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0501-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 May 15, Friday



QuickLinks:
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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

17. Riviera hot spot : MONTE CARLO CASINO
Monte Carlo is an administrative area in the Principality of Monaco that covers just under a quarter of a square mile. The area is known in particular as the location of the famous Monte Carlo Casino. “Monte Carlo” translates as “Mount Charles”, and was named in 1866 for Charles III of Monaco who was ruling the principality at the time.

“Riviera” is an Italian word meaning “coastline”. The term is often applied to a coastline that is sunny and popular with tourists. The term “the Riviera” is usually reserved for the French Riviera (the Mediterranean coastline in southeastern France), and the Italian Riviera (the Mediterranean coastline centered on Genoa).

18. Provider of an A in English? : THE SCARLET LETTER
Hester Prynne is the main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel "The Scarlet Letter". When Hester is convicted by her puritanical neighbors of the crime of adultery, she is forced to wear a scarlet "A" (for “adultery”) on her clothing for the rest of her life, hence the novel's title, "The Scarlet Letter".

19. Literally, "fool" : SOT
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning “fool”. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

20. Locales for many schools : REEFS
You can find schools of fish in coral reefs.

21. Brit in the news : HUME
The TV journalist Brit Hume’s full name is Alexander Britton Hume.

24. Surrey carriage : PRAM
Another word used in the UK that's rarely used over here is "pram", which in my day was the most common term for what is called a baby carriage in the US. "Pram" is short for "perambulator".

Surrey is an English county located just to the southwest of London. Among the many historic locations in Surrey is Runnymede, famous for the signing of Magna Carta by King John in 1215.

35. Reason for some recalls : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

36. "A thousand times good night!" speaker : JULIET
William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is all about the love between the two title characters, which is forbidden as the pair come from two families who are sworn enemies. Early in the play, Romeo (a Montague) sneaks into a masquerade ball being held by the Capulets in the hope of meeting a Capulet girl named Rosaline. Instead, he meets and falls for Juliet, also a Capulet. Tragedy ensues …

41. "___ Meninas" (Velázquez painting) : LAS
“Las Meninas” is a painting by Diego Velázquez, the name of which translates to “The Maids of Honor”. “Las Meninas” is the most famous painting owned by the Museo del Prado in Madrid.

43. Orwellian drudge : PROLE
George Orwell introduced us to the "proles", the working class folk in his famous novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four". Collectively, the proles make up the section of society known as the proletariat.

44. Phencyclidine, colloquially : ANGEL DUST
Phencyclidine is a recreational drug usually referred to on the street as PCP or “angel dust”.

47. Refuse at a bar : LEES
The dregs in wine, the sediment that settles during fermentation (and sometimes in the bottle), is also called "lees".

52. "Coming to America" role : AKEEM
“Akeem” is an Arabic name meaning “wise”, and is a variation of “Hakeem” that is common in Africa.

“Coming to America" is a 1988 comedy film starring Eddie Murphy as Akeem, an African crown prince who comes to the US to find a bride. Murphy also created the story on which the screenplay was based.

58. Many an extreme athlete : ADRENALINE JUNKIE
The naturally occurring hormone adrenaline is also known as epinephrine. Adrenaline takes its name from the adrenal glands that produce the hormone. The glands themselves take their name from their location in the body, right on the kidneys ("ad-renes" meaning near or at the kidneys in Latin). The alternative name of epinephrine has a similar root ("epi-nephros" meaning upon the kidney, in Greek).

Down
1. Lifesavers, briefly : EMTS
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

2. Westminster district : SOHO
The area of London called Soho had a very poor reputation for most of the 20th century as it was home to the city’s red light district. Soho has been transformed though, and has been a very fashionable neighborhood since the 1980s.

3. Big tech review site : CNET
c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as a host on a c|net show.

4. @ @ @ : ATS
The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of all email addresses.

5. Bench press target, informally : PEC
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

6. Relative of euchre : ECARTE
Écarté is a card game that comes to us from France, with a name that translates into 'discarded". Écarté is a game like whist but is played with a stripped-down deck and involves only two players.

Euchre is a card game that probably came to the US from Germany, introduced by German farmers who settled in Wisconsin. Euchre is a trick-taking game usually played by four people in two partnerships. Unlike bridge, Euchre is played with a stripped down deck of 24 or 32 cards.

7. Stud finders? : MARES
The word "stud", meaning "a male horse kept for breeding", is derived from the Old English word "stod", which described a whole herd of horses.

8. First name in mystery : ERLE
I must have read all of the Perry Mason books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn't get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

9. Start of a score : CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

11. ___ tear (knee injury) : ACL
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

12. Dunsinane disavowal : NAE
Dunsinane Hill in Perthshire, Scotland gets a mention in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”.
Macbeth shall never vanquished be, until Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill Shall come against him.

13. Connecting strips : ISTHMI
The word "isthmus" (plural “isthmi”) comes the Greek word for "neck". An isthmus is a narrow strip of land that usually connects two large land masses. The most notable examples of the formation are the Isthmus of Corinth in the Greek peninsula, and the Isthmus of Panama connecting North and South America.

14. The "s" of Lasik : SITU
LASIK surgery uses a laser to reshape the cornea of the eye to improve vision. The LASIK acronym stands for “laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis”.

25. Nicolas who directed "The Man Who Fell to Earth" : ROEG
Nicolas Roeg is film director from England with quite the pedigree when it comes to association with great movies. He contributed to 1962’s “Lawrence of Arabia”, and he himself directed noted films like “Walkabout” (1972), “Don’t Look Now” (1973) and “The Man Who Fell to Earth” (1976).

The 1976 British film "The Man Who Fell to Earth" is perhaps most famous for its star, David Bowie. The movie was directed by Nicolas Roeg, and is based on a 1963 novel of the same name written by Walter Tevis.

27. Street in Hollywood : DELLA
Della Street was Perry Mason's very capable secretary in the Erle Stanley Gardner novels. Street was played in the TV show by the lovely Barbara Hale.

29. Noodle request : NO MSG
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn't be in our food ...

31. Female George : ELIOT
George Eliot was the pen name of English novelist Mary Anne Evans. As one might think, Evans chose a male pen name in order that her work might be best appreciated in the Victorian era. Eliot wrote seven novels including “Adam Bede” (1859), “The Mill on the Floss” (1860), “Silas Marner” (1861) and “Middlemarch” (1871-72).

32. Stoned : ON POT
“Potiguaya” is the Mexican-Spanish word for “marijuana leaves”. The slang name “pot” comes from “potiguaya”.

36. Youngest of a baseball trio : JESUS ALOU
Jesus Alou played major league baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as does Felipe's son Moises.

40. Crossword designer? : ERTE
I don’t think the artist Erte had any particular link to crosswords, but he sure does turn up a lot in crosswords. “Erte” is a classic example of “crosswordese”.

Words described as “crosswordese” are those that are found frequently as answers in crosswords, but which do not appear nearly so often in everyday speech.

45. First name in mystery : ELLERY
The Ellery Queen series of detective novels was somewhat unique in that Ellery Queen was the hero of the tales, and was also the pen name of the author. Actually, the “author” was a pair of writers; two cousins from Brooklyn, New York.

48. Calvin of the P.G.A. : PEETE
Calvin Peete was the most successful African American golfer on the PGA tour before Tiger Woods hit the circuit. He was a member of the Ryder Cup teams of 1983 and 1985. Peete passed away in 2015.

50. Noodle product : IDEA
“Noodle” and “bean” are slang terms for the head.

54. Lady in "Idylls of the King" : ENID
"Idylls of the King" is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the "idylls" is the story of Geraint and Enid. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

56. Property restriction : LIEN
A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone's property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

60. V-mail overseer : APO
Army Post Office (APO)

V-mail was a mailing system used during WWII primarily by civilians corresponding with soldiers stationed abroad. The person sending the message wrote it on small sheets of letter paper, after which the mail censors had at it. The redacted message was photographed onto microfilm for transportation to various destinations around the world. At the destination, each message would be blown up to original size and printed for delivery to the recipient.

62. ___ Holman, early basketball great : NAT
Nat Holman was one of the very early professional basketball players, retiring from the game as a player in 1930. He played for the Original Celtics (no relation to the Boston Celtics).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. They'll help you out : ESCAPE MECHANISMS
17. Riviera hot spot : MONTE CARLO CASINO
18. Provider of an A in English? : THE SCARLET LETTER
19. Literally, "fool" : SOT
20. Locales for many schools : REEFS
21. Brit in the news : HUME
22. Things going to your head? : HATS
24. Surrey carriage : PRAM
27. Give to a bank, maybe : DONATE
30. Cutthroat : FEROCIOUS
35. Reason for some recalls : E COLI
36. "A thousand times good night!" speaker : JULIET
37. Indefinite power : NTH
38. Tangy dessert : LEMON MERINGUE PIE
41. "___ Meninas" (Velázquez painting) : LAS
42. Faux fireplace feature : GAS LOG
43. Orwellian drudge : PROLE
44. Phencyclidine, colloquially : ANGEL DUST
46. Notepad user : JOTTER
47. Refuse at a bar : LEES
48. Transparent piece : PANE
49. Ratchet (up) : DIAL
52. "Coming to America" role : AKEEM
55. White-haired : OLD
58. Many an extreme athlete : ADRENALINE JUNKIE
63. Unit in population statistics : METROPOLITAN AREA
64. Simple : EASY TO UNDERSTAND

Down
1. Lifesavers, briefly : EMTS
2. Westminster district : SOHO
3. Big tech review site : CNET
4. @ @ @ : ATS
5. Bench press target, informally : PEC
6. Relative of euchre : ECARTE
7. Stud finders? : MARES
8. First name in mystery : ERLE
9. Start of a score : CLEF
10. Steam source : HOT SPRING
11. ___ tear (knee injury) : ACL
12. Dunsinane disavowal : NAE
13. Connecting strips : ISTHMI
14. The "s" of Lasik : SITU
15. Memory: Prefix : MNEM-
16. Cross : SORE
22. Saintly presence : HALO
23. All excited : ATINGLE
25. Nicolas who directed "The Man Who Fell to Earth" : ROEG
26. Not just consider : ACT UPON
27. Street in Hollywood : DELLA
28. Body resting in bed? : OCEAN
29. Noodle request : NO MSG
30. Rolls up : FURLS
31. Female George : ELIOT
32. Stoned : ON POT
33. Valuable : UTILE
34. Transparent : SHEER
36. Youngest of a baseball trio : JESUS ALOU
39. Took home : MADE
40. Crossword designer? : ERTE
45. First name in mystery : ELLERY
46. Preserves preserver : JAM JAR
48. Calvin of the P.G.A. : PEETE
49. Woman in a hard-boiled detective story : DAME
50. Noodle product : IDEA
51. Newspaper section : ARTS
53. Ceramist's need : KILN
54. Lady in "Idylls of the King" : ENID
55. Stew thickener : OKRA
56. Property restriction : LIEN
57. No longer working : DEAD
59. "___ cool!" : NOT
60. V-mail overseer : APO
61. Little ___ : UNS
62. ___ Holman, early basketball great : NAT


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0430-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Herre Schouwerwou
THEME: Punny Answers … each of today’s answers sounds like a common word or phrase:
19A. Naked "Parks and Recreation" star? : POEHLER BARE (sounds like “polar bear”)
61A. Event at Walden Pond? : THOREAU FAIR (sounds like “thoroughfare”)
12D. Clothing line from an Oscar-winning singer? : CHER WEAR (sounds like “shareware”)
20D. Offspring of Beauty? : BELLE HEIR (sounds like “Bel Air”)
39D. The Galloping Gourmet in Germany? : HERR KERR (sounds like “haircare”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Case for a lawyer, maybe : ATTACHE
Attaché is a French term which literally means "attached", and is used for a person who is assigned to the administrative staff of some agency or other service. The term is most recognized as it applies to someone assigned to an Ambassador's staff at an embassy. The word was extended to “attaché case” at the beginning of the twentieth century, meaning a leather case used for carrying papers, perhaps by an attaché at an embassy.

15. Paper work not usually done at the office : ORIGAMI
Origami is the traditional Japanese art form of paper folding. The best-known example of the craft is the paper crane. The word “origami” is derived from “ori“ (folding) and “kami” (paper).

16. Performers with lots of fans? : GEISHAS
The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

17. Quintet in a nursery rhyme : PIGGIES
This little piggy went to market,
This little piggy stayed home,
This little piggy had roast beef,
This little piggy had none,
And this little piggy cried wee wee wee all the way home.

19. Naked "Parks and Recreation" star? : POEHLER BARE (sounds like “polar bear”)
Amy Poehler was a cast member on "Saturday Night Live" from 2001 to 2008, notable for appearing in many great sketches, including those where she played Hillary Clinton opposite Tina Fey's Sarah Palin. Poehler also starred with Fey in the 2008 movie "Baby Mama". And, Poehler led the cast of the sitcom "Parks and Recreation" for its seven-season run.

21. Fig. for a dietitian : RDA
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and are a set of recommendations for the standard daily allowances of specific nutrients. RDAs were effectively absorbed into a broader set of dietary guidelines in 1997 called Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs). RDIs are used to determine the Daily Values (DV) of foods that are printed on nutrition fact labels on most food that we purchase.

23. Some expensive hors d'oeuvres : ROES
An hors d’oeuvre is the first course in a meal. “Hors d’oeuvre” translates from French as “apart from the work”, really meaning “not the main course”.

24. Spread on a farm : SOW
Sow the seed, spread it around …

45. Balderdash : HOKUM
"Hokum" was originally theater slang, meaning "melodramatic, exaggerated acting". Now the term just means “empty talk”.

"Balderdash" means “senseless jumble of words”. The original balderdash (back before the late 1600s) was a jumbled mix of liquids, like maybe beer and wine, or even beer and milk!

54. Onetime owner of NBC : RCA
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) has had a number of different logos in its history, including the famous peacock with which we are familiar today. The first peacock logo was introduced in the early days of color television and was designed to illustrate how wonderful color television would be, so go buy one! (NBC was owned by RCA, and so had a vested interest in sales of color television sets).

61. Event at Walden Pond? : THOREAU FAIR (sounds like “thoroughfare”)
Henry David Thoreau is a personal hero of mine. Thoreau is best known for his book called “Walden” published in 1854. The book outlines his philosophy of life and details his experiences living in a cabin near Walden Pond just outside Concord, Massachusetts.

67. "The last thing I wanted to do was to be a ___ president": Lyndon Johnson : WARTIME
Here are a couple of quotes from President Lyndon B. Johnson, all related to the Vietnam War:
- We are not about to send American boys 9 or 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian boys ought to be doing for themselves.
- Peace is a journey of a thousand miles and it must be taken one step at a time.
- The last thing I wanted to do was to be a wartime President.

68. Firm, in a way : AL DENTE
The Italian expression "al dente" literally means "to the tooth" or "to the bite" and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender yet still crisp.

Down
1. Conductor of note : COPPER
Copper is a great conductor of electricity because the outer electrons of the copper atom are easily detached. These outer electrons can detach in a chain reactions enabling them to move with very little resistance in a circuit.

2. Maker of a hanging nest : ORIOLE
An oriole’s nest is a woven, cup-like structure that is suspended from a branch like a hammock.

6. Mideast title: Var. : EMEER
In English, “emir” can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

12. Clothing line from an Oscar-winning singer? : CHER WEAR (sounds like “shareware”)
Cher's real name is Cherilyn Sarkisian, born in 1946. In her acting career, Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in "Silkwood". She went further in 1998 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in "Moonstruck".

Shareware is software that is distributed for free, although there is usually request to pay non-compulsory license fee.

20. Offspring of Beauty? : BELLE HEIR (sounds like “Bel Air”)
“Beauty and the Beast” is a fairy tale was that was written by novelist Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. Titled “La belle et la bête” in French, the story was first published in 1756. The “beauty” in the tale is named “Belle”.

Bel Air is a ritzy neighborhood in Los Angeles, once home to stars of film and television. Famously, the sitcom “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air” was set in the neighborhood. President Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan had a home in Bel Air, and in fact the former president passed away there in 2004.

25. Snowy ___ : OWL
The snowy owl (also “snow owl”) is such a beautiful-looking creature, I think. The snowy owl has plumage that is thick and white making it well-adapted for life north of the Arctic Circle.

31. Landing info, briefly : ETA
Expected time of arrival (eta)

32. ___ Research Center (polling group) : PEW
The Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. is a think tank that is well-known for its polling of public opinion. The Pew Research Center is a subsidiary of the Pew Charitable Trusts.

37. Like a mizzenmast on a ship : AFT
A mizzenmast is found aft of the main mast on a vessel having more than one mast.

39. The Galloping Gourmet in Germany? : HERR KERR (sounds like “haircare”)
Graham Kerr is an English celebrity cook who had a very popular TV show called “The Galloping Gourmet”. Kerr was noted for the liberal use of butter, cream, fat and wine in his recipes. However, after his wife had a stroke followed by a heart attack in 1986, Kerr completely changed his style of cooking, He calls his new style of cuisine “Minimax”, minimizing the fat and cholesterol content while maximizing the aroma, color, texture and taste.

41. Any of about 18 elements on the periodic table : NONMETAL
Although about 80% of the elements in the Periodic Table are metals, the nonmetals hydrogen and helium make up over 99% of the Universe. Additionally, the nonmetal oxygen makes up almost 50% of the Earth’s atmosphere, crust and oceans. And when it comes to living organisms, they are are almost completely made from nonmetals.

44. "The Walking Dead" channel : AMC
"The Walking Dead" is a horror television show that made by AMC. There are lots of flesh-eating zombies featured, so I won’t be seen “dead” watching it …

51. Paige of Broadway and London's West End : ELAINE
The English singer and actress Elaine Paige got her big break in musical theater when she was cast at the original Eva Perón in the first production of “Evita”. She was also the first to play Grizabella in “Cats”, giving her a top ten hit with the song “Memory”. She paired up with Barbara Dickson in the musical “Chess” and together released the single “I Know Him So Well”, which is the biggest-selling record in history by a female duo.

57. Veronese who painted "The Wedding at Cana" : PAOLO
Paolo Veronese was a Renaissance painter from the Italian city of Verona (hence his name “Veronese”). Veronese is most famous for his paintings “The Wedding at Cana” and “The Feast at the House of Levi”. “The Wedding at Cana” is a massive work, measuring over 21 x 32 feet in size. It has the honor of being the largest painting in the Louvre Museum in Paris.

63. Pageant coif, maybe : UPDO
A “coif” is a hairdo. The term comes from an old French term “coife”, a skull-cap that was worn under a helmet back in the late 13th century.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Emergency status : CODE RED
8. Case for a lawyer, maybe : ATTACHE
15. Paper work not usually done at the office : ORIGAMI
16. Performers with lots of fans? : GEISHAS
17. Quintet in a nursery rhyme : PIGGIES
18. Longs : HANKERS
19. Naked "Parks and Recreation" star? : POEHLER BARE (sounds like “polar bear”)
21. Fig. for a dietitian : RDA
22. What may follow anything? : ELSE
23. Some expensive hors d'oeuvres : ROES
24. Spread on a farm : SOW
26. Surface again, as a road : RETAR
28. Layered lunch orders : BLTS
30. Mourn openly : WEEP
33. Wooden rod : DOWEL
35. Recently : OF LATE
37. "Say ___" : AAH
40. Tempo : CADENCE
42. Unpolished : RAW
43. Bizarre : FREAKY
45. Balderdash : HOKUM
47. Describe as : TERM
48. Out and about : SEEN
50. Two numbers? : DUETS
54. Onetime owner of NBC : RCA
56. Hitch : LIMP
58. Like some fees and feet : FLAT
59. Bit of discouragement : TSK
61. Event at Walden Pond? : THOREAU FAIR (sounds like “thoroughfare”)
64. Like some shopping : ONE-STOP
66. Of the highest reputation : TOPLINE
67. "The last thing I wanted to do was to be a ___ president": Lyndon Johnson : WARTIME
68. Firm, in a way : AL DENTE
69. Neatens (up) : SPRUCES
70. Most baggy : LOOSEST

Down
1. Conductor of note : COPPER
2. Maker of a hanging nest : ORIOLE
3. Compilation : DIGEST
4. Brainiac : EGGHEAD
5. Transit option : RAIL
6. Mideast title: Var. : EMEER
7. Stripped : DISROBED
8. Horrified : AGHAST
9. Well up : TEAR
10. Ends of some utensils : TINES
11. "Don't ___" : ASK
12. Clothing line from an Oscar-winning singer? : CHER WEAR (sounds like “shareware”)
13. Brain-busting : HARD
14. Italian pronoun : ESSA
20. Offspring of Beauty? : BELLE HEIR (sounds like “Bel Air”)
25. Snowy ___ : OWL
27. Wear, and look great doing it : ROCK
29. Wallop : SOCK
31. Landing info, briefly : ETA
32. ___ Research Center (polling group) : PEW
34. Routes : WAYS
36. Long row : FEUD
37. Like a mizzenmast on a ship : AFT
38. Equals, in math : ARE
39. The Galloping Gourmet in Germany? : HERR KERR (sounds like “haircare”)
41. Any of about 18 elements on the periodic table : NONMETAL
44. "The Walking Dead" channel : AMC
46. Quiets : MUFFLES
49. Skips the rite stuff? : ELOPES
51. Paige of Broadway and London's West End : ELAINE
52. Pollutes : TAINTS
53. Word with price or parking : STREET
55. Top level of many a 62-Down : ATTIC
57. Veronese who painted "The Wedding at Cana" : PAOLO
59. Followers of many breakdowns : TOWS
60. Rude way to call a waiter : SNAP
62. See 55-Down : HOME
63. Pageant coif, maybe : UPDO
65. Man's name that's an alphabet run : STU


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0429-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 15, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Daniel Landman
THEME: Polygons … the circled letters in the grid are VERTICES of POLYGONS, with each POLYGON being defined by a word made from those VERTICES:
52D. What each of this puzzle's circled squares represents : VERTEX
20A. ELK, geometrically, in the finished puzzle : RIGHT TRIANGLE
28A. EARL, geometrically : TRAPEZOID
39A. ELK, EARL, LEAK or GEAR, geometrically : POLYGON
48A. LEAK, geometrically : RECTANGLE
58A. GEAR, geometrically : PARALLELOGRAM
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 17s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Expressions of frustration abroad : ACHS
The German exclamation "ach!" is usually translated into English as "oh!"

5. Key of Mozart's last piano concerto : B-FLAT
The last piano concerto that Mozart composed was Piano Concerto No. 27 in B-flat major. It was first performed in 1791, which was the year the composer passed away.

14. 2013-'14 N.B.A. All-Star Joakim ___ : NOAH
Professional basketball player Joakim Noah is a citizen of the US, Sweden and France, as he was born in New York City to a French father and Swedish mother. Noah’s parents are celebrities in their own rights. Yannick Noah is a former world no. 3 tennis player, and Cécilia Rodhe was Miss Sweden in 1978.

15. Peanut-butter-and-chocolate innovator H. B. ___ : REESE
Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett "H.B." Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “pieces” ...

16. Record for later viewing, maybe : TIVO
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world's first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

17. Spanish lady : DONA
In Spain, a title of respect for men is “Don”. The equivalent female title is “Dona”.

18. Resident of 123 Sesame Street : ERNIE
Back in 1966, the Carnegie Institute allocated money to study the use of television to help young children prepare for school. The institute gave an $8million grant to set up the Children's Television Workshop with the task of creating an educational TV program for young people. The program began to come together, especially after Jim Henson (of Muppet fame) got involved. The name "Sesame Street" was chosen simply because it was the "least disliked" of all names proposed just before the program went on the air.

19. Midmonth day : IDES
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually "fixed" by law. "Kalendae" were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. "Nonae" were originally the days of the half moon. And "idus" (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure ...

20. ELK, geometrically, in the finished puzzle : RIGHT TRIANGLE
A right triangle is one that includes a right angle (i.e. 90 degrees).

27. Limey's drink : GROG
Edward Vernon was a naval officer with the nickname "Old Grog". In 1740, Vernon ordered that the daily ration of rum for his sailors should be watered down, in order to reduce discipline problems caused by drunkenness. The diluted rum was sweetened with sugar, and lemon or lime added to help preserve it on long voyages. This recipe, found to reduce scurvy among sailors (because of the citrus) spread throughout the Royal Navy, and "grog" was born.

“Limey” is a slang nickname for someone from Britain, and is a term used in particular by people from North America and Australia. “Limey” is thought to be short for “lime juicer”, an insulting phrase used to describe Royal Navy sailors who were given lime and lemon juice while at sea to help stave off scurvy.

28. EARL, geometrically : TRAPEZOID
A trapezoid is a four-sided shape in which at least one pair of sides are parallel.

32. Quiet : MUM
The phrase “mum’s the word” has been around since the early 1700s. “Mum” has been used to mean “silent” for centuries, the idea being that “mum” is the sound made when the lips are tightly sealed.

34. ___-lacto-vegetarian : OVO
A lacto-ovo vegetarian is someone who does not consume meat or fish, but does eat eggs (ovo) and dairy (lacto) products.

35. Europe's highest volcano : ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius.

39. ELK, EARL, LEAK or GEAR, geometrically : POLYGON
The suffix -gon comes from the Greek word "gonia" meaning "angle" or "knee". So, a polygon has many "angles". An octagon has eight angles or sides, for example.

43. Some nest eggs, briefly : IRAS
Individual retirement account (IRA)

46. Like Twizzlers : RED
Twizzlers candy has been produced since 1845, although back then the only flavor available was licorice. My wife is addicted to strawberry Twizzlers. Can’t stand the stuff myself …

54. "Wake Up With Al" co-host : ROKER
Al Roker is best known as the meteorologist on the “Today” show on NBC. He has successfully branched out from that platform though, and even co-wrote a novel called “The Morning Show Murders”, about a celebrity chef and TV host who get entangled in mystery. Topical stuff …

58. GEAR, geometrically : PARALLELOGRAM
A parallelogram is a quadrilateral in which the opposite sides are parallel.

68. "99 Luftballons" singer : NENA
Nena is a German singer ("Nena" became the name of her band as well) who had a big hit with one of my favorite songs of the eighties "99 Luftballons". The English translation of the German title ("99 Red Balloons") isn't literal, with the color "red" added just so that the title had the right number of syllables for the tune. "Luftballon" is the name given to a child's toy balloon in German.

71. Halves of an old item? : EXES
An unmarried couple known to be involved with each other might appear in the gossip columns. This appearance as "an item" in the papers, led to the use of "item" to refer to such a couple, but only since the very early seventies.

Down
1. Mixing male and female characteristics, slangily : ANDRO
“Andro-” is a prefix meaning male, as in androgen, a steroid hormone that controls the development of masculine characteristics.

3. Jet setting : HANGAR
“Hangar” is a French word for “shed”. The French first started using the term for a “shed for airplanes” in the very early 1900s.

4. Iran, formerly : SHAHDOM
The last Shah of Iran was Mohammed-Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

5. Baseball Hall-of-Famer George : BRETT
George Brett played his entire professional baseball career with the Kansas City Royals. Brett made more hits than any other third baseman in Major League history.

7. Director Riefenstahl : LENI
Leni Riefenstahl was a German film director, actress and dancer. She was a noted figure moving in Adolf Hitler's circle, and her most famous film was a propaganda piece called "Triumph of Will". "Triumph of the Will" documents the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremberg. We've all probably seen many excerpts, shots of huge crowds, Nazis marching with flags, and frenzied speeches from Hitler. Riefenstahl was arrested after the war and detained for a number of years but never found guilty of any crime. She lived a long life, a very long life. She was married for the second time in 2003, at the age of 101 years. She died just a few weeks later, as she had been suffering from cancer.

9. First-time voter, often : TEEN
The minimum age of voters was called out in the US Constitution when it was passed in 1787. This was set at 21 years, but applied to only white male property owners. The minimum age of voters was lowered in the Twenty-sixth Amendment to the Constitution in 1971 as a response to student activism. Young people at that time were frustrated that they were mature enough to be drafted to fight in the Vietnam War, yet were not considered mature enough to vote in elections.

12. D-Day minus one : EVE
The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term "D-Day" is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operations are to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for "Day". In fact, the French have a similar term, "Jour J" (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

22. Verizon forerunner : GTE
GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000 to form the company that we know today as Verizon.

25. Article in Die Zeit : EINE
"Die Zeit" is the most widely read, weekly newspaper in Germany. It was first published soon after after in the end of WWII, in February of 1946. "Zeit" is the German word for "time".

26. Neb. neighbor : SDAK
The Dakotas were admitted into the union in 1889, along with Montana and Washington. There was a famous rivalry between North and South Dakota, and some jockeying to determine which of the two's admission papers should be signed first. President Harrison solved the problem by directing that the papers of all four states should be shuffled, and he signed them without recording the order.

29. 5-Down, for his entire career : ROYAL
The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball team was founded in 1969. The team takes its name from the American Royal, a livestock show and rodeo held annually in Kansas City since 1899.

36. Line to Penn Sta. :  LIRR
The Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) is the commuter rail service that runs all over Long Island, New York with 124 stations and 700 miles of track. More people use the LIRR than any other commuter railroad in the US. It is also the only commuter railroad in the country that operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

38. Lumbago : BACK PAIN
Lumbago is pain in the lower back. The name “lumbago” is a Late Latin term describing a “weakness of the loins and lower back”. The term comes from the Latin “lumbus” meaning “loin”.

41. Dead: Prefix : NECRO-
The prefix “necro-” means “the dead, corpse, dead tissue”, ultimately deriving from the Greek “nekros” meaning “corpse”.

44. Bear's Wall Street partner : STEARNS
New York investment bank Bear Stearnswas one of the institutions that collapsed in the financial meltdown of 2008, and was then sold off to JPMorgan Chase.

49. Flight board abbr. : ARR
Arrival (arr.)

53. Puppet lady of "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" : ELAINE
The “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” TV show starred Fred Rogers. It was the second longest running series on PBS television after that other iconic children's show "Sesame Street". Fred Rogers played many puppet characters on the show, including a cranky female called Lady Elaine Fairchild who runs the Museum-Go-Round.

57. Some fitness centers : YMCAS
The YMCA is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of "a healthy spirit, mind and body". The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

59. Unaccounted for : AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) are concerned with personnel who go AWOL (Absent Without Leave).

60. Put on board : LADE
The verb "lade" meaning "to load" comes from an Old English word "hladan". Lade also used to mean "to draw water" and indeed gave us our word "ladle". So "lade" and "ladle" are close cousins.

61. "___ Rose" (song from "The Music Man") : LIDA
“The Music Man” is a musical by Meredith Willson. The show was a big hit on Broadway in 1957. “The Music Man” won the first ever Grammy Award for the “Best Original Cast Album”.

62. ___-Magnon : CRO
Remains of early man, dating back to 35,000 years ago, were found in Abri de Cro-Magnon in southwest France, giving the name to those early humans. Cro-Magnon remains are the oldest human relics that have been discovered in Europe.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Expressions of frustration abroad : ACHS
5. Key of Mozart's last piano concerto : B-FLAT
10. Accustomed (to) : USED
14. 2013-'14 N.B.A. All-Star Joakim ___ : NOAH
15. Peanut-butter-and-chocolate innovator H. B. ___ : REESE
16. Record for later viewing, maybe : TIVO
17. Spanish lady : DONA
18. Resident of 123 Sesame Street : ERNIE
19. Midmonth day : IDES
20. ELK, geometrically, in the finished puzzle : RIGHT TRIANGLE
23. At dinner for two, say : ON A DATE
24. Trident points : TINES
27. Limey's drink : GROG
28. EARL, geometrically : TRAPEZOID
32. Quiet : MUM
34. ___-lacto-vegetarian : OVO
35. Europe's highest volcano : ETNA
36. Easy question : LOB
39. ELK, EARL, LEAK or GEAR, geometrically : POLYGON
42. Cartoon yelp : EEK!
43. Some nest eggs, briefly : IRAS
45. Not quite the majors : AAA
46. Like Twizzlers : RED
48. LEAK, geometrically : RECTANGLE
51. Yacht spot : COVE
54. "Wake Up With Al" co-host : ROKER
55. For the most part : LARGELY
58. GEAR, geometrically : PARALLELOGRAM
62. Give a grilling? : CHAR
64. Dispense with : WAIVE
65. Ear-related : OTIC
66. Symbol of authority : REIN
67. Quirkier : ODDER
68. "99 Luftballons" singer : NENA
69. Excels over, in slang : OWNS
70. Inclined : LEANT
71. Halves of an old item? : EXES

Down
1. Mixing male and female characteristics, slangily : ANDRO
2. Whispering sweet nothings : COOING
3. Jet setting : HANGAR
4. Iran, formerly : SHAHDOM
5. Baseball Hall-of-Famer George : BRETT
6. Find (out) : FERRET
7. Director Riefenstahl : LENI
8. ___-Pacific : ASIA
9. First-time voter, often : TEEN
10. Avail oneself of : UTILIZE
11. Incidental remark : SIDE NOTE
12. D-Day minus one : EVE
13. Commendable activities : DOS
21. Advice to a base runner : TAG UP
22. Verizon forerunner : GTE
25. Article in Die Zeit : EINE
26. Neb. neighbor : SDAK
29. 5-Down, for his entire career : ROYAL
30. Mean: Abbr. : AVG
31. D : POOR
33. Spooky sound : MOAN
36. Line to Penn Sta. : LIRR
37. Non-fruit smoothie flavor : OREO
38. Lumbago : BACK PAIN
40. Jet ___ : LAG
41. Dead: Prefix : NECRO-
44. Bear's Wall Street partner : STEARNS
47. Darn : DOGGONE
49. Flight board abbr. : ARR
50. Nearing midnight : ELEVEN
52. What each of this puzzle's circled squares represents : VERTEX
53. Puppet lady of "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" : ELAINE
56. Red flag, maybe : ALERT
57. Some fitness centers : YMCAS
59. Unaccounted for : AWOL
60. Put on board : LADE
61. "___ Rose" (song from "The Music Man") : LIDA
62. ___-Magnon : CRO
63. Chop down : HEW


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0428-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 15, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jose Chardiet
THEME: Square Roots … the circled letters in the grid all contain the word ROOT, arranged in SQUARES:
34A. Math calculations exemplified 14 times in this puzzle : SQUARE ROOTS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. North-of-the-border media inits. : CBC
CBC stands for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Canada's national public radio and television broadcaster. In terms of financing and structure, CBC is akin to the BBC in Britain. But as commercial advertising is permitted, it perhaps more akin to RTE, the national broadcasting company in my homeland of Ireland.

10. Pit crew's canful : STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

19. N.Y.C. subway line : IRT
The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the original private operator of the New York Subway when it opened in 1904. The city took over ownership of the system in 1940, but the lines originally operated by the IRT are still known by the IRT moniker.

20. Elsie the Cow's brand : BORDEN
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World's Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer's Glue.

22. Healthful herbal beverage : SAGE TEA
In Britain, sage is listed as one of the four essential herbs. And those would be “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme”.

25. Speaker in the Baseball Hall of Fame : TRIS
Tris Speaker was a Major League Baseball player, the holder of the record for the most doubles hit in a career. He led the Boston Red Sox to two World Series championships, in 1912 and 1915.

27. Cartoon character voiced by Nancy Cartwright : BART
Bart Simpson is the main character in television’s “The Simpsons”. Bart’s name was chosen by the writers as it is an anagram of “brat”. Bart is voiced by actress and comedian Nancy Cartwright.

29. Locale for tarsals and metatarsals : FOOT
The tarsals are the ankle bones, equivalent to the carpals in the wrist.

The metatarsal bones are five long bones in each foot located between the heel and the toes. Apparently soccer players are particularly vulnerable to fractures of the metatarsal bones.

33. Sisters' grp. : SOR
Sorority (sor.)

38. Kind of port : USB
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

39. 2013 #1 Katy Perry hit : ROAR
Katy Perry is an American singer who grew up listening to and singing gospel music, as she was the daughter of two Christian pastors. In fact, her first musical release was a gospel album in 2001. She has branched out since then. Her first successful single was "Ur so Gay", followed by "I Kissed A Girl". She was married (only for a year) to the British comedian Russell Brand, until 2012.

40. Org. that might employ a climatologist : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

48. Trespassing, for one : TORT
The word "tort" is a French word meaning "mischief, injury or wrong". Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

58. The Senators, on sports tickers : OTT
The Senators are the NHL hockey team in Ottawa, Canada. The current team, founded in the 1992-93 season, is the second NHL team in the city to use the name "Senators". The original team was founded in 1917 and had a very successful run until the league expanded into the US in the late twenties. The cost of operating in what became the smallest NHL city eventually drove the Senators to St. Louis where they played for a year as the Eagles before finally folding.

60. "The Bourne Identity" org. : CIA
"The Bourne Identity" is a great spy novel written by Robert Ludlum, and first published in 1980. It has been ranked as the second best spy novel of all time, just behind the even more enjoyable "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold" by John le Carre. I'll agree with that sentiment. Ludlum wrote two sequels, and all three parts of the Bourne Trilogy have been made into very successful movies now, starring Matt Damon in the title role. Ludlum died before he could write more than three novels featuring Jason Bourne, but five more titles in the series have been published, written by Eric Van Lustbader. I must check them out ...

61. Poetic stanza : STROPHE
In general terms, in poetry a “strophe” is a pair of stanzas with alternating form. So, a poem might be made up from a number of strophes, and twice that number of stanzas.

62. ___ José : SAN
San José is a capital of the Central American country of Costa Rica.

63. Author Kesey : KEN
Ken Kesey wrote the novel "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest". Kesey was one of a group of friends who called themselves the "Merry Pranksters", a bunch of guys who were associated with the likes of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and Timothy Leary, all icons of the Beat Generation.

Down
1. Point of convergence: Abbr. : CTR
Center (ctr.)

3. Ones back on track? : CABOOSES
The word "caboose" originally came from Middle Dutch and was the word for a ship's galley. When the last car in a train in North America was given a stove for the comfort of the crew, it took on the name "caboose". The term has also become slang for a person’s backside.

4. Monopoly pile : DEEDS
Apparently, when Fidel Castro came to power in Cuba he banned the very popular game “Monopoly”, as he viewed it as a symbol of capitalism. In fact, he ordered that every copy of the game on the island be destroyed.

7. Exciting parts of games, for short : OTS
Overtime (OT)

9. Spotlight seekers : DIVAS
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

11. Entertainer with a cape : TORERO
"Toreador" is an old Spanish word for a bullfighter, but it's a term not used any more in Spain nor in Latin America. In English we use the term "toreador", but in Spanish a bullfighter is a "torero".

12. Common gnocchi ingredient : POTATO
Gnocchi are small dumplings in Italian cuisine that can be made from various ingredients including potato, my personal favorite. The name “gnocchi” might be derived from the Italian “nocchio” meaning “knot in wood”.

15. Good name for a baseball pitcher? : PEG
“To peg” something is to throw it, an informal term.

21. U.P.S. driver's assignment: Abbr. : RTE
United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky.

23. "Your Movie Sucks" author : EBERT
"Your Movie Sucks" is a collection of movie reviews by film critic Roger Ebert, reviews that are all under two-out-of-five stars.

24. ___TV (Time Warner channel) : TRU
truTV is a Turner Broadcasting cable network, launched in 1991 as Court TV. The name was changed to truTV in 2008.

26. Vocalist Flack : ROBERTA
I suppose the most famous song released by American singer Roberta Flack is her 1972 hit "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face", a beautiful number composed by British singer/songwriter Ewan MacColl in 1957. MacColl wrote the song for American singer Peggy Seeger, who he later married.

33. "The Young and the Restless," e.g. : SOAP
“The Young and the Restless” is a soap opera that has been on the air since 1973. It is a sister show to the soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful”, and so the two series share some actors and characters.

41. Chance card in Monopoly with a $15 fee : POOR TAX
One of the Chance cards in the game of Monopoly instructs a player to pay a “poor tax” of $15. I think that this “poor tax” might be reference to the “poor rate” that was paid by property owners in England and Wales in the 17th through the 19th centuries. This tax was collected to pay for relief of the poor.

42. Murals, e.g. : ART
A “mural” is a painting that is applied directly to a wall or a ceiling. The term comes from the Latin “murus” meaning “wall”.

44. Painful bit of horseplay : NOOGIE
A “noogie” is that childish move where someone rubs his (and it’s always a guy!) knuckles into a person’s head to create a little soreness.

45. James of "James and the Giant Peach," for one : ORPHAN
“James and the Giant Peach” is a 1961 children’s novel by British author Roald Dahl. The title character is a young orphan who enters into a surreal world inside a huge, magical peach.

46. Nissan model : SENTRA
The Nissan Sentra is sold as the Nissan Sunny back in Japan.

50. Israel's Shimon : PERES
Shimon Peres is an Israeli statesman who was born in Poland. Peres served as President of the State of Israel from 2007 to 2014. Born Szymon Perski in Poland, while president Peres was the oldest head of state in the world. While serving foreign minister, he represented Israel in the secret negotiations that led to the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993. For that work, Peres was jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat.

52. Producers of two outs, for short : DPS
Double plays (DPs)

54. Architect Ludwig Mies van der ___ : ROHE
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was a German architect who was routinely referred to simply as "Mies". I am a philistine, I know, but Mies' buildings look very plain to me. However, he did come up with two far-from-plain sayings: "less is more" and "God is in the details".

59. Stick with a fuse : TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. North-of-the-border media inits. : CBC
4. Contribute to society : DO GOOD
10. Pit crew's canful : STP
13. ___ point : TO A
14. Self-promotional autobiography, for its writer : EGO TRIP
16. Icky-___ (awful, in baby talk) : POO
17. Steal from : ROB
18. Like waves vis-à-vis the shoreline : EROSIVE
19. N.Y.C. subway line : IRT
20. Elsie the Cow's brand : BORDEN
22. Healthful herbal beverage : SAGE TEA
24. Honey : TOOTS
25. Speaker in the Baseball Hall of Fame : TRIS
27. Cartoon character voiced by Nancy Cartwright : BART
28. Got off the ground? : ROSE
29. Locale for tarsals and metatarsals : FOOT
30. "Same here" : ME TOO
31. Take advantage of : USE
32. Night life setting : CLUB
33. Sisters' grp. : SOR
34. Math calculations exemplified 14 times in this puzzle : SQUARE ROOTS
38. Kind of port : USB
39. 2013 #1 Katy Perry hit : ROAR
40. Org. that might employ a climatologist : EPA
43. Busybody : SNOOP
46. "Hold it!" : STOP!
47. Suffix with liquid : -ATOR
48. Trespassing, for one : TORT
49. Dependent on subtitles, say : DEAF
50. Frequent flier : PILOT
51. Lured, as a potential customer : ROPED IN
53. Minor seismic movement : TREMOR
55. "Yuck!" : UGH!
56. What a dog might raise a flap about? : PET DOOR
58. The Senators, on sports tickers : OTT
60. "The Bourne Identity" org. : CIA
61. Poetic stanza : STROPHE
62. ___ José : SAN
63. Author Kesey : KEN
64. Gets fresh with : SASSES
65. Abbr. after a telephone number : EXT

Down
1. Point of convergence: Abbr. : CTR
2. Owies : BOO-BOOS
3. Ones back on track? : CABOOSES
4. Monopoly pile : DEEDS
5. Fairy tale villain : OGRE
6. Hit the road, as a band : GO ON TOUR
7. Exciting parts of games, for short : OTS
8. Question that leaves an opening for doubt : OR IS IT?
9. Spotlight seekers : DIVAS
10. Show utter contempt for : SPIT AT
11. Entertainer with a cape : TORERO
12. Common gnocchi ingredient : POTATO
15. Good name for a baseball pitcher? : PEG
21. U.P.S. driver's assignment: Abbr. : RTE
23. "Your Movie Sucks" author : EBERT
24. ___TV (Time Warner channel) : TRU
26. Vocalist Flack : ROBERTA
29. Exerciser's target : FLAB
30. Tie up, as a ship : MOOR
32. Brink : CUSP
33. "The Young and the Restless," e.g. : SOAP
35. Not a paraphrase : QUOTE
36. Places to view fireworks : ROOFTOPS
37. Release, as the hounds : SET LOOSE
41. Chance card in Monopoly with a $15 fee : POOR TAX
42. Murals, e.g. : ART
43. Smacked : STRUCK
44. Painful bit of horseplay : NOOGIE
45. James of "James and the Giant Peach," for one : ORPHAN
46. Nissan model : SENTRA
47. Adjust an arrow, say : AIM
49. Demanding film role preparations : DIETS
50. Israel's Shimon : PERES
52. Producers of two outs, for short : DPS
54. Architect Ludwig Mies van der ___ : ROHE
57. Cuban couple : DOS
59. Stick with a fuse : TNT


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0427-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Apr 15, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Johanna Fenimore
THEME: Left Speechless … each of today’s themed answers has the same clue: “Left speechless”.
1A. With 66-Across, left speechless : BLEW …
66A. See 1-Across : … AWAY
16A. Left speechless : DUMBSTRUCK
25A. Left speechless : KICKED IN THE HEAD
43A. Left speechless : KNOCKED FOR A LOOP
58A. Left speechless : GOBSMACKED
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. "Just ___" (Nike slogan) : DO IT
The Nike slogan “Just Do It” was created in an advertising meeting in 1988. Apparently the phrase was inspired by the last words of famed criminal Gary Gilmore. Gilmore faced execution by the state of Utah in 1977 and when asked if he had any last words he simply replied, “Let’s do it”. A few minutes later, Gilmore was executed by a firing squad.

9. ___ mark (# symbol) : HASH
The “#” symbol is usually referred to as the “number sign”, but here in the US the name “pound sign” is very common as well, as is “hash mark”.

13. Mouselike animal : VOLE
Vole populations can really increase rapidly. Mama vole is pregnant for just three weeks before giving birth to litters of 5-10 baby voles. Then the young voles become sexually mature in just one month! If you have one pregnant vole in your yard, within a year you could have over a hundred of the little critters.

15. Cincinnati's home : OHIO
Cincinnati, Ohio was the first major city to be founded after the American Revolution, and indeed was the first major inland city to be founded in the whole country. Cincinnati was a boomtown in the 1800s, but it’s growth slowed as the the railroads displaced the steamboats as the major form of transportation. The city was founded in 1788, and was named “Cincinnati” two years later. It was named for the Society of Cincinnati, an organization with the mission to preserve the ideals and fellowship of the officers of Revolutionary War. The society was in turn named for Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus. cincinnatus was farmer in ancient Rome who left his land to serve as Consul and then lawful dictator of Rome during a war emergency, before happily handing back power to the Senate after the war was won.

24. Aunt, in Acapulco : TIA
The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

33. Direction opposite from sur : NORTE
The cardinal directions in Spanish are norte (north), este (east), sur (south) and oeste (west).

35. E.M.T.'s specialty : CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

39. Mr. ___ (Peter Lorre role) : MOTO
The mysterious Mr. Moto is a Japanese secret agent who appears in six novels by American author, John P. Marquand. Mr. Moto was famously played by Peter Lorre in a series of eight films released in the 1930s.

The marvelous actor Peter Lorre was born in what is now modern-day Slovakia. Lorre's real name was Laszlo Lowenstein. He started acting in Vienna when he was quite young, only 17 years old. When Hitler came to power, the Jewish Lowenstein headed to Paris and then London, eventually ending up in Hollywood. Lorre found himself typecast as the wicked foreigner in American movies, but I think he sneered and snarled his way to the bank.

42. Division of a long poem : CANTO
A canto is a section of a long poem, and is a term first used by the Italian poet Dante. "Canto" is the Italian for "song".

53. Big part of an elephant : EAR
There are only three species of elephant living today, with all others being extinct. These are the African bush elephant, the African forest elephant, and the Asian elephant (or "Indian elephant"). As is well known, the African elephant is distinguished from the Asian/Indian elephant by its much larger ears.

58. Left speechless : GOBSMACKED
“Gobsmack” is slang from the British Isles. “Gob” is also slang, for a mouth. So someone who is gobsmacked has received "a smack in the mouth", is stunned.

61. Org. that loves fur ... but not on humans : PETA
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is a very large animal rights organization, with 300 employees and two million members and supporters worldwide. Although the group campaigns for animal rights across a broad spectrum of issues, it has a stated focus in opposition of four practices:
- factory farming
- fur farming
- animal testing
- use of animals in entertainment

65. Transylvanian count, informally : DRAC
"Dracula" is a novel written by the Irish author Bram Stoker and first published in 1897. Dracula wasn't the first vampire of literature, but he certainly was the one who spawned the popularity of vampires in theater, film and television, and indeed more novels. Personally, I can't stand vampire fiction …

Transylvania is a geographic region in the center of Romania. The area is very much associated with vampires ever since the publication of Bram Stoker’s novel “Dracula” that is set in Transylvania.

Down
1. Some men's underwear : BVDS
The men’s underwear known as BVDs are made by the Bradley, Voorhees & Day. The company was started in 1876 to make bustles for women, and is named for its founders.

4. The third "w" of www : WEB
The World Wide Web (WWW) was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I for one am very grateful ...

5. Start of the musical scale : DO RE MI …
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti. The solfa scale was developed from a six-note ascending scale created by Guido of Arezzo in the 11th century. He used the first verse of a Latin hymn to name the syllables of the scale:
Ut queant laxis resonāre fibris
Mira gestorum famuli tuorum,
Solve polluti labii reatum,
Sancte Iohannes.
The "ut" in this scale was changed to "do", as it was a more "open ended" sound, and "si" was added (the initials of "Sancte Iohannes") to complete the seven-note scale. Later again, "si" was changed to "ti" so that each syllable began with a unique letter.

6. Tulsa sch. : ORU
Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction.

7. Poison ivy annoyance : ITCH
Two of the plants that are most painful to humans are poison oak and poison ivy. Poison oak is mainly found west of the Rocky Mountains, and poison ivy to the east.

9. Hashish pipe : HOOKAH
A hookah is a waterpipe, a device for smoking tobacco in which the smoke is passed through a water basin before it is inhaled.

Hashish is a drug that is derived from the Indian hemp or cannabis plant. The term “hashish” comes from the Arabic word for “grass”.

10. Sailor's call : AHOY!
“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

14. Precious stringed instrument, informally : STRAD
Generations of the Stradivari family produced violins, the most famous of which were constructed by Antonio Stradivari.

23. B'way booth in Times Square : TKTS
The “TKTS” booths sell discount theater tickets, notably in Times Square in New York and in the West End of London.

Times Square in New York City isn’t a square at all, but rather a triangle. When the New York Times newspaper opened new headquarters in the area in 1904, the city agreed to the name “Times Square”, changing it from Longacre Square.

26. Hawkeye State native : IOWAN
Iowa is nicknamed the Hawkeye State in honor of Chief Black Hawk, a leader of the Sauk people during the War of 1812 and the Black Hawk War.

27. Words to live by : CREDO
A creed or credo is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for "I believe".

30. Commercial lead-in to Lodge : ECONO
Econo Lodge is a low-cost hotel chain in the Choice Hotels portfolio of brands. The chain started in 1969 as Econo-Travel, and demonstrated pretty quickly that budget-hotels were a good idea. The first hotel was built in Norfolk, Virginia and it started making money three weeks after welcoming its first guests.

37. Hermes or Hades : GREEK GOD
Hermes was the Greek god of transitions and boundaries, one who intercedes between mortals and the divine. He could move freely between the mortal and divine worlds and so was regarded as the messenger of the gods. The Roman equivalent to Hermes was the god Mercury.

Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

38. British ref. work : OED
The "Oxford English Dictionary" (OED) contains over 300,000 "main" entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb "set". When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb "put". Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

39. Having X and Y chromosomes : MALE
In most mammalian species, including humans, females have two identical sex chromosomes (XX), and males two distinct sex chromosomes (XY). As a result it is the males who determine the sex of the offspring. However, in birds it’s the opposite, so females determine the sex of the chicks.

41. Gumbo ingredient : OKRA
Gumbo is a type of stew or soup that originated in Louisiana. The primary ingredient can be meat or fish, but to be true gumbo it must include the "holy trinity" of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers and onion. Okra used to be a requirement but this is no longer the case. Okra gave the dish its name as the vernacular word for the African vegetable is "okingumbo”, from the Bantu language spoken by many of the slaves brought to America.

42. Frank who directed "It's a Wonderful Life" : CAPRA
I can’t tell you how many of Frank Capra’s movies are on my list of all-time favorites. He directed such classics as “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”, “Lost Horizon”, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”, “Meet John Doe”, “Arsenic and Old Lace” and the holiday favorite “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Capra was the first person to win three directorial Oscars: for “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town” and “You Can’t Take It With You”. Capra also did his bit during WWII, enlisting just a few days after Pearl Harbor was attacked. Given his great talent, and the fact that he enlisted at the relatively advanced age of 44, the US Army put him to work directing 11 documentary war films in the “Why We Fight” series, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

The Christmas Classic “It's a Wonderful Life" was released in 1946, and is a Frank Capra movie starring James Stewart and Donna Reed. The film’s screenplay was adapted from a short story called “The Greatest Gift” by Philip Van Doren Stern. Remember the famous swimming pool scene? That was shot in Beverly High School gym, and the pool is still in use today.

44. Roman ruler who said "The die is cast" : CAESAR
Supposedly, when Julius Caesar marched back to Rome from Gaul, as he defiantly "crossed the Rubicon" with his army, he uttered the words "Alea iacta est" ("The die is cast").

49. Bay Area force: Abbr. : SFPD
The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is the 11th largest police department in the country. The SFPD dates back to the days of the Gold Rush, being founded in 1849 as a force of 35 officers. SFPD has featured a lot in movies and on television. The most famous films are probably "Bullitt", the "Dirty Harry" series and "48 Hrs." On television there was "Ironside", "The Streets of San Francisco" and now "Monk".

50. Beech or birch : TREE
Beech wood is prized as firewood as it burns for many hours with a bright flame and is easily split.

Birch is a hardwood tree. The bark of the birch has eye-like features, leading to the trees nickname of “the Watchful Tree”.

55. Wife of Zeus : HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

59. Troop grp. : BSA
As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. With 66-Across, left speechless : BLEW ...
5. "Just ___" (Nike slogan) : DO IT
9. ___ mark (# symbol) : HASH
13. Mouselike animal : VOLE
14. Kinda maybe : SORTA
15. Cincinnati's home : OHIO
16. Left speechless : DUMBSTRUCK
18. Seep : OOZE
19. Aves. and blvds. : STS
20. Anger : IRE
21. "You betcha!" : HECK YES!
23. Trolley : TRAM
24. Aunt, in Acapulco : TIA
25. Left speechless : KICKED IN THE HEAD
33. Direction opposite from sur : NORTE
34. Spoken : ORAL
35. E.M.T.'s specialty : CPR
36. Fills with wonder : AWES
37. Reached : GOT AT
39. Mr. ___ (Peter Lorre role) : MOTO
40. Heel : CAD
41. Cookie with white filling : OREO
42. Division of a long poem : CANTO
43. Left speechless : KNOCKED FOR A LOOP
47. "___ you out of your mind?!" : ARE
48. "Uh-uh!" : NOPE!
49. Some hair highlights : STREAKS
53. Big part of an elephant : EAR
54. Preceder of "loves me" and "loves me not" : SHE
57. Hairdos that are hard to wear hats with, familiarly : ‘FROS
58. Left speechless : GOBSMACKED
61. Org. that loves fur ... but not on humans : PETA
62. Desert green spots : OASES
63. Group of buffalo : HERD
64. Does and bucks : DEER
65. Transylvanian count, informally : DRAC
66. See 1-Across : … AWAY

Down
1. Some men's underwear : BVDS
2. Boor : LOUT
3. State symbols of Massachusetts and North Dakota : ELMS
4. The third "w" of www : WEB
5. Start of the musical scale : DO RE MI ...
6. Tulsa sch. : ORU
7. Poison ivy annoyance : ITCH
8. "So there!" : TAKE THAT!
9. Hashish pipe : HOOKAH
10. Sailor's call : AHOY!
11. Small, medium or large : SIZE
12. Tools for weeding : HOES
14. Precious stringed instrument, informally : STRAD
17. "No ___, Bob!" : SIREE
22. Sky: Fr. : CIEL
23. B'way booth in Times Square : TKTS
25. Talent : KNACK
26. Hawkeye State native : IOWAN
27. Words to live by : CREDO
28. ___ this world : NOT OF
29. La-la preceder : TRA
30. Commercial lead-in to Lodge : ECONO
31. Is ___ (probably will) : APT TO
32. Sag : DROOP
37. Hermes or Hades : GREEK GOD
38. British ref. work : OED
39. Having X and Y chromosomes : MALE
41. Gumbo ingredient : OKRA
42. Frank who directed "It's a Wonderful Life" : CAPRA
44. Roman ruler who said "The die is cast" : CAESAR
45. "Hold on ...!" : ONE SEC …!
46. Wanders : ROAMS
49. Bay Area force: Abbr. : SFPD
50. Beech or birch : TREE
51. Repetitive learning : ROTE
52. Fly high : SOAR
54. Distort : SKEW
55. Wife of Zeus : HERA
56. Small whirlpool : EDDY
59. Troop grp. : BSA
60. "___-ching!" : CHA


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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