mind when it comes to atonality, so I have very little of his music in my collection.

108. Formula One driver ___ Fabi : TEO
Teo Fabi is a retired racing driving from Italy who competed on the Formula One circuit. Teo often raced against his older brother Corrado Fabi.

111. "Comin' ___ the Rye" : THRO’
"Comin' Thro' the Rye" was the first novel of Ellen Buckingham Mathews, written under one of her pen names, Helen Mathers, and published in 1875. Mathews was a popular English novelist in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

114. Year that Cambridge's St. John's College was founded : MDXI
St. John’s College in Cambridge, England was founded way back in 1511. In over 500 years of its existence, the college has graduated an impressive list of alumni. A recent count includes nine winners of a Nobel Prize, six prime ministers, two princess and three saints!

120. Joe : MUD
It seems that no one really knows why we refer to coffee as "joe", but we've been doing so since early in WWII.

121. Civil War inits. : CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "u r KIDDING!" : OMG
4. Doesn't tread lightly : CLOMPS
10. Neighbor of a delt : PEC
13. 1958 space monkey : GORDO
17. Site of cataracts : NILE
19. Chillax : VEG OUT
20. Goof : ERR
21. "Conversely ...," online : OTOH
22. Pass : ENACT
24. Setting of 118-Across : SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
27. Language from which "tattoo" comes : SAMOAN
29. Mens ___ (legal term) : REA
30. Required : ESSENTIAL
31. Star of 118-Across : JULIE ANDREWS
35. "Roll Over Beethoven" group, briefly : ELO
36. Chemistry lab droppers : PIPETS
37. Luggage checker, for short : TSA
38. Hearing something? : LAWSUIT
43. Author LeShan : EDA
44. Botanist Carl Linnaeus, for one : SWEDE
48. With 65-Down, 160-year-old fraternity founded at Miami University of Ohio : SIGMA ...
49. Opening lyric of 118-Across : THE HILLS ARE ALIVE ...
57. Complaints : FLAK
58. Georgetown athlete : HOYA
59. Send : ELATE
60. Important factor in a crossword tournament : SOLVING TIME
62. Eclipses, to some : OMENS
64. Raid target : ROACH
67. ___ Fridays : TGI
68. Duo behind 118-Across : RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN
77. Fútbol announcer's shout : GOL!
78. See 130-Across : … SIREE!
79. Lightly hammered? : TIPSY
80. "Così Fan Tutte," e.g. : OPERA BUFFA
86. "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" actress : DENCH
89. Do some roof work : TILE
90. Port authority? : WINO
91. Honor for 118-Across : BEST PICTURE OSCAR
95. Sports bar fixture : LCD TV
97. Narnia girl : SUSAN
98. Curmudgeon's review : UGH!
99. Fish dish : SASHIMI
101. Prefix with city or centennial : TRI-
103. Digressions : ASIDES
106. It ends in Nov. : DST
108. Family upon whom 118-Across is based : THE VON TRAPPS
111. Wynken, Blynken and Nod, e.g. : THREESOME
115. Whup : TAN
116. Recondite : ARCANE
118. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC
122. Superdietary, informally : NO-CAL
123. "Pics ___ didn't happen" (slangy challenge) : OR IT
124. "Wailing" instrument : SAX
125. Big export of Myanmar : RUBIES
126. Nine-month pregnancy : TERM
127. "Let's Make a Deal" features : DOORS
128. Figure in a Sunni/Shia dispute : ALI
129. Where the Potemkin Steps are : ODESSA
130. With 78-Across, "Righto!" : YES ...

Down
1. Two out of 11? : ONES
2. Nicki with the 2014 hit "Anaconda" : MINAJ
3. Dress to the nines : GLAM UP
4. Rite Aid rival : CVS
5. Picks up : LEARNS
6. Checked out : OGLED
7. "The culminating point that beauty has attained in the sphere of music," per Tchaikovsky : MOZART
8. ___ crawl : PUB
9. Guy's name that's an alphabet run : STU
10. Viola parts : PEGS
11. Remove any trace of : ERASE
12. 1961 Disney villainess : CRUELLA
13. Crime boss John : GOTTI
14. Not esta or esa : OTRA
15. Disturb : ROIL
16. 2022 World Cup city : DOHA
18. Food poisoning cause : E COLI
23. Asian capital nicknamed the City of Azaleas : TAIPEI
25. Hi-___ : RES
26. Does a real number on, say : SNOWS
28. Something a trypanophobe fears : NEEDLE
32. In the slightest : AT ALL
33. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
34. Trumpet sound : WA-WA
39. Go (through) : SIFT
40. Citrus fruit : UGLI
41. Official in a turban : IMAM
42. Bit of filming : TAKE
45. ___ de México (Mexico City daily) : EL SOL
46. A.L. East, e.g.: Abbr. : DIV
47. Paperless party planner's option : EVITE
49. 2011 Marvel film : THOR
50. ___ neanderthalensis : HOMO
51. Checked out : EYED
52. "___ tight" : HANG
53. Singer Bareilles with the 2007 hit "Love Song" : SARA
54. Heaps : A TON
55. Interprets : READS
56. Many a Silicon Valley worker: Abbr. : ENGR
61. Heart : GIST
63. Maker of Dreamcast games : SEGA
65. See 48-Across : … CHI
66. Cave opening? : HARD C
69. Eldest Stark child on "Game of Thrones" : ROBB
70. Pivots : SLUES
71. Rendezvous : MEET
72. File ___ : MENU
73. Little songbirds : TITS
74. Bigger than big : EPIC
75. Luzón, por ejemplo : ISLA
76. Manhattanite, e.g., for short : NYER
80. Hooters : OWLS
81. 12 points : PICA
82. Cuts off : ENDS
83. Senator William who pioneered a type of I.R.A. : ROTH
84. Seminoles' sch. : FSU
85. Part of the food pyramid : FATS
87. Sicilian border? : CRUST
88. Flight from danger : HEGIRA
92. Orbit, e.g. : PATH
93. About : IN RE
94. "Rats!" : OH DARN!
96. Smartphone capability : VIDEO
100. Crown since 1952 : MISS USA
102. Hookup in bed? : IV TUBE
103. Annual awards in animation : ANNIES
104. Site of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
105. Kevin of "House of Cards" : SPACEY
107. Unlike much Schoenberg music : TONAL
108. Formula One driver ___ Fabi : TEO
109. Haven : OASIS
110. Pitfall : SNARE
111. "Comin' ___ the Rye" : THRO’
112. Prince, e.g. : HEIR
113. Lies : RESTS
114. Year that Cambridge's St. John's College was founded : MDXI
117. Stately trees : ELMS
118. Kind of list : TO-DO
119. To's partner : FRO
120. Joe : MUD
121. Civil War inits. : CSA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0228-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 15, Saturday



QuickLinks:
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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Barry C. Silk
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Summer suit accessory : PANAMA HAT
Panama hats are also known as Jipijapas, named for a town in Ecuador (and not Panama, surprisingly) that was a major player in the hat trade.

16. "Bluebeard's Castle," e.g. : OPERA
“Bluebeard's Castle” is an opera by Hungarian composer and pianist Béla Bartók. The opera is a little unusual in that there are only two singing characters on stage. There is only one act, and the whole work takes just over an hour to perform.

18. One of Utah's state symbols : TOPAZ
Topaz is a semiprecious stone made from silicate containing aluminum and fluorine. Topaz is the state gemstone of Utah, and the rare blue topaz is the state gemstone of Texas.

19. It serves many clients, briefly : LAN
Local Area Network (LAN)

20. Versailles votes : NONS
“Oui” is “yes” in French, and “non” is “no”.

Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous of course as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles. The palace started out as a hunting lodge built in the village of Versailles in 1624, built for Louis XIII. Louis XIII extended the lodge into a full-blown château, but it was Louis XIV who expanded it into one of the largest palaces on the planet. Louis XIV moved the royal court from Paris to Versailles starting in 1678.

21. Nincompoop : DODO
The word "nincompoop", meaning a fool, seems to have been around for quite a while. It has been used since the 1670s, but no one appears to know its origins.

24. Bean seen on-screen : SEAN
Sean Bean is an English actor who is perhaps best known in North America for playing Boromir in the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy. James Bond fans will remember him as the bad guy in “GoldenEye”, the character called Alec Trevelyan.

26. One of many made by Hitchcock : CAMEO
Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning, it's easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

Alfred Hitchcock makes a cameo appearance in 39 of his 52 movies. My favorite, and perhaps the most innovative, is in the movie "Lifeboat". In the film, there is a limited cast, just the people in a lifeboat and no extras. Hitchcock managed to make his appearance in a print ad in a newspaper read by one of the survivors in the boat.

27. Some orders at Chipotle : TACOS
Chipotle Mexican Grill is a chain of casual dining restaurants that was founded and is now headquartered in Denver, Colorado. For several years, the major investor in Chipotle was McDonald’s. The chain is named for the smoke-dried jalapeño called a “chipotle”.

29. Famous New Year's Eve party? : DICK CLARK
Television personality Dick Clark was best known for hosting “American Bandstand”, the longest-running TV variety show in the country’s history. Clark was also known as the host of the game show “Pyramid”, and of course as host of “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve” which was broadcast annually from Times Square in New York City. Despite suffering a massive stroke in 2004, and having a speech impairment as a result, Clark appeared on the “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve” show right up till the 2011/2012 episode. Clark passed away a few months later, in April 2012 at the age of 82.

34. Group of crackers, for short? : NSA
The NSA are famous as code crackers.

The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname ... "No Such Agency".

35. Like many basements : DANK
"Dank" is such a lovely word, now largely superseded by another nice word "damp". It is thought that "dank" came into English from Scandinavia some time before the 14th century. The modern Swedish word "dank" means "moist place".

37. Crib unit : SLAT
There are usually a collection of slats at the bottom of a crib.

39. State of old, briefly : SSR
The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and was comprised of fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

42. Linking brainstem part : PONS
The pons is part of the brainstem lying between the midbrain and the medulla oblongata. The pons is more completely known as the pons Varolii, named for the anatomist Costanzo Varolio who first described the feature in the 1570s. “Pons” is Latin for bridge.

48. Laugh-inducing pic : PHOTOBOMB
Photobombing is the act of intruding during the taking of a photograph as a practical joke. The term has gotten a lot of usage in recent years due to the proliferation of smartphone cameras. Collins English Dictionary named “photobomb” as Word of the Year for 2014.

51. Carrier with the WorldPass frequent flier program : PAN AM
Pan Am started out as a mail and passenger service between Key West, Florida and Havana, Cuba in 1927. From very early in the company's life it was the de facto representative air carrier of the United States. For many years Pan Am's fleet was built around the Boeing 314 Clipper, a long-range flying boat that was one of the largest aircraft around at the time. Pan Am adopted the Clipper as part of its image, even using "clipper" as the call sign for its flights.

53. "Bluebeard's Castle" librettist Balázs : BELA
Béla Balázs was a Hungarian film critic, although he is best remembered for writing the libretto to Béla Bartók’s opera “Bluebeard’s Castle”.

55. Name meaning "born again" : RENE
“René” and “Renée” are French for the adjective “reborn”, when applied to masculine and feminine nouns respectively.

57. Dandy : LULU
We call a remarkable thing or a person a “lulu”. The term is used in honor of Lulu Hurst, a stage magician active in the 1880s who was also known as the Georgia Wonder.

59. Port. title : SRA
The Portuguese word for “sir” is “senhor”, abbreviated to “Sr.” The female equivalent is “senhora”, or “sra.” for short.

60. Rearward, to a rear admiral : ABAFT
On a boat the term “abaft” means “towards the stern”.

64. Occasion for goat tying : RODEO
Goat tying is a rodeo event typically done by girls of high school and college age. The event is a race on horseback from one end of the arena to the other, where there is a goat tethered to a stake on the end of a 10-foot rope. The competitor dismounts, catches the goat, throws it to the ground and ties three of the animal’s feet together. I must admit, it’s not something I would approve of …

67. Greasy spoon appliance : FRYOLATOR
A fryolator is a deep fat fryer, a kitchen appliance.

“Greasy spoon” is a familiar term for a restaurant, usually a diner, that is less than pristine and that serves cheap food.

Down
2. GPS display : AREA MAP
Global Positioning System (GPS)

4. SAT fill-in: Abbr. : ANS
One fills in an answer (ans.) on the SAT Reasoning Test.

Today the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the acronym SAT.

5. Last name on a 40-Down : MCAN
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

6. City that rivaled ancient Sparta : ARGOS
Argos is one of the oldest cities in Greece, and indeed in Europe, having been continuously inhabited for over 7,000 years. In ancient times, Argos was a rival city-state to the powerful Sparta.

Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece, famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

7. Like some owls : HORNED
The Great Horned Owl is a large owl that is native to North and South America. Also called the Tiger Owl, it is the most common true owl in the region.

9. Equivalent of several dashes: Abbr. : TSP
In cooking, a “dash” is a very small measure, one that is often undefined. However, you can in fact buy some measuring spoons that define not only a dash but also a “pinch” and a “smidgen”, as follows:
- a dash is 1/8 teaspoon
- a pinch is 1/16 teaspoon
- a smidgen is 1/32 teaspoon

10. Kitty : POT
The "pot" in a card game has been referred to as the “kitty” since the 1880s. It's not certain how the name "kitty" evolved but possibly it came from "kit", the necessary equipment for the game.

14. "Stovepipe" of W.W. II : BAZOOKA
A bazooka is a metal tube rocket launcher. The first bazooka-type weapon was developed for the US Army just before the end of WWI. The weapon is also known as a “stovepipe”, due to its appearance.

25. Most-watched show of 2012-13 : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon.

30. Do-re-mi : KALE
“Do re mi” is a slang term for cash, as is kale.

32. One who's beyond picky : SNOB
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn't a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

38. Way up : T-BAR
A T-bar is a type of ski lift in which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There's also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

39. Some cookies : SPYWARE
When you visit a website, often it will leave a little piece of text information called a "cookie" on your computer. As a cookie is a text file, and not executable, it is relatively harmless. However, as browsers routinely read these text files, cookies can be used as "spyware". Basically, the browser can read the cookie and tell a lot about your browsing habits. This can be a good thing, so when you go back to your favorite websites you will be recognized and this can help you. For example, you may have shopped at a site and you'll find that your shopping cart still has the items you were looking at, often because the items were stored in a cookie. However, they can be "bad" as some spyware uses the cookies to detect your browsing habits and can direct the browser to do things you may not want it to do. So, I only accept cookies from sites I trust, as they do enhance the browsing experience ...

41. Musical embellishment : ROULADE
In music, a “roulade” is an extended embellishment to a sung syllable, using several notes. The term comes from the French verb “rouler” meaning “to roll”.

43. Where to get the lead out? : SMELTER
Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and of course, a greenhouse gas).

46. Tourist destination on the Riviera : SAN REMO
The Italian city of San Remo sits on the Mediterranean, right on the border with France. In Italian the city is named Sanremo, just one word, although the spelling of "San Remo" dates back to ancient times.

49. Bit of headwear, in British lingo : TITFER
“Titfer” is British slang for a hat. The term comes from the Cockney rhyming slang “tit for tat - hat”.

50. Kind of disc : BLU-RAY
A CD player reads the information on the disc using a laser beam. The beam is produced by what’s called a laser diode, a device similar to a light-emitting diode (LED) except that a laser beam is emitted. That laser beam is usually red in CD and DVD players. Blu-ray players are so called as they use blue lasers.

54. Cutlass successor : ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

General Motors introduced the Oldsmobile Cutlass in 1961, and used the name on a succession of models right up to 1999.

61. Squirt : TOT
A “squirt” is a whippersnapper, a tot, a child.

62. Dating site initialism : SWF
Single white female (SWF) is an abbreviation commonly used in personal ads.

63. Grp. whose seal featured Washington on horseback : CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

The Great Seal of the Confederate States of America (CSA) features George Washington on horseback, in the same pose that the former president strikes in 1858 Virginia Washington Monument located in the city of Richmond.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Summer suit accessory : PANAMA HAT
10. Second installment : PART B
15. Classic symbol of rebellion : IRON CROSS
16. "Bluebeard's Castle," e.g. : OPERA
17. Finishes freaking out : GETS A GRIP
18. One of Utah's state symbols : TOPAZ
19. It serves many clients, briefly : LAN
20. Versailles votes : NONS
21. Nincompoop : DODO
22. Throw out : EMIT
24. Bean seen on-screen : SEAN
26. One of many made by Hitchcock : CAMEO
27. Some orders at Chipotle : TACOS
29. Famous New Year's Eve party? : DICK CLARK
31. Some sorcery : SPELLS
33. Speed ___ : DIAL
34. Group of crackers, for short? : NSA
35. Like many basements : DANK
37. Crib unit : SLAT
39. State of old, briefly : SSR
42. Linking brainstem part : PONS
44. Make an impression on : EMBOSS
48. Laugh-inducing pic : PHOTOBOMB
51. Carrier with the WorldPass frequent flier program : PAN AM
52. Dealer's quick query : YOU IN?
53. "Bluebeard's Castle" librettist Balázs : BELA
55. Name meaning "born again" : RENE
56. Evidence of a big hit : WELT
57. Dandy : LULU
59. Port. title : SRA
60. Rearward, to a rear admiral : ABAFT
62. Battlefield transport : STRETCHER
64. Occasion for goat tying : RODEO
65. Yawn-inducing : WEARISOME
66. Apply : EXERT
67. Greasy spoon appliance : FRYOLATOR

Down
1. Farm litter : PIGLETS
2. GPS display : AREA MAP
3. Mean : NOT NICE
4. SAT fill-in: Abbr. : ANS
5. Last name on a 40-Down : MCAN
6. City that rivaled ancient Sparta : ARGOS
7. Like some owls : HORNED
8. "Once more ..." : AS I SAID ...
9. Equivalent of several dashes: Abbr. : TSP
10. Kitty : POT
11. Without feet : APODAL
12. One who assumes control by default? : REPO MAN
13. Stock handlers : TRADERS
14. "Stovepipe" of W.W. II : BAZOOKA
23. Sang : TOLD
25. Most-watched show of 2012-13 : NCIS
26. Woodworker's tool : C-CLAMP
28. Apply haphazardly : SLAP ON
30. Do-re-mi : KALE
32. One who's beyond picky : SNOB
36. Opening piece : KNOB
38. Way up : T-BAR
39. Some cookies : SPYWARE
40. Holder of many a diorama : SHOEBOX
41. Musical embellishment : ROULADE
43. Where to get the lead out? : SMELTER
45. Not part of a series : ONE-SHOT
46. Tourist destination on the Riviera : SAN REMO
47. Mudslinger : SMEARER
49. Bit of headwear, in British lingo : TITFER
50. Kind of disc : BLU-RAY
54. Cutlass successor : ALERO
58. Water, e.g.: Abbr. : UTIL
61. Squirt : TOT
62. Dating site initialism : SWF
63. Grp. whose seal featured Washington on horseback : CSA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0227-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 15, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 44m 16s!!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Jean-Paul Sartre or Winston Churchill, once : PRISONER OF WAR
Jean-Paul Sartre was a leading French philosopher, as well as a writer and political activist. He also served with the French army during WWII and spent nine months as a prisoner of war having been captured by German troops. Sartre was one of the few people to have been awarded a Nobel Prize and to have then refused to accept it. He was named winner of the prize for Literature in 1964, for his first novel "Nausea". Before his win, Sartre knew that his name was on the list of nominees so he wrote to the Nobel Institute and asked to be withdrawn from consideration. The letter somehow went unread, so he found himself having to refuse the award after he had been selected.

Winston Churchill worked as a war correspondent during the Second Boer War. After only a few weeks in the front lines, he was captured with British troops while traveling in an armoured train. Churchill was imprisoned in a POW camp in Pretoria. He managed to escape and traveled almost 300 miles to safety. Reports of his escape led to churchill becoming somewhat of a hero back in Britain.

14. Classic 1984 film in which most of the dialogue was ad-libbed : THIS IS SPINAL TAP
“This Is Spın̈al Tap” is a rock musical mockumentary about the fictional band Spinal Tap, directed by the great Rob Reiner. I love Rob Reiner’s work, but this movie … not so much …

16. Pink : ROSEATE
Something roseate is "rose colored", like rose colored glass, and hence also refers to something that is optimistic, perhaps overly so.

17. Certain shooter : CAT’S EYE
A “cat’s eye” is a type of marble, sometimes used as a shooter in the game. A cat’s eye marble is made from glass, with a colored insert that resembles a real cat’s eye.

19. Google worker : BOT
A bot is computer program that is designed to imitate human behavior. It might “crawl” around the Web doing searches for example, or it might participate in discussions in chat rooms by giving pre-programmed responses. It might also act as a competitor in a computer game.

20. Musical phrase in which a single syllable is sung over several notes : MELISMA
Melisma is the singing of a single syllable in a word while moving through a succession of single notes. A classical example of the technique is in the Christmas carol “Angels We Have Heard on High”, in which the “o” in the word “gloria” is sung to a string of 16 notes. The technique is used in popular songs a lot from the eighties and nineties. I’m not generally a fan of singers who do the melisma “thing”, to be honest …

30. Rabbit homes, maybe : BRIARS
“Briar” is a generic name for several plants that have thorns, including the rose. Famously, Br’er Rabbit lives in a “briar patch”.

31. Group of people : HOMO
The Homo genus includes the species Homo sapiens (modern humans), but we're the only species left in that genus. The last known species related to humans was Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal Man) which died off about 24,000 years ago. However, another species was discovered in Indonesia in 2003 that has been dubbed Homo floresiensis (Flores Man ... sometimes called "hobbit"), and it may possibly have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Watch this space ...

32. Robin Williams title role : GARP
John Irving's 1978 novel "The World According to Garp" is somewhat biographical. In fact, Irving's mother found parts of the novel difficult to read, recognizing elements of herself in Garp's mother, Jenny Fields.

52. Evolutionary biologist who wrote "The Panda's Thumb" : STEPHEN JAY GOULD
Stephen Jay Gould was an influential writer of popular science, but also a respected paleontologist and evolutionary biologist. Gould developed the theory of punctuated equilibrium with biologist Niles Eldredge. The theory suggests that evolution is not a gradual process, but rather takes place in spurts. Species have stable characteristics for long periods, with evolutionary branches taking place very rarely.

Down
3. Where the "tiger cub economies" are : ASIA
The Four Asian Tiger economies are Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. The Tiger Cub Economies are the economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippine and Thailand.

5. First word in Massachusetts' motto : ENSE
The motto of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is “Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem”, a Latin phrase that can be translated as “By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty”. The quotation is from a passage written by English politician Algernon Sidney who was executed for treason by King Charles II.

7. "True Blood" vampire Northman : ERIC
“True Blood” is a television drama made by HBO. The series is based on novels written by Charlaine Harris that describe human and vampires who co-exist in a small town in Louisiana. I don’t do vampires …

8. First name in gossip : RONA
Rona Barrett is a gossip columnist originally from New York City but who plies her trade in Southern California. Barrett started out as with a gossip column that was syndicated in newspapers but then made a successful transition to television. She made regular appearances in news broadcasts and on her entertainment shows in the sixties and seventies.

11. Relative of a Fig Newton : DATE BAR
The Fig Newton is based on what is actually a very old recipe that dates back to Ancient Egypt. Whereas we grew up with “Fig Rolls” in Ireland, here in America the brand name “Fig Newton" was used, named after the town of Newton, Massachusetts where they were first produced.

13. Some old-fashioned hosiery : RAYONS
Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

The word "hose" meaning a "covering for the leg" has the same roots as the contemporary German word "hose" meaning "trousers, pants".

14. Galumph : TRAMP
To galumph is to prance about, somewhat smugly. The word is an invention of Lewis Carroll and he used it in his famous nonsense poem “Jabberwocky”. Apparently he arrived at “galumph” by blending the words “gallop” and “triumph”.

15. Colleague of Don on "Mad Men" : PETE
On the AMC hit “Mad Men”, the character Pete Campbell is an ambitious account executive who works with Don Draper and Peggy Olson. Campbell is played by Vincent Kartheiser, Draper by Jon Hamm and Olson by Elizabeth Moss. For my money, Moss is the star of the whole show ...

21. Apple messaging software : ICHAT
iChat was introduced in 2002, and is still in use today. It is Apple's "instant messaging" application that integrates with the Mac Operating System.

22. So-called Japanese chess : SHOGI
“Shogi” is a game that is also known as Japanese Chess. The name “shogi” translates as “general’s board game”.

23. Photocopy predecessor : MIMEO
A mimeograph (also “mimeo”) is a cheap printing press that applies ink to paper through a stencil wrapped around a rotating drum. Mimeographs are still around, but have largely been replaced by offset printers and photocopiers.

25. Certain shooter : BB GUN
A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.080" in diameter) to size FF (.23"). 0.180" diameter birdshot is size BB, which gives the airgun its name.

26. Prefix meaning "heavens" : URANO-
"Urano-" comes from the Greek "ouranos" denoting the heavens.

27. Frequent demonstrator of the Doppler effect : SIREN
The Doppler effect is the change in frequency of a sound experienced by an observer when the source of the sound is moving nearer or further away. The effect was proposed by Austrian physicist Christian Doppler in 1842.

28. Setting for Steinbeck's "The Pearl" : LA PAZ
La Paz is the capital city of the state of Baja California Sur in Mexico.

“The Pearl” is a 1947 novella written by John Steinbeck. The work was inspired by Mexican folk tale, and is about a pearl diver called Kino.

34. Dances in 3/4 time : MINUETS
A minuet is a dance that originated in France. At some point, the middle section of the minuet was routinely scored for just a trio of instruments. The resulting composition was known as a minuet and trio, and in the Classical Era was commonly chosen as the third movement of a symphony.

39. Nestlé brand : EDY’S
Dreyers' ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy's in the Eastern states. The company's founders were William Dryer and Joseph Edy.

Nestlé is the world’s largest food company. It was founded in 1905 in Vevey, Switzerland where the company headquarters is to this day. Although the company came into being as the result of a merger, it retains the name of one of the co-founders, German confectioner Henri Nestlé. Henri Nestlé’s real breakthrough product was baby formula.

45. Dragsters' org. : NHRA
The sport of drag racing is administered by the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA).

Back in the 18th century "drag" was slang for a wagon or buggy, as it was "dragged" along by a horse or horses. In the 1930s, the underworld adopted drag as slang for an automobile. This sense of the word was imported into automobile racing in the forties, giving the name to "drag racing". A drag race is basically a competition between two cars to determine which can accelerate faster from a standstill.

47. William who wrote "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" : INGE
William Inge's 1957 play "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" won a Tony for Best Play and was made into a film in 1960.

Playwright William Inge had a run of success on Broadway in the early fifties. Inge's most celebrated work of that time was the play "Picnic", for which he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. The original 1953 cast of "Picnic" included a young male actor making his debut on Broadway. His name was Paul Newman. Many of Inge’s works are set in the American heartland and so he became known as the “Playwright of the Midwest”.

50. Culture medium : AGAR
Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

51. Nuts : LOCO
“Loco” is the Spanish word for “insane”.

53. Blacker than black : JET
The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Time of forgiveness : GRACE PERIOD
12. Jean-Paul Sartre or Winston Churchill, once : PRISONER OF WAR
14. Classic 1984 film in which most of the dialogue was ad-libbed : THIS IS SPINAL TAP
16. Pink : ROSEATE
17. Certain shooter : CAT’S EYE
18. Hill worker : ANT
19. Google worker : BOT
20. Musical phrase in which a single syllable is sung over several notes : MELISMA
25. Part of some city streets : BUS LANE
29. "I know what you're thinking" thinker : PSYCHIC
30. Rabbit homes, maybe : BRIARS
31. Group of people : HOMO
32. Robin Williams title role : GARP
33. Radiologist, often : IMAGER
35. Disinter : UNEARTH
39. Hardcover or paperback : EDITION
40. Positive or negative : NONZERO
41. Racket : DIN
42. Dental problem : GAP
43. We : YOU AND I
48. "Ready to go?" : SHALL WE?
52. Evolutionary biologist who wrote "The Panda's Thumb" : STEPHEN JAY GOULD
54. Trunks, e.g. : STORAGE SPACES
55. Be lenient : SPARE THE ROD

Down
1. Like some low-grade beef : GRISTLY
2. Stand : RISE
3. Where the "tiger cub economies" are : ASIA
4. Add up to : COST
5. First word in Massachusetts' motto : ENSE
6. Energy : PEP
7. "True Blood" vampire Northman : ERIC
8. First name in gossip : RONA
9. "___ first ..." : IF AT
10. Knot : toads :: parliament : ___ : OWLS
11. Relative of a Fig Newton : DATE BAR
12. Line items? : PHONES
13. Some old-fashioned hosiery : RAYONS
14. Galumph : TRAMP
15. Colleague of Don on "Mad Men" : PETE
21. Apple messaging software : ICHAT
22. So-called Japanese chess : SHOGI
23. Photocopy predecessor : MIMEO
24. Tough nut to crack : ACORN
25. Certain shooter : BB GUN
26. Prefix meaning "heavens" : URANO-
27. Frequent demonstrator of the Doppler effect : SIREN
28. Setting for Steinbeck's "The Pearl" : LA PAZ
33. Nuts : IDIOTS
34. Dances in 3/4 time : MINUETS
36. Fixed, as a model airplane : REGLUED
37. Tries to catch shrimp, say : TRAWLS
38. Wished : HOPED
39. Nestlé brand : EDY’S
44. Per : A POP
45. Dragsters' org. : NHRA
46. Honey or sugar : DEAR
47. William who wrote "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" : INGE
48. Military band : SASH
49. Something not to be believed? : HYPE
50. Culture medium : AGAR
51. Nuts : LOCO
53. Blacker than black : JET


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0226-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Feb 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Caleb Emmons
THEME: Half at the End … each of today’s themed answers features a “HALF something” at the end. But, the word HALF is left out of the grid, and only the first HALF of the word that follows is shown:
17A. Coin first minted in 1964 : KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR (KENNEDY “DOL”)
54A. Signaling remembrance, in a way : FLYING AT HALF-MAST (FLYING AT “MA”)
10D. Acting rashly : GOING OFF HALF-COCKED (GOING OFF “COC”)
24D. Occasion for a much-hyped performance : SUPER BOWL HALFTIME (SUPER BOWL “TI”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Nile wader : HIPPO
The name “hippopotamus” comes from the Greek for “river horse”. Hippos are the third largest land mammals, after elephants and rhinos. The closest living relatives to hippos don’t even live on land. They are the whales and porpoises of the oceans.

14. Utopian : IDEAL
The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book "Utopia" published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More's use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek "ou" meaning "not" and "topos" meaning "place". By calling his perfect island "Not Place", More was apparently making the point that he didn't think that the ideal could actually exist.

15. Sainted pope after Sixtus III : LEO I
The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

16. Wind quintet member : OBOE
A wind quintet is a group of five woodwind players, usually flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon.

17. Coin first minted in 1964 : KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR (KENNEDY “DOL”)
The Kennedy half dollar is a 50-cent coin that was first issued in 1964 as a memorial to President John F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated the year before. Even though a lot of the coins were minted, and still are, there are rarely seen in circulation. The first minting disappeared almost immediately as collectors and regular individuals put the coins away as a memento or an investment.

19. Golden calf, e.g. : IDOL
According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, Aaron made a golden calf as an idol for the Israelites to worship while Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the Ten Commandments. When Moses returned, he became angry on seeing the calf and destroyed it.

20. Dot-dot-dot : ESS
The Morse code symbol for the letter S is “dot-dot-dot”.

23. Elvis's "What'd I Say" vis-à-vis "Viva Las Vegas" : A-SIDE
“What’d I Say” is an R&B song composed by Ray Charles that he recorded in 1959. Elvis Presley sang the song in his 1964 film “Viva Las Vegas”, and released it as a single. The B-side to the Elvis version of “What’d I Say” is the “Viva Las Vegas” title song.

25. "Danced" like a bee : WAGGLED
The waggle dance is a behavior exhibited by bees that informs other members of the hive about the direction and distance to a supply of nectar. Apparently the meaning of the dance “moves” are fairly well understood. The direction of the dance relative to the sun indicates the direction to the nectar source. The length of time spent “waggling” in one direction indicates how far away the source is.

29. Hunter of wallabies and kangaroos : DINGO
The dingo is a wild dog of Australia. The dingo is thought to have originated from domesticated dogs that were brought to Australia with humans that settled the land centuries ago.

36. Tabloid nickname of the '80s : JACKO
Michael Jackson was such a sad figure I always think. Jackson's apparently unconstrained lifestyle made him an easy target for the tabloids. The less than charitable representatives of the media gave him the nickname "Wacko Jacko".

37. Münster Mrs. : FRAU
Münster is a city in the northwestern part of Germany, in the Westphalia region. Münster is noted for being the most bicycle-friendly city in the country with almost 40% of all traffic in the city being cyclists.

38. Company with a lot of bean counters? : STARBUCKS
Starbucks is a coffee company based in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest coffeehouse company in the world and has over 19,000 stores. In the 1990s, Starbucks was opening one new store every single day! Starbucks is named after the chief mate on the Pequod in the Herman Melville book “Moby Dick”.

40. Keeping in the loop, in a way : CCING
I wonder do the kids of today know that "cc" stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle?

42. Visitors in "A Christmas Carol" : GHOSTS
The classic 1843 novella "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to popular use of the phrase "Merry Christmas", and secondly it gave us the word "scrooge" meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Ebenezer Scrooge uttered the words "Bah! Humbug!".

43. Eponymous Soviet minister of foreign affairs : MOLOTOV
Vyacheslav Molotov was a prominent Soviet politician and protégé of Joseph Stalin. During the Winter War of WWII, between the Soviet Union and Finland, Molotov claimed in radio broadcasts that Finland was not being bombed, but rather that the Soviet Union was dropping food to relieve famine. With a sense of irony, the Finns started to call the Soviet bombs "Molotov bread baskets". The Finns also improvised incendiary bombs using bottles and a gasoline-based fuel, and called these devices "Molotov cocktails", a name that persists to this day.

48. Soap star Deborah : ADAIR
Deborah Adair is an actress best known for her roles in soap operas. Adair retired from acting in 1995 when she and her husband adopted two children.

53. What a chemist brings to the table? : NACL
Sodium chloride (NaCl, common salt) is an ionic compound, a crystal lattice made up of large chloride (Cl) ions in a cubic structure, with smaller sodium (Na) ions in between the chlorides.

54. Signaling remembrance, in a way : FLYING AT HALF-MAST (FLYING AT “MA”)
Some say that flags are flown at “half-mast” as a sign of respect or mourning in order to leave room for “the invisible flag of death” that flies at the top of the flagpole.

56. Certain sausage, informally : BRAT
A bratwurst (sometimes “brat” in the US) is a German sausage. The name comes from “brät-” meaning “finely chopped meat”, and “Wurst” meaning “sausage”.

58. Liberian president and Peace Nobelist ___ Johnson Sirleaf : ELLEN
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf was elected President of Liberia in 2005, and re-elected in 2011. Sirleaf was the first elected head of state in the continent of Africa. She was jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 for her work to protect women and women’s rights.

59. Many a surfer's locale, informally : CALI
California (Cali)

60. Six crayons in a Crayola 64 box : REDS
In the year 2000 the Crayola company, very cleverly I think, held the “Crayola Color Census 2000” in which people were polled and asked for their favorite Crayola colors. President George W. Bush chose “Blue Bell” and Tiger Woods chose “Wild Strawberry”.

61. Witherspoon of "Wild" : REESE
Reese is not actually actress Witherspoon's given name. She started out life as Laura Jeanne Witherspoon. Reese is her mother's maiden name.

The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) runs mainly through National Forest and protected wilderness. The southern end of the trail is near Campo, California on the US-Mexico border. The trail’s northern terminus is on US-Canadian border on the edge of Manning Park, British Columbia. The 2014 movie “Wild” starring Reese Witherspoon, is based on the true story of Cheryl Strayed who hiked much of the PCT by herself in 1995.

Down
2. May 15, e.g. : IDES
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually "fixed" by law. "Kalendae" were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. "Nonae" were originally the days of the half moon. And "idus" (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure ...

3. Southern city that calls itself "America's First Settlement" (1559) : PENSACOLA
Pensacola is the most westerly city in the Florida Panhandle. The port city is home to the country’s first US Naval Air Station, which in turn is home to the Navy’s Blue Angels flight demonstration team.

4. Give two thumbs down : PAN
To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

5. Oxford university, informally : OLE MISS
Ole Miss is the nickname for the University of Mississippi located in Oxford, Mississippi. The name "Ole Miss" dates back to 1897, the first year a student yearbook was published. The graduating class held a competition to name the yearbook and "Ole Miss" emerged as the winner. The name stuck to the yearbook, and also as a nickname for the school itself.

6. "Family Ties" mom : ELYSE
The actress Meredith Baxter is best known for playing Elyse, the mother in the eighties sitcom “Family Ties”. Baxter’s big break on television came with a title role on a short-lived sitcom called “Bridget Loves Bernie”. She ended up marrying David Birney, her co-star on “Bridget Loves Bernie”, and so was known for many years as Meredith Baxter-Birney. She changed her name back to Meredith Baxter when the pair divorced in 1989.

"Family Ties" was one of the first TV shows that I enjoyed when I arrived in the US back in 1983. I found the situation very appealing, with two ex-hippie parents facing off against an ultra-conservative son. The main characters in the show were Michael J. Fox as Alex, Justine Bateman as Alex's sister Mallory, Meredith Baxter-Birney as Alex's mom Elyse, and Michael Gross as Alex's dad Steven. But some future stars had recurring roles as well, including Courteney Cox as one of Alex's girlfriends and Tom Hanks as Elyse's younger brother.

8. Tricks : HOODWINKS
"Hoodwink" has had the meaning "to deceive" since about 1600. Prior to that it meant simply "to blindfold", a sort of portmanteau word from "hood" and "wink".

11. Talent show judge alongside Jackson and Cowell : ABDUL
Paula Abdul is primarily a singer and dancer, and someone who endeared herself even more to the American public in recent years as a judge on "American Idol". She had a famous husband for a couple of years, as she was married to actor Emilio Estevez from 1992-94.

12. Bull or cow : MOOSE
The moose is the largest species in the deer family. The name “moose” is used in American English for the animal called an “elk” in British English. What Americans call an elk is also known as the wapiti.

18. "My man!" : DUDE!
Our term “dude” arose as a slang term in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, Easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

22. Azalea with the 2014 #1 hit "Fancy" : IGGY
Iggy Azalea is the stage name of Australian rapper Amethyst Kelly. I hadn’t ever heard of her …

24. Occasion for a much-hyped performance : SUPER BOWL HALFTIME (SUPER BOWL “TI”)
For the first ten years or so, the Super Bowl halftime show featured college and military marching bands. Various entertainers were then included in a show based on marching bands. Over time, the halftime show became the much-anticipated spectacular that it is today.

26. ___ mundi : ANNO
Anno Mundi is abbreviated as AM, and translates from the Latin as "in the year of the world". The AM calendar dates from the year of creation, so the actual year changes in different versions depending on which year is understood to be "year 1".

27. Biblical source of the line "It is more blessed to give than to receive" : ACTS
The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts”.

29. University of Oregon team : DUCKS
The sports teams of the University of Oregon are known as the Oregon Ducks. The big rivals to the Ducks are the Oregon State Beavers, a rivalry that has been dubbed "the Civil War". The two schools' football teams play a game every year for the Platypus Trophy.

31. 1¢, for a penny : FACE VALUE
The US one-cent coin has borne the profile of President Abraham Lincoln since 1909, the centennial of Lincoln’s birth. Fifty years later, a representation of the Lincoln Memorial was added to the reverse side.

32. "Poetics" author : ARISTOTLE
“Poetics” is a treatise on literary theory by the Greek philosopher and scientist Aristotle. It is the oldest known such work.

36. ___ chop : JUDO
Judo is a martial art from Japan that was developed relatively recently, in 1882. The name “judo” translates as “gentle way”. Practitioners of judo proceed through a series of proficiency grades known as the kyu-dan system. At each progression, a different colored belt is awarded.

39. Smithereens : BITS
"Smithereens" is such a lovely word and I am proud to say that it comes from Irish. The Irish word "smiodar" means fragment. We add the suffix "-in" (anglicized as "-een") to words to indicate the diminutive form. So, "little fragment" is "smidirin", anglicized as "smithereens".

43. What's left of TV news? : MSNBC
MSNBC was founded in 1996 as a partnership between Microsoft ("MS") and General Electric's "NBC" broadcasting operation. Microsoft only owns a minority share in MSNBC today, but is still an equal partner in the separate company that runs msnbc.com.

44. John who wrote "Pal Joey" : O’HARA
“Pal Joey” is a 1940 novel by John O’Hara that was made into a stage musical and musical film with music and lyrics by Rodgers and Hart. There are two well-known songs from the musical: “I Could Write a Book” and “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered”. There’s also a film called “Pal Joey” starring Frank Sinatra, Rita Hayworth and Kim Novak. The film is loosely based on the stage musical.

51. ___ Straw Poll : AMES
The city of Ames, Iowa is famous for holding the Ames Straw Poll in advance of most presidential elections. The poll in question is used to gauge the level of support for two or more Republican candidates, although non-Republicans are allowed to cast a vote. To vote one has to be an Iowa resident and one must buy a ticket to the fundraising dinner at which the vote is taken. The event gets a lot of coverage, so it boosts the local economy as journalists hit the town. It is a very successful fundraiser for the Republican Party in Iowa as well, but the usefulness of the straw poll in predicting the eventual winner of the nomination is less clear. There have been six straw polls since 1979, and just 2 out of 6 times the poll winner went on to capture the party's nomination.

52. Rapper Big Daddy ___ : KANE
Big Daddy Kane is the stage name of rap artist Antonio Hardy. Hardy chose the “Big Daddy” in his name from the character played by Vincent Price in the 1963 movie “Beach Party”, and the Kane from the title character in the TV show “Citizen Kane”.

54. Real-life figure portrayed in movies by Jason Robards, Jon Voight and Bill Murray, in brief : FDR
President Franklin D. Roosevelt has been portrayed on the screen many times. For example:
- by Jason Robards in “FDR: The Final Years” (1980)
- by Jon Voight in “Pearl Harbor” (2001)
- by Bill Murray in “Hyde Park on the Hudson” (2012) … my personal favorite!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Nile wader : HIPPO
6. Return to sender? : ECHO
10. Up for something : GAME
14. Utopian : IDEAL
15. Sainted pope after Sixtus III : LEO I
16. Wind quintet member : OBOE
17. Coin first minted in 1964 : KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR (KENNEDY “DOL”)
19. Golden calf, e.g. : IDOL
20. Dot-dot-dot : ESS
21. Thought aloud : MUSED
22. Busy : IN USE
23. Elvis's "What'd I Say" vis-à-vis "Viva Las Vegas" : A-SIDE
25. "Danced" like a bee : WAGGLED
27. Impeach : ACCUSE
29. Hunter of wallabies and kangaroos : DINGO
30. Hutches : COOPS
31. Crazy place? : FUNNY FARM
35. Woven piece : TALE
36. Tabloid nickname of the '80s : JACKO
37. Münster Mrs. : FRAU
38. Company with a lot of bean counters? : STARBUCKS
40. Keeping in the loop, in a way : CCING
41. Waits : BIDES
42. Visitors in "A Christmas Carol" : GHOSTS
43. Eponymous Soviet minister of foreign affairs : MOLOTOV
46. It's all a plot : TRACT
47. Doesn't just tell : SHOWS
48. Soap star Deborah : ADAIR
50. Symbol of strength : OAK
53. What a chemist brings to the table? : NACL
54. Signaling remembrance, in a way : FLYING AT HALF-MAST (FLYING AT “MA”)
56. Certain sausage, informally : BRAT
57. Cause for pacing? : DUEL
58. Liberian president and Peace Nobelist ___ Johnson Sirleaf : ELLEN
59. Many a surfer's locale, informally : CALI
60. Six crayons in a Crayola 64 box : REDS
61. Witherspoon of "Wild" : REESE

Down
1. Up : HIKE
2. May 15, e.g. : IDES
3. Southern city that calls itself "America's First Settlement" (1559) : PENSACOLA
4. Give two thumbs down : PAN
5. Oxford university, informally : OLE MISS
6. "Family Ties" mom : ELYSE
7. Give up : CEDE
8. Tricks : HOODWINKS
9. It may be coming down the pipeline : OIL
10. Acting rashly : GOING OFF HALF-COCKED (GOING OFF “COC”)
11. Talent show judge alongside Jackson and Cowell : ABDUL
12. Bull or cow : MOOSE
13. Tried to catch some fish : EELED
18. "My man!" : DUDE!
22. Azalea with the 2014 #1 hit "Fancy" : IGGY
24. Occasion for a much-hyped performance : SUPER BOWL HALFTIME (SUPER BOWL “TI”)
26. ___ mundi : ANNO
27. Biblical source of the line "It is more blessed to give than to receive" : ACTS
28. Layer : COAT
29. University of Oregon team : DUCKS
31. 1¢, for a penny : FACE VALUE
32. "Poetics" author : ARISTOTLE
33. It might start "Don't get me started ..." : RANT
34. 38-Across containers : MUGS
36. ___ chop : JUDO
39. Smithereens : BITS
40. Cell need : CHARGER
42. Small beam? : GRIN
43. What's left of TV news? : MSNBC
44. John who wrote "Pal Joey" : O’HARA
45. Subway train designation : LOCAL
46. Flip response? : TAILS
49. Turned brown, say : DYED
51. ___ Straw Poll : AMES
52. Rapper Big Daddy ___ : KANE
54. Real-life figure portrayed in movies by Jason Robards, Jon Voight and Bill Murray, in brief : FDR
55. Draft classification : ALE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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