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0701-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jul 15, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ned White
THEME: Th-sound from S … each of today’s themed answers are common phrases starting with a word beginning with S, but that S-word has been changed to similar sounding TH-word:
1A. With 68-Across, release philosopher John Stuart from cryonic suspension? : THAW
68A. See 1-Across : MILL (from “saw mill”)

9A. With 66-Across, slow learner in the litter? : THICK
66A. See 9-Across : PUPPY (from “sick puppy”)

20A. Turkey servings for the famished? : THIGHS OF RELIEF (from “sighs of relief”)
38A. Quadrennial competition for hitchhikers? : THUMBER OLYMPICS (from “Summer Olympics”)
53A. TV critic's approval of a show's opening tune? : THEME’S OKAY TO ME (from “seems okay to me”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 9m 34s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. With 68-Across, release philosopher John Stuart from cryonic suspension? : THAW
(68A. See 1-Across : MILL)
John Stuart Mill was a philosopher from Britain who is particularly remembered for defining liberty as the freedom of the individual.

5. Not one, colloquially : NARY
The adjective "nary" means "not one", as in “nary a soul”.

14. Abu Simbel's waterway : NILE
Abu Simbel is a location in southern Egypt, the site of two temples carved out of a mountainside. The two rock temples had to be relocated to Abu Simbel in 1968 to save them from being submerged in the water above the Aswan High Dam that was being built across the Nile River.

17. Hybrid fruit : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

18. ___ butter (moisturizer) : SHEA
“Shea butter” is a common moisturizer or lotion used as a cosmetic. It is a fat that is extracted from the nut of the African shea tree. There is evidence that shea butter was used back in Cleopatra’s Egypt.

24. Sportscaster Berman : LEN
Len Berman is a former sports journalist on WNBC, NBC’s flagship station located in New York City.

25. Mandela's org. : ANC
As a young man, Nelson Mandela led the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Mandela was eventually arrested and admitted to charges of sabotage and was sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He remained behind bars for 27 years, mainly in the infamous prison on Robben Island. As the years progressed, Mandela became a symbol of the fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990, and immediately declared his commitment to peace and reconciliation with South Africa’s white minority population. Mandela was elected president of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) in 1994, an office that he held until 1999. Nelson Mandela passed away on December 5, 2013.

34. Order to attack : SIC ‘EM
“Sic 'em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with "sic" being a variation of "seek".

37. First name at Woodstock : ARLO
Arlo Guthrie was the first performer at Woodstock, followed by Joan Baez.

1969’s Woodstock Music & Art Fair was held on a dairy farm located 43 miles southwest of the town of Woodstock, New York. 400,000 young people attended, and saw 32 bands and singers perform over three days.

44. Classical column style : IONIC
The Ionic was one of the three classical orders of architecture, the others being the Doric and the Corinthian. An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a "scroll" design called a "volute". The scroll motif makes Ionic columns popular for the design of academic buildings. The term “Ionic” means “pertaining to Ionia”, with Ionia being an ancient territory that is located in modern-day Turkey.

45. Sharpton and Roker : ALS
The Reverend Al Sharpton is a high-profile Baptist minister and civil rights activist, with his own radio talk show. Sharpton preached his first sermon when he was only 4-years-old.

Al Roker is best known as the meteorologist on the “Today” show on NBC. He has successfully branched out from that platform though, and even co-wrote a novel called “The Morning Show Murders”, about a celebrity chef and TV host who get entangled in mystery. Topical stuff …

46. Toon tots of '90s-'00s TV : RUGRATS
“Rugrats” is a cartoon show that aired on Nickelodeon.

49. Author LeShan : EDA
Eda LeShan wrote "When Your Child Drives You Crazy", and was host of the PBS television show "How Do Your Children Grow?"

50. Like cardinals : RED
Cardinal red is a vivid shade that takes its name from the cassocks worn by Roman Catholic cardinals. The bird known as a cardinal takes its name from the color.

51. Court units : SETS
There might be three or five sets in a tennis match.

61. "Casablanca" heroine : ILSA
Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie "Casablanca". I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: "she paints his face with her eyes". Wow ...

64. Bank-protecting agcy. : FDIC
During the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the Banking Act of 1933. The legislation established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), intended to be a temporary government corporation that provided insurance on deposits made by customers of qualified financial institutions. The first accounts to be covered, in 1934, had an insurance limit of $2,500. Since the financial crisis of 2008, that limit is $250,000.

65. Copland's "Laurie's Song," e.g. : ARIA
“Laurie’s Song” is an aria from Aaron Copland’s opera “The Tender Land”.

“The Tender Land” is an Aaron Copland opera that premiered in 1954 in New York. “The Tender Land” is set in the American Midwest during the 1930s. Copland was inspired to compose the opera after reading “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men” by James Agee, which includes Depression-Era photographs taken by Walker Evans.

Down
5. Yokohama auto giant : NISSAN
Nissan is the second largest car manufacturer in its home market of Japan, surpassing even Honda in 2011, but still behind Toyota. Nissan used to sell under the brand name “Datsun”. Nissan’s luxury brand is Infiniti.

Yokohama is the second-most populous city in Japan. Yokohama lies on Tokyo Bay and is just a 40-minute drive from the nation's capital.

11. Capri, e.g. : ISLE
The island of Capri off the coast of Southern Italy has been a tourist resort since the days of ancient Rome. Capri is home to the famous Blue Grotto, a sea cave that is illuminated with sunlight that's colored blue as it passes through the seawater into the cave. Natives of Capri are known as Capriotes.

12. G ___ : CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. Usually, a G clef is used for high parts, a C clef for middle parts and an F clef for low parts.

21. Eniwetok blaster, informally : H-BOMB
There are two classes of nuclear weapons, both of which get the energy for the explosion from nuclear reactions. The first nuclear bombs developed, called atomic bombs (A-bombs), use fission reactions. Uranium nuclei are split into smaller nuclei with the release of an awful lot of energy in the process. The second class of nuclear weapons are fusion bombs. These devices are called thermonuclear weapons or hydrogen bombs (H-bombs). In a fusion reaction, the nuclei of hydrogen isotopes are fused together to form bigger nuclei, with the release of even greater amounts of energy than a fission reaction.

Enewetak Atoll is an atoll consisting of 40 islands in the Marshall Islands in the northern Pacific Ocean. Enewetak Atoll was the site of 43 nuclear test by the US from 1946 to 1958, including the test of the first ever hydrogen bomb. That H-bomb test in 1952 completely vaporized one of the islets in the atoll.

22. The Jetsons' son : ELROY
“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it was debuted in 1963 by ABC, "The Jetsons" was the network’s first ever color broadcast. “The Jetsons” are like a space-age version of “The Flintstones”. The four Jetson family members are George and Jane, the parents, and children Judy and Elroy. Residing with the family are Rosie the household robot, and Astro the pet dog.

25. "Per ardua ad ___" : ASTRA
“Per ardua ad astra” is Latin for “through struggle to the stars”. These words have been the motto of the Royal Air Force (RAF) since 1912.

26. Zero, to Nero : NIHIL
“Nihil” is the Latin word for “nothing, and is a term we’ve absorbed into English. “Nihil” is also the root from which we get our term “nil”.

The Roman emperor Nero had quite the family life. When Nero was just 16-years-old he married his stepsister, Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and step-brother executed.

32. Charlton Heston title role : EL CID
"El Cid" is an epic film released in 1961 that tells the story of the Castilian knight who was known as El Cid. The two big names at the top of the cast were Charlton Heston and Sophia Loren, but just who was the biggest star? When Loren discovered that a huge billboard promoting the movie in Times Square showed that her name was below Heston's, she sued the movie's producers.

33. Opera that premiered in Rome in 1900 : TOSCA
Unlike so many operas, "Tosca" was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. "Tosca" is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America, although I've only seen it once myself.

35. Grp. with defibrillators : EMS
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

37. How to address a sgt.? : APO
Army Post Office (APO)

46. Aspirin, for a headache : REMEDY
Aspirin was a brand name for the drug acetylsalicylic acid. Aspirin was introduced by the German drug company Bayer AG in the late 1800s. As part of the war reparations paid by Germany after WWI, Bayer AG lost the use of the trademark "Aspirin" (as well as the trademark Heroin!) and it became a generic term.

48. Cause of a 1773 "party" : TEA ACT
The famous destruction of tea in Boston Harbor to protest against the Tea Act took place on December 16, 1773. The action was referred to as the “destruction of the tea” for decades, and it wasn’t until 1834 that the term “Boston Tea Party” first appeared in print.

52. Cook, as dim sum : STEAM
Dim sum is a Chinese cuisine made up of small portions of various dishes. The tradition of serving dim sum is associated with the serving of tea, when small delicacies were offered to travelers and guests along with tea as a refreshment. The name "dim sum" translates as "touch the heart" implying that dim sum is not a main meal, just a snack "that touches the heart".

53. Drop ___ (moon) : TROU
“Trou” is short for “trousers”.

The first recorded mooning incident took place in 66 AD, during the First Roman-Jewish War. Roman soldiers decided to moon Jewish pilgrims as they traveled to the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.

56. ___ English Bulldogge : OLDE
The dog breed named “Olde English Bulldogge” sounds as though it has been around for a long time. In fact, the breed was developed in the 1970s.

57. Father of King Ahab : OMRI
Omri was the sixth king of Israel, and was succeeded by his son Ahab.

59. Even, to Yvonne : EGAL
"Égal" is the French word for "equal, alike", and a word we sometimes use in English. The national motto of France is "Liberté, égalité, fraternité", meaning "Liberty, equality, fraternity (brotherhood).

60. Sugar amt., maybe : TSP
Teaspoon (tsp.)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. With 68-Across, release philosopher John Stuart from cryonic suspension? : THAW
5. Not one, colloquially : NARY
9. With 66-Across, slow learner in the litter? : THICK
14. Abu Simbel's waterway : NILE
15. "Hmm ..." : I SEE ...
16. "Cleanup on ___ 4" (store announcement) : AISLE
17. Hybrid fruit : UGLI
18. ___ butter (moisturizer) : SHEA
19. Slacker : IDLER
20. Turkey servings for the famished? : THIGHS OF RELIEF
23. Flanged construction beam : H-BAR
24. Sportscaster Berman : LEN
25. Mandela's org. : ANC
28. Minimal poker draw : ONE CARD
31. Poker draw follow-up, often : BET
34. Order to attack : SIC ‘EM
36. Sob syllable : HOO
37. First name at Woodstock : ARLO
38. Quadrennial competition for hitchhikers? : THUMBER OLYMPICS
42. Home run swings : RIPS
43. Numeral atop a face : XII
44. Classical column style : IONIC
45. Sharpton and Roker : ALS
46. Toon tots of '90s-'00s TV : RUGRATS
49. Author LeShan : EDA
50. Like cardinals : RED
51. Court units : SETS
53. TV critic's approval of a show's opening tune? : THEME’S OKAY TO ME
60. Copy, in a way : TRACE
61. "Casablanca" heroine : ILSA
62. Online read, for short : E-MAG
63. "Such a shame" : SO SAD
64. Bank-protecting agcy. : FDIC
65. Copland's "Laurie's Song," e.g. : ARIA
66. See 9-Across : PUPPY
67. Something that has low stakes? : TENT
68. See 1-Across : MILL

Down
1. Flanged fastener : T-NUT
2. Weather forecast figure : HIGH
3. "For ___ care ..." : ALL I
4. Consider carefully : WEIGH
5. Yokohama auto giant : NISSAN
6. How things may drift : ASHORE
7. Boater's hazard : REEF
8. Wine datum : YEAR
9. Followed, as a suspect : TAILED
10. Used as cover : HID IN
11. Capri, e.g. : ISLE
12. G ___ : CLEF
13. Start to "plunk" : KER-
21. Eniwetok blaster, informally : H-BOMB
22. The Jetsons' son : ELROY
25. "Per ardua ad ___" : ASTRA
26. Zero, to Nero : NIHIL
27. Features of many bras : C-CUPS
29. Gospel group : CHOIR
30. Web giant : AOL
31. Pickling need : BRINE
32. Charlton Heston title role : EL CID
33. Opera that premiered in Rome in 1900 : TOSCA
35. Grp. with defibrillators : EMS
37. How to address a sgt.? : APO
39. Display, as charm : EXUDE
40. Oil driller's construction : RIG
41. A bit teary : MISTY
46. Aspirin, for a headache : REMEDY
47. Welcomes warmly : ASKS IN
48. Cause of a 1773 "party" : TEA ACT
50. Game follow-up : RECAP
52. Cook, as dim sum : STEAM
53. Drop ___ (moon) : TROU
54. Padlock holder : HASP
55. De-lump, as flour : SIFT
56. ___ English Bulldogge : OLDE
57. Father of King Ahab : OMRI
58. Contents of some drop boxes : MAIL
59. Even, to Yvonne : EGAL
60. Sugar amt., maybe : TSP


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0630-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jun 15, Tuesday

NOTE: Readers of the Vancouver Sun (and maybe others) saw this puzzle today, for some reason!



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Susan Gelfand
THEME: Punny People Actions … each of today’s themed answers is a common two-word phrase that is clued with an alternative meaning. That alternative meaning is a famous person doing something:
17A. Comedian cultivates flowers? : (Chris) ROCK GARDENS
23A. Poet inks a contract? : (Ezra) POUND SIGNS
33A. Opera singer scrawls graffiti? : (Leontyne) PRICE TAGS
48A. Actress stumbles? : (Sally) FIELD TRIPS
53A. Philosopher removes his clothes? : (Francis) BACON STRIPS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Kilt wearer : SCOT
The lovely Scottish garment called a kilt is pleated, but only at the rear.

13. Penny prez : ABE
The US one-cent coin has borne the profile of President Abraham Lincoln since 1909, the centennial of Lincoln’s birth. Fifty years later, a representation of the Lincoln Memorial was added to the reverse side.

15. Singer Josh whose self-titled 2001 debut album went 4x platinum : GROBAN
Josh Groban is a singer-songwriter from Los Angeles who was the number-one best selling artist in the US in 2007. Groban dated actress January Jones (Betty Draper on “Mad Men”) from 2003 to 2006, and has been dating Kat Dennings (Max Black on “2 Broke Girls”) since 2014.

16. Milky Way, for one : BAR
Having lived on both sides of the Atlantic, I find the Mars Bar to be the most perplexing of candies! The original Mars Bar is a British confection (and delicious) first manufactured in 1932. The US version of the original Mars Bar is called a Milky Way. But there is candy bar called a Milky Way that is also produced in the UK, and it is completely different to its US cousin, being more like an American "3 Musketeers". And then there is an American confection called a Mars Bar, something different again. No wonder I gave up eating candy bars ...

17. Comedian cultivates flowers? : (Chris) ROCK GARDENS
Chris Rock is a great stand-up comedian. Interestingly, Rock cites his paternal grandfather as an influence on his performing style. Grandfather Allen Rock was a preacher.

19. Schlub : LOSER
A “schlub” is a clumsy, stupid person. The term comes into English via Yiddish, possibly from the Polish “żłób“ meaning “blockhead”.

23. Poet inks a contract? : (Ezra) POUND SIGNS
Ezra Pound was an American poet who spent much of his life wandering the world, spending years in London, Paris, and Italy. In Italy, Pound's work and sympathies for Mussolini's regime led to his arrest at the end of the war. His major work was the epic, albeit incomplete, "The Cantos". This epic poem is divided into 120 sections, each known as a canto.

26. Nosh : BITE
Our word "nosh" has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word "nashn" meaning "to nibble".

28. GQ or S.I. : MAG
The Men’s magazine known today as “GQ” used to be titled “Gentlemen’s Quarterly”, and before that was called “Apparel Arts” when it was launched in 1931.

"Sports Illustrated" is read by 23 million people every week, including a whopping 19% of adult males in the US. And that's every week, not just the swimsuit issue …

29. Conundrum : POSER
“Conundrum” is a relatively new word, even though it sounds like Latin. It was coined in the late 16th century in Oxford University, England as slang, pseudo-Latin word meaning “pedant”. Somehow, this meaning evolved into “riddle, puzzle” in the late 18th century.

31. Looney Tunes devil, for short : TAZ
The “Looney Tunes” character known as the Tasmanian Devil, or “Taz”, first appeared on screens in 1964 but gained real popularity in the 1990s.

The carnivorous marsupial known as the Tasmanian devil is aptly named, in the sense that the only place the animal is found in the wild is on the island of Tasmania. The “little devils” are about the size of a small dog, and they have the strongest bite for their size of any known mammal.

32. Assassin John ___ Booth : WILKES
By the time John Wilkes Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, he was a very well-known and respected stage actor. Both was so successful that he was earning over $500,000 a year in today’s money.

33. Opera singer scrawls graffiti? : (Leontyne) PRICE TAGS
"Graffiti" is the plural of "graffito", the Italian for "a scribbling". The word was first used to describe ancient inscriptions on the walls in the ruins of Pompeii.

Leontyne Price is a soprano from Laurel, Mississippi. Before retiring from the opera stage, Price was a leading artist at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, one of the first African-American singers to be so honored.

39. Bagel topper : LOX
Lox is a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

40. Sondheim's "Sweeney ___" : TODD
"Sweeney Todd" was originally a 1936 film, and later in 1973 a play, then a 1979 musical and a movie adaptation of the musical in 2007. After Sweeney Todd has killed his victims, his partner in crime Mrs. Lovett helped him dispose of the bodies by taking the flesh and baking it into meat pies that she sold in her pie shop. Ugh!

Stephen Sondheim has won more Tony Awards than any other composer, a total of eight. He has a long list of stage (and big screen) successes including "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum", "A Little Night Music", "Sweeney Todd" and "Into the Woods". Sondheim is big fan of crosswords and had a whole series of cryptic crosswords published in "New York" magazine in the sixties.

44. Land of Minos : CRETE
Minos was the King of Crete in Greek mythology, and the son of Zeus and Europa. Minos had an elaborate labyrinth built in Crete, designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus (who famously died trying to escape from the island by "flying" away). In the labyrinth, King Minos kept the Minotaur, a dreadful creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man.

46. Prefix with comic : SERIO-
Something described as "seriocomic" has both serious and comical elements, but generally the comic side predominates.

48. Actress stumbles? : (Sally) FIELD TRIPS
Actress Sally Field first came to the public's attention in the sixties with title roles in the TV shows "Gidget" and "The Flying Nun". She has two Best Actress Oscars; one for "Norma Rae" (1979) and one for "Places in the Heart" (1984).

51. "___ Wiedersehen" : AUF
“Auf Wiedersehen” is German for “goodbye”, literally translating as “till we see each other again”.

52. Supporter of the arts? : EASEL
The word "easel" comes from an old Dutch word meaning "donkey" would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

53. Philosopher removes his clothes? : (Francis) BACON STRIPS
The English philosopher and statesman Francis Bacon wrote a celebrated and respected collection of essays called “The Essayes”, first published in 1597. My favorite of these essays is “Of Simulation and Dissimulation”, which observes:
Dissimulation, in the negative; when a man lets fall signs and arguments, that he is not, that he is... Simulation, in the affirmative; when a man industriously and expressly feigns and pretends to be, that he is not.

60. "Tout ___" ("All mine": Fr.) : A MOI
"À moi" (literally "to me") is the French for "mine".

61. Cable inits. for film buffs : TMC
The Movie Channel is owned by Showtime, which in turn is subsidiary of CBS. The channel’s name is often abbreviated to “TMC”, although this is informal usage.

62. Weighty books : TOMES
“Tome” first came into English from the Latin "tomus" which means "section of a book". The original usage in English was for a single volume in a multi-volume work. By the late 16th century "tome" had come to mean "a large book".

Down
2. Ornamental shell source : ABALONE
The large edible sea snails that we call abalone are called “ormer” in the British Isles. The abalone shell resembles a human ear, giving rise to the alternative names “ear shell” and “sea ear”.

5. "As cold as the Rockies" sloganeer : COORS
Adolph Coors founded the Coors brewing company in 1873, in Golden, Colorado. Coors was originally from the Rhine Province in Prussia, and worked in various brewers around what is today Germany before immigrating to the US in 1868. Despite all of his success as a brewer here in America, Coors ended up taking his own life in 1929, by jumping to his death out of a hotel window.

6. Non-Rx : OTC
Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs don't need a prescription.

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol "Rx" that's used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter's blessing to help a patient recover.

8. Flight board column: Abbr. : ARRS
Arrival (arr.)

10. Bunker Hill Monument, for one : OBELISK
An obelisk is a rectangular column that tapers to the top and is capped by a pyramid shape.

The Battle of Bunker Hill was a victory for the British early in the Civil War, although the British losses were so large that it emboldened the inexperienced colonial militiamen who were up against regular army troops. The battle was named for nearby Bunker Hill located close to Charlestown, Massachusetts, although almost all of the combat took place on Breed’s Hill.

11. Everglades mammal : MANATEE
Manatees, also known as sea cows, are very large marine mammals that can grow to 12 feet in length. The manatee is believed to have evolved from four-legged land mammals and probably shares a common ancestor with the elephant. The manatee's upper lip somewhat resembles the trunk of an elephant in that it is prehensile, and can be used to grip it's food.

12. They cross in a crossword : ANSWERS
Arthur Wynne is generally credited with the invention of what we now known as a crossword puzzle. Wynne was born in Liverpool, England and emigrated to the US when he was 19-years-old. He worked as a journalist and was living in Cedar Grove, New Jersey in 1913 when he introduced a “Word-Cross Puzzle” in his page of puzzles written for the “New York World”. And the rest, as they say, is history ...

23. Part of the Iams logo : PAW
Iams dog food was produced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

24. Apple variety : IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

25. Graceful antelope : GAZELLE
When running at a sustained speed, gazelles can move along at 30 miles per hour. If needed, they can accelerate for bursts up to 60 miles per hour.

26. Gives support : BOLSTERS
Back in Ireland I often slept in beds that had a "bolster" as well as pillows. The bolster was usually a long, bed-wide, stuffed cushion, harder than a pillow. It served the purpose of raising the pillows, perhaps as an aid for sitting up in bed. Our modern usage of the verb "bolster", meaning to give a metaphoric shot in the arm, derives from this "bolster" that we used to sit up against.

31. "___ the season ..." : ‘TIS
The music for the Christmas song “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “tra-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century. “‘Tis the season to be jolly …”

32. Medium for Madame Tussaud : WAX
Marie Tussaud was a wax sculptor from France. Some of her early work was very gruesome as she lived through the French Revolution. She would take the decapitated heads of executed citizens and use them to make death masks which were then paraded through the streets. She eventually moved to London, taking with her a vast collection of wax models made by her and her father. She opened a museum to display the works, and the Madame Tussaud’s wax museum is a major attraction in the city to this day.

34. New York city with an amusement park that's a National Historic Landmark : RYE
The New York city of Rye is the youngest in the state, having received its charter in 1942. Rye is home to the historic amusement park called Playland, which in 1987 was designated a National Historic Landmark. Opened in 1928, today’s Playland is actually owned and operated by Westchester County, making it one of the only government-operated amusement parks in the whole country.

38. Early Sony recorder : BETACAM
Betacam is range of video cassette products that was released by Sony in 1982.

42. Item on many a doctor's wall : DIPLOMA
Our word "diploma" comes from Greek via Latin, with an original meaning of "state or official document". The Greek word "diploma" described a license or a chart, and originally meant a "paper doubled over" from "diploos" the word for "double".

43. Spanish couple : DOS
“Dos” is Spanish for “two”.

49. The Home ___ : DEPOT
The Home Depot is the largest home improvement retail chain in the US, ahead of Lowe’s. Home Depot opened their first two stores in 1979. The average store size if just over 100,000 square feet. The largest Home Depot outlet is in Union, New Jersey, and it is 225,000 square feet in size. That’s a lot of nuts and bolts …

51. Some "giants" in "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" : ANTS
"Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" is a fun movie from 1989 starring Rick Moranis as a goofy professor who accidentally shrinks his children. The movie was written with Chevy Chase in mind for the starring role, but he was busy filming "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation". John Candy was a second choice, but he decided to pass and suggested Rick Moranis instead. I think the final choice was a good one ...

55. 1990s Indian P.M. : RAO
P. V. Narasimha Rao was Prime Minister of India from 1991 to 1996. Rao is seen by most as the leader who transformed his country’s economy into the market-driven engine that it is today.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Peanut butter holder : JAR
4. Kilt wearer : SCOT
8. Coffee lure : AROMA
13. Penny prez : ABE
14. Have the ___ for : HOTS
15. Singer Josh whose self-titled 2001 debut album went 4x platinum : GROBAN
16. Milky Way, for one : BAR
17. Comedian cultivates flowers? : (Chris) ROCK GARDENS
19. Schlub : LOSER
21. Toning targets, for short : ABS
22. What a court interprets : LAW
23. Poet inks a contract? : (Ezra) POUND SIGNS
26. Nosh : BITE
27. The opposition : ANTIS
28. GQ or S.I. : MAG
29. Conundrum : POSER
30. Exhibit some grief : WEEP
31. Looney Tunes devil, for short : TAZ
32. Assassin John ___ Booth : WILKES
33. Opera singer scrawls graffiti? : (Leontyne) PRICE TAGS
36. Monasteries : ABBEYS
39. Bagel topper : LOX
40. Sondheim's "Sweeney ___" : TODD
44. Land of Minos : CRETE
45. ___-pitch softball : SLO
46. Prefix with comic : SERIO-
47. Squealers : RATS
48. Actress stumbles? : (Sally) FIELD TRIPS
50. Egg cells : OVA
51. "___ Wiedersehen" : AUF
52. Supporter of the arts? : EASEL
53. Philosopher removes his clothes? : (Francis) BACON STRIPS
57. "___ don't!" : NO I
59. Adjusts to one's environment : ADAPTS
60. "Tout ___" ("All mine": Fr.) : A MOI
61. Cable inits. for film buffs : TMC
62. Weighty books : TOMES
63. Elects : OPTS
64. Word after "you might" or "you don't" : SAY

Down
1. Poke : JAB
2. Ornamental shell source : ABALONE
3. Send on a detour, say : REROUTE
4. Tatters : SHREDS
5. "As cold as the Rockies" sloganeer : COORS
6. Non-Rx : OTC
7. Disapproving cluck : TSK!
8. Flight board column: Abbr. : ARRS
9. Fishing shop purchase : ROD
10. Bunker Hill Monument, for one : OBELISK
11. Everglades mammal : MANATEE
12. They cross in a crossword : ANSWERS
15. Yaks : GABS
18. Crew : GANG
20. Tiny excerpts : SNIPPETS
23. Part of the Iams logo : PAW
24. Apple variety : IMAC
25. Graceful antelope : GAZELLE
26. Gives support : BOLSTERS
29. Squealer : PIG
31. "___ the season ..." : ‘TIS
32. Medium for Madame Tussaud : WAX
34. New York city with an amusement park that's a National Historic Landmark : RYE
35. Plane, for one : TOOL
36. Trapeze artist, e.g. : ACROBAT
37. Impressive show of courage : BRAVADO
38. Early Sony recorder : BETACAM
41. Gives new-employee training, e.g. : ORIENTS
42. Item on many a doctor's wall : DIPLOMA
43. Spanish couple : DOS
45. Search (through) : SIFT
46. Equilibrium : STASIS
48. Commotion : FUSS
49. The Home ___ : DEPOT
51. Some "giants" in "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" : ANTS
54. Unlock, to a bard : OPE
55. 1990s Indian P.M. : RAO
56. Little handful : IMP
58. Like Arctic waters : ICY


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0629-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jun 15, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Todd Gross & Andrea Carla Michaels
THEME: They Move Faster and Faster … each of today’s themed answers ends with something that moves at a certain pace, and that pace increases as we progress through the grid:
17A. Bot that systematically browses the Internet : WEB CRAWLER
28A. "The Color Purple" novelist : ALICE WALKER
48A. 1982 Harrison Ford sci-fi film : BLADE RUNNER
64A. Classic red wagon : RADIO FLYER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Sig Ep, e.g. : FRAT
The Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity was founded in 1901 in Richmond, Virginia and is sometimes known as "SigEp".

14. Jane Austen novel : EMMA
I listened to one of my favorite Jane Austen novels on Audio Book not so long ago. "Emma" is the tale of Emma Woodhouse and the wonderful George Knightley. At the end of the story, Emma marries Knightley and her young friend Harriet marries Robert Martin, who had been trying to get Harriet's attention practically from page one of the novel!

15. Capital on the Nile : CAIRO
Cairo is the capital city of Egypt. It is the largest city on the continent of Africa and is nicknamed "The City of a Thousand Minarets" because of its impressive skyline replete with Islamic architecture. The name "Cairo" is a European corruption of the city's original name in Arabic, "Al-Qahira", which translates as “the Vanquisher” or “the Conqueror”.

16. ___ Strauss & Co. (jeans maker) : LEVI
Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

17. Bot that systematically browses the Internet : WEB CRAWLER
A bot is computer program that is designed to imitate human behavior. It might “crawl” around the Web doing searches for example, or it might participate in discussions in chat rooms by giving pre-programmed responses.

20. Bullet that leaves a trail : TRACER
Tracer ammunition has a small chemical charge at the base that leaves a bright, smoky trail so that path of the bullet or projectile is visible. This allows the shooter correct his or her aim more easily.

23. Language of the Quran : ARABIC
The Koran is also known as the Qur'an in English, a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of "Koran" is "the recitation".

26. Billiard stick : CUE
The more correct name for the game of pool is pocket billiards. The name "pool" arose after pocket billiards became a common feature in "pool halls", places where gamblers "pooled" their money to bet on horse races.

27. "I have a dream" monogram : MLK
I remember listening to the full text of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr's "I have a dream ..." speech not long after I moved to this country. I think I am man enough to admit that my eyes misted up as I listened to the words. I also recall thinking how lucky I was to have been invited to live in this great country, which was facing up to some of the sins of its past.
I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.
I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.
I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.
I have a dream today.
I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.
I have a dream today.
I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

28. "The Color Purple" novelist : ALICE WALKER
Alice Walker is an author and poet. Walker’s best known work is the novel “The Color Purple”, which earned her the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. “The Color Purple” was of course adapted into a very successful film of the same name, directed by Steven Spielberg.

31. Words from Wordsworth : ODES
The great English poet William Wordsworth is intrinsically linked with the Lake District in the north of England, where he lived from much of his life. The Lake District is a beautiful part of the country, and I’ve been fortunate enough to visit Dove Cottage in Grasmere a couple of times, where Wordsworth lived with his wife Dorothy ...

34. Austin Powers, e.g. : SPY
The character of Austin Powers was created by the actor who plays him, namely Mike Myers. Apparently Myers came up with the idea for Powers while listening to the Burt Bacharach song “The Look of Love”.

35. Precursor of Windows : MS-DOS
MS-DOS (short for Microsoft Disk Operating System) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.

39. Radisson or Ritz-Carlton : HOTEL
The first Radisson hotel opened in 1909 in Minneapolis. The hotel name was chosen in honor of the 17th-century French explorer Pierre-Esprit Radisson.

César Ritz was a Swiss hotelier, who had a reputation for developing the most luxurious of accommodations and attracting the wealthiest clientèle. He opened the Hotel Ritz in Paris in 1898 and the second of his most famous hotels, the Ritz Hotel in London, in 1906. Ritz was lucky in his career, as before starting his own hotel chain he had been dismissed from the Savoy Hotel in London, implicated in the disappearance of a substantial amount of wine and spirits. Today’s Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company was founded in 1983, although the chain has its roots in the properties developed by César Ritz.

47. Archibald or Thurmond of the N.B.A. : NATE
Nate Archibald is a retired basketball player who played mainly for the Kansas City Kings and the Boston Celtics. Archibald could get the ball in the basket, but was also willing pass to a teammate when advantageous. He is only player to lead the league in assists and scoring in the same season.

Nate Thurmond is a retired basketball player who was known to fans as “Nate the Great”.

48. 1982 Harrison Ford sci-fi film : BLADE RUNNER
“Blade Runner” is a cult classic, a sci-fi film made in 1982 loosely based on the novel “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” by Philip K. Dick. It was directed by Ridley Scott who regards “Blade Runner” as his most “complete” film. There is a phenomenon known as the “‘Blade Runner’ Curse”. An inordinate number of companies behind products that were displayed prominently in the movie found themselves in financial trouble soon after the movie’s release. Included in the list of troubled concerns are Atari, Cuisinart, Pan Am and the Bell System.

55. The "p" of m.p.h. : PER
Miles per hour (mph).

56. ___ l'oeil (literally, "deceives the eye") : TROMPE
Trompe-l’oeil is a technique in art that creates the optical illusion that a drawn object exists in three dimensions. “Trompe-l’oeil” is French for “deceive the eye”.

58. The Lone Ranger, to Tonto : KEMOSABE
“Kemosabe” is a term used by the Tonto character in the iconic radio and television program “The Lone Ranger”. “Kemosabe” doesn't really mean anything outside of the show, and in fact was written as “ke-mo sah-bee” in the original radio show scripts. The term was created by longtime director of “The Lone Ranger”, Jim Jewell. To come up with the term, Jewell used the name of a boy’s camp that his father-in-law established called Kamp Kee-Mo Sah-Bee.

63. Zest : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e "style" or "flair".

64. Classic red wagon : RADIO FLYER
Radio Flyer is the name of the toy company that produces the famous red wagon. The company's founder was Antonio Pasin, and he named the steel wagon “Radio Flyer” simply because he was fascinated with radio and flight.

68. Architect Saarinen : EERO
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK. The list of his lesser-known, but still impressive, works includes several buildings erected on academic campuses. For example, the Chapel and Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus, the Emma Hartman Noyes House at Vassar College, the Law School building at the University of Chicago, and Yale's David S. Ingalls Rink.

70. Birds that fly in V's : GEESE
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to "slipstream" a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when it gets fatigued. It's also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

Down
1. Eye of ___ and toe of frog (ingredients in a witches' brew) : NEWT
The witches in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" have some lovely lines as they boil up and evil brew and cast a spell:
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and howlet's wing,--
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

2. Green gems : EMERALDS
The mineral beryl is a source of a number of different, semi-precious stones, depending on the nature of the impurities present. Pure beryl is colorless; blue beryl is called aquamarine, and green beryl is emerald. The source of the green color is mainly chromium.

4. Capital of Bangladesh, old-style : DACCA
Dhaka (once “Dacca”) is the capital city of Bangladesh. Dhaka is known for many things, including production of the finest muslin in the world. It's also the rickshaw capital of the world, with about 400,000 rickshaws running each day.

8. Graham who wrote "Our Man in Havana" : GREENE
“Our Man in Havana” is a marvelously entertaining novel by Graham Greene, first published in 1958. It’s all about a British vacuum cleaner salesman who lives in Havana, Cuba. The salesman is recruited by the British secret service, and then sends fake information to London, just to get paid. The novel was adapted into a fabulous film of the same name in 1959, starring Alec Guinness.

10. Chunk of ice in the Arctic Ocean : FLOE
An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field and is floating freely on the ocean.

12. Park or Madison, in Manhattan : AVENUE
Park Avenue in New York City used to be known as Fourth Avenue, and for much of its length carried the tracks of the New York and Harlem Railroad. When the line was built, some of it was constructed by cutting through the length of the street and then forming underground tunnels by covering over the line with grates and greenery. This greenery formed a parkland between 34th and 40th Streets, and in 1860 the grassy section of Fourth Avenue was renamed Park Avenue, a name that was eventually used for the whole thoroughfare.

Madison Avenue became the center of advertising in the US in the twenties, and serves as the backdrop to the great TV drama “Mad Men”. There aren’t many advertising agencies left on Madison Avenue these days though, as most have moved to other parts of New York City. The street takes its name from Madison Square, which is bounded on one side by Madison Avenue. The square in turn takes its name from James Madison, the fourth President of the United States.

18. 2000s sitcom starring a country singer : REBA
Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called "Reba" that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

24. "See ya!" : CIAO!
"Ciao" is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates as "goodbye".

29. Make butter the old-fashioned way : CHURN
Butter churns are devices that convert cream into butter. The churn agitates the cream mechanically, disrupting milk fat. Clumps of disrupted milk fat form larger and larger fat globules. Eventually, the mixture separates into solid butter and liquid buttermilk.

30. French city historically known for silk : LYON
The city of Lyon in France, is also known as “Lyons” in English.

32. Cry when an auctioneer brings down the gavel : SOLD
A gavel is a small hammer that is rapped on a table or desk to call a meeting to order, or perhaps to signify a sale at an auction.

40. Many an April 15 mailer : TAXPAYER
April 15th wasn’t always Tax Day in the US. The deadline for returns was March 1st from 1913-18, when it was moved to March 15th. Tax Day has been April 15th since 1955.

41. "Yadda, yadda, yadda" : ET CETERA
"The Yada Yada Yada" is actually the name of the 153rd episode of "Seinfeld". Before "Seinfeld" made "yada yada yada" famous, we were more likely to hear the phrase "yadda yadda", often used by comedian Lenny Bruce, for example.

42. Necklace of flowers : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

46. Wordy : VERBOSE
Someone described as “verbose” is said to use too many words. The term comes from the Latin “verbum” meaning “word”.

48. Makers of tortes and tarts : BAKERS
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

50. Spanish fleet of 1588 : ARMADA
The most famous Armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in order to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I in 1588. It failed in its mission, partly due to bad weather encountered en route. Ironically, the English mounted a similar naval attack against Spain the following year, and it failed as well.

51. Polite and refined : URBANE
We use “urbane” today to mean something courteous or refined. Back in the 1500s the term was used in the same way that we now use “urban”. Those townsfolk thought they were more sophisticated than the countryfolk, and so the usage evolved.

52. Liesl's love in "The Sound of Music" : ROLF
The von Trapps portrayed in the musical “The Sound of Music”, was a real family, as is well known. In the musical and film, the eldest daughter is “Liesl”, although in real life her name was Agathe. Agathe came with her family to the US in 1938, and operated a private kindergarten in Baltimore, Maryland for 35 years. Agathe passed away in 2010.

57. Brawl : MELEE
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means "confused fight".

59. Rare blood type, for short : O-NEG
In general, a person with type O-negative blood is a universal donor, meaning that his or her blood can be used for a transfusion into persons with any other blood type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive (although there are other considerations). Also in general, a person with type AB-positive blood is a universal recipient, meaning that he or she can receive a transfusion of blood of any type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive.

60. Brickell or Falco : EDIE
Edie Brickell is a singer-songwriter from Dallas, Texas. Brickell has been married to fellow singer Paul Simon since 1991.

The actress Edie Falco won three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO's outstanding drama series called "The Sopranos". Falco also won an Emmy in 2010 for playing the title role in “Nurse Jackie”.

62. B'way hit signs : SROS
Standing room only (SRO)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Requisite : NEED
5. Trudges (through) : SLOGS
10. Sig Ep, e.g. : FRAT
14. Jane Austen novel : EMMA
15. Capital on the Nile : CAIRO
16. ___ Strauss & Co. (jeans maker) : LEVI
17. Bot that systematically browses the Internet : WEB CRAWLER
19. Unwrap : OPEN
20. Bullet that leaves a trail : TRACER
21. To whom a private says "Sir, yes, sir!" : SERGEANT
23. Language of the Quran : ARABIC
25. Neither's partner : NOR
26. Billiard stick : CUE
27. "I have a dream" monogram : MLK
28. "The Color Purple" novelist : ALICE WALKER
31. Words from Wordsworth : ODES
33. "Boo" follower, in a triumphant shout : YAH!
34. Austin Powers, e.g. : SPY
35. Precursor of Windows : MS-DOS
37. What three strikes make : OUT
39. Radisson or Ritz-Carlton : HOTEL
43. Grazing expanse : LEA
45. Excite, with "up" : REV
47. Archibald or Thurmond of the N.B.A. : NATE
48. 1982 Harrison Ford sci-fi film : BLADE RUNNER
53. 91, to Caesar : XCI
54. Beach ball filler : AIR
55. The "p" of m.p.h. : PER
56. ___ l'oeil (literally, "deceives the eye") : TROMPE
58. The Lone Ranger, to Tonto : KEMOSABE
61. Sounds like a sheep : BLEATS
63. Zest : ELAN
64. Classic red wagon : RADIO FLYER
66. Was a passenger : RODE
67. College class hours : UNITS
68. Architect Saarinen : EERO
69. Giveaways at events : SWAG
70. Birds that fly in V's : GEESE
71. Geologic time periods : ERAS

Down
1. Eye of ___ and toe of frog (ingredients in a witches' brew) : NEWT
2. Green gems : EMERALDS
3. Started, as on a journey : EMBARKED
4. Capital of Bangladesh, old-style : DACCA
5. In a frightening way : SCARILY
6. Attorney-at-___ : LAW
7. Classical paintings : OILS
8. Graham who wrote "Our Man in Havana" : GREENE
9. Woes : SORROWS
10. Chunk of ice in the Arctic Ocean : FLOE
11. Prepare to go home from vacation, say : REPACK
12. Park or Madison, in Manhattan : AVENUE
13. Dye specialist : TINTER
18. 2000s sitcom starring a country singer : REBA
22. Math class drawing : GRAPH
24. "See ya!" : CIAO!
27. Word in a heart tattoo : MOM
29. Make butter the old-fashioned way : CHURN
30. French city historically known for silk : LYON
32. Cry when an auctioneer brings down the gavel : SOLD
36. Oozes : SEEPS
38. Circus structure : TENT
40. Many an April 15 mailer : TAXPAYER
41. "Yadda, yadda, yadda" : ET CETERA
42. Necklace of flowers : LEI
44. Carpet alternative : AREA RUG
46. Wordy : VERBOSE
48. Makers of tortes and tarts : BAKERS
49. Stay out of sight : LIE LOW
50. Spanish fleet of 1588 : ARMADA
51. Polite and refined : URBANE
52. Liesl's love in "The Sound of Music" : ROLF
57. Brawl : MELEE
59. Rare blood type, for short : O-NEG
60. Brickell or Falco : EDIE
62. B'way hit signs : SROS
65. "___ all good" : IT’S


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0628-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jun 15, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeremy Newton
THEME: Getting in the Final Word … today’s themed answers are in two parts, one an across-answer and the other a down-answer. The themed answers are all in the format “A in B”, and so the across- and down- pairs are written one “in” the other, to give the complete answer:
30A. With 13-Down, shorthand pact for a wild trip : WHAT HAPPENS (in VEGAS)
(13D. Unlikely butchers : VEGANS)

52A. With 49-Down, 1995 Oscar-nominated Pixar theme song : YOU'VE GOT A FRIEND (in ME)
(49D. Good name for a lawn care guy? : MOE)

80A. With 58-Down, request for an official document : COULD YOU PUT THAT (in WRITING)
(58D. Twisting : WRITHING)

101A. With 90-Down, reacting to a gut punch, perhaps : DOUBLED OVER (in PAIN)
(90D. Bristol, for one : PALIN)

3D. With 18-Across, "To be on the safe side ..." : JUST (in CASE)
(18A. Gay rights, e.g. : CAUSE)

16D. With 21-Across, remembering : KEEPING (in MIND)
(21A. Like some enemy waters in wartime : MINED)

87D. With 104-Across, talking with a fake rasp, perhaps : CALLING (in SICK)
(104A. Cleverly crafted : SLICK)

109D. With 125-Across, got the booby prize : CAME (in LAST)
(125A. Tiniest thing : LEAST)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 27m 52s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. "The Avengers" supervillain : LOKI
“The Avengers” is a 2012 movie that features a whole load of superheroes battling a supervillain called Loki. Loki is the brother of Thor, one of superhero team.

18. Gay rights, e.g. : CAUSE
In 2015, my homeland of Ireland became the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage by popular vote. We don’t have a mail-in voting in Ireland and so citizens who wanted to support the measure flew into Ireland in droves to cast their votes. Apparently the lines at passport control at Dublin airport were unprecedented. One month later, the US became the most populous country to recognize same-sex marriage, following a landmark Supreme Court decision.

19. Sportscaster Rashad : AHMAD
Ahmad Rashād is a former football player who now works with NBC as a sportscaster. Ahmad proposed marriage to actress Phylicia Ayers-Allen on national television in 1985. Phylicia, who played Bill Cosby’s wife on “The Cosby Show”, accepted the proposal and became Rashād’s third wife.

20. Hello from Hadrian : AVE
“Ave” is a Latin word meaning “hail” as in “Ave Maria”, which translates as “Hail Mary”. “Ave” can also be used to mean “goodbye”.

The Roman Emperor Hadrian is best remembered today for building Hadrian’s Wall, a barrier marking the northern limit of Roman Britain. Construction of the stone wall was started in AD 122, and the end result was the most fortified border in the whole of the Roman Empire. Much of Hadrian’s Wall can still be seen today, and I’ve had the privilege of walking along part of it when visiting Northern England.

26. Tums and others : ANTACIDS
The main ingredient in Tums antacid, made by GlaxoSmithKline, is calcium carbonate. Tums have been on the market since 1930. If you want to save a few pennies, Target brand antacid is identical to Tums, so I hear ...

28. Mountain, in Hawaiian : MAUNA
“Mauna” is a Hawaiian word meaning “mountain”, as in Mauna Loa (Long Mountain).

30. With 13-Down, shorthand pact for a wild trip : WHAT HAPPENS (in VEGAS)
“What Happens in Vegas, Stays in Vegas” is a marketing campaign slogan created for the city in 2004. The slogan helped bring a record 37.4 million visitors to Las Vegas in the year it was launched.

34. Mumbai misters : SRIS
Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

35. Green dwarf : BONSAI
The term "bonsai" is used more correctly to describe the Japanese art of growing carefully shaped trees in containers, although it has come to be used as the name for all miniature trees in pots.

39. "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding" philosopher : HUME
David Hume was a philosopher and historian from Scotland.

40. Old J.F.K. fliers : SSTS
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Famously, the Concorde routinely broke the sound barrier, and cruised at about twice the speed of sound. Above Mach 2, frictional heat would cause the plane’s aluminum airframe to soften, so airspeed was limited.

42. C.D. fig. : INT
A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

43. Stopping points : DEPOTS
Our term “depot”, meaning a station or warehouse, derives from the word “dépôt”, French for “deposit” or “place of deposit”.

44. Like most Seth Rogen roles : COMEDIC
Seth Rogen is a Canadian comedian who got a lot of credit for his supporting role in "The 40-Year-Old Virgin". That led to him being cast as the lead in the 1970 film "Knocked Up". More recently, Rogen co-directed and and co-starred in the movie “The Interview”, which created a huge ruckus in North Korea.

48. Ever so slightly : A MITE
A mite is a small amount, as in "the widow's mite", a story from the Bible.

49. Red orbiter : MIR
The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station's life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth's atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

52. With 49-Down, 1995 Oscar-nominated Pixar theme song : YOU'VE GOT A FRIEND (in ME)
“You’ve Got a Friend in Me” is the theme song for the “Toy Story” series of animated films from Pixar. The song was written and first recorded by Randy Newman for the original “Toy Story” movie, with cover versions being used in subsequent releases.

62. Rosie, for one : RIVETER
Rosie the Riveter is a cultural icon that represented women working in factories across the country during WWII as part of the war effort. The term “Rosie the Riveter” first appeared as the title of a 1942 song that was a national hit.

69. Philosophy book by Spinoza : ETHICS
Baruch Spinoza was a Dutch philosopher whose magnum opus was “Ethics”, a philosophical treatise that was first published just after his death in 1677.

75. "___ Lisa" : MONA
Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece that we know in English as the "Mona Lisa" is called "La Gioconda" in Italian, the language of the artist. It's also known as "La Joconde" by the Government of France which owns the painting and displays it in the Louvre Museum in Paris. The title comes from the name of the subject, almost certainly Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo. Giocondo was a wealthy silk merchant in Florence who commissioned the painting for the couple's new home to celebrate the birth of their second son.

77. Start of many Batman villain names : THE …
The Joker, the Riddler, the Penguin …

85. "___ and wisdom are like the seven stars, seldom seen together": Thomas Fuller : WIT
Thomas Fuller was man of the church, and a historian, from England.

86. Some crackers : THINS
Wheat Thins, maybe …?

87. The City of a Thousand Minarets : CAIRO
Cairo is the capital city of Egypt. It is the largest city on the continent of Africa and is nicknamed "The City of a Thousand Minarets" because of its impressive skyline replete with Islamic architecture. The name "Cairo" is a European corruption of the city's original name in Arabic, "Al-Qahira", which translates as “the Vanquisher” or “the Conqueror”.

89. Guard at a gated community? : ST PETER
In the Christian tradition, Saint Peter is often depicted as the keeper of the gates of heaven. This depiction arises from a passage in the Gospel of Matthew:
I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hell will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.

94. Bit of roller derby gear : PAD
The sport of roller derby has an international footprint, with almost half the world’s teams being located outside of the US. Most of the teams playing the sport are all-female.

95. Master of fugues : BACH
A fugue is similar to a round in that it is a piece written for two or more voices, with themes that are introduced and taken up by different voices at different pitches. The most famous composer of fugues has to be Johann Sebastian Bach.

97. Latin 101 verb : AMAT
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

98. Mr. Jefferson of "The Jeffersons" : GEORGE
George Jefferson was a supporting character in the sitcom “All in the Family”, and a lead character in the spin-off show “The Jeffersons”. The role was played by actor Sherman Hemsley.

99. Admiral Zumwalt : ELMO
When Elmo Zumwalt was made Rear Admiral during the Vietnam War, he was put in command of the famous flotilla of Swift Boats that patrolled coasts, harbors and rivers. In 1970, he was made Chief of Naval Operations, and at 49 years of age, he was the youngest man to hold that post. His tenure at Chief of Naval Operations was noted for the progress he made in easing racial tension in the service, and promoting gender equality.

106. Financial backer for Magellan : SPAIN
Ferdinand Magellan was a Portuguese explorer who was hired by King Charles I of Spain to find a westward route to the “Spice Islands”, now known as the Maluku Islands of Indonesia. Magellan headed west through the Atlantic starting out in 1519. He passed south of the Americas through was is now called the Strait of Magellan. The body of water he encountered west of the Americas he named the “peaceful sea”, the Pacific Ocean. He and his expedition reached the Spice Islands in 1521, and returned home via the Indian Ocean. This voyage was the first circumnavigation of the globe in history.

113. Gift in a plate : TITHE
Traditionally, a “tithe” is a payment of one tenth of a person's annual income and is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

114. Stock character like Mayberry's Otis : TOWN DRUNK
Otis Campbell is the town drunk on the sitcom “The Andy Griffith Show”, and was played by actor Hal Smith. The Campbell character was dropped in the late sixties as sponsors became concerned about being associated with heavy drinking.

117. Bush in the Rose Garden, once : LAURA
Laura Bush, wife of President George W. Bush, had her memoir "Spoken from the Heart" published in 2010. Born Laura Lane Welch, the former First Lady has a Master's degree in Library Science (as does my wife, my own First Lady!). Given that background, it's not surprising that two causes that Laura Bush focused on while in the White House were education and literacy. She established the annual National Book Festival, first held in Washington, D.C. in 2001, after having co-founded the Texas Book Festival in her home state.

118. Light bulb in the fridge? : ONION
The Rose Garden of the White House was established by the Ellen Axson Wilson in 1913, when she was the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson.

120. Sister of Clio : ERATO
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
- Calliope (epic poetry)
- Clio (history)
- Erato (lyric poetry)
- Euterpe (music)
- Melpomene (tragedy)
- Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
- Terpsichore (dance)
- Thalia (comedy)
- Urania (astronomy)

121. Age-old bug trap : AMBER
Amber's technical name is "resinite", reflecting its composition and formation. Amber starts out life as soft sticky tree resin but then under high temperature and pressure from overlying layers of soil, it fossilizes. The sticky resin can trap organisms or other plant matter, and this material can sometimes remain virtually intact inside the amber fossil giving us a unique gift from the past.

Down
1. Pac-12 team : UCLA
Pac-12 is an abbreviation for the Pacific-12 Conference, a college athletic conference in the western US. The Pac-12 has won more NCAA National Team Championships than any other conference. The Pac-12 was founded in 1915 as the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC). Over time as it grew, the conference went by the names Big Five, Big Six, Pacific-8, Pacific-10 and became the Pacific-12 in 2011.

2. Indian flatbread : NAAN
Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

5. Former Ford make, informally : MERC
The Mercury brand of car was made by Ford from 1938 until 2011. Mercury was introduced by Henry Ford’s son Edsel Ford. Mercury vehicles were positioned as being more luxurious that the regular Ford models, and more economical than Ford’s high-end Lincoln models.

6. Whom Indians called "Bapu" ("Father") : GANDHI
Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, as the country sought independence from Britain. He was also referred to as "Mahatma", meaning "great soul". His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Sadly, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year, by a Hindu nationalist.

7. Home of many monasteries : LHASA
Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, and the name "Lhasa" translates as "place of the gods". However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious "goat's place". Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

8. "Wow!," in I.M.s : OMG!
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

10. Sushi bar appetizer : EDAMAME
Edamame is a simple dish made of immature soybeans still in the pod. The pods are boiled and then salted before serving, usually as a snack or side dish. The name “edamame” translates as “twig bean”.

12. Not here for long : EVANESCENT
Something described as “evanescent” is fleeting, scarcely perceptible. Ultimately the term comes from the Latin “vanescere” meaning “to vanish”.

13. Unlikely butchers : VEGANS
A vegan is someone who stays away from animal products. A dietary vegan eats no animal foods, not even eggs and dairy which are usually eaten by vegetarians. Ethical vegans take things one step further by following a vegan diet and also avoiding animal products in other areas of their lives e.g. items made from leather or silk.

14. Typesetting machines, informally : LINOS
Linotype printing was the main technology used in the publication of newspapers and magazines for most of the 20th century, up until the 1970s when it was gradually replaced by offset printing and computer typesetting. Linotype printing was so called as a complete “line of type” was produced at one time.

15. Locale of the Battle of Stoney Creek in the War of 1812 : ONTARIO
The Battle of Stoney Creek took place during the War of 1812 in June 1813, near the modern-day community of Stoney Creek in Ontario. The action consisted of a surprise attack by the British who overwhelmed the American forces and captured two American generals. Casualties were shared evenly by both sides, but the Americans were badly shaken and never again ventured so far north of the Niagara River.

21. Cold War flier : MIG
The Russian fighter jets that we know as “MiGs” are so called because they were designed by the Mikoyan-and-Gurevich Design Bureau, and MiG is an acronym for “Mikoyan-and-Gurevich” in Russian.

31. Actress Birch of "American Beauty" : THORA
Thora Birch is an actress from Los Angeles. Birch is probably best known for her breakthrough role in the 1999 movie “American Beauty” in which she was the insecure daughter of a married couple played by Kevin Spacey and Annette Bening.

41. They're often loaded : SOTS
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

45. Summer coolers : ICEES
Icee and Slurpee are brand names of those slushy drinks. Ugh …

47. Performs, in Proverbs : DOETH
The Book of Proverbs is in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. The original Hebrew title for the book translates as “Proverbs of Solomon”.

49. Good name for a lawn care guy? : MOE
“Moe” sounds like “mow”.

51. W.W. II inits. : DDE
General Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII.

53. Potential hurdles for coll. students : GRES
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

63. Lens care brand : RENU
ReNu is a brand name of contact lens products sold by Bausch & Lomb.

65. Biter in Niger : TSETSE
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name "tsetse" comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as "fly". Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as "sleeping sickness". Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

The Republic of Niger is a landlocked country in Western Africa that gets its name from the Niger River. 80% of the country lies within the bounds of the Sahara Desert.

67. Taste that's not sweet, sour, bitter or salty : UMAMI
Umami is one of the five basic tastes, along with sweet, sour, bitter and salty. “Umami” is a Japanese word used to describe "a pleasant savory taste”. Umami was proposed as a basic taste in 1908, but it wasn’t until 1985 that the scientific community finally accepted it as such.

70. Something you can't get off your chest? : TATTOO
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo".

74. Chinese dish often wrapped in pancakes : MOO SHU PORK
Moo shu pork is a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg.

75. Naturalist John : MUIR
John Muir was a famous American naturalist, although he was born in Scotland. He published "My First Summer in the Sierra" in 1911, describing one of his favorite places in the country, the Sierra Nevada range in California. Muir was a co-founder of the Sierra Club.

79. Tennis's Novak Djokovic, e.g. : SERB
Novak Djokovic is a Serbian tennis player, currently the world No. 1. Djokovic is quite the character off the court it seems and he is very popular on the talk-show circuit, all around the world. It also helps that Djokovic is fluent in several languages.

82. Must See TV night: Abbr. : THUR
“Must See TV” is a slogan that has been used by NBC to promote its Thursday night lineup of sitcoms. The slogan was introduced in the 1990s, and was dropped in the 2000s.

88. "Fess up!" : ADMIT IT!
The term “fess” is most often seen as part of the phrasal verb “to fess up” meaning “to admit to something”. “Fess” is simply a shortened form of “confess”.

90. Bristol, for one : PALIN
Bristol Palin is the oldest daughter of former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. Bristol was thrust in the public arena when her mother was chosen by Senator John McCain as his vice presidential running mate in 2008. The media pounced on the fact that Bristol was pregnant and expecting a child with her then-fiance Levi Johnson. The couple had a son at the end of 2008, and ended their engagement in 2009. Since then, Bristol Palin has become a public speaker and an advocate for the prevention of teenage pregnancy.

92. Tiny piece : TAD
Back in the 1800s "tad" was used to describe a young child, and this morphed into our usage of "small amount" in the early 1900s. The original use of "tad" for a child is very likely a shortened version of "tadpole".

93. Physics Nobelist Martin, discoverer of the tauon : PERL
Martin Perl was a physicist from New York who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1995 for his discovery of the elementary particle known as the “tau” or “tau lepton” in the mid-seventies.

94. Italian sauces : PESTOS
The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as “pesto” sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy. I love, love pesto sauce ...

96. Longtime Olympics TV host : COSTAS
Bob Costas has been a sportscaster for NBC since the early eighties. Costas has a son called Keith. Just before his son was born, Costas made (as a joke) a bet with Minnesota Twins center fielder Kirby Puckett that if he was batting over .350 by the time the child was born, he would name the baby "Kirkby". Well, Puckett won the bet, but the actual name chosen was Keith Michael Costas. When Puckett reminded Costas of the agreement, the birth certificate was changed to Keith Michael Kirkby Costas. My wife would have made my life not worth living ...

98. Wall climbers : GECKOS
The word "gecko" comes from an Indonesian/Javanese word "tokek", which is imitative of the reptile's chirping sound. In making such a sound, geckos are unique in the world of lizards. More interesting to me than a gecko's chirping is its ability to cling to walls and to other vertical surfaces. Their feet are specially adapted with "toes" that make extremely intimate, close contact to a surface. The toes have millions of hairs called setae that enable the clinging. It isn't suction that supports them, but rather van der Waals forces (weak "gravitational" attractions). Fascinating stuff ...

100. Big figures in Spanish ice skating : OCHOS
A figure skater might carve out a figure eight (“ocho” in Spanish) in the ice.

105. Plastic guy : KEN
Barbie's male counterpart doll is Ken, and Ken's family name is Carson. Barbie's full name is Barbie Millicent Roberts. When Ken was introduced in 1959, it was as Barbie's boyfriend. In 2004 it was announced that Ken and Barbie were splitting up, and needed to spend quality time apart. Soon after the split, Barbie “met” Blaine, a boogie boarder from Australia.

108. Airline to Ben Gurion : EL AL
El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies” or “skyward”.

Ben-Gurion International (TLV) is Israel’s main airport, and is located in the city of Lod just a few miles southeast of Tel Aviv. The airport is named for David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister.

115. Classroom basics, in a manner of speaking : RRR
The “three Rs” are Reading, ‘Riting and ‘Rithmetic.

116. Fed. rich in oil : UAE
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Free, as copies : UNJAM
6. Small world? : GLOBE
11. Flock leader, for short : REV
14. "The Avengers" supervillain : LOKI
18. Gay rights, e.g. : CAUSE
19. Sportscaster Rashad : AHMAD
20. Hello from Hadrian : AVE
21. Like some enemy waters in wartime : MINED
22. ___ focus : LASER
23. "Geez, get off my back already!" : NAG NAG NAG!
25. Drone's mission, maybe : INTEL
26. Tums and others : ANTACIDS
28. Mountain, in Hawaiian : MAUNA
29. Flip : GO APE
30. With 13-Down, shorthand pact for a wild trip : WHAT HAPPENS (in VEGAS)
34. Mumbai misters : SRIS
35. Green dwarf : BONSAI
39. "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding" philosopher : HUME
40. Old J.F.K. fliers : SSTS
42. C.D. fig. : INT
43. Stopping points : DEPOTS
44. Like most Seth Rogen roles : COMEDIC
46. "Sup, homie" : YO, DOG!
48. Ever so slightly : A MITE
49. Red orbiter : MIR
50. Give formally : CEDE TO
52. With 49-Down, 1995 Oscar-nominated Pixar theme song : YOU'VE GOT A FRIEND (in ME)
57. Tailor-made : SEWN
60. "Pow!" : BAM!
61. Hunted : PREY
62. Rosie, for one : RIVETER
64. Easy step : TROT
66. Ultimate application : END USE
68. Bomb shelters? : SILOS
69. Philosophy book by Spinoza : ETHICS
71. Judge : DEEM
72. Chocolatier's offering : SAMPLER
75. "___ Lisa" : MONA
77. Start of many Batman villain names : THE ...
78. Forensic IDs : DNAS
80. With 58-Down, request for an official document : COULD YOU PUT THAT (in WRITING)
83. Metaphor for a sudden success : METEOR
85. "___ and wisdom are like the seven stars, seldom seen together": Thomas Fuller : WIT
86. Some crackers : THINS
87. The City of a Thousand Minarets : CAIRO
89. Guard at a gated community? : ST PETER
93. Not let a big opportunity slip by, say : POUNCE
94. Bit of roller derby gear : PAD
95. Master of fugues : BACH
97. Latin 101 verb : AMAT
98. Mr. Jefferson of "The Jeffersons" : GEORGE
99. Admiral Zumwalt : ELMO
101. With 90-Down, reacting to a gut punch, perhaps : DOUBLED OVER (in PAIN)
104. Cleverly crafted : SLICK
106. Financial backer for Magellan : SPAIN
107. Diverse : ECLECTIC
113. Gift in a plate : TITHE
114. Stock character like Mayberry's Otis : TOWN DRUNK
117. Bush in the Rose Garden, once : LAURA
118. Light bulb in the fridge? : ONION
119. Dull finish? : -ARD
120. Sister of Clio : ERATO
121. Age-old bug trap : AMBER
122. Barracks barkers: Abbr. : SGTS
123. Drone zone : SKY
124. Prepare, as poultry : DRESS
125. Tiniest thing : LEAST

Down
1. Pac-12 team : UCLA
2. Indian flatbread : NAAN
3. With 18-Across, "To be on the safe side ..." : JUST (in CASE)
4. Out fishing, maybe : ASEA
5. Former Ford make, informally : MERC
6. Whom Indians called "Bapu" ("Father") : GANDHI
7. Home of many monasteries : LHASA
8. "Wow!," in I.M.s : OMG!
9. Outlaw : BAN
10. Sushi bar appetizer : EDAMAME
11. Accrued : RAN UP
12. Not here for long : EVANESCENT
13. Unlikely butchers : VEGANS
14. Typesetting machines, informally : LINOS
15. Locale of the Battle of Stoney Creek in the War of 1812 : ONTARIO
16. With 21-Across, remembering : KEEPING (in MIND)
17. Most lazy : IDLEST
21. Cold War flier : MIG
24. Looked surprised : GAPED
27. "___ robbed!" : I WAS
31. Actress Birch of "American Beauty" : THORA
32. Be busy : HUM
33. Ocular irritation : STYE
35. Didn't like, and said so : BEMOANED
36. Smoke-filled establishment : OPIUM DEN
37. Timeout alternative : NO TV
38. Gets into hot water? : STEEPS
41. They're often loaded : SOTS
43. Versatile couch : DAYBED
44. Dot on a map : CITY
45. Summer coolers : ICEES
47. Performs, in Proverbs : DOETH
49. Good name for a lawn care guy? : MOE
51. W.W. II inits. : DDE
53. Potential hurdles for coll. students : GRES
54. Amenity : FRILL
55. Angry : RILED
56. ___-billed woodpecker : IVORY
58. Twisting : WRITHING
59. "Forget it!" : NO CHANCE!
63. Lens care brand : RENU
65. Biter in Niger : TSETSE
67. Taste that's not sweet, sour, bitter or salty : UMAMI
68. What might win a race : SPURT
70. Something you can't get off your chest? : TATTOO
73. Whiz-bang : ACE
74. Chinese dish often wrapped in pancakes : MOO SHU PORK
75. Naturalist John : MUIR
76. ___-in clause : OPT
79. Tennis's Novak Djokovic, e.g. : SERB
81. Must pay : OWE TO
82. Must See TV night: Abbr. : THUR
84. Repugnant sort : TOAD
87. With 104-Across, talking with a fake rasp, perhaps : CALLING (in SICK)
88. "Fess up!" : ADMIT IT!
90. Bristol, for one : PALIN
91. Wrong no longer : EMENDED
92. Tiny piece : TAD
93. Physics Nobelist Martin, discoverer of the tauon : PERL
94. Italian sauces : PESTOS
96. Longtime Olympics TV host : COSTAS
98. Wall climbers : GECKOS
100. Big figures in Spanish ice skating : OCHOS
102. Off-color : BAWDY
103. Lets it all out : VENTS
105. Plastic guy : KEN
108. Airline to Ben Gurion : EL AL
109. With 125-Across, got the booby prize : CAME (in LAST)
110. March sound : TUBA
111. Angers : IRES
112. Wheel (off) : CART
115. Classroom basics, in a manner of speaking : RRR
116. Fed. rich in oil : UAE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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