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0601-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jun 15, Monday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Woolf
THEME: Sew’ll Sound Like This … today’s themed answers start with one of the homophones: SOL, SOLE, SEOUL and SOUL:
17A. Popular Mexican brew : SOL CERVEZA
27A. The only trustworthy one? : SOLE BENEFICIARY
48A. Where Kia and Hyundai are headquartered : SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA
63A. Woman's best female friend : SOUL SISTER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Coke rival : PEPSI
The Pepsi-Cola formulation was developed by one Caleb Bradham who made the drink at home and sold it as “Brad’s Drink”. Bradham's aim was to provide a drink that was pleasant to taste, that would aid digestion and boost energy. Included in the formula were pepsin (a digestive enzyme) and kola nuts. These two ingredients inspired the brand name we use today: Pepsi-Cola.

10. Cracked open, as a door : AJAR
Our word "ajar" is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which "a char" means "slightly open".

14. Sir ___ Newton : ISAAC
Sir Isaac Newton was one of the most influential people in history, the man who laid the groundwork for all of classical mechanics. The story about an apple falling on his head, inspiring him to formulate his theories about gravity, well that's not quite true. Newton often told the story about observing an apple falling in his mother's garden and how this made him acutely aware of the Earth's gravitational pull. However, he made no mention of the apple hitting him on the head.

15. Milky gem : OPAL
An opal is often described as having a milky iridescence, known as "opalescence".

16. Bit of Old Norse writing : RUNE
A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

17. Popular Mexican brew : SOL CERVEZA
Sol is a brand of Mexican beer that dates back to the late 1800s, when it was called “El Sol”.

“Cerveza” is Spanish for “beer”.

20. Nincompoop : ASS
The word "nincompoop", meaning a fool, seems to have been around for quite a while. It has been used since the 1670s, but no one appears to know its origins.

26. Co. name ender : INC
A company that has incorporated uses the abbreviation “Inc.” after its name. By incorporating, a company forms a corporation, which is a legal entity that has legal rights similar to those of an individual. For example, a corporation can sue another corporation or individual. However, a corporation does not have all the rights of citizens. A corporation does not have the Fifth Amendment right of protections against self-incrimination, for example. It is perhaps understandable that the concept of “corporations as persons” is a frequent subject for debate.

36. Canadian native : CREE
The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

37. ___ au vin : COQ
The French word "coq" actually means rooster, but a more tender bird is usually chosen for the classic French dish "coq au vin". The most common wine used for the "vin" is burgundy, but sometimes another red wine is chosen, and you can also find on a menu "coq au Champagne" and "coq au Riesling".

45. Vietnamese soup : PHO
“Pho” is a noodle soup from Vietnam that is a popular street food.

46. That is, in Latin : ID EST
“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

48. Where Kia and Hyundai are headquartered : SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

54. Aided and ___ : ABETTED
The word "abet" comes into English from the Old French "abeter" meaning "to bait" or "to harass with dogs" (it literally means "to make bite"). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of "abet" meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

58. Suffix with British and Bush : -ISM
A “Britishism” is a word or phrase in English that is typically used in Britain, with a meaning that is peculiar to that country. Examples would be “fortnight” (two weeks), “davenport” (small writing desk), “bomb” (great success), “kiosk” (telephone booth) and “dustman” (garbage collector).

A Bushism is a linguistic error that has been attributed to President George W. Bush. President Bush himself admitted that he mixed up his words at times. Documented examples would be:
- "Too many good docs are getting out of the business. Too many OB-GYNs aren't able to practice their love with women all across this country."
- "Rarely is the question asked: Is our children learning?"
- "You teach a child to read, and he or her will be able to pass a literacy test."
- “They misunderestimated me.”

62. Language of Pakistan : URDU
Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

67. William who shot an apple off his son's head : TELL
Supposedly William Tell came from Uri, a canton in the German part of Switzerland. Altdorf is the capital of Uri and is the city where William Tell shot the apple off his son's head, at least according to legend.

70. What the Venus de Milo lacks : ARMS
The famous "Venus de Milo" is so named as she was discovered in the ruins of the ancient city of Milos, on the Aegean island of the same name. I've been lucky enough to see the statue, in the Louvre in Paris, and was surprised at how large it is (6 ft 8 in tall).

Down
1. Italy's Tower of ___ : PISA
The city of Pisa is right on the Italian coast, sitting at the mouth of the River Arno, and is famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city's cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are ...

6. Groovy 1960s event : LOVE-IN
A “love-in” was a peaceful protest most associated with the late sixties. The gatherings themselves often involved meditation, music and the use of psychedelic drugs. The term “love-in” was apparently coined by LA comedian Peter Bergman who had a radio show at that time.

7. Gorilla : APE
The gorilla is the largest primate still in existence, and is one of the nearest living species to humans. Molecular biology studies have shown that our nearest relatives are in fact the species in the genus Pan (the chimpanzee and the bonobo), which split from the human branch of the family 4-6 million years ago. Gorillas and humans diverged at a point about 7 million years ago. The term “gorilla” derives from the Greek "gorillai” meaning “tribe of hairy women”.

8. The Soup ___ ("Seinfeld" character) : NAZI
“The Soup Nazi” is a famous episode of the hit show “Seinfeld”. The story is all about a soup stand owned by an excessively strict man referred to as the “Soup Nazi”. Believe it or not, the “Soup Nazi” character is based on a real soup vendor in New York City.

9. Panache : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e "style" or "flair".

Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially in a hat.

10. "___ and Old Lace" (play and movie) : ARSENIC
I suppose that most famously “Arsenic and Old Lace” is a Frank Capra film, released in 1944. The movie was based on a 1939 stage play by Joseph Kesselring. The film stars Cary Grant as a completely madcap and frantic Mortimer Brewster. Grant was only the fourth choice for the role, after Bob Hope, Jack Benny and Ronald Reagan. That’s quite an eclectic mix of actors …

11. Wife portrayed in 2005's "Walk the Line" : JUNE CARTER
June Carter is best-remembered as a singer-songwriter, and the second wife of Johnny Cash. June performed with Cash for many years as a member of the Carter Family. Cash proposed to June on stage in London, Ontario in 1968. Both Cash and Carter maintained a friendship with President Jimmy Carter, who was a distant cousin of June.

I must admit that I am not a big country music fan, but who doesn't love Johnny Cash? The man had such a unique voice, and indeed unique songs. I think that his biopic, "Walk the Line", is very cool, as is the title song itself. Recorded back in 1956, "Walk the Line" is relatively creative for “popular” music. The basic rhythm of the song emulates the sound of a freight train, the “boom-chicka-boom” sound. Cash’s guitar has a unique tone to it as it plays this rhythm, achieved by threading a piece of paper between the guitar strings giving the rhythm a bit of a “buzz”. Above the rhythm line, each of the five verses is sung in different keys. You can actually hear Cash hum a note signifying the key change at the start of each verse. With all these modulations, the final verse is sung a full octave lower that the first. A remarkable tune …

12. Excessively focused on something : ANAL
Our use of the word “anal” is an abbreviated form of “anal-retentive”, a term derived from Freudian psychology.

13. Dems.' foes : REPS
America’s Democratic Party was founded in 1828, making it the oldest existing political party in the world. It evolved from Democratic-Republican Party that was organized by Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and others in opposition to the Federalist Party of Alexander Hamilton and John Adams.

The Republican Party has had the nickname Grand Old Party (GOP) since 1875. That said, the phrase was coined in the “Congressional Record” as “this gallant old party”. The moniker was changed to “grand old party” in 1876 in an article in the “Cincinnati Commercial”. The Republican Party’s elephant mascot dates back to an 1874 cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast for “Harper’s Weekly”. The Democrat’s donkey was already an established symbol. Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion’s skin scaring away the other animals. One of the scared animals was an elephant, which Nast labeled “The Republican Vote”.

18. Descartes who wrote "Cogito ergo sum" : RENE
The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, "Cogito ergo sum". This translates into French as “Je pense, donc je suis” and into English as "I think, therefore I am".

23. Fruit-flavored drink with a hyphenated name : HI-C
Hi-C orange drink was created in 1946, and introduced to the market in 1948, initially in the south of the country. The name Hi-C was chosen to emphasize the high vitamin C content in the drink, as it contained added ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

24. Geo. Washington, in the Revolutionary War : GEN
Future-president George Washington was selected as a delegate for the State of Virginia to the First Continental Congress that met in 1774. Delegate Washington turned up at the Second Continental Congress dressed in a military uniform, as the 1775 meeting took place in soon after the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Congress created the Continental Army, and named George Washington as General and Commander-in Chief, having been nominated by John Adams.

28. Part of the atmosphere depleted by CFCs : OZONE
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are the propellants that were once used in aerosols. CFCs make their way up into the ozone layer and trigger a chain reaction that converts ozone (O3) into regular oxygen (O2). That conversion creates “holes” in the ozone layer. Regular O2 is good stuff, but we need O3 to absorb harmful UV radiation raining down on us. CFC is not good stuff ...

29. Three sheets to the wind : LIQUORED UP
A sheet is the rope that is used to control a sail on a sailing vessel. The expression "three sheets to the wind" meaning "drunk" dates back to the early 1800s. It likely derives from the notion that a sailboat with three sails, and with all three sheets slipped out of control, would behave like someone who was drunk, and vice versa.

31. One of the Gershwins : IRA
Ira Gershwin was a lyricist who worked with his brother George to create such American classics as the songs "I Got Rhythm" and "Someone to Watch Over Me", as well as the opera "Porgy and Bess". After George Gershwin died, Ira continued to create great music, working with the likes of Jerome Kern and Kurt Weill.

32. Witherspoon who played 11-Down in "Walk the Line" : REESE
(11D. Wife portrayed in 2005's "Walk the Line" : JUNE CARTER)
Reese is not actually actress Witherspoon's given name. She started out life as Laura Jeanne Witherspoon. Reese is her mother's maiden name.

33. Gossipy sort : YENTA
Yenta (also "Yente") is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater "yenta" came to mean a busybody.

39. FedEx alternative : UPS
United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky. UPS is the largest deliverer of packages in the world. The company has the nickname “Brown”, a reference to the color of its delivery trucks and uniforms.

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it's more catchy abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its "SuperHub" at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world's largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

40. Follower of pi : RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter "p".

41. Emulating basketball's Jordan, per an old catchphrase : LIKE MIKE
“Be Like Mike” was a commercial catchphrase used by Gatorade in the nineties, with the “Mike” being a reference to basketball great Michael Jordan.

49. "___ there be light" : LET
The third verse in the Book of Genesis in the Bible is “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.”

The township of Edison, New Jersey was established as Raritan Township in 1870, but changed its name to Edison in 1954. That change was in honor of inventor Thomas Edison who worked in the Menlo Park section of the township. The motto appearing on the town seal is “Let There be Light”.

60. Mexican coin : PESO
The coin called a “peso” is used in many Spanish-speaking countries around the world. The coin originated in Spain where the word “peso” means “weight”. The original peso was what we know in English as a “piece of eight”, a silver coin of a specific weight that had a nominal value of eight “reales”.

61. Boats like the one Noah built : ARKS
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah's life-preserver during the flood.

64. German city where Einstein was born : ULM
Ulm is in the south of Germany and sits on the River Danube. Ulm is famous as home to the tallest church in the world, Ulm Minster, a Gothic building with a steeple that is 530-feet tall, with 768 steps to climb. Ulm is also the birthplace of Albert Einstein, and is where the entire Austrian army surrendered to Napoleon after the Battle of Ulm in 1805.

After Albert Einstein moved to the US in 1933, he became quite a celebrity and his face was readily recognizable. He was frequently stopped in the street by people who would naively ask him if he could explain what "that theory" (i.e. the theory of relativity) was all about. Growing tired of this, he finally learned to tell people that he was sorry, but folks were constantly mistaking him for Albert Einstein!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Coke rival : PEPSI
6. Narrow street : LANE
10. Cracked open, as a door : AJAR
14. Sir ___ Newton : ISAAC
15. Milky gem : OPAL
16. Bit of Old Norse writing : RUNE
17. Popular Mexican brew : SOL CERVEZA
19. Sound that completes the phrase "Just like ...!" : SNAP!
20. Nincompoop : ASS
21. Letter after bee : CEE
22. Wearing some party shoes : IN HEELS
24. Put the pedal to the metal : GUN IT
26. Co. name ender : INC
27. The only trustworthy one? : SOLE BENEFICIARY
34. Online periodical : E-ZINE
35. Atmosphere : AIR
36. Canadian native : CREE
37. ___ au vin : COQ
38. Dreamy : SURREAL
42. Roman numeral X : TEN
43. Letter-shaped fastener : T-NUT
45. Vietnamese soup : PHO
46. That is, in Latin : ID EST
48. Where Kia and Hyundai are headquartered : SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA
52. Hwy. : RTE
53. Attempts : TRIES
54. Aided and ___ : ABETTED
58. Suffix with British and Bush : -ISM
59. Resort with mineral waters : SPA
62. Language of Pakistan : URDU
63. Woman's best female friend : SOUL SISTER
66. Beat by a mile : ROUT
67. William who shot an apple off his son's head : TELL
68. Many a tourist information handout site : KIOSK
69. Egyptian slitherers : ASPS
70. What the Venus de Milo lacks : ARMS
71. Big fairs : EXPOS

Down
1. Italy's Tower of ___ : PISA
2. Those: Sp. : ESOS
3. Buddies : PALS
4. Anatomical pouch : SAC
5. They make clinks in drinks : ICE CUBES
6. Groovy 1960s event : LOVE-IN
7. Gorilla : APE
8. The Soup ___ ("Seinfeld" character) : NAZI
9. Panache : ELAN
10. "___ and Old Lace" (play and movie) : ARSENIC
11. Wife portrayed in 2005's "Walk the Line" : JUNE CARTER
12. Excessively focused on something : ANAL
13. Dems.' foes : REPS
18. Descartes who wrote "Cogito ergo sum" : RENE
23. Fruit-flavored drink with a hyphenated name : HI-C
24. Geo. Washington, in the Revolutionary War : GEN
25. Remove, as a coupon : TEAR OUT
27. Religious offshoots : SECTS
28. Part of the atmosphere depleted by CFCs : OZONE
29. Three sheets to the wind : LIQUORED UP
30. "Bah!" : FIE!
31. One of the Gershwins : IRA
32. Witherspoon who played 11-Down in "Walk the Line" : REESE
33. Gossipy sort : YENTA
39. FedEx alternative : UPS
40. Follower of pi : RHO
41. Emulating basketball's Jordan, per an old catchphrase : LIKE MIKE
44. Shows oral disapproval : TUT-TUTS
47. Hair arrangements : DOS
49. "___ there be light" : LET
50. Soprano sounds : TRILLS
51. Snake sound : HISS
54. Otherworldly glow : AURA
55. Buddies : BROS
56. "Cómo ___?" ("How are you?": Sp.) : ESTA
57. Not just a talker : DOER
59. Octagonal street sign : STOP
60. Mexican coin : PESO
61. Boats like the one Noah built : ARKS
64. German city where Einstein was born : ULM
65. Highest roll of a single die : SIX


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0531-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 May 15, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: Making Projections … there’s a note with today’s puzzle that reads:
When this puzzle is completed, an apt phrase can be found by starting at the top central letter and reading clockwise.
That “apt phrase” is SORE THUMB, so we have a set of letters outside of the grid proper, sticking out like a SORE THUMB. We need those letters to make sense of several of the clues:
9A. Seafood soup base : (S)HARK FIN
12A. Attraction that operates under its own steam? : (O)LD FAITHFUL
15A. Catcher of some waves : (R)ADIO ANTENNA
59A. Words below an orange on a license plate : SUNSHINE STAT(E)
72A. Hematophagous creature : VAMPIRE BA(T)
67A. Mariana, e.g. : OCEAN TRENC(H)
62A. It might contain a list of postal abbreviations : DROP-DOWN MEN(U)
4A. Peak that's known as "The Great One" : (M)OUNT MCKINLEY
6A. Crisp bit in a stir-fry : (B)EAN SPROUT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … ALBUM (albus!!!), MOREL (sorel)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Choco ___ (Klondike treat) : TACO
A Choco Taco is an elaborate ice cream dessert that was created in the eighties by the Jack and Jill Ice Cream Company in Philadelphia.

10. Items that may be labeled SMTWTFS : PILLS
A pill that is taken daily might be labeled with the days of the week: SMTWTFS.

20. Kurt Vonnegut's "Happy Birthday, ___ June" : WANDA
“Happy Birthday, Wanda June” is a 1971 play by Kurt Vonnegut that was adapted into a film released the same year. The film version stars Rod Steiger and Susannah York in the lead roles. The title character is a young girl who is run over by an ice cream truck and dies, just before she can celebrate her birthday.

21. Former part of the British Empire : INDIA
The period of colonial rule by the British in South Asia from 1858 to 1947 is referred to as the British Raj. Prior to 1858, the area was ruled by a private enterprise, the British East India Company. “Raj” is the Hindi word for “reign”.

22. Joe Biden's home: Abbr. : DEL
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

28. Currency which, in one denomination, features a portrait of Linnaeus : KRONA
"Krona" translates in English as "crown", and is the currency of Sweden. As a member of the European Union, Sweden is required to adopt the euro as its official currency. Such a move isn’t really popular in Sweden and so the Swedish government has been using a legal loophole to allow the country to retain the krona.

Carl Linnaeus was a botanist and physician from Sweden. Linnaeus who developed the system of biological classification that we still use today. He introduced us to kingdoms, classes, orders, families, genera and species in his 1735 publication “Systema Naturae”.

30. Garment for tennis, perhaps : SKORT
The garment called a “skort” is a hybrid between shorts and a skirt.

37. When blacksmithing began : IRON AGE
Ancient societies can be classified by the "three-age system", which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:
- The Stone Age
- The Bronze Age
- The Iron Age
The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

41. 66, e.g.: Abbr. : RTE
The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the "Main Street of America". The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole's song "(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66", and also because of the sixties TV show called "Route 66".

42. Nav. rank : ENS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

43. Run ___ : AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

50. Shenanigans : TOMFOOLERY
In Middle English, in the middle of the 14th century, a mentally deficient man would be called a Thom Foole, sort of a nickname. We retain the name today in our word "tomfoolery" meaning "clowning around".

I suppose one could be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation but was coined in San Francisco and Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

53. Dietary no-no : TRANS FAT
Trans fat is an ingredient in some of our food that is known to greatly increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Trans fats are very difficult to find in nature and instead are the product of the hydrogenation process that many oils undergo in making some of our less healthy foodstuffs.

57. Park opened in 1964 : SEAWORLD
SeaWorld was started in San Diego in 1964. The original plan was build an underwater restaurant with a marine life show. Eventually the founders dropped the idea of the eating establishment and just went with a theme park. SeaWorld has been mired in controversy since the 2013 release of the documentary “Blackfish”, which tells of the involvement of a particular orca (killer whale) in the death of two SeaWorld employees and one SeaWorld visitor.

60. Chocolate mint brand with peaks in its logo : ANDES
Andes Chocolate Mints were first produced by a company called Andy’s Candies, established in 1921 by Andrew Kanelos in Chicago. Kanelos learned that men didn’t like giving boxes of candy to their wives and girlfriends if there was another man’s name on the box, so he changed his business to Andes Candies.

63. Temperature units : KELVINS
The kelvin is a unit of measurement for temperature, named after William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin.

64. Muscles worked by leg presses : QUADS
The quadriceps femoris is the muscle group at the front of the thigh. It is the strongest muscle in the human body, and is also the leanest. The “quads” are actually a group of four muscles in the upper leg, hence the use of the prefix “quad-”.

65. Anti-Revolutionary of 1776 : TORY
During the American Revolution, those advocating Independence were known as Patriots. Those who stayed loyal to Britain were called Loyalists or Tories.

68. An example of itself : NOUN
Our word “noun” is itself a noun.

70. Lacto-___ vegetarian : OVO
A lacto-ovo vegetarian is someone who does not consume meat or fish, but does eat eggs (ovo) and dairy (lacto) products.

76. Hockey team with a patriotic name : MAPLE LEAFS
The Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team was founded way back in 1917. As members of the National Hockey League, the Maple leafs have won the Stanley Cup championships thirteen times, the second best record in the league. Having said that, the last championship the team won was in 1967, and the resulting “drought” is the longest in NHL today.

The current design of the Canadian National Flag, known as “the Maple Leaf”, has been in place since 1965. The design made its first appearance on February 15th of that year, and so that date is celebrated annually as National Flag of Canada Day.

81. Capacious : ROOMY
Something described as “capacious” is spacious, capable of holding much.

82. Apple desktop : IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

83. National Novel Writing Mo. : NOV
National Novel Writing Month is creatively shortened to “NaNoWriMo”, and takes place in November each year. Participants in NaNoWriMo are encouraged to write a minimum of 50,000 words from from midnight on November 1st until 11:59PM on November 30th. The activity is managed through the website NaNoWriMo.org. The focus is completion rather than perfection, so that a complete first draft is finished and ready for editing at a later time.

84. Havana-to-Palm Beach dir. : NNE
Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

Palm Beach is the most easterly town in Florida, and is located on a barrier island. Palm Beach is separated from the cities of West Palm Beach and Lake Worth by the Intracoastal Waterway.

86. See 92-Across : ST NICK
(92A. Portrayer of 86-Across in "Elf" : ASNER)
Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

90. Japanese for "teacher" : SENSEI
“Sensei” is a Japanese form of address used for figures of authority, from lawyers to martial arts instructors.

91. Message to one's followers : TWEET
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so (but one should never say “never”). Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

92. Portrayer of 86-Across in "Elf" : ASNER
(86A. See 92-Across : ST NICK)
Ed Asner is most famous for playing the irascible but lovable Lou Grant on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and on the spin-off drama "Lou Grant". Off-screen, Asner is noted for his political activism. He served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and was very involved in the 1980 SAG strike. When "Lou Grant" was cancelled in 1982, despite decent ratings, there was a lot of talk that the cancellation was a move by the network against Asner personally. In fact one of Asner's activist colleagues, Howard Hesseman (who played Johnny Fever), found that his show "WKRP in Cincinnati" was also cancelled ... on the very same day.

“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role with James Caan supporting. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City.

95. Rakes : ROUES
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

A "rake" (short for “rakehell”) is defined as a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn’t it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie "Bridget Jones’s Diary". "Rake" comes from the Old Norse "reikall", meaning "vagrant or a wanderer".

97. Cooking spray brand : PAM
PAM cooking oil was introduced in 1961 by Leon Rubin and Arthur Meyerhoff. The name “PAM” is an acronym ... standing for “Product of Arthur Meyerhoff”. Who’d a thunk it …?

98. "The Downeaster '___'" (Billy Joel song) : ALEXA
“The Downeaster ‘Alexa’” is a 1990 song written and performed by Billy Joel. The title refers to a vessel called the Alexa, a Maine lobster boat known as a “downeaster”.

110. Hyphenated fig. : SSN
A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

Down
1. Mai ___ : TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

3. Capt. Kangaroo's network : CBS
“Captain Kangaroo” is a TV series for children that CBS aired for a long, long time. The show was first broadcast in 1955, and the last show was aired nearly 30 years later in 1984. The title character was played by Bob Keeshan. Apparently Keeshan had to wear heavy makeup in the early years to make him old enough for his role. The show ran so long that Keeshan had to use makeup to look younger in the latter years.

4. Peak that's known as "The Great One" : MOUNT MCKINLEY
Denali means "the high one, great one" in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

5. Rare notes : TWOS
The US two-dollar bill features a portrait of Thomas Jefferson. The bill was introduced in 1862, and withdrawn in 1966. It was reintroduced in 1976, and is still legal tender. That said, there are relatively few two-dollar bills in circulation. Some people even hold that possession of a two-dollar bill is bad luck.

9. Seafood soup base : SHARK FIN
Shark finning is a cruel fishing practice driven by the demand for Chinese shark fin soup. Millions of sharks every year are captured, have their fins sliced off at sea and are then thrown back into the ocean still alive. The mutilated sharks don’t last very long and are usually eaten because they cannot maneuver very easily without their dorsal fins.

12. Attraction that operates under its own steam? : OLD FAITHFUL
Old Faithful is a geyser in Yellowstone National Park. It erupts almost every 63 minutes on the nose, making it one of the most predictable geographic features on the planet. It was this predictability that led to the name “Old Faithful”. In the early days of Yellowstone’s existence as a park, the geyser was used as a laundry. Dirty linen clothing was placed in the geyser’s crater during the quiet period. The clothing was ejected during the eruption, thoroughly washed.

15. Catcher of some waves : RADIO ANTENNA
An antenna’s job is to convert electrical power into radio waves, and radio waves into an electrical signal. The first antennas were built by the German physicist Heinrich Hertz in 1888.

17. Champagne holder : FLUTE
The narrow bowl of a champagne flute is preferred over the wide bowl of a champagne coupe as the smaller surface area of the wine helps retain its carbonation.

19. Seasonal linguine topper : MOREL
The morel is that genus of mushroom with the honeycomb-like structure on the cap. They're highly prized, especially in French cuisine. Morels should never be eaten raw as they are toxic, with the toxins being removed by thorough cooking.

Linguine is a type of pasta that is similar to spaghetti, except that in cross-section linguine is elliptical whereas spaghetti is round. The correct name for the dish is “linguine” meaning “little tongues” in Italian. That said, the misspelling “linguini” is given in some dictionaries as an acceptable Americanized variant..

33. Redolence : AROMA
Something that is redolent is aromatic, emits a fragrance. Redolent is an Old French word.

35. Pro ___ : RATA
"Pro rata" is a Latin phrase meaning "in proportion".

36. Coin to pay for passage across the River Styx : OBOL
An obol is also known as an obolus. The obol was a silver coin used in Greece that was worth one sixth of a drachma.

The River Styx of Greek mythology was the river that formed the boundary between the Earth and the Underworld (or “Hades”). The souls of the newly dead had to cross the River Styx in a ferry boat piloted by Charon. Traditionally, a coin would be placed in the mouths of the dead "to pay the ferryman".

41. Fodder for tabloids : RUMORS
"Tabloid" is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

45. Wise ones : SOLONS
Solon was an Athenian statesman and lawmaker in Ancient Greece. He gave his name to our contemporary word "solon" meaning "a wise lawmaker".

46. Daughter of Hyperion : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

Hyperion was one of the Titan deities, and was the personification of the Earth.

57. Ends of letters : SERIFS
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif (using the French word "sans" meaning "without"). Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I'm not so sure though ...

59. Words below an orange on a license plate : SUNSHINE STATE
Florida is known as the Sunshine State, although it is also the lightning capital of the US, experiencing more lightning strikes than the rest of the country. Florida is also the nation’s fourth-rainiest state, after Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.

60. One of 24 in a glucose molecule : ATOM
Glucose is a simple sugar that is also known as dextrose or grape sugar. It is widely found in nature as glucose is made by plants from carbon dioxide and water during photosynthesis.

61. Bagel topper : NOVA
Nova lox is salmon that has been cured with a mild brine and then cold-smoked. The term originally applied to salmon from Nova Scotia.

63. Something you might get a kick out of? : KARATE
The Japanese word "karate", means "open hand", and the related word "karaoke" means "open orchestra".

64. Steven Wright's "I intend to live forever. So far, so good," e.g. : QUIP
Steven Wright is a remarkable and droll comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wright is very, very quotable:
- What's another word for Thesaurus?
- If a word in the dictionary were misspelled, how would we know?
- I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
- When I was a little kid we had a sand box. It was a quicksand box. I was an only child... eventually.

66. Capital city founded during a gold rush : HELENA
Helena is the capital of the state of Montana, and is known as the Queen City of the Rockies. Helena's main street has a very colorful name, namely Last Chance Gulch.

67. Mariana, e.g. : OCEAN TRENCH
The Mariana Trench is the lowest elevation on the surface of the Earth's crust. The Mariana Trench takes its name from the nearby Mariana Islands in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

68. ___ a one : NARY
The adjective "nary" means "not one", as in “nary a soul”.

69. What's superior to Lake Superior: Abbr. : ONT
Lake Superior is the largest of the Great Lakes, and the largest freshwater lake in the world by area. The lake was referred to by the first French explorers as “le lac supérieur”, which translates literally as “the upper lake”. The British anglicized the name to “Lake Superior”.

71. Hip-hop's Mos ___ : DEF
Mos Def is the former stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay, now known as Yasiin Bey. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003's "The Italian Job" , 2005's "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", and for a featured role in an episode of television's "House".

72. Hematophagous creature : VAMPIRE BAT
Vampire bats feed mostly in the blood of mammals, including humans. When they find a suitable "victim", often one that is asleep, the bat usually lands close by and approaches its "meal" on the ground. It makes a small cut with its razor-sharp teeth and laps up the blood. The blood tends to flow freely as the bat's saliva contains anticoagulants. Reports of bats biting the neck of humans are very rare in the real world, but the neck is the preferred location of attack in the fantasy world of vampires.

An animal described as “hematophagous” feeds on blood.

75. Hand source : DECK
Hands are dealt from decks of cards.

77. Bank to rely on : LEVEE
A levee is an artificial bank usually made of earth, running along the length of a river. A levee is designed to hold back river water at a time of potential flooding. "Levée" is the French word for "raised" and is an American term that originated in French-speaking New Orleans around 1720.

79. Pouting expression : MOUE
The term “moue” comes from French, and means a small grimace or a pout.

85. Hula hoop? : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

88. June honorees : PAPAS
Father’s Day was added as an official holiday in 1972, although bills to create the holiday had been with Congress since 1913. By rights, the holiday should be called “Fathers’ Day” (note the punctuation), but the Bill that was introduced in 1913 used the “Father’s Day” spelling, and that’s the one that has stuck.

96. Variety of antelope : ORYX
The oryx is a large antelope species, mainly found in Africa but also in the Arabian Peninsula. One species was introduced by man into the White Sands Missile Range. As a result, the oryx is now considered an invasive species in the neighboring White Sands National Monument.

101. Old White House moniker : IKE
“I Like Ike” was a political slogan that originated with the grassroots movement to get Dwight D. Eisenhower to run for president in the 1952 presidential election.

102. Unit usually seen with the prefix deci- : BEL
In the world of acoustics, one bel is equal to ten decibels.

104. Big name in current research? : OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

105. Point of writing? : NIB
"Nib" is a Scottish variant of the Old English word "neb", with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of "nib" as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with "nib" meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Choco ___ (Klondike treat) : TACO
5. School : TEACH
10. Items that may be labeled SMTWTFS : PILLS
15. Dog sound : ARF!
18. Series of numbers? : ALBUM
20. Kurt Vonnegut's "Happy Birthday, ___ June" : WANDA
21. Former part of the British Empire : INDIA
22. Joe Biden's home: Abbr. : DEL
23. "I expected as much" : IT'S NO WONDER
25. Towering : LOFTY
26. Letters of obligation : IOU
27. Hair piece : TRESS
28. Currency which, in one denomination, features a portrait of Linnaeus : KRONA
30. Garment for tennis, perhaps : SKORT
32. Not as exciting : TAMER
34. Return from a store : PROFIT
37. When blacksmithing began : IRON AGE
39. Perfect orbit : CIRCLE
40. Fanatical : RABID
41. 66, e.g.: Abbr. : RTE
42. Nav. rank : ENS
43. Run ___ : AMOK
44. Boarded : GOT ON
45. "Awe-SOME!" : SUH-WEET!
47. Occurring in March and September, say : SEMIANNUAL
50. Shenanigans : TOMFOOLERY
53. Dietary no-no : TRANS FAT
54. Grey and ochre : COLOURS
55. "There is ___ in team" : NO I
56. Pleasant inflection : LILT
57. Park opened in 1964 : SEAWORLD
59. Easy-peasy task : SNAP
60. Chocolate mint brand with peaks in its logo : ANDES
63. Temperature units : KELVINS
64. Muscles worked by leg presses : QUADS
65. Anti-Revolutionary of 1776 : TORY
66. Gets harsher : HOARSENS
68. An example of itself : NOUN
70. Lacto-___ vegetarian : OVO
71. Condemned : DECRIED
72. Gone : VANISHED
76. Hockey team with a patriotic name : MAPLE LEAFS
78. Distraction for many an idle person : SMARTPHONE
80. Bests : DEFEATS
81. Capacious : ROOMY
82. Apple desktop : IMAC
83. National Novel Writing Mo. : NOV
84. Havana-to-Palm Beach dir. : NNE
85. Eagerly accept : LAP UP
86. See 92-Across : ST NICK
88. Handled roughly : PAWED AT
90. Japanese for "teacher" : SENSEI
91. Message to one's followers : TWEET
92. Portrayer of 86-Across in "Elf" : ASNER
93. Artifact : RELIC
95. Rakes : ROUES
97. Cooking spray brand : PAM
98. "The Downeaster '___'" (Billy Joel song) : ALEXA
100. Sleep mode? : HIBERNATION
106. Malt product : ALE
107. Bring home the gold : WIN IT
108. Barely manage : EKE BY
109. Breakfast cereal maker : KASHI
110. Hyphenated fig. : SSN
111. Factions : SECTS
112. "It was just a joke!" : RELAX!
113. Where writing is on the wall? : TOMB

Down
1. Mai ___ : TAI
2. Bottom-row key : ALT
3. Capt. Kangaroo's network : CBS
4. Peak that's known as "The Great One" : MOUNT MCKINLEY
5. Rare notes : TWOS
6. Crisp bit in a stir-fry : BEAN SPROUT
7. Further : AND
8. String after B : CDE
9. Seafood soup base : SHARK FIN
10. Series opener : PILOT
11. Privy to : IN ON
12. Attraction that operates under its own steam? : OLD FAITHFUL
13. Not in the dark : LIT
14. Authorization : SAY-SO
15. Catcher of some waves : RADIO ANTENNA
16. Shake-ups in corps. : REORGS
17. Champagne holder : FLUTE
19. Seasonal linguine topper : MOREL
24. "___ even" : WE’RE
29. Expunge : RID
31. Prepare to tie a shoelace, say : KNEEL
32. Staple of quiz bowls : TIMER
33. Redolence : AROMA
35. Pro ___ : RATA
36. Coin to pay for passage across the River Styx : OBOL
38. Put another way : REWORD
39. Strewn : CAST
41. Fodder for tabloids : RUMORS
44. Little bugger : GNAT
45. Wise ones : SOLONS
46. Daughter of Hyperion : EOS
48. Condition of sale : AS IS
49. TV's "The ___ Today" : NFL
50. Bring, as to a repair shop : TOW IN
51. Thoroughfare : ROAD
52. Dog sounds : YIPS
54. Collapsed, with "in" : CAVED
57. Ends of letters : SERIFS
58. Somebody ___ : ELSE’S
59. Words below an orange on a license plate : SUNSHINE STATE
60. One of 24 in a glucose molecule : ATOM
61. Bagel topper : NOVA
62. It might contain a list of postal abbreviations : DROP-DOWN MENU
63. Something you might get a kick out of? : KARATE
64. Steven Wright's "I intend to live forever. So far, so good," e.g. : QUIP
66. Capital city founded during a gold rush : HELENA
67. Mariana, e.g. : OCEAN TRENCH
68. ___ a one : NARY
69. What's superior to Lake Superior: Abbr. : ONT
71. Hip-hop's Mos ___ : DEF
72. Hematophagous creature : VAMPIRE BAT
73. Buddy : HOMIE
74. Pass : ENACT
75. Hand source : DECK
77. Bank to rely on : LEVEE
78. Soaks (up) : SOPS
79. Pouting expression : MOUE
81. Major stockholder? : RANCHER
83. "m" and "n" : NASALS
85. Hula hoop? : LEI
86. Dumbfound : STUN
87. Small change : TWEAK
88. June honorees : PAPAS
89. Parts, as blinds : DRAWS
90. Blind parts : SLATS
94. Highway number : EXIT
96. Variety of antelope : ORYX
99. Fiction : LIE
101. Old Whitehouse moniker : IKE
102. Unit usually seen with the prefix deci- : BEL
103. Equal: Prefix : ISO-
104. Big name in current research? : OHM
105. Point of writing? : NIB


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0530-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 May 15, Saturday



QuickLinks:
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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Samuel A. Donaldson & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 49s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Like TV's Dr. Richard Kimble, famously : FRAMED
If you recall the beginning of each episode of "The Fugitive" television series, there was a narration that summarized the background to the show. It started off "The Fugitive, a QM Production — starring David Janssen as Dr. Richard Kimble: an innocent victim of blind justice, falsely convicted for the murder of his wife ..." Those words were read by actor William Conrad, who made a name for himself in his detective series playing the portly "Cannon".

16. Spectator who got a standing O at Wimbledon in 1981 : LADY DI
Charles, Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The wedding was a huge television event, with about 750 million people tuning in worldwide. Although the event was billed as a fairytale wedding, the couple separated in 1992 and divorced in 1996.

17. Mushroom layer of a beef Wellington : DUXELLES
“Duxelles” is a mixture of chopped mushrooms, onions, shallots and herbs that have been sauteed and then reduced to a paste. I am a huge, huge fan of duxelles …

18. Quintessential : ICONIC
In Ancient Greece, Aristotle believed that there was a fifth element, beyond the accepted four elements of earth, wind, fire and water. This fifth element he called aether, postulating it was the makeup of celestial bodies. In Middle French in the 14th century, the "fifth element" was called "quinte essence", coming into English as "quintessence' in the early 15th century. In the late 1500s, quintessence came to mean "purest essence" in a more general sense, with quintessential meaning "at it's finest".

25. Danger in stories of Sinbad the sailor : ROC
The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants. The roc was said to come from the Indian subcontinent. The supposed existence of the roc was promulgated by Marco Polo in the accounts that he published of his travels through Asia.

Sinbad is the hero of a set of fictional tales from the Middle East. Sinbad comes from the port city of Basra and had fantastic adventures on voyages throughout the sea east of Africa and south of Asia.

31. Where most occupants need masks, for short : ORS
Operating room (OR)

36. Pirates' place : DIAMOND
The Pittsburgh Pirates (nicknamed the Bucs or Buccos) joined baseball’s National League in 1887 just six years after the league was formed. The Pirates played in the first ever World Series in 1903, and won their first World Series in 1909.

38. Trademark Isaac Asimov accessory : BOLO TIE
In his latter years, the author Isaac Asimov was known for an eccentric “look”. He sported bushy mutton-chop whiskers and frequently wore a bolo tie and cowboy boots.

Isaac Asimov was a wonderful science fiction writer, and a professor of biochemistry. He was a favorite author as I was growing up and I must admit that some hero worship on my part led me to study and work as a biochemist for a short while early in my career. My favorite of his works is the collection of short stories called “I, Robot”. Asimov wrote three autobiographies, the last of which was called “I, Asimov”, which was published in 1994, two years after his death.

45. Annual Vancouver event, familiarly : TED
The acronym TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. TED is a set of conferences held around the world (the main event held in Vancouver) by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”.

50. Gets the lead out, quaintly : HIES
"To hie" is to move quickly, to bolt.

59. Layette item : ONESIE
A “onesie” is a baby’s bodysuit, and is a common gift at a baby shower.

A newborn baby’s collection of clothing and accessories is called a layette.

62. "Das Kapital" topic : LABORERS
"Das Kapital" (entitled "Capital" in English versions) is a book about political economy written by Karl Marx, first published in 1867. The book is in effect an analysis of capitalism, and proffers the opinion that capitalism relies on the exploitation of workers. Marx concludes that the profits from capitalist concerns come from the underpaying of labor.

Down
1. Footwear donned on camera by Mr. Rogers : KEDS
Keds is a brand name of athletic shoe first introduced in 1916 by US Rubber. The shoe was originally marketed as a rubber-soled, canvas-topped sneaker.

The “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” TV show starred Fred Rogers. It was the second longest running series on PBS television after that other iconic children's show "Sesame Street".

3. Onetime Strom Thurmond designation : DIXIECRAT
Dixiecrats were members of the States’ Rights Democratic Party, a segregationist group that was disbanded after only a few months of activity, in 1948. The Dixiecrats were a breakaway faction from the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrat party platform was centered around States’ rights, racial segregation and white supremacy.

Strom Thurmond was a US Senator for the state of South Carolina for 48 years, until he stepped down in 2003. Thurmond was the oldest-serving senator in US history. He retired from his office at the age of 100-years-old, and passed away just a few months after leaving Washington.

4. Comics pet in a horned helmet : SNERT
Snert is the clever dog that belongs to Hägar the Horrible in the classic comic strip.

5. Rows : MELEES
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means "confused fight".

6. The bigger picture: Abbr. : ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

7. TV honor last presented in 1997 : ACE AWARD
The ACE Awards were instituted in 1978, with the acronym standing for “Award for Cable Excellence”. The name of the award was later changed to the Cable ACE Award, and honored excellence in cable television programming. The award was abandoned after the 1997 ceremony as recognition of cable programming at the Emmys made a separate cable TV award redundant.

8. Newsman Holt and others : LESTERS
Lester Holt is a television journalist. Holt is anchor for the weekend editions of the shows “Today” and “Nightly News” on NBC, as well as the show “Dateline NBC”.

9. Noted employee of Slate : FLINTSTONE
In “The Flintstone” animated TV show, Fred Flintstone operates a bronto-crane at the Slate Rock and Gravel Company, which is owned by Fred’s boss Mr. Slate.

12. Winged mimics : MYNAS
Some species of myna (also "mynah") bird are known for their ability to imitate sounds.

13. Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt : EDITH
Edith Carow was the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt and the First Lady of the US when President Roosevelt was in office. Theodore’s first wife was Alice Hathaway Lee who died two days after the birth of their daughter in 1884. Roosevelt proposed to Carow in 1885 and the couple were married in 1886. Carow survived her husband, who died in 1919. The former First Lady briefly came out of retirement during the 1932 presidential election to campaign for President Herbert Hoover, which put Edith in opposition to her cousin-in-law Franklin D. Roosevelt.

21. Class in which students raise their hands, briefly? : ASL
It's really quite unfortunate that American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL) are very different, and someone who has learned to sign in one cannot understand someone signing in the other.

28. Corset-making tool : AWL
I guess one might use an awl to make holes in the whalebone that often is incorporated into corsets.

A corset is a close-fitting undergarment that is stiffened with a material such as whalebone. Corsets are more usually worn by women, to shape the body. The word “corset” is a diminutive of the Old French “cors” meaning “body”.

40. "The Principles of Mathematics" philosopher : RUSSELL
Bertrand Russell was a British philosopher, a noted liberal and outspoken pacifist.

43. Org. conducting lots of X-rays : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks. TSA personnel carry out the baggage and body searches at US airports.

44. U.P.S. label phrase : SHIP TO
United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky.

47. 1959 #2 hit whose flip side was "La Bamba" : DONNA
The 1958 single “Donna” by Ritchie Valens is one of those A-sides that was outshone by the record’s B-side, which in this case was “La Bamba”. “Donna” was written as a tribute ot Valens’ high school sweetheart Donna Ludwig.

53. New York county on the Canadian border : ERIE
Erie County lies just west of Wyoming County in New York State. Erie County is home to the city of Buffalo, and sits right on the shores of lake Erie.

58. Kind of port : USB
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. It may facilitate playing with one's food : KIDS’ MEAL
9. Like TV's Dr. Richard Kimble, famously : FRAMED
15. Prestige : EMINENCE
16. Spectator who got a standing O at Wimbledon in 1981 : LADY DI
17. Mushroom layer of a beef Wellington : DUXELLES
18. Quintessential : ICONIC
19. Point made by architects : SPIRE
20. "Whatever the case ..." : AT ANY RATE ...
22. Throw a party for : FETE
23. What was due for some pioneers? : WEST
24. Like spent charcoal : ASHY
25. Danger in stories of Sinbad the sailor : ROC
26. Addresses with bared teeth : SNARLS AT
29. Has things reversed, maybe : ERRS
31. Where most occupants need masks, for short : ORS
32. Soft-serve ice cream requests : TWISTS
36. Pirates' place : DIAMOND
38. Trademark Isaac Asimov accessory : BOLO TIE
39. Mammals that congregate in groups called "rafts" : OTTERS
40. Was yellow, say : RAN
41. April, May or June : NAME
42. Heads for the garden? : LETTUCES
45. Annual Vancouver event, familiarly : TED
46. Recipient of 11-Down : IDOL
49. No. 2 : ASST
50. Gets the lead out, quaintly : HIES
52. Chalked warning left for custodial staff : DON'T ERASE
54. Relative position? : IN-LAW
56. Business reply card, e.g. : INSERT
57. Prone to tantrums : ERUPTIVE
59. Layette item : ONESIE
60. Showed interest, in a way : LISTENED
61. Count : MATTER
62. "Das Kapital" topic : LABORERS

Down
1. Footwear donned on camera by Mr. Rogers : KEDS
2. Volunteer's assurance : I'M UP FOR IT
3. Onetime Strom Thurmond designation : DIXIECRAT
4. Comics pet in a horned helmet : SNERT
5. Rows : MELEES
6. The bigger picture: Abbr. : ENL
7. TV honor last presented in 1997 : ACE AWARD
8. Newsman Holt and others : LESTERS
9. Noted employee of Slate : FLINTSTONE
10. Salacious : RACY
11. Something shown to 46-Acrosses : ADORATION
12. Winged mimics : MYNAS
13. Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt : EDITH
14. Full of risk : DICEY
21. Class in which students raise their hands, briefly? : ASL
25. Overhaul : REDO
27. Really bad idea : NONSTARTER
28. Corset-making tool : AWL
30. Informal gauge of credibility : SMELL TEST
33. Where you might lose an hour : STATE LINE
34. It might gain you an hour : TIMESAVER
35. Germ : SEED
37. It's targeted for extraction : ORE
38. Cultured ones? : BACTERIA
40. "The Principles of Mathematics" philosopher : RUSSELL
43. Org. conducting lots of X-rays : TSA
44. U.P.S. label phrase : SHIP TO
46. Burn the midnight oil, e.g. : IDIOM
47. 1959 #2 hit whose flip side was "La Bamba" : DONNA
48. Earliest symptoms : ONSET
51. Consign to a time capsule, say : INTER
53. New York county on the Canadian border : ERIE
55. Gains a 54-Across : WEDS
58. Kind of port : USB


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0529-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 May 15, Friday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 38s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Call in the evening : TAPS
"Taps" is played nightly by the US military, indicating "lights out". It's also known as "Butterfield's Lullaby" as it is a variation of an older bugle call named the "Scott Tattoo", arranged during the Civil War by the Union Army's Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield. The tune is called "taps", from the notion of drum taps, as it was originally played on a drum, and only later on a bugle. The whole tune comprises just 24 notes, with there only being four different notes within the 24 i.e. “low G”, C, E and “high G”. Minimalism at its best ...

9. Island group near Fiji : TONGA
The Kingdom of Tonga is made up of 176 islands in the South Pacific, 52 of which are inhabited and scattered over an area of 270,000 square miles. Tonga was given the name Friendly Islands in 1773 when Captain James Cook first landed there, a reference to the warm reception given to the visitors.

14. Heckelphone lookalike : OBOE
A heckelphone is a musical instrument like an oboe, but pitched an octave lower. The heckelphone was invented in 1904 by a manufacturer of woodwind instruments in Germany called Wilhelm Heckel.

17. For which two heads are better than one? : YOKE
A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of oxen so that they are forced to work together.

20. Site of an annual British music festival : STONEHENGE
The magnificent Stonehenge monument in the south of England was built from 3000 to 2000 BC. “Stonehenge” has given its name to “henges”, a whole class of earthenwork monuments that are circular in form with an internal ditch surrounded by a bank. Paradoxically, Stonehenge doesn’t qualify as a henge by this contemporary definition, as its earthen bank is surrounded by an external ditch.

23. Ben who played the Wizard in "Wicked" : VEREEN
Ben Vereen is an American actor and dancer who is probably best known for playing Chicken George in the magnificent television miniseries "Roots". When he was applying for a passport in the sixties, Vereen discovered that he was adopted. He then went looking for his birth parents and identified his birth mother (who had passed away by this time). She went away on a trip when Ben was very young only to return and find that her child and the person minding him had disappeared. She never saw her son again.

25. Soul producer : KIA
The Kia Soul is a compact car produced in South Korea, although it was designed by Kia here in Irvine, California. Yep, the Kia Soul is from Seoul ...

27. Judas never attained it : SAINTHOOD
Judas Iscariot was one of the twelve original apostles who studied with Jesus. Famously, it was Judas who betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, a transaction that led to the Crucifixion and Resurrection.

33. Setting for Hawthorne's "The Marble Faun" : ROME
Nathaniel Hawthorne’s romance “The Marble Faun” was published in 1860 simultaneously in American and in England. The work had a different title on the other side of the Atlantic: “Transformation”. The two different titles persist on either side of “the pond” to this day.

35. Pasta option : ORZO
Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

36. Four-hour tour features? : EYE RHYMES
Sight rhymes (also “eye rhymes”) are words that share the same spelling at the end of a word, but not the same sound. Examples are “four”, “hour” and “tour”.

38. Roughly 1% of the earth's atmosphere : ARGON
The chemical element argon has the symbol Ar. Argon is a noble gas, and so by definition is relatively nonreactive. The name “argon” comes from the Greek word for “lazy, inactive”. There’s a lot of argon around, as it is the third-most abundant gas in our atmosphere.

45. Procter & Gamble product line : PANTENE
The hair care product line called Pantene was introduced in the late 1940s in Europe, but has been owned by Procter & Gamble since the 80s. The name “Pantene” was chosen as one of the main ingredients was the alcohol called panthenol.

49. Bygone cracker brand : HI-HO
Sunshine Biscuits was an independent producer of cookies and crackers which produced Hi-Ho crackers in competition with the successful Ritz brand. In 1996, Sunshine was absorbed by the Keebler Company and Hi-Ho Crackers was on the list of brands that was discontinued because of the merger.

52. Maker of PerformX sportswear : IZOD
Jack Izod was a tailor of some repute over in England, producing shirts for King George V as well as other members of the Royal Family. As Izod was about to retire, he was approached for the use of his name by an American clothing manufacturer based in New York. The brand Izod of London was introduced to America in 1938.

56. "You ___ Me" (1957 R&B hit) : SEND
“You Send Me” is a 1957 song written and recorded by Sam Cooke, his debut single. “You Send Me” was originally released as the B-side to a recording by Cooke of “Summertime” from George Gershwin’s opera “Porgy and Bess”. The B-side turned out to be more popular with disk jockeys, and so the subsequent releases had the A-side and B-side designations switched.

57. Fall location : EDEN
In the Christian tradition, the “fall of man” took place in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve succumbed to the temptation of eating from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, against the bidding of God. As a result, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden to prevent them becoming immortal by eating from the tree of life. The first humans had transitioned from a state of innocent obedience to a state of guilty disobedience.

Down
2. 1998 coming-of-age novel by Nick Hornby : ABOUT A BOY
The English author Nick Hornby wrote three novels that were adapted into successful movies, namely “High Fidelity”, “About a Boy” and “Fever Pitch”.

3. Oscar Madison's weekly event : POKER GAME
"The Odd Couple" is a play by the wonderfully talented Neil Simon first performed on Broadway, in 1965. This great play was adapted for the big screen in 1968, famously starring Jack Lemmon (as Felix Unger, the neat-freak) and Walter Matthau (as Oscar Madison, the slob). The success of the play and the film gave rise to an excellent television sitcom that ran from 1970-1975, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. In 1985, Neil Simon even went so far as to adapt the play for an all-female cast, renaming it "The Female Odd Couple". I'd like to see that one ...

5. Tool with a bezel : CHISEL
The bezel of a chisel is the sloping face of the tool.

6. How a nocturne is often played : LENTO
A lento passage is a piece of music that has a slow tempo.

A nocturne is a musical piece that is written to be evocative of the night.

7. First high priest of the Israelites : AARON
In the Bible and the Qur'an, Aaron was the older brother of Moses and was a prophet. Aaron became the first High Priest of the Israelites.

9. 2013 Sandra Bullock/Melissa McCarthy comedy : THE HEAT
“The Heat” is a 2013 comedy film about an FBI agent and a Boston detective working together to take down a mobster. Sandra Bullock plays the agent, and Melissa McCarthy the detective.

16. British Open winner of 1971 and 1972 : TREVINO
Lee Trevino is an American golfer of Mexican descent, and so has the nicknames "The Merry Mex" and "Supermex". He is well known for his great sense of humor and for playing pranks on the golf course. For many years, Trevino wore a Band-Aid on his arm while playing, covering the tattoo with the name of his ex-wife.

25. Baby foxes : KITS
A kit is a young mammal of several species, including the ferret and the fox. “Kit” is probably a shortened form of “kitten”.

29. Old baseball coverage? : HORSEHIDE
The official balls in the sport of baseball were traditionally covered by horsehide. The covering was switched to cowhide in 1974.

30. In a union : ORGANIZED
Workers in a trade union are said to be organized.

31. Atmospheric problem : OZONE HOLE
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are the propellants that were once used in aerosols. CFCs make their way up into the ozone layer and trigger a chain reaction that converts ozone (O3) into regular oxygen (O2). That conversion creates “holes” in the ozone layer. Regular O2 is good stuff, but we need O3 to absorb harmful UV radiation raining down on us. CFC is not good stuff ...

The Montreal Protocol is an international treaty designed to phase out production of chemicals that deplete the ozone layer of the atmosphere. The protocol is actually a great example of international cooperation actually achieving something. The ozone hole over Antarctica is recovering and the levels of ozone are expected to return to 1980 levels in fifty years or so.

38. Word with carpenter or weaver : ANT
Carpenter ants can wreak havoc in a wooden structure. They burrow into damp wood creating galleries and pathways that form a complex network of nests. Unlike termites though, carpenter ants don’t feed on the wood.

Weaver ants can be found in extremely large colonies consisting of perhaps more than a hundred nests. A colony can consist of over half a million workers. Weaver ants are very territorial and defend their territories aggressively. It is not unknown for farmers in southeast Asia to use weaver ants to control agricultural pests.

42. Easygoing : TYPE B
The Type A and Type B personality theory originated in the fifties. Back then, individuals were labelled as Type A in order to emphasize a perceived increased risk of heart disease. Type A personality types are so called "stress junkies", whereas Type B types are relaxed and laid back. But there doesn't seem to be much scientific evidence to support the linkage between the Type A personality and heart problems.

43. Arabian port that's home to Sinbad Island : BASRA
It's quite a coincidence that the Iraqi city of Basra has a name that is an anagram of "Arabs", isn't it? Basra also features in the H. G. Wells science-fiction tale "The Shape of Things to Come". Written in 1933, the storyline predicts a global conflict (WWII) that breaks out in 1940 lasting for ten years, after which chaos reigns as no victor emerges. Following worldwide plague, a benevolent dictatorship takes charge and the world moves towards a serene utopia. In time, the dictators are overthrown and peacefully retired, and the people of the Earth live happily ever after, all citizens of one global state with its capital in Basra in the Middle East.

45. Pasta option : PENNE
Cylindrical pasta is known in general as “penne”, and there are many variants. For example, ziti is a particularly large and long tube with square-cut ends. "Penne" is the plural of "penna", the Italian for "feather, quill".

46. ___ Chigurh ("No Country for Old Men" villain) : ANTON
“No Country for Old Men” is a 2007 thriller made by the Coen brothers that is based on a novel of the same name by Cormac McCarthy. I have to put this one on my list as I hear good things about it. It won several Oscars and stars Tommy Lee Jones, a favorite actor of mine.

48. Lectern locale : DAIS
Ultimately our word "dais", meaning “raised platform for a speaker”, comes from the Latin "discus" meaning a "disk-shaped object". I guess that many a dais was disc-shaped ...

50. Figure in the Ynglinga saga : ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin's wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term "Friday" (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin's son was Thor, and his name gave us the term "Thursday". Odin himself gave us our word “Wednesday”, from “Wodin”, the English form of his name.

Ynglinga saga is an Old Norse saga written in 1225 by the Icelandic poet Snorri Sturluson. The work tells the history of the Norwegian kings from the age of mythical prehistory until the 12th century.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Call in the evening : TAPS
5. Thunderous sound : CLAP
9. Island group near Fiji : TONGA
14. Heckelphone lookalike : OBOE
15. Good eats : HEALTH FOOD
17. For which two heads are better than one? : YOKE
18. Doing particularly well : IN RARE FORM
19. Prefers charges against : SUES
20. Site of an annual British music festival : STONEHENGE
21. Take advantage of : TRADE ON
23. Ben who played the Wizard in "Wicked" : VEREEN
24. Grocery quantity : BAGFUL
25. Soul producer : KIA
26. Lose intensity : ABATE
27. Judas never attained it : SAINTHOOD
33. Setting for Hawthorne's "The Marble Faun" : ROME
34. Really affected : GOT TO
35. Pasta option : ORZO
36. Four-hour tour features? : EYE RHYMES
38. Roughly 1% of the earth's atmosphere : ARGON
39. Oaf : APE
40. Wild : INSANE
41. Offensive opportunities : AT BATS
45. Procter & Gamble product line : PANTENE
47. Without trying : BY ACCIDENT
49. Bygone cracker brand : HI-HO
51. Increases risk and reward : UPS THE ANTE
52. Maker of PerformX sportswear : IZOD
53. Gets very near : ZEROES IN ON
54. Eatery with scales : DELI
55. Steel brackets with two flanges : Z-BARS
56. "You ___ Me" (1957 R&B hit) : SEND
57. Fall location : EDEN

Down
1. ___ & Hobbies (eBay category) : TOYS
2. 1998 coming-of-age novel by Nick Hornby : ABOUT A BOY
3. Oscar Madison's weekly event : POKER GAME
4. Attends to : SEES AFTER
5. Tool with a bezel : CHISEL
6. How a nocturne is often played : LENTO
7. First high priest of the Israelites : AARON
8. Leave nothing to chance : PLAN
9. 2013 Sandra Bullock/Melissa McCarthy comedy : THE HEAT
10. Bid : OFFER
11. Very sad turnout : NO ONE
12. Big ravine : GORGE
13. Commercial manufacturers : ADMEN
16. British Open winner of 1971 and 1972 : TREVINO
22. Fitting : DUE
24. Unadorned : BARE
25. Baby foxes : KITS
27. Adjective-forming suffix : -SOME
28. Took a course? : ATE
29. Old baseball coverage? : HORSEHIDE
30. In a union : ORGANIZED
31. Atmospheric problem : OZONE HOLE
32. All washed up : DONE
34. Broadway chorus dancers, informally : GYPSIES
37. Sub entries : HATCHES
38. Word with carpenter or weaver : ANT
40. Mean : INTEND
41. Full of excitement : ABUZZ
42. Easygoing : TYPE B
43. Arabian port that's home to Sinbad Island : BASRA
44. Part taker : ACTOR
45. Pasta option : PENNE
46. ___ Chigurh ("No Country for Old Men" villain) : ANTON
48. Lectern locale : DAIS
50. Figure in the Ynglinga saga : ODIN


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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