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0801-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Aug 15, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Kameron Austin Collins
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 04s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3 … LAD MAG (mad mag!), LYN (Len), HOLY SYNOD (home synod!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Big releases of the '50s : H-BOMBS
The first test of a hydrogen bomb was in 1954 at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. It may have been a technical success but it was an environmental disaster, largely because the actual yield of 15 megatons was unexpected (the military anticipated only 4-6 megatons). The resulting nuclear fallout caused many deaths, and led to birth defects in generations to come.

15. Cobbler waste : PEACH PIT
The dessert called "cobbler" originated in colonial America when settlers invented it as a substitute for suet pudding as they didn’t have the necessary ingredients to make the more traditional dish. Instead, they stewed fruit and covered it with a layer of uncooked scones or biscuits, creating a surface that resembled a "cobbled" street, hence the name.

16. Yale, to the "ten thousand men of Harvard" : OLD ELI
Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1701, making it the third-oldest university in the US. Originally called the Collegiate School, it was renamed to Yale University in honor of retired merchant from London called Elihu Yale, who made generous contributions to the institution. Yale University’s nickname is “Old Eli”, in a nod to the benefactor.

"Ten Thousand Men of Harvard" is one of Harvard’s fight songs, one that was written by student A. Putnam of the class of 1918.
Ten thousand men of Harvard
Want vict'ry today,
For they know that o'er old Eli
Fair Harvard holds sway.

18. Maxim, e.g. : LAD MAG
A "lad mag" is a men's magazine.

"Maxim" is an international men's magazine featuring revealing photo spreads (non-nude in the US) of female celebrities and models.

19. "Star Wars" army member : CLONE
In the “Star Wars” universe, the clone troopers are soldiers cloned from a bounty hunter called Jango Fett. The clone troopers were created by the Galactic Republic, the precursor to the the Galactic Empire.

20. Nixon adviser Nofziger : LYN
Lyn Nofziger was a press secretary for Ronald Reagan when he was Governor of California. Nofziger was also a political advisor to the White House during the Nixon and Reagan administrations. One of Nofziger’s legacies is that he managed to convince President Reagan to drop the program to bring metrification to the US.

24. Parlous : RISKY
“Parlous” is an old contraction of the word “perilous”, with both meaning “risky, dangerous”.

31. Possessive on a Chinese menu : TSO’S
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

33. Classic record label : EMI
EMI was a British music company, with the initialism originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

34. Some kitchen pads : BRILLOS
Brillo Pad is a soapy, steel wool pad, patented in 1913. The company claims that the name "Brillo" is derived from the Latin word for "bright". The problem with the assertion is that no such word exists in Latin, although the prefix brill- is used for words meaning "bright" in Italian, French and Spanish.

35. Jazz's Beiderbecke : BIX
Bix Beiderbecke was a jazz cornet player and composer. Beiderbecke was very influential in the world of jazz in the 1920s in particular and is said to have invented the jazz ballad style.

38. Cornel who wrote "Race Matters" : WEST
Cornel West is a philosopher, academic and activist who was the first African American to graduate Princeton with a Ph.D. in philosophy.

40. Shade of black : SABLE
Sables are small mammals about two feet long, found right across northern Europe and northern Asia. The sable’s black pelt is highly prized in the fur trade. Sable is unique among furs in that it feels smooth no matter which direction it is stroked.

42. Put in bundles for the bookbinder : QUIRED
A “quire” is a measure of paper quantity. There are usually 25 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires (500 sheets) in a ream. However, a quire sometimes only contains 15, 18 or 20 sheets, depending on the type of paper.

46. Characters of average width : ENS
In typography, there are em dashes and en dashes. The em dash is about the width of an "m" character, and an en dash about half that, the width of an "n' character. An en dash is used, for example, to separate numbers designating a range, as in 5-10 years. Th em dash seems to be going out of style, and indeed the application I am using to write this paragraph won't let me show you one!

53. Musician Mendes known for the bossa nova : SERGIO
Sérgio Mendes is a musician from Brazil who headed up the band Sérgio Mendes and Brasil ‘66.

55. Irish runner Coghlan : EAMONN
Eamonn Coghlan is a former middle-distance runner who is now a Senator in his native Ireland. Coghlan ran a sub-four-minute mile at the age of 22, the first Irishman to do so. He also became the first man anywhere over the age of 40 to run a mile below 4 minutes.

56. Principal means of address? : PA SYSTEM
Public address (PA) system

Down
1. Mail ctr. : GPO
General post office (GPO)

2. "Good-___, good fellow" (greeting from Romeo) : E’EN
William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is all about the love between the two title characters, which is forbidden as the pair come from two families who are sworn enemies. Early in the play, Romeo (a Montague) sneaks into a masquerade ball being held by the Capulets in the hope of meeting a Capulet girl named Rosaline. Instead, he meets and falls for Juliet, also a Capulet. Tragedy ensues …

4. Lugs : SCHLEPS
Our word “schlep” means “to carry, drag”. “Schlep” comes from Yiddish, with “shlepen” having the same meaning in that language.

7. See 8-Down : NICE
8. When 7-Down gets hot : ETE
The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France.

9. Highest authority in some Eastern churches : HOLY SYNOD
Several Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches have ruling bodies called Holy Synods, comprising a group of bishops who elect the head bishop or patriarch for their church.

20. One who's disparaged : LIBELEE
The word "libel", meaning a published or written statement likely to harm a person's reputation, comes into English from the Latin "libellus", the word for a small book. Back in the 1500s "libel" was just a formal written statement, with the more damaging meaning arising in the 1600s.

22. "Fiddler on the Roof" setting : SHTETL
The Yiddish word for "town" is "shtot", and so "shtetl" is the diminutive form meaning "small town".

25. 1960s-'80s Bosox legend : YAZ
Yaz is the nickname for Carl Yastrzemski who played his whole career with the Boston Red Sox.

27. Ones symbolized by John Bull : BRITONS
John Bull is a character used in artwork to portray the country of England, much in the way that we use Uncle Sam in the United States. Bull was created by John Arbuthnot in 1712 and is a portly man dressed in a top hat and tails, often with a Union Jack pattern on his vest (or waistcoat as the Brits would say).

28. Basketball's Black Mamba : KOBE BRYANT
Kobe Bryant plays basketball for the LA Lakers. Kobe Bryant got his name from a menu would you believe? His parents were in a Japanese restaurant and liked the name of "Kobe" beef, the beef from around the city of Kobe on the island of Honshu in Japan.

29. Maroon : ENISLE
To maroon: to enisle, to leave on an island.

30. Sent pixxx? : SEXTED
"Sexting" (a portmanteau of "sex" and "texting") is the sending of explicit dialog and images between cell phones. The term "sexting" was first coined by the UK's "Sunday Telegraph Magazine" in a 2005 article. Apparently the practice is "rampant" among teens and young adults. Whatever happened to dinner and a movie ...?

37. Some high-speed cars : GTS
GT stands for "Grand Touring" or "Gran Turismo".

38. Original band that sang "I Shot the Sheriff," with "the" : WAILERS
The Bob Marley song “I Shot the Sheriff” tells of someone who killed the local sheriff. Marley wanted to say “I shot the police”, but figured the government wouldn’t like that too much. He also stated that the song is about justice.

The Wailers were the band, formed in Jamaica in 1963, whose most famous member was Bob Marley. The band's name went through a few iterations, starting out as the Teenagers, then the Wailing Rudeboys, the Wailing Wailers, and finally simply the Wailers.

40. "___ says ..." : SURVEY
“Survey says!” is a phrase oft-heard in the show “Family Feud”.

“Family Feud” is an American game show that has been remade in countries all over the world. We even make a version in Ireland that we call “Family Fortunes”.

43. Plinth, for a pillar : BASE
A plinth is a block on which a column is based. The Greek word "plinthos" means "squared stone".

47. Eric of "Munich" : BANA
Eric Bana is an Australian actor who enjoyed a successful career in his home country before breaking into Hollywood playing an American Delta Force sergeant in "Black Hawk Down". A couple of years later he played the lead in Ang Lee's 2003 movie "The Hulk", the role of Dr Bruce Banner. More recently he played the Romulan villain Nero, in the 2009 "Star Trek" movie.

“Munich” is a 2005 Steven Spielberg film that deals with the Munich massacre that took place at the 1972 Summer Olympic Games, and its aftermath. Much of the movie follows the Mossad operation to track down and kill the terrorists responsible for murdering the israeli athletes.

49. CARE, e.g., for short : NGO
Non-governmental organization (NGO)

The Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) is a humanitarian agency that was founded in 1945 in the US as a conglomerate of twenty-two charities with the aim of delivering aid to Europe after WWII.

51. Food writer Drummond : REE
Ree Drummond is a food writer and blogger. Drummond’s blog “The Pioneer Woman” recounts her daily life on her family’s working ranch outside of Pawhuska, Oklahoma.

52. Pro ___ : TEM
"Pro tempore" can be abbreviated to "pro tem" or "p.t." "Pro tempore" is a Latin phrase that best translates as "for the time being". It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Rock : GEMSTONE
9. Big releases of the '50s : H-BOMBS
15. Cobbler waste : PEACH PIT
16. Yale, to the "ten thousand men of Harvard" : OLD ELI
17. Skating, as a hockey team : ON THE ICE
18. Maxim, e.g. : LAD MAG
19. "Star Wars" army member : CLONE
20. Nixon adviser Nofziger : LYN
21. "Now I get it!" : OHH!
22. World : SPHERE
24. Parlous : RISKY
26. "Are you satisfied now?" : HAPPY?
27. Sweetie : BABYCAKES
31. Possessive on a Chinese menu : TSO’S
32. Relationship with unrequited love, in modern slang : FRIEND ZONE
33. Classic record label : EMI
34. Some kitchen pads : BRILLOS
35. Jazz's Beiderbecke : BIX
36. Stammering : TONGUE-TIED
38. Cornel who wrote "Race Matters" : WEST
39. Tot : LITTLE ONE
40. Shade of black : SABLE
41. Thrown (over) : SLUNG
42. Put in bundles for the bookbinder : QUIRED
43. Specialty, informally : BAG
46. Characters of average width : ENS
47. Musclebound : BURLY
48. Defensive comeback : AREN'T I?
50. Works of childlike simplicity : NAIVE ART
53. Musician Mendes known for the bossa nova : SERGIO
54. Camp dweller : INTERNEE
55. Irish runner Coghlan : EAMONN
56. Principal means of address? : PA SYSTEM

Down
1. Mail ctr. : GPO
2. "Good-___, good fellow" (greeting from Romeo) : E’EN
3. Situation in which one person might have the advantage : MATCH POINT
4. Lugs : SCHLEPS
5. Practice's counterpart : THEORY
6. Speak out : OPINE
7. See 8-Down : NICE
8. When 7-Down gets hot : ETE
9. Highest authority in some Eastern churches : HOLY SYNOD
10. They may get burned : BLANK CDS
11. Miscellaneous : ODD
12. Office paper : MEMO
13. Unexciting : BLAH
14. [Not that again] : SIGH
20. One who's disparaged : LIBELEE
22. "Fiddler on the Roof" setting : SHTETL
23. "Not me": Fr. : PAS MOI
24. What's up for grabs? : RAILING
25. 1960s-'80s Bosox legend : YAZ
27. Ones symbolized by John Bull : BRITONS
28. Basketball's Black Mamba : KOBE BRYANT
29. Maroon : ENISLE
30. Sent pixxx? : SEXTED
32. Cohabitation without marriage : FREE UNION
34. Television interruption : BULLETIN
37. Some high-speed cars : GTS
38. Original band that sang "I Shot the Sheriff," with "the" : WAILERS
40. "___ says ..." : SURVEY
42. What you might call it : QUITS
43. Plinth, for a pillar : BASE
44. Precinct : AREA
45. It can make you sick : GERM
47. Eric of "Munich" : BANA
49. CARE, e.g., for short : NGO
50. Beat by a hair : NIP
51. Food writer Drummond : REE
52. Pro ___ : TEM


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0731-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 15, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: James Mulhern & Ashton Anderson
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 44s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. It often features diva impersonators : DRAG SHOW
The etymology of the term "drag", as used in the transvestite world, seems to be unclear. It perhaps relates to the tendency of a transvestite's skirts to drag along the ground in days of old (although why they just didn't hitch up their skirts is beyond me!).

"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

9. Some IHOP orders : STACKS
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn't do too well in marketing tests ...

15. Musical tool on Time's list of "50 Worst Inventions" : AUTO-TUNE
When Cher recorded the 1998 song "Believe", the audio engineers routinely corrected the sound of Cher's voice to ensure that all notes were sung with perfect pitch (all singers "cheat", it seems!). The software that does this pitch correction is called "Auto-Tune". Then, for a bit of fun, the same engineers played with the Auto-Tune software and created a special effect in her voice that she so liked it was left in the final release. You can easily detect the strange effect if you listen to the song. The process is now called the "Cher Effect" and is used by other artists in their recordings.

Included in the list of “50 Worst Inventions” compiled by “Time” magazine, are:
- New Coke
- Agent Orange
- Hydrogenated oils
- Hydrogen Blimps
- Red Dye No. 2
- Tanning beds
- Asbestos

17. Sister brand of Twinkies : SNO BALLS
The Hostess cakes called Sno Balls are usually pink in color, although in its original form each packet of two cakes contained one white and one pink. Around Halloween you can buy Sno Balls in the form of Scary Cakes and Glo Balls that are colored orange and green. and on St. Paddy's Day there's a green one available. Yoo hoo!

The snack cakes called Twinkies have been around since 1930. They were created by a baker called James Dewar, who chose the name from a billboard advertising “Twinkle Toe Shoes”. The original filling in the cake was a banana cream, but this was swapped out as a result of rationing during WWII. The vanilla cream became so popular that the banana recipe was dropped completely.

18. Psychiatrist played by Mia Farrow in "Zelig" : EUDORA
"Zelig" is a 1983 film by Woody Allen. "Zelig" tells the fictitious story, in documentary style, of Leonard Zelig (played by Allen) who has the gift of being able to change his appearance in order to better fit in with the company he keeps. He becomes famous as a "human chameleon". By using archive footage, the film includes clever "cameos" by real figures from history (like Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover and Susan Sontag).

Mia Farrow is an energetic, award-winning actress who really hasn't looked back in her career since her first leading role, in "Rosemary's Baby" back in 1968. Her on-screen celebrity is matched by the interest created by her personal life. Her first husband was Frank Sinatra, a wedding in 1966 that received a lot of attention partly due to the couple's age difference (she was 21, he was 50). Her second husband was almost as famous, the magnificent musician André Previn. Farrow then moved in with Woody Allen, a relationship that famously fell apart when Farrow discovered that Allen was having a sexual relationship with Soon-Yi, one of her adopted daughters from the marriage with André Previn.

23. Sudanese president ___ al-Bashir : OMAR
In response to a 2003 rebellion in the Darfur region of Sudan, the Sudanese government embarked on a campaign of ethnic cleansing against the non-Arab population in the region. Hundreds of thousands of civilian deaths ensued, and eventually Sudan’s president Omar al-Bashir was indicted for crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court. al Bashir is still in office.

27. Donald Duck cartoon princess : OONA
Princess Oona is one of the ducks appearing in stories about “Donald Duck”. Created in 1994, Oona lives in a cave and is usually proclaiming her interest in Donald, romantically that is …

28. A tyre may rub against one : KERB
"Curb" is another of those words that I had to learn when I came to the US. We park by the "kerb" on the other side of the Atlantic. Oh, and the "pavement", that's what we call the "footpath" (because the footpath is "paved"!). It's very confusing when you arrive in this country from Ireland, and a little dangerous when one has been taught to "walk on the pavement" ...

The British spelling of “tyre”, for what we call a “tire” here in North America, was indeed the original spelling. The English started to use “tire” spelling in the 17th century, and then shifted back to the current “tyre” in the 19th century.

29. Swamp thing : GATOR
Crocodiles and alligators do indeed bear a resemblance to each other, although they belong to distinct biological families. One of the main ways used to distinguish them is by their teeth and jaws. Both the upper and lower sets of teeth of a crocodile are visible when its mouth is closed, whereas only the upper teeth of an alligator are visible with the mouth shut.

30. Times Sq. bargain booth : TKTS
The “TKTS” booths sell discount theater tickets, notably in Times Square in New York and in the West End of London.

31. Ziering of "Sharknado" : IAN
Ian Ziering is an actor best-known for playing Steve Sanders on the TV show “Beverly Hills, 90210”.

“Sharknado” is a 2013 tongue-in-cheek disaster movie that was made for the Syfy television channel. The basis of the plot is a freak hurricane that hits Los Angeles, resulting in a flood that leaves man-eating sharks roaming the city. I don’t think so ...

32. Cartoon character often pictured on his back : SNOOPY
When cartoon beagle Snoopy adopts his "Joe Cool" alias, he puts on sunglasses and just leans against a wall doing nothing. Other times, Snoopy can be seen lolling around, lying on his back on top of his kennel.

33. Pip's place : CARD
A pip is a dot on a die or a domino, or a mark on a playing card.

35. Gendarme's topper : KEPI
A kepi is a circular cap with a visor that’s worn in particular by the French military.

In France, a “gendarme” is military office with policing duties among the civilian population. The name “gendarme” comes from the Old French “gen d’armes” meaning “men-at-arms”. France’s Gendarmerie Nationale work alongside the Police Nationale, a civil law enforcement agency.

45. "___ Bell" (Stephen Foster song) : KATY
Stephen Foster was a songwriter active in the 19th century who is sometimes referred to as “the father of American music”. Foster wrote some really famous songs, including “Oh! Susanna”, “Camptown Races”, “My Old Kentucky Home”, “Jeannie with the Light Brown Hair” and “Beautiful Dreamer”. Despite the success of his songs, Foster made very little cash in his own lifetime. That all went to his publishers, with the composer impoverished in the last few years of his life.

46. ___ Bell : TACO
Taco Bell was founded by a former US Marine, 25-year-old Glen Bell. His first restaurant was Bell’s Drive-In, located in Southern California. After opening that first establishment, Bell bought up some more restaurants including four named El Taco. He sold off the El Taco restaurants but used the name in part when he opened his first Taco Bell in 1962. Bell sold then sold franchises, with the 100th Taco Bell opening in 1967. The ex-Marine sold off the whole chain to PepsiCo in 1978, and I am guessing he made a pretty penny.

48. One on whom tabs keep tabs : CELEB
"Tabloid" is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

51. Lower leg woe, slangily : CANKLES
“Cankle” is an informal term describing a thickened area between the calf and ankle of person who is overweight.

53. Country ___ : HAM
Country ham is a salty, cured ham.

58. Academic award : TENURE
A job in a university that is described as “tenure-track” is one that can lead to a tenured position. A tenured position is a “job for life”. A person with tenure can only be dismissed for cause.

60. Drawer of paradoxes : ESCHER
M. C. Escher was a gra 60. Drawer of paradoxes : ESCHER
phic artist from the Netherlands. Escher was noted for creating works inspired by mathematics, often works that were physical impossibilities. One famous such work is “Drawing Hands” (1948) in which a pair of hands emerge from a piece of paper and actually draw themselves. He also created a drawing in which a group of red ants are crawling around a Möbius strip, never reaching the end.

Down
1. Oversize Oktoberfest vessel named after a classic film : DAS BOOT
I am ashamed to say that I have never watched the whole of the 1981 movie "Das Boot", even though I love WWII submarine films. The film drew great critical acclaim, good news for the producers as it is one of the most expensive films ever made in Germany. The story is about the German U-boat U-96 on a patrol in October of 1941. There is a large glass, boot-shaped vessel called “das boot” that is often used at Oktoberfest and which takes its name from the movie.

2. Go nuts : RUN AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

3. Slight '60s superhero : ATOM ANT
Atom Ant is a cartoon character introduced by Hanna-Barbera in 1965.

4. Hunk : GOB
“Gobs” is an informal term meaning “a large amount”.

5. Whack : STAB
Take a whack, take a stab, have a try.

6. Hipster's dance wear? : HULA SKIRT
Hula is the name of the Polynesian dance. The chant or song that the dance illustrates, that's known as the mele.

9. Restaurateur's turf? : STEAK
From the French, a “restaurateur” (without a letter N) owns or manages a restaurant (with a letter N).

21. Rainy day rarity : CAB
A hansom cab is a very specific design of horse and buggy that was patented by Joseph Hansom in 1834 in England. The "cab" in the name is short for "cabriolet", a prior design of carriage on which the hansom was based. It's from "hansom cab" that we get our modern term "cab".

26. 20th-century revolutionaries : MAOISTS
The Maoist philosophy holds that the agrarian worker, as opposed to the more general working class, is the driving force in transforming from a capitalist society into a socialist society.

29. Country stat : GNP
A country’s Gross National Product (GNP) is the value of all services and products produced by its residents in a particular year. GNP includes all production wherever it is in the world, as long as the business is owned by residents of the country concerned. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is different, although related, and is the value of all services and goods produced within the borders of the country for that year.

34. One of Aesop's animals : ASS
Aesop used the ass in at least four of his fables:
- The Ass and his Masters
- The Ass and the Pig
- The Ass Carrying an Image
- The Ass in the Lion’s Skin

Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

35. Vodka with an "Oranje" variety : KETEL ONE
Ketel One is a brand of vodka from the Netherlands. The vodka is distilled from wheat in copper pot stills, and “ketel” is Dutch for “pot still”.

36. Chanteuse, e.g. : ARTISTE
A “chanteuse” is a female singer, a French term.

41. Game named after the Hindi word for "twenty-five" : PACHISI
Pachisi is an ancient Indian game that has been commercialized in the West as Ludo, Sorry! and Parcheesi. The name derives from the Hindi “pachis” meaning “twenty-five”, which is the largest score that can thrown in one move in the original game.

42. Land at 0 degrees latitude : ECUADOR
"Ecuador" is the Spanish word for "equator", which gives the country its name.

Lines of latitude are the imaginary horizontal lines surrounding the planet. The most "important" lines of latitude are, from north to south:
- Arctic Circle
- Tropic of Cancer
- Equator
- Tropic of Capricorn
- Antarctic Circle

43. Kudize : COMMEND
“To kudize” is grant honors to, to give kudos to.

Our word "kudos" means acclaim given for an exceptional achievement. "Kudos" is not a plural, despite a common misapprehension. It is a singular noun derived from the Greek "kyddos" meaning "glory, fame".

45. Grasp : KEN
“Ken” is a noun meaning “understanding, perception”. One might say, for example, “half the clues in Saturday’s crossword are beyond my ken, beyond my understanding”.

48. Hawk or Pelican : CAGER
In the early days of basketball, when a ball went out of bounds possession was awarded to the player who first retrieved the ball. This led to mad scuffles off the court, often involving spectators. As the game became more organized courts were routinely "caged", largely because of this out of bounds rule, to limit interaction with the crowd. It's because of these cages that basketball players are sometimes referred to today as "cagers".

The NBA’s Atlanta Hawks started out as the Buffalo Bisons in 1946, although after only a few months the team was moved to Moline, Illinois as the Tri-Cities Blackhawks. The Blackhawks were one of the 17 original teams playing at the founding of the National Basketball Association. There was another move in 1951 and a renaming to the Milwaukee Hawks, and yet again in 1955 when the team became the St. Louis Hawks. The latest move was to Atlanta, in 1968.

The New Orleans Pelicans joined the NBA in 1988 as an expansion team, originally based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The team was going to be called the Charlotte Spirit, but the name was changed following a "name the team" contest run in the local area. During the Revolutionary War, Lord General Cornwallis had referred to Charlotte as a "veritable nest of hornets" due the city's resistance to British occupation, which explains the local fans' fondness for the name "Hornets". The franchise was moved to New Orleans for the 2002 season, as attendance wasn't big enough to sustain the team in Charlotte. The team had to play two seasons in Oklahoma City due to damage caused by Hurricane Katrina, and played as the New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets. After several years back in New Orleans, the franchise was renamed to the Pelicans, a nod to the Brown Pelican that is the Louisiana state bird.

57. 2011 Grammy winner Corinne Bailey ___ : RAE
Corinne Bailey Rae is a British singer from Yorkshire in the north of England.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. It often features diva impersonators : DRAG SHOW
9. Some IHOP orders : STACKS
15. Musical tool on Time's list of "50 Worst Inventions" : AUTO-TUNE
16. "Reading room" : TOILET
17. Sister brand of Twinkies : SNO BALLS
18. Psychiatrist played by Mia Farrow in "Zelig" : EUDORA
19. "Just like THAT!" : BAM!
20. Help in catching an auto thief : BAIT CAR
22. Authority on bugs? : SPY
23. Sudanese president ___ al-Bashir : OMAR
25. Slippery sort : SNEAK
26. Join : MELD
27. Donald Duck cartoon princess : OONA
28. A tyre may rub against one : KERB
29. Swamp thing : GATOR
30. Times Sq. bargain booth : TKTS
31. Ziering of "Sharknado" : IAN
32. Cartoon character often pictured on his back : SNOOPY
33. Pip's place : CARD
35. Gendarme's topper : KEPI
36. Cry after a holdup : AT LAST!
39. Role in an 8-Down, maybe : TEX
40. What many designers work on : SPEC
44. Is turbulent : ROILS
45. "___ Bell" (Stephen Foster song) : KATY
46. ___ Bell : TACO
47. Max : TOPS
48. One on whom tabs keep tabs : CELEB
49. Lowest of the low : SCUM
50. Fingers : IDS
51. Lower leg woe, slangily : CANKLES
53. Country ___ : HAM
54. Cunning sort : SLY DOG
56. Outing on a river or lake : BOAT RIDE
58. Academic award : TENURE
59. Like strawberries during the summer and apples during the fall : IN SEASON
60. Drawer of paradoxes : ESCHER
61. Turn awkward, as a relationship : GET WEIRD

Down
1. Situate : PUT
2. Musician who coined the term "ambient music" : ENO
3. Downright homely : PLUG-UGLY
4. Something to meditate on : YOGA MAT
5. Deep divide : SCHISM
6. Small price to pay? : AMT
7. Printing problems : JAM-UPS
8. Revival reply : AMEN
9. What's really hot : RAGE
10. TV news host Melissa ___-Perry : HARRIS
11. Swirly-colored marbles : AGATES
12. Ones in the closet? : MOTHS
14. Chess piece: Abbr. : KNT
18. Worth keeping : USABLE
22. To whom "I'll take ..." is often said : ALEX
23. "Rock Me" group, 1975 : ABBA
24. What a title may come with : LIEN
26. Muslim V.I.P.s : MULLAHS
29. One doing the dishes? : YENTE
30. Relating to part of the small intestine : ILEAC
31. Quick approval : NOD
36. Source of some shadows, for short : KGB
37. Woolly : LANATE
38. "Looks like I was wrong" : GUESS NOT
39. Vault locale : APSE
40. Glasses, informally : SPEX
41. Taiwan-based computer giant : ACER
43. Put on again : RESTAGE
44. Long vowel indicator : MACRON
45. Creator of the characters added in 17-, 28-, 44- and 57-Across : ALCOTT
46. University that was originally the Medical College of Louisiana : TULANE
47. Like some tea : HERBAL
48. "The way beer was meant to be" sloganeer, once : PABST
52. Home of Bountiful : UTAH
53. Duncan of Obama's cabinet : ARNE
55. "___ I'm saying is ..." : ALL
58. Cartoonist Mayerik who co-created Howard the Duck : VAL
59. Book before Psalms : JOB
60. Last ___ : ONE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0730-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Brendan Emmett Quigley
THEME: Added Little Women … each of today’s themed answers is well-known phrase, but with the name of a character from Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” inserted:
45D. Creator of the characters added in 17-, 28-, 44- and 57-Across : ALCOTT

17A. Hardy brown spice? : TOUGH NUTMEG (“tough nut” & “Meg”)
28A. Company that will get you a second spouse? : BIGAMY BUSINESS (“big business” & “Amy”)
44A. Extremely tacky production of a Shakespeare play? : MACBETH ‘N’ CHEESE (“mac ‘n cheese” & “Beth”)
57A. Country instrument played by a migrant? : TRAVEL BANJO (“travel ban” & “Jo”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 ... HEEL (heed!!!), VAL (Vad)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Chronicler of the English Restoration : PEPYS
Samuel Pepys was a British Member of Parliament and naval administrator, more famous these days for his diary than for his contribution to political history. Pepys started to keep a diary on New Year's Day in 1660 and recorded his daily life for almost ten years. His writings include details of his personal life as well as firsthand accounts of the important events of the 1660s such as the Great Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of London in 1666.

In English history, the Restoration was the period immediately following the restoration of the English monarchy to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland. This took place in 1660 when Charles II was crowned king after an 11-year gap following the execution of his father Charles I.

6. Open a crack : AJAR
Our word "ajar" is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which "a char" means "slightly open".

10. Player for big laughs : HAM
The word "ham", describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of "hamfatter" and dates back to the late 1800s. "Hamfatter" comes from a song in old minstrel shows called "The Ham-Fat Man". It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the "acting" qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

15. Baby ___ : MAMA
“Baby mama” is a term used these days as an alternative for “single mother”.

17. Hardy brown spice? : TOUGH NUTMEG (“tough nut” & “Meg”)
The fruit of the nutmeg tree yields two very different spices. What we call “nutmeg” comes from the seed of the tree. “Mace” is the dried covering of the seed.

20. Shambles, e.g. : GAITS
“To shamble” is to walk awkwardly, to shuffle along. The term may derive from the use of “shamble” as a noun meaning a butcher’s shop. A shambling gait might involve the leg’s being someone splayed, resembling the legs on a butchers’ table. As an aside, the most famous old street in York in the north of England is called “the Shambles”. Back in the late 1800s, the relatively short street was home to twenty-five butchers’ shops, although all are long gone now.

23. Many homecoming attendees, informally : ALUMS
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

25. Booster for a band : AMP
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

32. Corn ___ : BELT
The Corn Belt (sometimes “Grain Belt”) is a region in the Midwest where, since the mid-1800s, corn has been the major crop. Geographically, the Corn Belt covers Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and parts of Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota and Missouri. About 40% of the world’s corn production comes from the region, and most of that production is used for the feeding of livestock.

33. School closing? : ELL
The word “school” ends with a letter L (ell).

34. Deli stock : LOX
Lox is a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

36. Rang : KNELLED
The word "knell" is used for a solemn ring from a bell, often associated with death or a funeral. "Knell" comes the Old English "cnell" and is probably imitative in origin, sounding like a peal from a large bell.

38. Real blast : GAS
I reckon use of "a gas" to mean something fun must come from Ireland (I couldn't confirm it though). We use the word "gas" as an adjective meaning "hilarious". So, we'd say "that's gas" when describing something very funny.

41. Deal maker: Abbr. : AGT
Agent (agt.)

42. Like some baseball : AAA
A, AA and AAA are minor leagues in baseball.

43. Lexington's ___ Arena : RUPP
The Rupp Arena in Lexington, Kentucky is home to the University of Kentucky’s men’s basketball team. The arena is is named for former Kentucky coach Adolph Rupp, and is the country’s largest sports indoor area with a capacity of 24,000 people.

44. Extremely tacky production of a Shakespeare play? : MACBETH ‘N’ CHEESE (“mac ‘n cheese” & “Beth”)
There is a superstition in the theatrical world that uttering the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring disaster of some sort. To avoid this, the euphemism “the Scottish Play” is used instead.

Thomas Jefferson’s name is associated with the dish we known today as “mac ‘n’ cheese”. The future president discovered the baked macaroni with Parmesan cheese while in Paris and in northern Italy. He started serving the dish to guests in the US, and even had a machine imported to make the macaroni locally. Whether or not Jefferson was the first to bring mac ‘n’ cheese to America isn’t entirely clear, but it has been popular ever since.

49. Network with "Suits" and "Royal Pains" : USA
The USA Network cable television channel has been around since 1971. Back in 1971 it was called the Madison Square Garden Network, becoming USA in 1979.

50. Whaling ship that inspired "Moby-Dick" : ESSEX
Herman Melville mined his own experiences when writing his novels. Melville sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1841 on a whaler called Acushnet, heading into the Pacific Ocean. He used his experience on the Acushnet, as well as the 1820 sinking of the Nantucket ship Essex, as source material for “Moby-Dick”.

54. Pop-___ : TARTS
Pop-Tart is the most successful single brand for the Kellogg company, as millions of the sugary treats are sold every year. The US Military bought quite a few in 2001, and dropped 2.4 million Pop-Tarts into Afghanistan during the invasion after 9/11.

56. Man cave invitee : BRO
“Man cave” is a slang term for a male sanctuary within a home, often a spare bedroom (as it is in our house) or a converted garage.

57. Country instrument played by a migrant? : TRAVEL BANJO (“travel ban” & “Jo”)
The instrument that we know today as the banjo is a derivative of instruments that were used in Africa.

61. Rummy : SOT
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

62. Actress Gunn of "Breaking Bad" : ANNA
Anna Gunn is an actress from Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is best known for playing Skyler White on the TV show “Breaking Bad”.

63. Calm swimming spot : LAGOON
A lagoon is a shallow body of water, usually separated from the sea by sandbar or reef. The term comes from the Italian “laguna”, the word for a pond or lake. The original “laguna” is the “Laguna Veneta”, the enclosed bay in the Adriatic Sea on which Venice is located. In 1769, Captain Cook was the first to apply the word “lagoon” to the body of water inside a South Seas atoll.

64. Sticks in an abandoned building? : TNT
I’m not sure that TNT comes in “sticks”. Dynamite does, but the two explosives are unrelated.

TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

The explosive called dynamite contains nitroglycerin as its active component. Dynamite also contains diatomaceous earth and sodium carbonate that absorb the nitroglycerin. The absorbed nitroglycerin is far less sensitive to mechanical shock, making it easier to transport and to handle. Famously, dynamite was invented by Alfred Nobel, the man who used his fortune to institute the Nobel Prizes.

Down
2. Musician who coined the term "ambient music" : ENO
Musician Brian Eno started his career as synthesiser player with Roxy Music and then launched a very successful solo career in the seventies. Eno is considered as a pioneer of the ambient music genre.

4. Something to meditate on : YOGA MAT
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

5. Deep divide : SCHISM
A schism is a split or a division, especially in a religion.

6. Small price to pay? : AMT
A “price to pay” is an “amount”, which can be abbreviated to “amt.”

8. Revival reply : AMEN
The word “amen” is translated as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

10. TV news host Melissa ___-Perry : HARRIS
Melissa Harris-Perry is a political commentator with a show on MSNBC called simplu “Melissa Harris-Perry”. Perry also fills in regularly as host on “The Rachel Maddow Show”.

11. Swirly-colored marbles : AGATES
A playing marble made from agate is called just that, an agate. Steelies on the other hand, are made from solid steel.

12. Ones in the closet? : MOTHS
The larvae of several types of moth are noted for eating fabrics made from natural fibers such as wool or cotton. Many people store woolens in cedar chests believing that the scent of the wood prevents a moth infestation. In fact, the only known effective repellent is the naphthalene found in mothballs, which might be a health concern for humans. One way to kill moth larvae in fabric is to freeze the garment for several days at a temperature below 8 degrees centigrade.

14. Chess piece: Abbr. : KNT
It is believed that the game of chess originated in northwest India, evolving from a 6th-century game called "chaturanga", a Sanskrit word meaning "four divisions". These four (military) divisions were represented in the game:
- Infantry (now "pawns")
- Cavalry (now "knights")
- Elephants (now "bishops")
- Chariots (now "rooks")

22. To whom "I'll take ..." is often said : ALEX
"Jeopardy" first went on the air in 1964, and is another successful Merv Griffin creation. But it took the introduction of Alex Trebek as host in order to bring the show into the big times. Trebek has been host since 1984.

23. "Rock Me" group, 1975 : ABBA
I am an unapologetic fan of ABBA's music. ABBA was of course the Swedish group who topped the charts in the seventies and eighties. The name ABBA is an acronym formed from the first letters of the given names of each of the band members, namely: Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid.

24. What a title may come with : LIEN
A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone's property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

26. Muslim V.I.P.s : MULLAHS
In the Islamic tradition a mullah is a man or woman educated in theology and sacred law.

29. One doing the dishes? : YENTE
Yenta (also "Yente") is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater "yenta" came to mean a busybody.

30. Relating to part of the small intestine : ILEAC
The human ileum is the lowest part of the small intestine, found below the jejunum and above the cecum of the large intestine.

36. Source of some shadows, for short : KGB
The Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d'état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

37. Woolly : LANATE
Lanate is a biological term, and is used to describe something that has a wooly or hairy appearance or covering. It is derived from the Latin word "lana" meaning wool.

39. Vault locale : APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

41. Taiwan-based computer giant : ACER
I owned several Acer laptops, which are for my money the most reliable machine at the best price. Acer is a Taiwanese company that I used to visit a lot when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed with the company's dedication to quality, and haven't been let down since.

44. Long vowel indicator : MACRON
A macron is a diacritical mark placed above a vowel. It is a horizontal line and is used to indicate that the vowel is long.

A diacritic mark is added to a letter to indicate that it has a special phonetic sound. Examples of diacritic marks are the tilde above the n in Spanish words like “piñata”, and the cedilla under the c in French words like “façade”.

45. Creator of the characters added in 17-, 28-, 44- and 57-Across : ALCOTT
"Little Women" is a novel written by American author Louisa May Alcott. The quartet of little women is Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March. Jo is a tomboy and the main character in the story, and is based on Alcott herself.

46. University that was originally the Medical College of Louisiana : TULANE
Tulane University is a private research university in New Orleans, Louisiana. Tulane was founded in 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana. The university was privatized with the aid of an endowment from philanthropist Paul Tulane in 1884, and as a result the school’s name was changed to Tulane University.

48. "The way beer was meant to be" sloganeer, once : PABST
Pabst Blue Ribbon is the most recognizable brand of beer from the Pabst Brewing Company. There appears to be some dispute over whether or not Pabst beer ever won a "blue ribbon" prize, but the company claims that it did so at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. The beer was originally called Pabst Best Select, and then just Pabst Select. With the renaming to Blue Ribbon, the beer was sold with an actual blue ribbon tied around the neck of the bottle until it was dropped in 1916 and incorporated into the label.

52. Home of Bountiful : UTAH
The city of Bountiful is in the northern part of Utah, and serves as a bedroom community for Salt Lake City. Bountiful was settled back in 1847, the second settlement in Utah right after Salt Lake City. It was originally called Sessions Settlement after the first settler, Perrigrine Sessions, and later North Canyon Ward. The name Bountiful was adopted in 1855, taking the name of a city in the Book of Mormon.

53. Duncan of Obama's cabinet : ARNE
Long before Arne Duncan became Secretary of Education he was a professional basketball player, but not in the NBA. Duncan played for the National Basketball League of Australia, for the Eastside Spectres in Melbourne.

58. Cartoonist Mayerik who co-created Howard the Duck : VAL
Howard the Duck is a character in the Marvel Comics universe who was created by writer Steve Gerber and artist Val Mayerik. Howard is a satirical character, not really the usual comic book superhero.

59. Book before Psalms : JOB
The story of “the patience of Job” is told in the Book of Job in the Bible. Job exhibits great patience in refusing to condemn God after Satan was allowed to destroy his family, his health and his property.

The Greek word "psalmoi" originally meant "songs sung to a harp", and gave us the word "psalms".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Chronicler of the English Restoration : PEPYS
6. Open a crack : AJAR
10. Player for big laughs : HAM
13. Crack, as a code : UNLOCK
15. Baby ___ : MAMA
16. Back : AGO
17. Hardy brown spice? : TOUGH NUTMEG (“tough nut” & “Meg”)
19. Tell : RAT
20. Shambles, e.g. : GAITS
21. Bring to light : UNEARTH
23. Many homecoming attendees, informally : ALUMS
25. Booster for a band : AMP
27. Not just deception : LIES
28. Company that will get you a second spouse? : BIGAMY BUSINESS (“big business” & “Amy”)
32. Corn ___ : BELT
33. School closing? : ELL
34. Deli stock : LOX
35. "Take your pick" : ANY
36. Rang : KNELLED
38. Real blast : GAS
41. Deal maker: Abbr. : AGT
42. Like some baseball : AAA
43. Lexington's ___ Arena : RUPP
44. Extremely tacky production of a Shakespeare play? : MACBETH ‘N CHEESE (“mac ‘n’ cheese” & “Beth”)
48. Ill-looking : PALE
49. Network with "Suits" and "Royal Pains" : USA
50. Whaling ship that inspired "Moby-Dick" : ESSEX
51. Increase in interest : ACCRUAL
54. Pop-___ : TARTS
56. Man cave invitee : BRO
57. Country instrument played by a migrant? : TRAVEL BANJO (“travel ban” & “Jo”)
61. Rummy : SOT
62. Actress Gunn of "Breaking Bad" : ANNA
63. Calm swimming spot : LAGOON
64. Sticks in an abandoned building? : TNT
65. "Follow" : HEEL
66. Don't bother : LET BE

Down
1. Situate : PUT
2. Musician who coined the term "ambient music" : ENO
3. Downright homely : PLUG-UGLY
4. Something to meditate on : YOGA MAT
5. Deep divide : SCHISM
6. Small price to pay? : AMT
7. Printing problems : JAM-UPS
8. Revival reply : AMEN
9. What's really hot : RAGE
10. TV news host Melissa ___-Perry : HARRIS
11. Swirly-colored marbles : AGATES
12. Ones in the closet? : MOTHS
14. Chess piece: Abbr. : KNT
18. Worth keeping : USABLE
22. To whom "I'll take ..." is often said : ALEX
23. "Rock Me" group, 1975 : ABBA
24. What a title may come with : LIEN
26. Muslim V.I.P.s : MULLAHS
29. One doing the dishes? : YENTE
30. Relating to part of the small intestine : ILEAC
31. Quick approval : NOD
36. Source of some shadows, for short : KGB
37. Woolly : LANATE
38. "Looks like I was wrong" : GUESS NOT
39. Vault locale : APSE
40. Glasses, informally : SPEX
41. Taiwan-based computer giant : ACER
43. Put on again : RESTAGE
44. Long vowel indicator : MACRON
45. Creator of the characters added in 17-, 28-, 44- and 57-Across : ALCOTT
46. University that was originally the Medical College of Louisiana : TULANE
47. Like some tea : HERBAL
48. "The way beer was meant to be" sloganeer, once : PABST
52. Home of Bountiful : UTAH
53. Duncan of Obama's cabinet : ARNE
55. "___ I'm saying is ..." : ALL
58. Cartoonist Mayerik who co-created Howard the Duck : VAL
59. Book before Psalms : JOB
60. Last ___ : ONE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0729-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 15, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

Share today's solution with a friend:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: David J. Lieb
THEME: Double-Double … each of today’s themed answers comprises two words, each of which can follow DOUBLE:
65A. Statistical achievement in basketball ... or what the answer to each starred clue is : DOUBLE-DOUBLE

18A. *It's divided into four zones in the contiguous U.S. states : STANDARD TIME (double standard & double time)
27A. *Coup d'état, e.g. : TAKEOVER (double take & double over)
33A. *Incidental chatter : CROSS TALK (double cross & double-talk)
47A. *Handouts to theatergoers : PLAYBILLS (double play & double bills)
53A. *Make retroactive : BACKDATE (double back & double date)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Parent of a zorse or a zonkey : ZEBRA
A “zebroid” is the offspring of a zebra and another equine. More specifically, a “zorse” is a hybrid of a zebra and a horse, and a “zonkey” is the offspring of a zebra and a donkey.

12. "Fresh Air" network : NPR
National Public Radio (now just called NPR) was launched in 1970 after President Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The intent of the act was to provide funding for radio and television broadcasting that wasn’t simply driven by profit. As a longtime fan of the state-funded BBC in the UK, I’d have to agree with that intent …

“Fresh Air” is a marvelous radio talk show broadcast on NPR, hosted by Terry Gross. The first broadcast of the program was made in 1975, with Judy Blank hosting. Terry Gross took over a few months later, and Gross has been presenting and producing the show ever since. I had the privilege of hearing Terry Gross give a talk here in my hometown some years ago. What a fascinating woman she is, full of great stories about the her experiences interviewing so many interesting personalities.

15. Knuckle to the head : NOOGIE
A “noogie” is that childish move where someone rubs his (and it’s always a guy!) knuckles into a person’s head to create a little soreness.

16. Lop-___ : EARED
A creature that is “lop-eared” has bent or drooping ears.

17. "Hostel" director Roth : ELI
Eli Roth is one of a group of directors of horror movies known quite graphically as "The Splat Pack". I can't stand "splat" movies and avoid them as best I can. Roth is also famous for playing Donny Donowitz in the Quentin Tarantino movie "Inglourious Basterds", a good film I thought, if you close your eyes during the gruesome bits.

18. *It's divided into four zones in the contiguous U.S. states : STANDARD TIME (double standard & double time)
That would be Pacific, Mountain, Central and Eastern Standard Time.

22. Carne ___ (burrito filler) : ASADA
The name of the dish called “Carne Asada” translates from Spanish as "roasted meat".

23. Eight-year member of Clinton's cabinet : RENO
Janet Reno was Attorney General of the US from 1993 to 2001. Reno was the person to hold the office second longest, and was our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Thereafter she retired from public life.

27. *Coup d'état, e.g. : TAKEOVER (double take & double over)
A coup d'état (often just "coup") is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for "stroke of state". The Swiss German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”.

29. Blood-typing system : ABO
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a "universal donor".

30. What a line drive lacks : ARC
In baseball, a line drive is a ball that is hit low, hard and straight.

37. Stain on one's reputation : STIGMA
A stigma (plural “stigmata), in a social sense, is a distinguishing mark of disgrace. For example, one might have to suffer the stigma of being in prison. The term derives from the Greek “stigma”, which was a mark or brand.

41. Home of the Buccaneers : TAMPA
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers joined the NFL in 1976 along with the Seattle Seahawks as expansion teams. The Bucs had a tough start in the NFL, losing their first 26 games. Things went better in the early eighties, but then the team went through 14 consecutive losing seasons. Their luck changed again though, and they won the Super Bowl at the end of the 2002 season.

42. Knuckleballer Wilhelm : HOYT
Hoyt Wilhelm was a Major league pitcher. Hoyt had a long career and made his final appearance (for the LA Dodgers) in 1972, just shy of his 50th birthday.

47. *Handouts to theatergoers : PLAYBILLS (double play & double bills)
I get quite a kick out of reading the bios in "Playbill" as some of them can be really goofy and entertaining. "Playbill" started off in 1884 in New York as an in-house publication for just one theater on 21st St. You can't see any decent-sized production these days anywhere in the United States without being handed a copy of "Playbill".

49. Regatta gear : OARS
The word "regatta" is Venetian dialect and was originally used to describe boat races among the gondoliers of Venice on the Grand Canal back in the mid-1600s.

51. Flight info, briefly : ETA
Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

52. End to "end" : DEE
The end of the word “end” is the letter D (dee).

57. Russell of "Black Widow" : THERESA
“Black Widow" is a 1987 thriller about a woman who marries wealthy men and murders them for their money, and the efforts made by a female agent in the Department of Justice who tries to prove the crimes. The “black widow” is played by Theresa Russell, and the agent by Debra Winger.

60. Site with Daily Deals : EBAY
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

61. Fare for Oliver Twist : GRUEL
"Oliver Twist" is a novel by Charles Dickens. It is a popular tale for adaptation to the big screen. There were two silent film versions, in 1909 and 1922, and the first talkie version was released in 1933, with many to follow. The latest "Oliver" for the big screen was a 2005 Roman Polanski production.

63. Hoodwink : CON
"Hoodwink" has had the meaning "to deceive" since about 1600. Prior to that it meant simply "to blindfold", and is simply a combining of the words "hood" and "wink".

64. Great Society inits. : LBJ
President Johnson introduced a set of programs in the mid-sixties that were designed to eliminate racial injustice and domestic poverty. The president called these programs “the Great Society”. Some of the Great Society programs have survived the ravages of time, such as Medicare, Medicaid and the Older Americans Act.

65. Statistical achievement in basketball ... or what the answer to each starred clue is : DOUBLE-DOUBLE
In the world of basketball, a “double” is the accumulation of double digits in either points, rebounds, assists, steals or blocked shots. A “double-double” is getting double digits in two of these five categories. A player can also earn a triple-double, quadruple-double or quintuple-double.

69. Fraternity letter : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

71. Breath mint in a tin : ALTOID
Altoids breath mints have been around since 1780, when they were introduced in Britain. The famous tin in which Altoids are sold is often reused for other purposes. The most famous use is as a container to hold a mini survival kit.

72. Hyphenated ID : SSN
A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSNs are assigned randomly.

Down
3. Where forgotten umbrellas may accumulate : COATROOMS
Our term “umbrella” ultimately derives from the Latin “umbra” meaning “shade, shadow”.

4. Vice president before Ford : AGNEW
Spiro Agnew served as Vice-President under Richard Nixon, before becoming the only VP in American history to resign because of criminal charges (there was a bribery scandal). Agnew was also the first Greek-American to serve as US Vice-President as he was the son of a Greek immigrant who had shortened the family name from Anagnostopoulos.

President Gerald Ford was well known for his athletic prowess. He was the star football player both in his high school and later at the University of Michigan. After graduation, President Ford received two offers to play in the NFL, from the Detroit Lions and the Green Bay Packers. He turned down both teams opting instead to take a coaching position at Yale giving him the opportunity to apply to Yale Law School. But young Mr. Ford's plan backfired as Yale Law School turned him down because of his full-time commitment to sports: coaching football, boxing and teaching JV cheerleading. It took three years for President Ford to make it into Yale Law School, but he finally got there, in 1938.

5. Half a 45 : SIDE A
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm "single" the following year, in 1949.

6. Chai ___ : TEA
Chai is a drink made from spiced black tea, honey and milk, with "chai" being the Hindi word for "tea". We often called tea "a cup of char" growing up in Ireland, with "char" being our slang word for tea, derived from "chai".

7. Sleep indicator in a British comic strip : ZEDS
The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

11. Ending with Gator : -ADE
Gatorade was developed at the University of Florida by a team of researchers at the request of the school's football team. And so, Gatorade is named after the Gators football team.

12. More than half of Israel : NEGEV
The Negev is a desert region in southern Israel. The largest city in the Negev is Beersheba.

23. Corkscrew-shaped pasta : ROTINI
Rotini is the corkscrew-shaped pasta that is often used in pasta salads. Even though “rotini” sounds like it comes from a word meaning “twist, rotate”, the word “rotini” doesn’t exist in Italian, other than as the name for the pasta.

24. Prickly pears, e.g. : CACTI
The “prickly pear” is a genus of cactus more correctly called “opuntia”.

25. James ___ Garfield : ABRAM
James Abram Garfield, the 20th President, was assassinated in office. Garfield was shot twice, and one bullet could not be found (it was lodged in his spine). The inventor Alexander Graham Bell developed a metal detector in an attempt to locate the bullet, but apparently he was unsuccessful because of interference from the metal bed frame on which the president lay. Garfield died two months after being shot.

36. "American Sniper" subject Chris ___ : KYLE
Chris Kyle was a Navy SEAL who served four tours in Iraq, and then wrote a 2012 autobiography called “American Sniper”. The book was adapted into an equally successful 2014 movie of the same name. Kyle was murdered in 2013 by a US Marine suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder on a public shooting range.

48. "Fargo" assent : YAH
"Fargo" is one of my favorite films of all time, and stars perhaps my favorite actress, Frances McDormand. “Fargo” was directed by the Coen brothers, Joel and Ethan. Frances McDormand is Joel's wife.

50. Walks like a peacock : STRUTS
The female peafowl, the peahen, has very dull plumage compared to the extravagant display on the tail of the peacock.

54. Arafat's successor : ABBAS
Mahmoud Abbas took over as Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization in 2004 after the death of Yasser Arafat. Abbas is also the President of the Palestinian National Authority, equivalent to "head of state".

Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

55. New Orleans cuisine : CAJUN
The great explorer Verrazzano gave the name "Arcadia" to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The "Arcadia" name quickly evolved into the word "Acadia" that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word "Acadian" was "Cajun", giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

56. Ragtime pianist Blake : EUBIE
James Hubert “Eubie” Blake was a composer and pianist from Baltimore, Maryland. Blake was a noted composer and performer of ragtime music. The 1978 musical revue “Eubie!” features his music. Apparently Blake claimed to have started smoking cigarettes at the age of 10 years, and died 85 years later in 1983. Blake’s celebrity status and long life as a smoker was often cited by politicians who opposed anti-tobacco legislation.

58. France's ___ des Beaux-Arts : ECOLE
In France, an “École des Beaux-Arts” is a school of fine arts. The most famous such school is the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts located on the left bank of the Seine in Paris, across the river from the Musée du Louvre.

67. Polygraph detection : LIE
We are most familiar with the term “polygraph” as the generic name for a lie detector instrument. This usage began in 1921, although the term had been around since the end of the 18th century. Back then, a polygraph was a mechanical device use to make multiple copies as something was written or drawn. Famously, Thomas Jefferson used a polygraph to preserve copies of letters that he wrote to correspondents.

68. Some desk workers, for short : EDS
Editor (ed.)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Thrown skyward : UPCAST
7. Parent of a zorse or a zonkey : ZEBRA
12. "Fresh Air" network : NPR
15. Knuckle to the head : NOOGIE
16. Lop-___ : EARED
17. "Hostel" director Roth : ELI
18. *It's divided into four zones in the contiguous U.S. states : STANDARD TIME (double standard & double time)
20. React to a stench, maybe : GAG
21. One end of a fairway : TEE
22. Carne ___ (burrito filler) : ASADA
23. Eight-year member of Clinton's cabinet : RENO
24. Common school fund-raiser : CAR WASH
27. *Coup d'état, e.g. : TAKEOVER (double take & double over)
29. Blood-typing system : ABO
30. What a line drive lacks : ARC
32. "... ___ ye be judged" : LEST
33. *Incidental chatter : CROSS TALK (double cross & double-talk)
37. Stain on one's reputation : STIGMA
41. Home of the Buccaneers : TAMPA
42. Knuckleballer Wilhelm : HOYT
44. Have ___ (avoid blame) : AN OUT
45. "You've convinced me!" : I’M SOLD
47. *Handouts to theatergoers : PLAYBILLS (double play & double bills)
49. Regatta gear : OARS
51. Flight info, briefly : ETA
52. End to "end" : DEE
53. *Make retroactive : BACKDATE (double back & double date)
57. Russell of "Black Widow" : THERESA
60. Site with Daily Deals : EBAY
61. Fare for Oliver Twist : GRUEL
63. Hoodwink : CON
64. Great Society inits. : LBJ
65. Statistical achievement in basketball ... or what the answer to each starred clue is : DOUBLE-DOUBLE
69. Fraternity letter : TAU
70. As late as : UNTIL
71. Breath mint in a tin : ALTOID
72. Hyphenated ID : SSN
73. Half of the letters in this answer's row : ESSES
74. "Of course, that's obvious" : YES YES

Down
1. Young ___ (tots) : ‘UNS
2. Container for 6-Down : POT
3. Where forgotten umbrellas may accumulate : COATROOMS
4. Vice president before Ford : AGNEW
5. Half a 45 : SIDE A
6. Chai ___ : TEA
7. Sleep indicator in a British comic strip : ZEDS
8. Really get to : EAT AT
9. Like some showers : BRIDAL
10. Many movies with built-in audiences : REMAKES
11. Ending with Gator : -ADE
12. More than half of Israel : NEGEV
13. It lacks depth : PLANE
14. Extreme hardship : RIGOR
19. Full of school spirit : RAH-RAH
23. Corkscrew-shaped pasta : ROTINI
24. Prickly pears, e.g. : CACTI
25. James ___ Garfield : ABRAM
26. Remained idle : SAT
28. Founded: Abbr. : ESTAB
31. Sound of a wooden shoe : CLOP
34. Like a haunted house : SPOOKY
35. Restaurant dish that patrons may make themselves : SALAD
36. "American Sniper" subject Chris ___ : KYLE
38. Person who can do no wrong : GOLDEN BOY
39. Stubborn sorts : MULES
40. Totally disoriented : AT SEA
43. Act the snitch : TATTLE
46. Chinese New Year decorations : DRAGONS
48. "Fargo" assent : YAH
50. Walks like a peacock : STRUTS
53. Big swigs : BELTS
54. Arafat's successor : ABBAS
55. New Orleans cuisine : CAJUN
56. Ragtime pianist Blake : EUBIE
58. France's ___ des Beaux-Arts : ECOLE
59. Defeats handily : ROUTS
62. Some add-ons : ELLS
65. Expected in : DUE
66. Word repeated in "___ in, ___ out" : DAY
67. Polygraph detection : LIE
68. Some desk workers, for short : EDS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0728-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jul 15, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Caleb Emmons
THEME: Rows A, E, I , O and U … looking at today’s grid we see that the only vowel in the first row is an A, the only vowel in the second row is an E, the third an I, the fourth an O and the fifth a U. This pattern repeats twice, to complete the rest of the grid:
47D. Noteworthy features of rows 1-5, 6-10 and 11-15, in that order : A-E-I-O-U

1A. Schmooze : CHAT
5A. Chance for getting a hit : AT BAT
10A. Not yet posted, on a sked : TBA

13A. Dwarf planet between Mars and Jupiter : CERES
15A. Chess player's warning : CHECK
16A. 90-degree turn : ELL

17A. Like autumn air or a fresh apple : CRISP
18A. Close, as a community : TIGHT-KNIT

20A. Utter coward : POLTROON
22A. Playing with matches, e.g. : NO-NO

23A. Aaron who was vice president under Jefferson : BURR
24A. Released, as from jail : SPRUNG

27A. "Sic 'em!" : ATTACK!
30A. Kickoff : START

31A. Jules who wrote "Around the World in 80 Days" : VERNE
32A. Shudder-inducing feeling : THE CREEPS

36A. Here, in Arles : ICI
37A. Does the crawl or butterfly : SWIMS
38A. CBS show set in Vegas : CSI

39A. Played some b-ball : SHOT HOOPS
42A. 144 : GROSS

44A. Singer/songwriter Wainwright : RUFUS
45A. Lowly soldiers : GRUNTS

46A. Car club freebie : AAA MAP
48A. Monks' titles : FRAS

49A. Meat, potato and vegetable dish : STEW
50A. Sudden floods : FRESHETS

54A. King who led Spain into the Thirty Years' War : PHILIP III
58A. Essential parts : PITHS

59A. Tic-tac-toe winner : O-O-O
60A. Henhouse perch : ROOST
61A. Snobbish sort : SNOOT

62A. Nashville sch. : TSU
63A. Unlikely juggler : KLUTZ
64A. Wildebeests : GNUS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Schmooze : CHAT
“To schmooze” is to chat intimately, a word that comes from the Yiddish “schmusen” meaning ‘to chat” .

10. Not yet posted, on a sked : TBA
Something not yet on the schedule (sked) is to be advised (TBA).

13. Dwarf planet between Mars and Jupiter : CERES
Ceres is the smallest dwarf planet in our solar system. Ceres was discovered in 1801 and is the largest body in the asteroid belt. For fifty years Ceres was classified as the eighth planet circling our sun. The Dawn space probe launched by NASA entered Ceres orbit in March 2015, becoming the first mission to study a dwarf planet at close range.

15. Chess player's warning : CHECK
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be "in check". If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in "checkmate" and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce "check!") so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn't occur.

20. Utter coward : POLTROON
A “poltroon” is a terrible coward. We imported the word from Italian via Middle French. New to me ...

23. Aaron who was vice president under Jefferson : BURR
Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, serving under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn't brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

27. "Sic 'em!" : ATTACK!
“Sic 'em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with "sic" being a variation of "seek".

31. Jules who wrote "Around the World in 80 Days" : VERNE
Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

"Around the World in 80 Days" is just a wonderful adventure story, written by French author Jules Verne and first published in 1873. There have been some great screen adaptations of the story, including the 1956 movie starring David Niven as Phileas Fogg. In almost all adaptations, a balloon is used for part of the journey, perhaps the most memorable means of transportation on Fogg's trip around the world. However, if you read the book, Fogg never used a balloon at all.

36. Here, in Arles : ICI
Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city's design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous "Cafe Terrace at Night", as well as "Bedroom in Arles".

38. CBS show set in Vegas : CSI
“CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” is apparently the most-watched television show worldwide.

42. 144 : GROSS
The number 144 is also known as a gross. The term comes from the Old French “grosse douzaine” meaning “large dozen”, i.e. a “dozen dozen”.

44. Singer/songwriter Wainwright : RUFUS
Rufus Wainwright is singer-songwriter who was born in New York State and raised in Montreal. Primarily a pop artist, Wainwright has also written two classical operas, “Prima Donna” and “Hadrian”.

46. Car club freebie : AAA MAP
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

48. Monks' titles : FRAS
The title "Fra" (brother) is used primarily by Italian monks.

50. Sudden floods : FRESHETS
A “freshet” is a flood resulting from a heavy rain or a thaw in the spring, especially in Canada.

54. King who led Spain into the Thirty Years' War : PHILIP III
King Philip III ruled Spain from 1598 to 1621. He was known in his homeland as Philip the Pious.

The Thirty Years’ War started in 1618 in Central Europe, largely as a conflict between Catholic and Protestant states as the Holy Roman Empire began to fall apart. The war gradually wound down in 1648 with the signing of a series of treaties that are collectively referred to as the Peace of Westphalia.

61. Snobbish sort : SNOOT
"Snoot" is a variant of "snout" and is a word that originated in Scotland. The idea is that someone who is “snooty”, or snouty, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

62. Nashville sch. : TSU
Tennessee State University (TSU) was established in 1912 in Nashville. It was founded as the Agricultural and Industrial State Normal School, and was originally intended as a school for African Americans. There was a court-ordered merger in 1979 with the traditionally white University of Tennessee at Nashville.

63. Unlikely juggler : KLUTZ
A “klutz” is an awkward individual, and the term comes from Yiddish. The Yiddish word for a clumsy person is "klots".

64. Wildebeests : GNUS
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. "Wildebeest" is actually the Dutch word for "wild beast".

Down
1. Letters on a Soyuz rocket : CCCP
The abbreviation CCCP stands for "Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик", which translates from Russian as “Union of Soviet Socialist Republics”, the USSR.

The Russian Soyuz space program started in the early sixties as part of a plan to land a cosmonaut on the moon. The Soyuz program is still alive and kicking, and derivatives of those early spacecraft designs from the sixties are regularly visiting the International Space Station. "Soyuz" is a Russian word meaning "union".

3. Seed cover : ARIL
The casing surrounding many seeds is called the aril, and it may be quite fleshy. This fruit-like characteristic makes it desirable as a food and aids in the dispersion of the seeds.

8. Berliner's exclamation : ACH!
The German exclamation "ach!" is usually translated into English as "oh!"

Berlin is the capital and largest city in Germany, and is the second most populous city in the European Union (after London).

9. Traveler's purchase: Abbr. : TKT
Ticket (tkt.)

10. Dovetail joint part : TENON
One simple type of joint used in carpentry is a mortise and tenon, basically a projection carved at the end of one piece of wood that fits into a hole cut into the end of another. In a dovetail joint, the projecting tenon is not rectangular but is cut at a bias, so that when the dovetails are joined they resist being pulled apart. You'll see dovetail joints in drawers around the house.

11. Rapper's jewelry : BLING
Bling-bling (often simply “bling”) is the name given to all the shiny stuff sported by rap stars in particular i.e. the jewelry, watches, metallic cell phones, even gold caps on the teeth. The term comes from the supposed “bling” sound caused by light striking a shiny metal surface.

19. Rockne of Notre Dame fame : KNUTE
Knute Rockne, America's most famous football coach many say, was born in the city of Voss in Norway. He came to the United States with his family when he was 5-years-old. Years later he graduated Notre Dame with a degree in Chemistry, but abandoned that career path when he was offered his first real coaching job.

21. Mork's planet : ORK
"Mork & Mindy" was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams) in a special episode of "Happy Days". The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and "Nanu Nanu" means both "hello" and "goodbye" back on the planet Ork. "I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu". Great stuff ...

25. Moneyed campaign orgs. : PACS
A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent-expenditure only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

26. Grammar sch. basics : RRR
The “three Rs” (RRR) are reading, ‘riting and rithmetic.

27. Hertz rival : AVIS
Avis has been around since 1946, and is the second largest car rental agency after Hertz. Avis has the distinction of being the first car rental company to locate a branch at an airport.

The Hertz car rental company was started in 1918 by Walter L. Jacobs in Chicago. He began with just twelve model T Ford cars available for rent. In 1923, the car rental operation was bought out by John D. Hertz who incorporated it into his truck and coach manufacturing company.

28. Silicon Valley field, for short : TECH
The Santa Clara Valley, just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as "Silicon Valley". The term "Silicon Valley" dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called "Electronic News" in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

29. Peter, Paul & Mary, e.g. : TRIO
Peter, Paul and Mary were a folk-singing trio who got together in 1961. The group’s members were Peter Yarrow, Paul Stookey and Mary Travers. Peter, Paul and Mary’s big hit was 1963’s “Puff, the Magic Dragon”.

32. Aussie gambling game with coins : TWO-UP
The Australian gambling game called “two-up” is played by throwing two coins into the air. Bets are placed on whether the coins land heads-up, tails-up, or one up and one down. Playing two-up is a tradition on Anzac Day, particularly in pubs across the country. Anzac Day commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders who served and died in war.

35. Make a sibilant sound : SISS
“Sibilant” is a lovely word, describing a sound of speech, the sound of an “s” or “z”, a hissing sound. The word “sissies”, for example, has three sibilant sounds.

37. Living room piece : SOFA
"Sofa" is a Turkish word meaning "bench".

45. Ph.D. program applicant's hurdle : GRE
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

46. Companion of Aramis and Porthos : ATHOS
Alexandre Dumas’ "Three Musketeers" are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, and their young protégé is D'Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers" really don't use their muskets, and are better known for their prowess with their swords.

48. Lang who directed "Metropolis" : FRITZ
Fritz Lang was an Austrian-born American filmmaker. His masterpiece "Metropolis" was produced in Germany in 1927, a work of science-fiction that explored the struggle between workers and owners in a capitalist society. "Metropolis" was the most expensive silent movie ever made.

51. School on the Thames : ETON
The world-famous Eton College sits on the River Thames and is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who took power in the last UK general election. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington, George Orwell, and the creator of James Bond, Ian Fleming (as well as 007 himself as described in the Fleming novels).

The River Thames flowing though London is the longest river entirely located in England.

52. "Wherefore art ___ Romeo?" : THOU
In the balcony scene in Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, Juliet utters the famous line:
O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?
Every school kid must have commented with a giggle “he’s down in the garden!” Of course, “wherefore” isn’t an archaic word for “where”, but rather an old way of saying “why”. So Juliet is asking, “Why art thou Romeo, a Montague, and hence a sworn enemy of the Capulets?”

53. Retired jets, for short : SSTS
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Famously, the Concorde routinely broke the sound barrier, and cruised at about twice the speed of sound. Above Mach 2, frictional heat would cause the plane’s aluminum airframe to soften, so airspeed was limited.

56. D.C. insider : POL
Politician (pol.)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Schmooze : CHAT
5. Chance for getting a hit : AT BAT
10. Not yet posted, on a sked : TBA
13. Dwarf planet between Mars and Jupiter : CERES
15. Chess player's warning : CHECK
16. 90-degree turn : ELL
17. Like autumn air or a fresh apple : CRISP
18. Close, as a community : TIGHT-KNIT
20. Utter coward : POLTROON
22. Playing with matches, e.g. : NO-NO
23. Aaron who was vice president under Jefferson : BURR
24. Released, as from jail : SPRUNG
27. "Sic 'em!" : ATTACK!
30. Kickoff : START
31. Jules who wrote "Around the World in 80 Days" : VERNE
32. Shudder-inducing feeling : THE CREEPS
36. Here, in Arles : ICI
37. Does the crawl or butterfly : SWIMS
38. CBS show set in Vegas : CSI
39. Played some b-ball : SHOT HOOPS
42. 144 : GROSS
44. Singer/songwriter Wainwright : RUFUS
45. Lowly soldiers : GRUNTS
46. Car club freebie : AAA MAP
48. Monks' titles : FRAS
49. Meat, potato and vegetable dish : STEW
50. Sudden floods : FRESHETS
54. King who led Spain into the Thirty Years' War : PHILIP III
58. Essential parts : PITHS
59. Tic-tac-toe winner : O-O-O
60. Henhouse perch : ROOST
61. Snobbish sort : SNOOT
62. Nashville sch. : TSU
63. Unlikely juggler : KLUTZ
64. Wildebeests : GNUS

Down
1. Letters on a Soyuz rocket : CCCP
2. One who may be a lifesaver : HERO
3. Seed cover : ARIL
4. Nuclear treaty provision : TEST BAN
5. Person with lines : ACTOR
6. Slender : THIN
7. Say "Ple-e-ease ...," say : BEG
8. Berliner's exclamation : ACH!
9. Traveler's purchase: Abbr. : TKT
10. Dovetail joint part : TENON
11. Rapper's jewelry : BLING
12. Choir voice : ALTO
14. Neaten, with "up" : SPRUCE
19. Rockne of Notre Dame fame : KNUTE
21. Mork's planet : ORK
24. Parts of goblets : STEMS
25. Moneyed campaign orgs. : PACS
26. Grammar sch. basics : RRR
27. Hertz rival : AVIS
28. Silicon Valley field, for short : TECH
29. Peter, Paul & Mary, e.g. : TRIO
30. Sends : SHIPS
32. Aussie gambling game with coins : TWO-UP
33. "Micro" or "macro" subj. : ECON
34. Call in place of a nudge : PSST!
35. Make a sibilant sound : SISS
37. Living room piece : SOFA
40. Fish with a net : TRAWL
41. Fan noise : HUM
42. Understands : GRASPS
43. In a hurry : RUSHING
45. Ph.D. program applicant's hurdle : GRE
46. Companion of Aramis and Porthos : ATHOS
47. Noteworthy features of rows 1-5, 6-10 and 11-15, in that order : A-E-I-O-U
48. Lang who directed "Metropolis" : FRITZ
49. Bleach target : SPOT
50. Hand ball? : FIST
51. School on the Thames : ETON
52. "Wherefore art ___ Romeo?" : THOU
53. Retired jets, for short : SSTS
55. Bother : IRK
56. D.C. insider : POL
57. Promissory note : IOU


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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