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0401-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 15, Wednesday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Sharon Delorme
THEME: April Fool! … each of today’s themed answers is something that might be used by a PRANKSTER, with each answer being clued by what the PRANKSTER might say when using the joke item:
62A. Speaker of the clues for 18-, 24-, 38- and 51-Across : PRANKSTER

18A. "Put 'er there, pal!" : JOY BUZZER
24A. "Here, have a drink" : DRIBBLE GLASS
38A. "Smell my corsage" : SQUIRTING FLOWER
51A. "Happy birthday! Make a wish and blow" : TRICK CANDLES
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 07m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. 1925 Pulitzer Prize winner for Edna Ferber : SO BIG
Edna Ferber was a novelist and playwright from Kalamazoo, Michigan. Ferber won a Pulitzer for her novel "So Big", which was made into a film a few times, most famously in 1953 starring Jane Wyman.

6. Barber's sprinkle : TALC
Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days "baby powder" is also made from cornstarch.

10. Gallic girlfriend : AMIE
A male friend in France is "un ami", and a female friend is "une amie".

The Gauls were a Celtic race, with Gaul covering what is now known as France and Belgium. We use the term “Gallic” today, when we refer to something pertaining to France or the French.

17. Larsson who wrote "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" : STIEG
“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” is a sensational hit novel by the Swedish author Stieg Larsson, originally titled in Swedish as “Men Who Hate Women”. It is the first in a trilogy of successful books, all of which were only published after Larsson's death.

18. "Put 'er there, pal!" : JOY BUZZER
A “joy buzzer” is also known as a “hand buzzer”. It’s that practical joke device that is hidden in the palm of one person before he or she shakes hands with another. When contact is made, a button on the device causes a wound spring to unwind creating a sudden vibration that might be mistaken for an electric shock. The joy buzzer was invented in 1928 by Danish American inventor Soren Sorensen Adams.

22. Monsters' mouths : MAWS
“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

23. Rowan of "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" : DAN
Dan Rowan was the straight man to funny guy Dick Martin on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In". "Laugh-In" was originally recorded as a one-off special for NBC in 1967, but it was so successful that it was brought back as a series to replace the waning "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." Personally, back then I loved both shows!

30. Welcome to the fold? : BAA
A “fold” is an enclosure for sheep, or an alternative name for a “flock”.

31. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us "oen-" as a prefix meaning "wine". For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

32. Kate's kisser in a classic tongue twister : ESAU
I saw Esau kissing Kate.
I saw Esau, he saw me, and she saw I saw Esau.

34. "___ Survivor" (2013 war film) : LONE
“Lone Survivor” is a 2013 war film starring Mark Wahlberg as a US Navy SEAL who is the only survivor from a 4-man team in a mission in Afghanistan. The film is based on a 2007 book that recounts the real-life experience of Marcus Luttrell and the comrades that he lost on that mission. It’s a powerful movie …

38. "Smell my corsage" : SQUIRTING FLOWER
“Corsage” is a word we imported from French in the late 15th century. Back then we used it to mean “the size of the body”. By the early 1800s a corsage was a bodice, or the body of a woman’s dress. At the beginning of the 20th century, the French term “bouquet de corsage” was being used for a “bouquet worn on the bodice”, and this has been shortened simply to “corsage”.

44. Hello or goodbye : CIAO
"Ciao" is Italian for “hi” and "'bye", and is rather informal term.

45. "Smarter Planet" co. : IBM
IBM was founded as the Tabulating Machine Company in 1896. The company changed its name to the Computing Tabulating Recording Corporation (CTR) in 1911 and was listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1916. The name of International Business Machines (IBM) was given first to the company's Canadian subsidiary, and then its South American subsidiary. In 1924, it was decided to adopt the International Business Machines name for the whole company. Good choice ...

49. Region off the Côte d'Azur : RIVIERA
“Riviera” is an Italian word meaning “coastline”. The term is often applied to a coastline that is sunny and popular with tourists. The term “the Riviera” is usually reserved for the French Riviera (the Mediterranean coastline in southeastern France), and the Italian Riviera (the Mediterranean coastline centered on Genoa).

The Côte d'Azur is on the Mediterranean coast of France and stretches from Saint Tropez in the west and to the Italian border in the east. In English we often refer to the area as the French Riviera. It's a little crowded for me (okay, "expensive"), especially in the summer

68. Meower : TABBY
Tabbies aren’t a breed of cat, but rather are cats with particular markings regardless of breed. Tabbies have coats with stripes, dots and swirling patterns, and usually an “M” mark on the forehead.

Down
4. Well-heeled Marcos? : IMELDA
Imelda Marcos is the widow of former Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos, and is a former politician in her own right. Imelda fled the Philippines with her husband and family in 1986, ending up in exile in Hawaii. She was allowed to return in 1991, and set up residence in an apartment block in Manila. One of my personal claims to fame is that I lived for two years in an apartment block right next door to Imelda Marcos when I lived in Manila …

6. Atlantic City casino, with "the" : TAJ
Donald Trump's Taj Mahal Casino Resort opened up for business in Atlantic City in 1990.

7. Manhattan Project project, informally : A-BOMB
The Manhattan project was the joint US-Canada-UK project to develop an atomic bomb during WWII. Initially, the Army headquarters for the program was located on the 18th floor of a building on Broadway in New York City. Eventually, because of that first location, the project adopted the name “Manhattan”.

10. Cooper's tool : ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft. An axe's blade is set in line with the shaft.

A cooper is a craftsman who makes wooden vessels, such as barrels.

11. Toyota competitor : MAZDA
Mazda is a Japanese car manufacturer based in the Hiroshima Prefecture in Japan. The ballpark where the Hiroshima baseball team play was for many years known as the MAZDA Zoom-Zoom Stadium.

19. Links org. : USGA
The United States Golf Association (USGA) was formed in 1894. The need for a governing body for the sport became evident that year when both the Newport Country Club and the St. Andrew's Golf Club in Yonkers, declared that the winner of a tournament at each of their courses was the "national amateur champion". The first president of the USGA was Theodore Havemeyer, and to this day the one and only US Amateur Trophy bears his name.

21. Dianne of "Law & Order" : WIEST
Dianne Wiest is an actress from Kansas City, Missouri. Wiest has won two Best Supporting Actress Academy Awards, for “Hannah and Her Sisters” in 1987 and for “Bullets over Broadway” in 1995. In both movies, she was directed by Woody Allen.

25. ___ B'rith : B’NAI
B'nai B'rith is a Jewish service organization founded in New York City in 1843. “B'nai B'rith” is Hebrew for “Sons of the Covenant”.

26. Film composer Schifrin : LALO
Lalo Schifrin is an Argentine pianist and composer best-known for writing film and television scores. Famously, Schifrin wrote the theme for “Mission: Impossible”, but also for “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.”, “Mannix” and “Starsky and Hutch”.

27. Big name in audio equipment : BOSE
Bose Corporation was founded in 1964 by Amar G. Bose, and is a company that specializes in manufacture of audio equipment.

29. Curtis Mayfield's "Move ___" : ON UP
Curtis Mayfield was a soul and R&B singer-songwriter from Chicago who was very influential during the Civil Rights Movement of the fifties and sixties. Mayfield’s most famous song is probably 1964’s “Keep on Pushing” which he wrote and recorded while a member of the Impressions.

37. Funny Bombeck : ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

39. Visiting the Library of Cong., say : IN DC
The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. is regarded as the national library of the US, although its official function is the library of the US Congress. It is the world’s largest library, and has been so since 1990. Most of the book acquired by the library each year are in languages other than English.

50. Weather line : ISOBAR
An isobar is a line on a weather map connecting points of equal barometric pressure.

51. Not laid-back : TYPE A
The Type A and Type B personality theory originated in the fifties. Back then, individuals were labelled as Type A in order to emphasize a perceived increased risk of heart disease. Type A personality types are so called "stress junkies", whereas Type B types are relaxed and laid back. But there doesn't seem to be much scientific evidence to support the linkage between the Type A personality and heart problems.

52. Lacking Verizon coverage, maybe : RURAL
GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000 to form the company that we know today as Verizon.

54. Threepio's buddy : ARTOO
Artoo's proper name is R2-D2. R2-D2 is the smaller of the two famous droids from the "Star Wars" movies. British actor Kenny Baker, who stands just 3 ft 8 ins tall, has been the man inside the R2-D2 droid for all six of the "Star Wars" movies.

C-3PO, Threepio for short, is the "protocol droid" that appears in all six "Star Wars" movies.

59. Group with the hit 1978 album "The Album" : ABBA
I am an unapologetic fan of ABBA's music. ABBA was of course the Swedish group who topped the charts in the seventies and eighties. The name ABBA is an acronym formed from the first letters of the given names of each of the band members, namely: Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 1925 Pulitzer Prize winner for Edna Ferber : SO BIG
6. Barber's sprinkle : TALC
10. Gallic girlfriend : AMIE
14. Drawing of a bakery? : AROMA
15. Ending with peek : -ABOO
16. One a baby may cry out to : DADA!
17. Larsson who wrote "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" : STIEG
18. "Put 'er there, pal!" : JOY BUZZER
20. Insincere : HOLLOW
22. Monsters' mouths : MAWS
23. Rowan of "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" : DAN
24. "Here, have a drink" : DRIBBLE GLASS
27. Expand : BROADEN
30. Welcome to the fold? : BAA
31. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
32. Kate's kisser in a classic tongue twister : ESAU
34. "___ Survivor" (2013 war film) : LONE
38. "Smell my corsage" : SQUIRTING FLOWER
43. Channel turned to at many bars : ESPN
44. Hello or goodbye : CIAO
45. "Smarter Planet" co. : IBM
46. ___ double take : DO A
49. Region off the Côte d'Azur : RIVIERA
51. "Happy birthday! Make a wish and blow" : TRICK CANDLES
56. "Sho' nuff!" : YUP!
57. Spaniard's "other" : OTRO
58. Boating hazards : SHOALS
62. Speaker of the clues for 18-, 24-, 38- and 51-Across : PRANKSTER
65. Brother's keeper? : ABBOT
66. What you might solve a puzzle with : EASE
67. Dynamite : A-ONE
68. Meower : TABBY
69. "One more thing ..." : ALSO ...
70. Purchase with popcorn : SODA
71. Start over with a clean slate? : ERASE

Down
1. Clothing item worn diagonally : SASH
2. "___ put it another way ..." : OR TO
3. Be hot under the collar : BOIL
4. Well-heeled Marcos? : IMELDA
5. Silencer : GAG ORDER
6. Atlantic City casino, with "the" : TAJ
7. Manhattan Project project, informally : A-BOMB
8. True : LOYAL
9. Sign of disuse : COBWEB
10. Cooper's tool : ADZ
11. Toyota competitor : MAZDA
12. Some of the best ones are crazy : IDEAS
13. Really works for : EARNS
19. Links org. : USGA
21. Dianne of "Law & Order" : WIEST
25. ___ B'rith : B’NAI
26. Film composer Schifrin : LALO
27. Big name in audio equipment : BOSE
28. Not electives: Abbr. : REQS
29. Curtis Mayfield's "Move ___" : ON UP
33. Cuz's father : UNC
35. Cut or scrape, in totspeak : OWIE
36. Neighbor of Colo. : NEBR
37. Funny Bombeck : ERMA
39. Visiting the Library of Cong., say : IN DC
40. Encircle : GIRD
41. Holds back a grade : FAILS
42. Kind of relationship : LOVE-HATE
47. "All right, already!" : OK OK!
48. Impersonates : ACTS AS
50. Weather line : ISOBAR
51. Not laid-back : TYPE A
52. Lacking Verizon coverage, maybe : RURAL
53. "No bid for me" : I PASS
54. Threepio's buddy : ARTOO
55. Ceaselessly : NO END
59. Group with the hit 1978 album "The Album" : ABBA
60. Slo-pitch pitches : LOBS
61. Eyelid annoyance : STYE
63. Prefix with classical : NEO-
64. ___ Irvin, first art director of The New Yorker : REA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0331-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 15, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

Share today's solution with a friend:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: Verbal Gymnastics … each of today’s themed answers ends with the name of a piece of gymnastics equipment:
38A. Fancy, evasive language ... or a hint to the ends of 18-, 26-, 54- and 65-Across : VERBAL GYMNASTICS

18A. Deep-fried side dish : ONION RINGS
26A. Metaphor for straightness : LASER BEAM
54A. Snootiness : HIGH HORSE
65A. Java joints : COFFEE BARS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 06m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. iTunes button : PLAY
The iTunes Store now offers a “Complete My Album” service. The idea is that if someone already owns a track in an album, the balance of the album can be purchased at a discount.

15. San ___ (Italian resort) : REMO
The Italian city of San Remo sits on the Mediterranean, right on the border with France. In Italian the city is named Sanremo, just one word, although the spelling of "San Remo" dates back to ancient times.

16. Thomas who wrote "Common Sense" : PAINE
Thomas Paine was an English author who achieved incredible success with his pamphlet “Common Sense” published in 1776 which advocated independence of colonial America from Britain. Paine had immigrated to the American colonies just two years before his pamphlet was published, and so was just in time to make a major contribution to the American Revolution.

20. ___ cotta : TERRA
The name "terra cotta" comes to us from Latin via Italian and means "baked earth". Terra cotta is a ceramic made from clay which is left unglazed. Maybe the most famous work in terra cotta is the Terracotta Army, the enormous collection of life-size figures that was buried with the Qin Shi Huang, the First Emperor of China around 210 BC. I had the privilege of seeing some of this collection when it toured the US a few years ago, and just the few pieces on display were so very impressive.

22. U2's homeland : EIRE
Irish singer Bono is a Dubliner, born Paul David Hewson. As a youth, Hewson was given the nickname "Bono Vox" by a friend, a Latin expression meaning "good voice", and so the singer has been known as Bono since the late seventies. His band's first name was "Feedback", later changed to "The Hype". The band members searched for yet another name and chose U2 from a list of six names suggested by a friend. They picked U2 because it was the name they disliked least ...

34. Schlep : HAUL
Our word “schlep” means “to carry, drag”. As one might expect, “schlep” comes from Yiddish, with “shlepen” having the same meaning.

36. British nobleman : EARL
In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquess. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquess and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known simply as a countess.

44. Abominable Snowman : YETI
A yeti is a beast of legend, also called an abominable snowman. "Yeti" is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

45. Noshes : EATS
Our word "nosh" has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word "nashn" meaning "to nibble".

46. U.S. medical research agcy. : NIH
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is made up of 27 different institutes that coordinate their research and services. Examples of member institutes are the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging.

49. Disreputable : SEAMY
We've used "seamy" to mean "the least pleasant, the worst" since the 1600s. The idea comes from the seamed side of a sewn garment being the less attractive.

52. ___ Heep : URIAH
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens. The character is such a "yes man" that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a "Uriah Heep".

54. Snootiness : HIGH HORSE
The expression "on one's high horse" stems from the fact that someone of rank tended to ride a "high horse" i.e. a war horse or a charger.

56. Letter encl. with a manuscript : SAE
A stamped addressed envelope (SAE) might be included with a manuscript (MS) submitted to an editor (ed.).

57. Gold medalist of 1960, under a previous name : ALI
Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. was born in 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky. Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali when he converted to Islam in 1964. Who can forget Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic flame for the 1996 games in Atlanta? Ali was presented with a gold medal during those '96 Games, a replacement for the medal he won at the 1960 Olympics. He had thrown the original into the Ohio River as a gesture of disgust after being refused service at a "whites only" restaurant.

59. Maine's capital : AUGUSTA
As well as being the easternmost, Augusta, Maine is the third smallest US state capital, with a population of under 20,000.

67. Claptrap : TRIPE
“Tripe” is an informal term meaning “rubbish, of little value”. Tripe is actually the rubbery lining of say a cow, that in the UK is traditionally eaten with onions.

“Claptrap” these days means nonsense talk. It was originally a term used on the stage meaning a trick to attract applause, hence the name “clap trap”.

68. "Don't ___ on me" : TREAD
The phrase "don't tread on me" appeared on many early American flags. The phrase usually appeared with a rattlesnake. Notably, "Don't tread on me" was included in the first Navy Jack.

69. U.S. city that's an anagram of 22-Across : ERIE
(22A. U2's homeland : EIRE)

70. Part of a G.E.D. exam : ESSAY
The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of five tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

71. Broadway composer Jule : STYNE
Jule Styne was an English songwriter who made a name for himself in America with a series of popular musicals. Styne wrote a number of famous songs including “Don’t Rain on My Parade” from “Funny Girl”, “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” from “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, and “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” from “Gypsy”.

72. California county east of Sonoma : NAPA
Apparently the name "Napa" comes from the Native American Patwin word "napo" meaning “house”.

Did you know that there are far more wine grapes produced in Sonoma than Napa? Within Sonoma County some of the more well-known appellations are Chalk Hill, Anderson Valley and Russian River Valley. Personally, when I want to visit the wine country, I head for the Russian River Valley as it's far less crowded and much more fun than Napa Valley.

Down
2. Dunham of HBO's "Girls" : LENA
Lena Dunham is a co-star in the HBO series “Girls”, and is also the show’s creator. Dunham garnered a lot of attention for herself during the 2012 US Presidential election cycle as she starred in ad focused on getting out the youth vote. In the spot she compared voting for the first time with having sex for the first time. I must say, I quite enjoy the show “Girls” ...

3. Dictator Idi : AMIN
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country's military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country's president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

12. Stuffed, rolled pasta : TORTELLINI
Tortellini are stuffed pasta that are ring-shaped, or navel shaped. In fact tortellini can also be called “umbellico”, the Italian for “belly button”.

14. Source of the line "The Lord is thy keeper" : PSALMS
The Greek word "psalmoi" originally meant "songs sung to a harp", and gave us the word "psalms".

27. Ernie's "Sesame Street" buddy : BERT
For many years, I believed that the "Sesame Street" characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life". In the movie, the policeman's name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the "Sesame Street" folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence.

28. Rugged four-wheeler, briefly : ATV
All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

29. Daniels who directed "The Butler" : LEE
“Lee Daniels’ The Butler” is a 2013 movie that is loosely based on the life of Eugene Allen, who worked at the White House for 34 years before retiring as head butler in 1986. Forest Whitaker plays the title role. My wife saw this one, and really enjoyed it. It has been on my list for quite a while now …

30. Woe for a singer : LARYNGITIS
The suffix “-itis” is used to denote inflammation, as in laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx) and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses).

35. 27-time Grammy winner Krauss : ALISON
Alison Krauss is country singer/musician who has won a whole host of Grammy Awards. As of 2012, only the late classical conductor had won more Grammys, and only Quincy Jones has won as many.

39. New York's ___ Israel Medical Center : BETH
Beth Israel Medical Center is a teaching hospital in New York City. The facility was founded in 1890 and initially provided services to Jewish immigrants in the Lower East Side tenements.

40. Something trending online : MEME
A "meme" (short for "mineme") is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

48. Edmonton six : OILERS
The National Hockey League's Edmonton Oilers are so called because they are located in Alberta, Canada ... oil country.

53. Sandwich with sauerkraut : REUBEN
There are conflicting stories about the origin of the Reuben sandwich. One is that it was invented around 1914 by Arnold Reuben, an immigrant from Germany who owned Reuben's Deli in New York.

56. Napped leather : SUEDE
Suede is leather made from the underside of the skin, mainly from a lamb. As such it is very soft, although not as durable as leather made from the exterior skin. The soft leather was, and is still used for making gloves. Back in 1859 these gloves were called "gants de Suede" in France, or "gloves of Sweden". So, the name "suede" comes from the French word for Sweden.

59. Picasso's "Lady With ___" : A FAN
“Lady with a Fan” is a 1905 work by Pablo Picasso, painted during his Rose Period.

60. Singer Bareilles : SARA
Sara Bareilles achieved success with her 2007 “Love Song” with the help of the iTunes online store. In one week in June of that year, iTunes offered the song as "free single of the week" and it quickly became the most downloaded song in the store, and from there climbed to the number spot in the charts.

64. Beer variety, familiarly : IPA
India Pale Ale is a style of beer that comes from England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

66. Tina who wrote the autobiographical "Bossypants" : FEY
Tina Fey’s 2011 humorous autobiography “Bossypants” topped the New York Times Best Seller list for five weeks.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. iTunes button : PLAY
5. Up and about : ASTIR
10. Illuminated : LIT UP
15. San ___ (Italian resort) : REMO
16. Thomas who wrote "Common Sense" : PAINE
17. Removes wrinkles : IRONS
18. Deep-fried side dish : ONION RINGS
20. ___ cotta : TERRA
21. Virility : MANHOOD
22. U2's homeland : EIRE
24. No. in a letterhead : TEL
25. Rent-to-___ : OWN
26. Metaphor for straightness : LASER BEAM
28. Let pass : ALLOW
31. Jollity : MIRTH
32. Right-angled additions : ELLS
33. Serving at a Chinese restaurant : TEA
34. Schlep : HAUL
36. British nobleman : EARL
38. Fancy, evasive language ... or a hint to the ends of 18-, 26-, 54- and 65-Across : VERBAL GYMNASTICS
44. Abominable Snowman : YETI
45. Noshes : EATS
46. U.S. medical research agcy. : NIH
47. More to come: Abbr. : CONT
49. Disreputable : SEAMY
52. ___ Heep : URIAH
54. Snootiness : HIGH HORSE
56. Letter encl. with a manuscript : SAE
57. Gold medalist of 1960, under a previous name : ALI
58. Singles : ONES
59. Maine's capital : AUGUSTA
63. Not aligned on the margin : SET IN
65. Java joints : COFFEE BARS
67. Claptrap : TRIPE
68. "Don't ___ on me" : TREAD
69. U.S. city that's an anagram of 22-Across : ERIE
70. Part of a G.E.D. exam : ESSAY
71. Broadway composer Jule : STYNE
72. California county east of Sonoma : NAPA

Down
1. Senior's big night out : PROM
2. Dunham of HBO's "Girls" : LENA
3. Dictator Idi : AMIN
4. "Over here!" : YOO-HOO!
5. Griller's garment : APRON
6. Put into words : SAID
7. Material in many camping utensils : TIN
8. Not idling : IN GEAR
9. Be part of the opposition : RESIST
10. Soda bottle size : LITER
11. Indignation : IRE
12. Stuffed, rolled pasta : TORTELLINI
13. Make-believe : UNREAL
14. Source of the line "The Lord is thy keeper" : PSALMS
19. "You again?!" : NOW WHAT?!
23. Throw in the microwave, maybe : REHEAT
26. Easter bloom : LILY
27. Ernie's "Sesame Street" buddy : BERT
28. Rugged four-wheeler, briefly : ATV
29. Daniels who directed "The Butler" : LEE
30. Woe for a singer : LARYNGITIS
31. Root beer holder : MUG
35. 27-time Grammy winner Krauss : ALISON
37. Soften, as fears : ASSUAGE
39. New York's ___ Israel Medical Center : BETH
40. Something trending online : MEME
41. Yea's opposite : NAY
42. Covert org. : CIA
43. "Not so loud!" : SHH!
47. Unsullied : CHASTE
48. Edmonton six : OILERS
50. Builds : ERECTS
51. Classify : ASSORT
53. Sandwich with sauerkraut : REUBEN
55. Sweetie : HONEY
56. Napped leather : SUEDE
59. Picasso's "Lady With ___" : A FAN
60. Singer Bareilles : SARA
61. Take a spill : TRIP
62. On the ocean : ASEA
64. Beer variety, familiarly : IPA
66. Tina who wrote the autobiographical "Bossypants" : FEY


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0330-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 15, Monday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Bruce Haight
THEME: The Birds … if we look at the grid, the black squares portray a formation of birds flying from bottom-right to top-left. We also have several themed answers that reflect that V-formation:
13A. Ones that are alike : BIRDS OF A FEATHER
30A. Gather as a group : FLOCK TOGETHER

18A. Flier in a V formation : GOOSE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 06m 08s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. "Tommy" band, with "the" : WHO
“Tommy” is the fourth album recorded by the British band called the Who. “Tommy” was the original “rock opera” and was adapted for both the stage and screen, with both adaptations becoming huge successes. The title character has an uncanny ability to play pinball, giving rise to the hit song “Pinball Wizard”.

7. Network on the telly : BBC
The marvelous British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is mainly funded by the UK government through a television licence fee that is levied annually on all households watching TV transmissions. Currently the fee is 145 UK pounds, about 230 US dollars.

“Telly” is a term commonly used in the UK that is short for “television”.

12. "The Clan of the Cave Bear" heroine : AYLA
Ayla is a little Cro-Magnon girl who is orphaned and then adopted by a Neanderthal tribe, as told in "The Clan of the Cave Bear", the first of a series of novels written by Jean Auel that set in prehistoric times. I haven't read any of Auel’s books myself, but they are on my reading to-do list as my wife recommends them. They sound interesting ...

16. Queen ___ (nickname for Jay Z's wife) : BEY
Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny's Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical "Dreamgirls". Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as Queen Bey, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”.

17. Cleopatra biter : ASP
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

18. Flier in a V formation : GOOSE
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to "slipstream" a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when it gets fatigued. It's also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

19. Status ___ : QUO
"Status quo" translates from Latin as "state in which", and in English is used to mean the existing condition or state of affairs.

20. Theater stage item : PROP
We use the term “props” for objects that are used by actors on stage during a play. The term is a shortening of the older term “properties”, which was used with the same meaning up through the 19th century.

22. The Red Baron, to Snoopy : FOE
Snoopy, the famous beagle in the "Peanuts" comic strip, has a number of alter-egos and is sometimes depicted as a World War I flying ace piloting a Sopwith Camel biplane. Snoopy's arch-enemy in the air is Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, and Snoopy can often be seen shaking his fist and crying out, "Curse you, Red Baron!"

Manfred von Richthofen was a famous WWI fighter pilot flying for the Germans and was known as the Red Baron. Von Richthofen was credited with more kills than any other pilot fighting on either side of the conflict, recording over 80 combat victories. He didn't survive the war though, as he was shot down near Amiens in France in 1918.

26. Barbie's beau : KEN
Barbie's male counterpart doll is Ken, and Ken's family name is Carson. Barbie's full name is Barbie Millicent Roberts. When Ken was introduced in 1959, it was as Barbie's boyfriend. In 2004 it was announced that Ken and Barbie were splitting up, and needed to spend quality time apart. Soon after the split, Barbie “met” Blaine, a boogie boarder from Australia.

27. Literary Jane who says "No net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will" : EYRE
"Jane Eyre" is the celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel ...

28. Wildebeests : GNUS
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. "Wildebeest" is actually the Dutch word for "wild beast".

33. Sch. in Columbus : OSU
Ohio State University (OSU) was founded back in 1870 as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The athletic teams of OSU are called the Buckeyes, named after the state tree of Ohio. In turn the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch thought to resemble a "buck's eye".

34. Genre for Jay Z and Schoolboy Q : RAP
Jay Z is a rap artist whose real name is Shawn Carter. Jay Z married the singer Beyoncé in 2008, and by all accounts, the celebrity couple keep their lives together very private. That said, when the couple had their first child, the cries of their two-day-old daughter were used at the end of the 2002 Jay Z song “Glory”, for which baby Blue Ivy Carter was given a credit on the record as “B.I.C”. That made young Blue Ivy the youngest person to ever appear on a Billboard chart.

35. French clerics : ABBES
“Abbé” is the French word for “abbot”.

38. Gen ___ (one born after the baby boom) : XER
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

39. Bread that might hold hummus : PITA
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a "pocket" in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools. The pockets were a big hit in the seventies when someone came up with the idea of using them for fillings hence creating pita sandwiches or "pita pockets".

The lovely dip/spread called hummus usually contains mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic. The name “hummus” is an Arabic word for “chickpeas”.

45. Top-rated TV show of 2002-05 : CSI
“CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” is apparently the most-watched television show worldwide.

46. Gospel singer Winans : CECE
CeCe Winans (real name Priscilla) is a Gospel music singer. She is part of a duo with her brother, BeBe Winans (real name Benjamin).

48. ___ Rabbit : BR’ER
Br'er Rabbit and Br'er Fox are characters in the Uncle Remus stories, written by Joel Chandler Harris. The Uncle Remus stories are adaptations of African American folktales that Harris collected across the Southern States. "Br'er" is an abbreviated form of "brother".

54. ___ Stone (key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs) : ROSETTA
Rosetta is a coastal city and port on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt. The Rosetta Stone is an Ancient Egyptian artifact of tremendous importance in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics. Carvings on the stone are actually three translations of the same passage of prose, one in Egyptian hieroglyphics, one in Egyptian Demotic language, and one in classical Greek. The stone was discovered by the French military during Napoleon's 1798 campaign in Egypt. Before the French could get it back to France, the stone somehow ended up in enemy hands (the British), so it is now on display in the British Museum. Ownership of the stone is very much in dispute. The French want it, and understandably, the Egyptians would like it back.

Down
1. Right guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment : JURY OF YOUR PEERS
The Sixth Amendment to the US Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights that deals with an individual's rights when facing criminal prosecution.

2. Chicago airport code : ORD
O'Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport's current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O'Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O'Hare who grew up in Chicago. O'Hare was the US Navy's first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Butch O'Hare's father Edward was a lawyer friend of Al Capone who eventually worked undercover for the IRS and helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion. Some years later, Edward was shot to death while driving his car.

5. Playboy founder, informally : HEF
Hugh Hefner (often called “Hef”) is from Chicago. His first publishing job was in the military, where he worked as a writer for a US Army newspaper from 1944-46. He went to college after his military service and then worked as a copywriter for "Esquire" magazine. He left "Esquire" to found his own publication that he called "Playboy", which first hit the newsstands in 1953. "Playboy" has been around ever since.

6. Work by Gray or Shelley : ODE
Thomas Gray was an 18th-century poet from England. Gray’s most famous work is his “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard”, which is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:
- Celestial fire
- Far from the Madding Crowd
- Kindred spirit

Percy Bysshe Shelley was an English Romantic poet. Shelley had strong views on vegetarianism. He was dedicated to the cause of all sentient beings, believing that the slaughter of animals by humans for the use of food was a barbaric practice. He wrote a famous essay on the subject called "A Vindication of Natural Diet" in 1813.

8. Like the meek, per Matthew 5:5 : BLESSED
In the Christian tradition, the Beatitudes are a collection of moral teachings laid out by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount, according to the Gospel of Matthew. The eight Beatitudes are:
… Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven
… Blessed are those who mourn: for they will be comforted
… Blessed are the meek: for they will inherit the earth
… Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness: for they will be filled
… Blessed are the merciful: for they will be shown mercy
… Blessed are the pure in heart: for they will see God
… Blessed are the peacemakers: for they will be called children of God
… Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

9. Goes around a corner fast, say : CAREENS
"Careen" dates back to 1590 when it meant "to turn a ship on its side, exposing the keel". The word evolved from the Middle French word "carene" meaning "keel". Our modern usage, meaning to lean or tilt, only dates back as far as the 1880s. Careen should not be confused with "career", a verb meaning to move rapidly. One has to "career" from side-to-side in order to "careen".

10. In ___ of (replacing) : LIEU
As one might perhaps imagine, "in lieu" comes into English from the Old French word "lieu" meaning "place", which in turn is derived from the Latin "locum", also meaning "place". So, "in lieu" means "in place of".

13. Outdoor meal with a grill, informally : BBQ
It is believed that our word “barbecue” comes from the Taíno people of the Caribbean in whose language “barbacoa” means “sacred fire pit”.

15. The "17" in NC-17 : AGE
The Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film-rating system (R, PG-17, G etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

23. Middle-earth creature : ORC
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

28. Billy or nanny : GOAT
Males goats are called “bucks” or “billies”, although castrated males are known as “wethers”. Female goats are called “does” or “nannies”, and young goats are referred to as “kids”.

29. Singer McEntire : REBA
Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called "Reba" that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

30. "The Simpsons" airer : FOX
"The Simpsons" is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson's catchphrase is "D'oh!", which is such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001.

31. Prefix with -ceps : TRI-
The triceps brachii muscle is found at the back of the upper arm. The muscle’s name translates to “three-headed arm muscle”, fitting as it is actually made up of three bundles of muscles.

32. "2001" computer : HAL
In Arthur C. Clarke's "Space Odyssey" (famously adapted for the big screen as "2001: A Space Odyssey") the computer system that went rogue was called HAL 9000, or simply "HAL". HAL stands for Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer. Even though, Clarke denied it, there's a good argument that can be made that the acronym HAL is a veiled reference to IBM, the big player in the world of computing at the time of the novel's publication (1968). The acronym HAL is just a one-letter shift from the initials "IBM".

46. Muse of history : CLIO
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
- Calliope (epic poetry)
- Clio (history)
- Erato (lyric poetry)
- Euterpe (music)
- Melpomene (tragedy)
- Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
- Terpsichore (dance)
- Thalia (comedy)
- Urania (astronomy)

47. Greeting south of the border : HOLA
“Hola” is Spanish for the greeting “hi”.

48. Paint company whose name sounds like an animal : BEHR
The Behr brand of paint is pronounced “bear”, and the cans even have a bear logo. The company was founded in 1947 by Otho Behr Jr.

51. Mauna ___ : KEA
Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Elation : JOY
4. "Tommy" band, with "the" : WHO
7. Network on the telly : BBC
10. Entice : LURE
11. Furious : IRED
12. "The Clan of the Cave Bear" heroine : AYLA
13. Ones that are alike : BIRDS OF A FEATHER
16. Queen ___ (nickname for Jay Z's wife) : BEY
17. Cleopatra biter : ASP
18. Flier in a V formation : GOOSE
19. Status ___ : QUO
20. Theater stage item : PROP
21. Peaceful state : REPOSE
22. The Red Baron, to Snoopy : FOE
24. Rink surface : ICE
26. Barbie's beau : KEN
27. Literary Jane who says "No net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will" : EYRE
28. Wildebeests : GNUS
29. Towel holders : RODS
30. Gather as a group : FLOCK TOGETHER
33. Sch. in Columbus : OSU
34. Genre for Jay Z and Schoolboy Q : RAP
35. French clerics : ABBES
38. Gen ___ (one born after the baby boom) : XER
39. Bread that might hold hummus : PITA
40. Not engage in seriously : PLAY AT
41. Easy as ___ : PIE
43. Buddy : PAL
45. Top-rated TV show of 2002-05 : CSI
46. Gospel singer Winans : CECE
47. Lead-in to port : HELI-
48. ___ Rabbit : BR’ER
49. Give the go-ahead from the control tower : CLEAR FOR TAKEOFF
52. Letters sent by plane : AIRMAIL
53. Length of most TV dramas : ONE HOUR
54. ___ Stone (key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs) : ROSETTA
55. In plain contrast : STARKLY

Down
1. Right guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment : JURY OF YOUR PEERS
2. Chicago airport code : ORD
3. "Absolutely!" : YES!
4. It might show wreaths and candy canes at Christmas : WRAPPING PAPER
5. Playboy founder, informally : HEF
6. Work by Gray or Shelley : ODE
7. In any manner necessary : BY HOOK OR BY CROOK
8. Like the meek, per Matthew 5:5 : BLESSED
9. Goes around a corner fast, say : CAREENS
10. In ___ of (replacing) : LIEU
11. Assuming that's true : IF SO
12. Crowning : ATOP
13. Outdoor meal with a grill, informally : BBQ
14. Rowing blade : OAR
15. The "17" in NC-17 : AGE
20. Sneak a look : PEEK
21. Lie down for a while : REST
23. Middle-earth creature : ORC
25. Actor's prompt : CUE
27. Alternatively : ELSE
28. Billy or nanny : GOAT
29. Singer McEntire : REBA
30. "The Simpsons" airer : FOX
31. Prefix with -ceps : TRI-
32. "2001" computer : HAL
36. Relaxing : EASEFUL
37. Certain Chinese dish : STIR-FRY
39. Eye closely : PEER AT
40. Malleable : PLIANT
42. "___ all the way here for this?" : I CAME
44. Some choristers : ALTOS
46. Muse of history : CLIO
47. Greeting south of the border : HOLA
48. Paint company whose name sounds like an animal : BEHR
49. Auto : CAR
50. In good health : FIT
51. Mauna ___ : KEA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0329-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Mar 15, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Arbesfeld
THEME: California, Here I Come … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with the letters CA inserted:
23A. Ancient Peruvian using Netflix? : STREAMING INCA (from “streaming in”)
33A. "No fishing here!"? : CAST ELSEWHERE (from “St. Elsewhere”)
51A. Dog whose rocket went off course? : DEEP-SPACE CANINE (from “Deep Space Nine”)
65A. Comment to an annoying blackjack dealer? : YOU MAKE ME WANNA CASH OUT (from “you make me wanna shout”)
82A. Part of a jumbo trail mix? : REALLY BIG CASHEW (from “really big ‘shew’”)
97A. Agent for Bogart's partner? : BACALL HANDLER (from “ball handler”)
111A. "12-Point Type: A History"? : THE LIFE OF PICA (from “The Life of Pi”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 39m 58s!!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … LENI (Lene), NITTI (Netti)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Small drums : TABORS
A tabor is a portable snare drum that is played with one hand. The tabor is usually suspended by a strap from one arm, with the other hand free to beat the drum. It is often played as an accompaniment for a fife or other small flutes. The word "tabor" comes from "tabwrdd", the Welsh word for “drum”.

13. Folded like a fan : PLICATE
Something that is “plicate” is pleated, folded like a fan. The term comes from the Latin “plicare” meaning “to fold, weave”. If we add the prefix “com-”, meaning “together”, we derive our word “complicated”, literally something that is “folded or woven together”. Interesting ...

20. East Coast national park : ACADIA
Acadia National Park in Maine was created in 1919, although back then it was called Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette who famously supported the American Revolution. The park was renamed to Acadia in 1929.

21. Early stone tool : EOLITH
Eoliths are chipped flint nodules. They were once thought to be the first stone tools, but the general opinion today is that eoliths are produced by natural processes such as glaciation.

23. Ancient Peruvian using Netflix? : STREAMING INCA (from “streaming in”)
The Inca people emerged as a tribe around the 12th century, in what today is southern Peru. The Incas developed a vast empire over the next 300 years, extending along most of the western side of South America. The Empire of course fell to the Spanish, finally dissolving in 1572 with the execution of Tupac Amaru, the last Incan Emperor.

Netflix was founded in Los Gatos, California in 1997. Although now focused on video streaming, the company delivered it's billionth DVD in 2007. I presume the renter wasn't charged for that movie ...

26. Newbie: Var. : TIRO
A tyro (also “tiro”) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which "tiro" means "a recruit".

27. Senator Mike from Wyoming : ENZI
Mike Enzi is the senior US Senator from Wyoming, and has been in office since 1997. Enzi succeeded Senator Ted Kennedy as the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.

28. 1965 hitmakers Dino, ___ & Billy : DESI
Dino, Desi and Billy were a singing group in the late sixties. Two of the trio were sons of famous parents. “Dino” was Dean Paul Martin, son of singer, actor and comedian Dean Martin. “Desi” was Desi Arnaz, Jr., the son of Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball. Rounding out the group was a friend called Billy Hinsche.

31. Exactly 72, maybe : EVEN PAR
That would be par on a golf course, often 72 strokes.

33. "No fishing here!"? : CAST ELSEWHERE (from “St. Elsewhere”)
“St. Elsewhere” is a comedy-drama TV series that originally ran from 1982 to 1988. Set in an old hospital in Boston called St. Eligius, the show starred Ed Flanders, Norman Lloyd and William Daniels. This was in fact the first TV show that I started to watch regularly when I moved the US in the early eighties. That actors I remember most are Ed Begley, Jr. and Howie Mandel …

40. Vietnam ___ : WAR
By some definitions, the official involvement of Americans in the Vietnam War started in 1955. At that time, President Eisenhower deployed a Military Assistance Advisory Group to assist in the training of the South Vietnamese Army. American involvement in the conflict officially ended in 1973 with the signing of an agreement that came out of the Paris Peace Accords.

44. Lines from Homer and Erasmus : ADAGES
Homer was a famous poet of Ancient Greece, believed to be the author of the two classic epic poems, the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey". However, some scholars believe that Homer did not actually exist, but rather he is the personification of oral tradition that was passed down through the ages. One nice bit of advice attributed to Homer is:
How Prone to doubt, how cautious are the wise.

Desiderius Erasmus was a Dutch priest and theologian. Erasmus was a very prolific and successful writer and in the 1530s his written works accounted for 10-20% of all book sales in the world. A famous quotation accredited to Erasmus is:
In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

51. Dog whose rocket went off course? : DEEP-SPACE CANINE (from “Deep Space Nine”)
“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” is TV series belonging to the “Star Trek” franchise that originally ran from 1993 to 1999. This show was set on a space station, so there wasn’t much trekking going on. The stations name is “Deep Space Nine”. Never cared for this one …

55. Make the podium : MEDAL
“Podium” is the Latin word for “raised platform”.

56. Some black-tie events : SOIREES
"Soir" is the French word for "evening" and a "soirée" is an "evening party". The French word "soirée" has an acute accent over the first "e", but we tend to drop this when using the word in English.

58. "Network," for one : SATIRE
The movie "Network" was released in 1976. It was directed by Sidney Lumet and stars Peter Finch in his final role, for which he won a posthumous Academy Award. That Oscar for Peter Finch was remarkable in that it was the first time the Best Actor award had been won after the actor passed away, and it was also the first time it had been won by an Australian.

64. A minimus is a little one : TOE
A “minimus” is a little toe or a little finger.

65. Comment to an annoying blackjack dealer? : YOU MAKE ME WANNA CASH OUT (from “you make me wanna shout”)
“Shout” is a huge hit released in 1959 by the Isley Brothers. A huge hit it was indeed, but not at first. In fact, it was destined to become the first record to “go gold” based on its longevity rather than its initial sales. “Shout” has been covered many times. My personal favorite cover versions are by Otis Day and the Knights in the film “Animal House” in 1978, and by Scottish singer Lulu in 1964.
You know you make me wanna (Shout!)
Kick my heels up and (Shout!)
Throw my hands up and (Shout!)
Throw my head back and (Shout!)
Come on now (Shout!)

71. TV ET : ALF
“ALF” is a sitcom that aired in the late eighties. ALF is a hand-puppet, supposedly an alien from the planet Melmac that crash-landed in a suburban neighborhood. “ALF” stands for “alien life form”.

77. Letters after Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's name : D-NY
Kirsten Gillibrand is a US Senator from New York, and a member of the Democratic Party. Gillibrand was serving as a member of the US House of Representatives when she was appointed to the Senate by Governor David Paterson in 2009 after Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton left office to serve as Secretary of State.

81. Sealer, maybe : ALEUT
The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

A “sealer” hunts seals.

82. Part of a jumbo trail mix? : REALLY BIG CASHEW (from “really big ‘shew’”)
Ed Sullivan regularly uttered the phrase “a really big show”, when describing his late night TV show that ran from 1955 to 1971. Famously, Sullivan pronounced the phrase a little oddly as “a really big shew”.

89. Lit : SAUCED
“Lit” and “sauced” are terms meaning “drunk”.

90. Marie Antoinette, par exemple : REINE
“La reine” (the queen) is the wife of “le roi” (the king), in French.

Marie Antoinette was the wife of Louis XVI, the last king of France. Marie Antoinette was the fifteenth of sixteen children born to the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. The marriage to Louis, her second cousin once removed, was arranged while the two were very young. The prospective bride was "handed over" to the French at a border crossing in 1770 and two weeks later she was married to the future king. Marie Antoinette was just 14 years of age at the time, and Louis only a year her senior. Both Louis and Marie Antoinette were doomed to lose their heads courtesy of the guillotine during the French Revolution.

91. First name on the "America's Got Talent" panel : HEIDI
German-born Heidi Klum was married to the successful English singer, Seal. Klum is a talented lady and has built a multi-faceted career based on her early success as a model. She is the force behind the Bravo reality show called "Project Runway" that has been on the air since 2004. Klum has been nominated 4-5 times for an Emmy for her association with the show. Klum was also signed up as the official ambassador for Barbie in 2009, the 50th anniversary of the Barbie Doll, and for her service that year a Heidi Klum Barbie was produced. She has a added a touch of class to the judging panel on the show “America’s Got Talent” since 2013.

93. State on the Miss. : ILL
The Mississippi River runs right through the Midwest. It originates in Lake Itasca, Minnesota and flows into the Gulf of Mexico about a hundred miles below New Orleans. The name Mississippi is a corruption of a Native American name "misi-ziibi", meaning "Great River".

96. AAA offering: Abbr. : RTE
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

97. Agent for Bogart's partner? : BACALL HANDLER (from “ball handler”)
What a bombshell Lauren Bacall was, with that husky voice and her quiet, suggestive manner. Bacall was born in New York City to Jewish immigrant parents from Europe. She was actually a first cousin of Shimon Peres, the President of Israel and former Prime Minister.

102. Wild : BERSERK
Our word “berserk” meaning “deranged” comes from the "Berserkers", Norse warriors described in Old Norse literature. Berserkers were renowned for going into battle in a fury, and some believe that they consumed drugged food to get themselves worked up for the fighting ahead.

105. Filmmaker Riefenstahl : LENI
Leni Riefenstahl was a German film director, actress and dancer. She was a noted figure moving in Adolf Hitler's circle, and her most famous film was a propaganda piece called "Triumph of Will". "Triumph of the Will" documents the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremberg. We've all probably seen many excerpts, shots of huge crowds, Nazis marching with flags, and frenzied speeches from Hitler. Riefenstahl was arrested after the war and detained for a number of years but never found guilty of any crime. She lived a long life, a very long life. She was married for the second time in 2003, at the age of 101 years. She died just a few weeks later, as she had been suffering from cancer.

106. Hold it! : HILT
The “hilt” of a weapon is its handle. One might push in the blade of a knife say “to the hilt”, to the maximum degree.

109. President John Tyler's wife : LETITIA
John Tyler was married to Letitia Christian when he became President of the United States in 1841 after the untimely death of President William Henry Harrison. Letitia was to become the first wife of a US president to die in the White House, passing away in 1842 after suffering a stroke. She was also the youngest First Lady to die, at 51 years of age.

111. "12-Point Type: A History"? : THE LIFE OF PICA (from “The Life of Pi”)
The answer is just off a tad, I think, as the novel and movie are actually called “Life of Pi”, without a definite article.

A pica is a unit of measure used in typography. One pica is equivalent to 1/6 of an inch. Each pica unit contains 12 "points".

The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy called Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

117. They might grab some food before a flight : TALONS
A “talon” is a claw of a bird of prey. The term ultimately derives from “talus”, the Latin word for “ankle”.

119. Bar order that's not drunk : OYSTERS
There is a traditional warning that one shouldn’t eat shellfish in a month without an R i.e. May through August. That’s because these are the warmer months here in the northern hemisphere when algae blooms can spread toxins that are soaked up by clams, mussels and oysters. Personally, I only eat shellfish in months containing a Q … that would be never …

Down
1. It may be on the tip of your tongue : TASTE BUD
There are 2,000 to 8,000 taste buds on the human tongue, and together they detect five different tastes: salty, sour, bitter, sweet and umami. Taste buds have a short lifetime, and are replaced about every ten days.

3. It holds a lock in place : BARRETTE
A barrette is a hair clip, a clasp for holding the hair in place. The word is French in origin, with a literal translation of “little bar”.

4. Classic theater : ODEON
In Ancient Greece an odeon (also odeum) was like a small theater, with "odeon" literally meaning a "building for musical competition". Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

5. Marshy place, perhaps : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

7. Auto pioneer Karl : BENZ
It is generally accepted that Karl Benz invented the internal combustion engine, although others were doing similar work around the same time. He certainly was awarded the first patent for an automobile, in 1886. His first automobile, the Patent-Motorwagen, couldn't get up hills unaided so his wife Bertha Benz suggested the introduction of gears. Sure enough, the next model had two gears. Behind every successful man ...

8. "When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of ___": Dale Carnegie : LOGIC
Dale Carnegie wrote and lectured on self-improvement. His most famous book is “How to Win Friends and influence People”, which was first published in 1936. Carnegie made the clever move of changing the spelling of his family name from “Carnagey”. In so doing, he used the goodwill associated with the name of industrialist Andrew Carnegie who was much revered at the time, even though there was no relation. Dale even rented Carnegie Hall and delivered a lecture to a full house.

9. Will Smith biopic : ALI
“Ali” is a 2001 biographical movie about Muhammad Ali, with Will Smith in the title role. Among other things, the film is noted for its realistic fight scenes. The scenes were realistic because Smith was really being hit, as hard as his opponents could manage.

10. When repeated, a child's meal : DIN
It’s din-din time, dinner time for the young ones.

11. Yadda, yadda, yadda : ETC
"The Yada Yada Yada" is actually the name of the 153rd episode of "Seinfeld". Before "Seinfeld" made "yada yada yada" famous, we were more likely to hear the phrase "yadda yadda", often used by comedian Lenny Bruce, for example.

14. ___ brothers, inventors of the motion picture (1895) : LUMIERE
The very first filmmakers were French brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière. The first true film ever made was shot by the Lumière brothers in 1894, and was called “La Sortie de l'Usine Lumière à Lyon” (Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory in Lyon).

19. Classic British Jaguar : E-TYPE
In my part of the world growing up, we knew them as E-type Jags, but they were marketed over in the US as the Jaguar XK-E line, manufactured from 1961 to 1974.

34. High-tech surveillance acronym : AWACS
When the British developed radar in WWII, they also came up with an airborne system that they actually deployed during the war. In 1944 the US Navy commissioned a similar system, and so launched the first American Airborne Early Warning (AEW) system, also before the war was over. The more modern term for the technology is Airborne Warning and Control System, or AWACS for short.

36. Site of a 1776 George Washington victory in the Revolutionary War : TRENTON
The city of Trenton, New Jersey was first settled in 1679 by Quakers. The settlement was named Trent-towne in 1719 in honor of William Trent, who was one of the biggest landowners in the area. The name “Trent-towne” was later shortened to Trenton. The city was the site of George Washington’s first military victory in the Revolutionary War, in 1776. Because of the Battle of Trenton, the New Jersey capital is sometimes called the “Turning Point of the Revolution”.

37. ___ Rudolph, U.S. sprinter who won three golds in the 1960 Olympics : WILMA
Wilma Rudolph was a track and field athlete from Saint Bethlehem, Tennessee. Winning three gold medals in the 1960 Olympics in Rome, she was labelled “the Tornado, the fastest woman on earth”. Rudolph suffered from infantile paralysis when she was four years old, and had to wear a brace on her left leg for five years. She had to wear an orthopedic shoe for a further two years. Amazing …

43. British racetrack site : EPSOM
The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. We also come across Epsom salt from time to time. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time.

44. ___ Hardware : ACE
The Ace Hardware chain of stores was founded in 1924 in Chicago, Illinois. The name “Ace” was chosen after “ace” fighter pilots from World War I.

45. It's in the 60s : DEE
An academic grade of D (dee) in the US is equivalent to 60-69%.

46. Rock singer? : SIREN
In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed closed to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song Odysseus begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and and the whole crew sailed away unharmed.

48. Photoshop user, e.g. : EDITOR
Photoshop is a wonderful piece of software used for editing graphics. When I first bought a copy of Photoshop, it was really expensive (about $300, ten years ago), but now there are cost-effective, stripped-down versions available.

49. Egyptian king overthrown in a 1952 revolution : FAROUK
Farouk I was King of Egypt and Sudan took over the throne when his father passed away in 1936. Farouk was overthrown in the Egyptian Revolution of 1932. He was renowned as a corrupt ruler who amassed great wealth. Famously, Farouk had an enormously valuable coin collection, which included the extremely rare 1933 double eagle, a 20-dollar gold coin. The collection also included two 1913 Liberty Head nickels.

50. Wintry mixes : SLEETS
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two different weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail. The second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls. It's the second definition that I have always used ...

53. Visibly stunned : AREEL
I really (pun!) don’t think that “areel” is a real (pun!) word outside of crosswords …

59. Spiral-horned antelopes : NYALAS
A nyala is an antelope from South Africa with spiral horns. “Nyala” is the Swahili name for the beast.

61. Like some titmice : TUFTED
The birds known as chickadees or titmice in North America, are usually called simply “tits” in the rest of the English-speaking world.

62. Fist bump, in slang : DAP
The dap is a form of handshake, nowadays often a complicated and showy routine of fist-bumps, slaps and shakes. Some say that "dap" is an acronym standing for "Dignity And Pride".

66. Ancient Assyrian foe : MEDE
The Medes were an ancient people that lived in what is now northwestern Iran. The Medes held sway in the region only for about 60 years, until Cyrus the Great came along and defeated Astyages, the king of Media (not to be confused with Howard Stern, the self-proclaimed "king of all media"!).

67. Old lab burners : ETNAS
“Etna” (after the volcano) is another name for a Bunsen Burner that is used in a laboratory.

75. Catholic rite : EUCHARIST
In the Roman Catholic Church, the Eucharist is the celebration of Mass.
The principal act of worship in the Roman Catholic tradition is the Mass. The term “Mass” comes from the Late Latin word “missa” meaning “dismissal”. This word is used at the end of the Latin Mass in “Ite, missa est” which translates literally as “Go, it is the dismissal”.

76. "Delphine" author Madame de ___ : STAEL
Germaine de Staël was a French-speaking Swiss author active at the turn of the 19th century. She was commonly referred to as "Madame de Staël". Staël was noted for her outspoken criticism of Napoleon in her native France, for which she suffered exile in Switzerland.

78. Waxing and waning, e.g. : CYCLE
The verbs waxing and waning come from Old English. To wax is to increase gradually in size, strength, intensity or number. And to wane is to decrease gradually.

79. U.K. honour : OBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry in the UK that was established in 1917 by King George V. There are five classes within the order, which are in descending seniority:
- Knight Grand Cross (GBE)
- Knight Commander (KBE)
- Commander (CBE)
- Officer (OBE)
- Member (MBE)

82. Thomas Jefferson and Calvin Coolidge, e.g. : REDHEADS
About 2% of the world’s population has red hair. The highest percentage of redheads are Scottish (13%), with the Irish coming in second (10%).

85. Showstopper? : ENTR’ACTE
The term “entr'acte” comes to us from French, and is the interval “between two acts” ("entre deux actes") of a theatrical performance. It often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

92. Novelist McEwan : IAN
Ian McEwan is an English author with a track record of writing well-received novels. McEwan's most famous work at the moment I would say is "Atonement" which has benefited from the success of the fabulous movie adaptation released in 2007.

97. Maryland's largest city, informally : BALTO
Cecilius Calvert was the 2nd Baron of Baltimore, an English peer and member of the Irish House of Lords who became Proprietary Governor of the Province of Maryland. Calvert managed the Maryland colony from his home in England, for 42 years. As Calvert was a Roman Catholic, the colony of Maryland became a haven for Catholics from England who were suffering religious persecution. The city of Baltimore is named after Calvert, who was also known as Lord Baltimore. The Baltimore title comes from the Manor of Baltimore, a large estate in County Longford in Ireland.

98. ___ Fisher Hall, longtime venue at Lincoln Center : AVERY
Avery Fisher was an audio engineer who made major contributions in the field of sound reproduction. He donated over $10 million to the New York Philharmonic in 1973, and since then the Lincoln Center facility used by the orchestra has been named Avery Fisher Hall.

99. Whale constellation : CETUS
Cetus is a constellation named after a sea monster from Greek mythology. Today, Cetus is often called “the Whale”.

100. Capone henchman : NITTI
Frank Nitti was one of the top henchmen working for Al Capone. Unlike American-born Capone, Nitti was actually from Italy and was born near the city of Salerno. When Capone was eventually put away for 11 years for tax evasion, Nitti was convicted of the same crime. Nitti was only imprisoned for 18 months, and when released he was labelled as the new head of Capone's Chicago Outfit. However the truth seems to be that he was just a frontman, with others making the decisions.

101. Something you might get a charge out of : RHINO
There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, and the smaller Javan Rhino is the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

103. Tasty : SAPID
Something that is “sapid” is “tasty, savory”. The opposite to “sapid” is “insipid”, meaning “without taste, bland”.

110. China's Lao-___ : TSE
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism.

113. Jeff Lynne's band, for short : ELO
Jeff Lynne is a singer-songwriter best known as the leader of the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO). Lynne went on to form the Traveling Wilburys supergroup, along with Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Roy Orbison and Tom Petty.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Small drums : TABORS
7. Leaves of grass : BLADES
13. Folded like a fan : PLICATE
20. East Coast national park : ACADIA
21. Early stone tool : EOLITH
22. Go wild : RUN RIOT
23. Ancient Peruvian using Netflix? : STREAMING INCA (from “streaming in”)
25. Washington post? : EMBASSY
26. Newbie: Var. : TIRO
27. Senator Mike from Wyoming : ENZI
28. 1965 hitmakers Dino, ___ & Billy : DESI
30. Start to lose it : SLIP
31. Exactly 72, maybe : EVEN PAR
33. "No fishing here!"? : CAST ELSEWHERE (from “St. Elsewhere”)
38. Be up : BAT
39. Ending with Vietnam : ESE
40. Vietnam ___ : WAR
41. Like the headline "ELVIS FATHERED MY ALIEN BABY" : LURID
42. Sheer : UTTER
44. Lines from Homer and Erasmus : ADAGES
47. Some art projections : RELIEFS
51. Dog whose rocket went off course? : DEEP-SPACE CANINE (from “Deep Space Nine”)
55. Make the podium : MEDAL
56. Some black-tie events : SOIREES
57. Refrain syllable : TRA
58. "Network," for one : SATIRE
59. Never : NOT ONCE
62. "Is that so?" : DOES IT?
64. A minimus is a little one : TOE
65. Comment to an annoying blackjack dealer? : YOU MAKE ME WANNA CASH OUT (from “you make me wanna shout”)
71. TV ET : ALF
72. Pub fixture : ALE TAP
73. "Ta-da!" : IT WORKS!
74. Up-to-the-minute : LATEST
77. Letters after Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's name : D-NY
78. Less deserving of a laugh, say : CORNIER
81. Sealer, maybe : ALEUT
82. Part of a jumbo trail mix? : REALLY BIG CASHEW (from “really big ‘shew’”)
87. Sorry sort : SAD CASE
89. Lit : SAUCED
90. Marie Antoinette, par exemple : REINE
91. First name on the "America's Got Talent" panel : HEIDI
93. State on the Miss. : ILL
94. Bouncer's concern : AGE
96. AAA offering: Abbr. : RTE
97. Agent for Bogart's partner? : BACALL HANDLER (from “ball handler”)
102. Wild : BERSERK
104. Declare : AVER
105. Filmmaker Riefenstahl : LENI
106. Hold it! : HILT
108. "When I was ___ ..." : A LAD
109. President John Tyler's wife : LETITIA
111. "12-Point Type: A History"? : THE LIFE OF PICA (from “The Life of Pi”)
116. Tied up : TRUSSED
117. They might grab some food before a flight : TALONS
118. Hard and unyielding : FLINTY
119. Bar order that's not drunk : OYSTERS
120. "Me as well!" : I DO TOO!
121. Isn't completely truthful : FUDGES

Down
1. It may be on the tip of your tongue : TASTE BUD
2. Put in play : ACTIVATE
3. It holds a lock in place : BARRETTE
4. Classic theater : ODEON
5. Marshy place, perhaps : RIA
6. Identical to : SAME AS
7. Auto pioneer Karl : BENZ
8. "When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of ___": Dale Carnegie : LOGIC
9. Will Smith biopic : ALI
10. When repeated, a child's meal : DIN
11. Yadda, yadda, yadda : ETC
12. Tangerine or peach : SHADE
13. Force divided by area, in physics : PRESSURE
14. ___ brothers, inventors of the motion picture (1895) : LUMIERE
15. Having five sharps : IN B
16. Cause of a great loss? : CRASH DIET
17. Option for a quick exit : AISLE
18. Quaint letter opener : TO SIR
19. Classic British Jaguar : E-TYPE
24. Concerning : IN RE
29. Sharp turn : ELL
32. Projected image : PERSONA
34. High-tech surveillance acronym : AWACS
35. Major account : SAGA
36. Site of a 1776 George Washington victory in the Revolutionary War : TRENTON
37. ___ Rudolph, U.S. sprinter who won three golds in the 1960 Olympics : WILMA
43. British racetrack site : EPSOM
44. ___ Hardware : ACE
45. It's in the 60s : DEE
46. Rock singer? : SIREN
48. Photoshop user, e.g. : EDITOR
49. Egyptian king overthrown in a 1952 revolution : FAROUK
50. Wintry mixes : SLEETS
52. Barely touch, as a meal : PICK AT
53. Visibly stunned : AREEL
54. Grp. with a launch party? : NASA
58. Criticism : STATIC
59. Spiral-horned antelopes : NYALAS
60. "C'est magnifique!" : OO LA LA!
61. Like some titmice : TUFTED
62. Fist bump, in slang : DAP
63. It might say "Happy Birthday!" : ICING
66. Ancient Assyrian foe : MEDE
67. Old lab burners : ETNAS
68. Ambushed : WAYLAID
69. One calling foul? : SWEARER
70. Mess (around) : HORSE
75. Catholic rite : EUCHARIST
76. "Delphine" author Madame de ___ : STAEL
78. Waxing and waning, e.g. : CYCLE
79. U.K. honour : OBE
80. Free : RID
82. Thomas Jefferson and Calvin Coolidge, e.g. : REDHEADS
83. Quiet period : LULL
84. Menial : HIRELING
85. Showstopper? : ENTR’ACTE
86. When school's open : WEEKDAYS
88. More slapstick : SILLIER
92. Novelist McEwan : IAN
94. ___-bodied : ABLE
95. Board's opposite : GET OFF
97. Maryland's largest city, informally : BALTO
98. ___ Fisher Hall, longtime venue at Lincoln Center : AVERY
99. Whale constellation : CETUS
100. Capone henchman : NITTI
101. Something you might get a charge out of : RHINO
103. Tasty : SAPID
107. "In that case ..." : IF SO ...
110. China's Lao-___ : TSE
112. Suffered from : HAD
113. Jeff Lynne's band, for short : ELO
114. Patch of land : LOT
115. ___ season : FLU


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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