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0901-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Sep 15, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Michael Torch
THEME: Vowel Sound Progression … each of today’s theme answers ends with a word starting with an S-sound, and ending with an N-sound. The middle of the word is a long vowel-sound, progressing from an A-sound to a U-sound:
17A. Locale of the Île de la Cité : RIVER SEINE
25A. Highway investigation site : CRASH SCENE
36A. Request from one seeking help from above : LORD, GIVE ME A SIGN
46A. Like clothing customized from raw fabric : CUT AND SEWN
57A. Phrase over a movie poster : COMING SOON
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 52s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Buddy of "The Beverly Hillbillies" : EBSEN
The actor Buddy Ebsen is best known for playing Jed Clampett in television’s “The Beverly Hillbillies”, as wells the title character on the seventies detective series “Barnaby Jones”. Ebsen had been cast in the role of the Tin Man in the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, but he developed an allergy to the aluminium dust that was used in the makeup. He ended up in hospital and had to walk away from the part. Ebsen blamed “The Wizard of Oz” on persistent problems that he had with his lungs in subsequent years. But Ebsen lived 16 years longer that any of the other major cast members of the film, so maybe he got the last laugh!

"The Beverly Hillbillies" was a rags-to-riches sitcom that aired from 1962 to 1971, a creation of writer Paul Henning. Buoyed by the success of "Hillbillies", Henning created another sitcom in 1965, one that was a complete opposite in terms of plot, the riches-to-rags story of "Green Acres".

17. Locale of the Île de la Cité : RIVER SEINE
There are two famous islands in the middle of the River Seine in Paris, one being the Île de la Cité, and the other Île Saint-Louis. Île de la Cité is the most renowned of the two, as it is home to the cathedral of Notre Dame.

19. Rug rat : TYKE
"Tyke" has been used playfully to describe a young child since at least 1902, but for centuries before that a tyke was a cur or mongrel, or perhaps a lazy or lower-class man.

21. "___ Yankees" : DAMN
In the musical show “Damn Yankees”, the title refers to the New York Yankees baseball team that dominated the sport in the fifties. That said, the show tells the story of the a man who sells his soul to help his beloved Washington Senators team beat the Yankees and win the pennant. So, "Damn Yankees" is yet another version of the classic German legend of "Faust". The show was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, a production that turned out to be a very successful follow-up to their prior hit, "The Pajama Game". The future was looking really rosy for Adler and Ross but, sadly, Jerry Ross died of an obstructive lung disease only a few weeks after "Damn Yankees" opened on Broadway in 1955. He was just 29 years old.

33. Classic car inits. : REO
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom E. Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

40. Santa ___ winds : ANA
The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically "falls" down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

42. Riches : LUCRE
Our word “lucre” meaning “money, profits” comes from the Latin “lucrum” that means the same thing.

43. Street one block over from Second, maybe : MAIN
The most common street name in the US is “Second Street”. “First Street” comes in only at number three, and this is because many cities and towns forego the use of “First” and instead go with “Main” or something more historical in nature. “Elm Street” appears on the list at number fifteen.

44. Castor bean, for one : OILSEED
The castor bean is the seed of the castor oil plant, although it isn’t actually a true “bean”. The castor seed is the source of castor oil, which has several medicinal uses.

54. 2016 Olympics city : RIO
Even though the 2016 Olympic Games is a “summer” competition, it will be held in Rio de Janeiro in the winter. As Rio is in the southern hemisphere, the planned date of the opening of 5th August 2016 falls in the local season of winter. The 2016 games will also be first to be held in South America, and the first to be hosted by a Portuguese-speaking country.

56. Little pup : RUNT
Back around 1500. a runt was an old or decayed tree stump, and by the early 1600s "runt" was being used to describe animals that were similarly old and decayed. Ultimately "runt" came to mean the smallest and often sickest in a litter.

60. "Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi," e.g. : PLEA
In the first "Star Wars" movie, Princess Leia hides plans for the Galactic Empire's Death Star in the droid named R2-D2. She also records a holographic message, so when it is played we can see Princess Leia as a hologram, asking for help to destroy the Death Star:
I have placed information vital to the survival of the Rebellion into the memory systems of this R2 unit. My father will know how to retrieve it. You must see this droid safely delivered to him on Alderaan. This is our most desperate hour. Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You're my only hope.

Down
1. Shade of many a lampshade : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word "ecru" comes from French and means "raw, unbleached". "Ecru" has the same roots as our word "crude".

3. Like the name "Leningrad" : SOVIET ERA
St. Petersburg in Russia is an absolutely beautiful city to visit. The city was renamed to Petrograd in 1914, Leningrad in 1924 and back to St. Petersburg in 1991.

4. Suffix with ethyl : -ENE
Ethylene (also called ethene) has a gazillion uses, including as an anesthetic and an aid to hastening the ripening of fruit. Ethylene’s most common use is as a major raw material in the manufacture of plastics (like polyethylene).

5. One scoring 100% on Sporcle quizzes, say : NERD
Sporcle.com is a trivia quiz website. The name is derived from the word "oracle" apparently. I like the web site's mission statement: "We actively and methodically search out new and innovative ways to prevent our users from getting any work done whatsoever."

6. One's wife, informally : THE MRS
Mr. is the abbreviation for "master", and Mrs. is the abbreviation for "mistress".

7. Madrid's ___ Sofia Museum : REINA
The Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid is Spain’s national museum of 20th-century art. The museum features a lot of work by Spanish artists, most famously Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali. The gallery’s most famous work is Picasso’s large oil painting “Guernica”.

8. Hotelier Schrager who co-founded Studio 54 : IAN
Ian Schrager is a hotelier and property developer who is very much associated with boutique hotels. Along with Steve Rubell, Schrager opened New York’s Studio 54 in 1977. However, the two partners fell foul of the law for skimming unreported income from the club’s receipts. Rubell and Schrager were both sentenced in 1980 to three and a half years in prison.

10. Prison riot town : ATTICA
The Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York is used to incarcerate the toughest of the state's convicts. Famous people who have spent time in Attica include David Berkowitz (Son of Sam) and Mark David Chapman (who killed John Lennon). Attica was the site of a famous riot in 1971 involving almost 1,000 inmates. Control of the prison was restored by the authorities after several days of unrest that left 39 people dead, including ten guards and other prison employees.

13. Alfred Nobel, for one : SWEDE
Alfred Nobel was a Swedish chemist and businessman. Nobel is famous for the invention of dynamite during his lifetime, as well as for instituting the Nobel Prizes by providing the necessary funds in his will.

18. Beneficial baseball outs, for short : SACS
Sacrifice fly, in baseball …

24. Oklahoma city : ENID
Enid, Oklahoma takes its name from the old railroad station around which the city developed. Back in 1889, that train stop was called Skeleton Station. An official who didn't like the name changed it to Enid Station, using a character from Alfred Lord Tennyson's "Idylls of the King". Maybe if he hadn't changed the name, the city of Enid would now be called Skeleton, Oklahoma! Enid has the nickname "Queen Wheat City" because is has a huge capacity for storing grain, the third largest grain storage capacity in the world.

27. Sound in body : HALE
"Hale" is an adjective meaning "healthy". Both the words "hale" and "healthy" derive from the the Old English "hal" meaning healthy.

28. F.D.R.'s dog : FALA
Fala was the famous Scottish Terrier that was ever present at the side of President Franklin D. Roosevelt for many years. The terrier was a Christmas gift to the president from his cousin, who had named the dog Big Boy while she trained him as a puppy. President Roosevelt renamed him after an ancestor of his from Falahill in Scotland, so the dog’s full name was Murray the Outlaw of Falahill. Fala lived on for several years after the president’s passing. I’ve had the privilege of visiting the gravesites of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt in Hyde Park, New York, and Fala is buried just a few feet away from his master.

29. Winner (and host) of the 1966 FIFA World Cup : ENGLAND
The 1966 FIFA World Cup was held in England, and marked the only time that the English team has won soccer’s most prestigious tournament.

33. Grocery item known as "The San Francisco Treat" : RICE-A-RONI
Rice-a-Roni was introduced in 1958 by the Golden Grain Macaroni Company of San Francisco. The company was run by an Italian immigrant and his four sons. The wife of one of the sons served a pilaf dish at a family diner that was a big hit, so her brother-in-law created a commercial version by blending dry chicken soup mix with rice and macaroni. Sounds like "a San Francisco treat" to me ...

35. Linear, for short : ONE-D
The dimension of an object is defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify each point in the object. Therefore a line is one-dimensional, as you only need an x-coordinate to specify a particular point on the line. A surface is two-dimensional, as you need both an x-coordinate and a y-coordinate to locate a point on the surface. The inside of a solid object is then three-dimensional, needing an x-, y- and z-coordinate to specify a point, say within a cube.

37. Footnote abbr. : IBID
Ibid. is short for the Latin word "ibidem" and is typically found in footnotes and bibliographies. Ibid. is used to refer the reader to the prior citation, instead of giving the same information all over again (title, author etc.).

43. Cocktail often served with a pineapple garnish : MAI TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

46. Complains : CARPS
The word "carp" used to mean simply "talk" back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian "karpa" meaning "to brag". A century later the Latin word "carpere" meaning "to slander" influenced the use of "carp" so that it came to mean "find fault with".

47. Throat dangler : UVULA
The uvula is that conical fleshy projection hanging down at the back of the soft palate. The uvula plays an important role in human speech, particularly in the making of "guttural" sounds. The Latin word for "grape" is "uva", so "uvula" is a "little grape".

48. Contents of an HP cartridge : TONER
The key features of a laser printer (or copier) are that it uses plain paper and produces quality text at high speed. Laser printers work by projecting a laser image of the printed page onto a rotating drum that is coated with photoconductors (material that becomes conductive when exposed to light). The areas of the drum exposed to the laser carry a different charge than the unexposed areas. Dry ink (toner) sticks to the exposed areas due to electrostatic charge. The toner is then transferred to paper by contact and is fused into the paper by the application of heat. So, that explains why paper coming out of a laser printer is warm, and sometimes powdery ...

49. Chair designer Charles : EAMES
Charles and Ray Eames were a husband-wife team of furniture designers. One of the more famous of their designs is the Eames lounge chair that comes with an ottoman. This trendy piece of furniture featured in a late episode of the television show “Frasier”. In the show, Frasier’s Dad remarks that the Eames chair is so comfortable that he might have gotten rid of his tatty old recliner a long time ago.

53. Former New York archbishop : EGAN
Edward Egan served as Roman Catholic Archbishop of New York from 2000 to 2009. Egan was made a cardinal in 2001.

55. Title word before "You," "U" or "Yesterday" in hit songs : ONLY
The 1955 hit by the Platters is more completely called "Only You (and You Alone)".

“Only U” is a 2004 song by American singer-songwriter Ashanti.

“Only Yesterday” is a 1975 song released by the Carpenters.

57. Engine part : CAM
Cams are wheels found on the cam shaft of a car's engine that are eccentric in shape rather than circular. The rotation of the cams causes the intake and exhaust valves of the cylinders to open and close.

59. ___-cone : SNO
A sno-cone (also "snow cone") is just a paper cone filled with crushed ice and topped with flavored water. Italian ice is similar, but different. Whereas the flavoring is added on top of the ice to make a sno-cone, Italian ice is made with water that is flavored before it is frozen.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Buddy of "The Beverly Hillbillies" : EBSEN
6. Small combo : TRIO
10. Music and dance, for two : ARTS
14. Witchy sort : CRONE
15. Foam on a beer : HEAD
16. Spring event : THAW
17. Locale of the Île de la Cité : RIVER SEINE
19. Rug rat : TYKE
20. Prefix with brow : UNI-
21. "___ Yankees" : DAMN
22. Pointed : AIMED
23. "Well, I'll be!" : GEE!
25. Highway investigation site : CRASH SCENE
28. Goal of exercise : FITNESS
30. It's a laugh : HA-HA
31. Had home cooking : ATE IN
32. 30 minutes, in the N.F.L. : HALF
33. Classic car inits. : REO
36. Request from one seeking help from above : LORD, GIVE ME A SIGN
40. Santa ___ winds : ANA
41. 90-degree angle iron : L-BAR
42. Riches : LUCRE
43. Street one block over from Second, maybe : MAIN
44. Castor bean, for one : OILSEED
46. Like clothing customized from raw fabric : CUT AND SEWN
50. Show age, in a way : SAG
51. Steer clear of : AVOID
52. Lotion additive : ALOE
54. 2016 Olympics city : RIO
56. Little pup : RUNT
57. Phrase over a movie poster : COMING SOON
60. "Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi," e.g. : PLEA
61. Wows : AWES
62. Invalidate : ANNUL
63. Draped dress : SARI
64. Work well together : MESH
65. Clamorous : NOISY

Down
1. Shade of many a lampshade : ECRU
2. Them's fighting words : BRING IT ON
3. Like the name "Leningrad" : SOVIET ERA
4. Suffix with ethyl : -ENE
5. One scoring 100% on Sporcle quizzes, say : NERD
6. One's wife, informally : THE MRS
7. Madrid's ___ Sofia Museum : REINA
8. Hotelier Schrager who co-founded Studio 54 : IAN
9. Dedicated poem : ODE
10. Prison riot town : ATTICA
11. Hot to trot, e.g. : RHYME
12. Spoken for : TAKEN
13. Alfred Nobel, for one : SWEDE
18. Beneficial baseball outs, for short : SACS
22. Post-eruption phenomenon : ASH FALL
24. Oklahoma city : ENID
26. Hoax : SHAM
27. Sound in body : HALE
28. F.D.R.'s dog : FALA
29. Winner (and host) of the 1966 FIFA World Cup : ENGLAND
32. Pronoun for a ship : HER
33. Grocery item known as "The San Francisco Treat" : RICE-A-RONI
34. Flagrant : EGREGIOUS
35. Linear, for short : ONE-D
37. Footnote abbr. : IBID
38. Movers' trucks : VANS
39. Figure (out) : SUSS
43. Cocktail often served with a pineapple garnish : MAI TAI
44. Wise-looking : OWLISH
45. Wise to : IN ON
46. Complains : CARPS
47. Throat dangler : UVULA
48. Contents of an HP cartridge : TONER
49. Chair designer Charles : EAMES
53. Former New York archbishop : EGAN
55. Title word before "You," "U" or "Yesterday" in hit songs : ONLY
57. Engine part : CAM
58. "You ___ me one" : OWE
59. ___-cone : SNO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0831-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Aug 15, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

Share today's solution with a friend:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Michael Dewey
THEME: Into the Pool … each of today’s themed answers are common phrases that might also describe how to get into a swimming pool:
17A. Attack an endeavor vigorously : DIVE IN HEADFIRST
37A. Get hitched : TAKE THE PLUNGE
58A. Lose one's mind : GO OFF THE DEEP END
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. ___ pit (area at a punk concert) : MOSH
Moshing (also “slam dancing”) is the pushing and shoving that takes place in the audience at a concert (usually a punk or heavy metal concert). The area directly in front of the stage is known as the mosh pit. When a performer does a "stage dive" it is into (or I suppose "onto") the mosh pit. It doesn't sound like fun to me. Injuries are commonplace in the mosh pit, and deaths are not unknown.

5. Cheese named after a town in Holland : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

13. Butterlike spreads : OLEOS
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

16. Shankar who mentored George Harrison : RAVI
The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. The sitar is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

20. Allen whose #3 was retired by the 76ers : IVERSON
Allen Iverson is a professional basketball player who played in the NBA for several years. Iverson signed up to play for a Turkish basketball team in 2010. He played in Turkey for two seasons and retired from the game in 2013.

21. Papal name chosen 12 times : PIUS
There have been twelve popes named Pius, the latest being Pope Pius XII who led the Roman Catholic Church until his death in 1958.

25. Heroine of Purim : ESTHER
Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther. During the celebration of Purim, the Book of Esther (or Megillah) is read aloud, once in the evening and once the following morning. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Old Testament that doesn't mention the word "God".

29. Pilgrim to Mecca : HADJI
Hadji is the term used for someone who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and it is sometimes also used as a form of address for such a person. The word Hadji actually translates into English as "pilgrim".

33. Ginger ___ (soft drink) : ALE
The brand most closely associated with ginger ale is Canada Dry. "Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale" was first formulated in 1904 by a Canadian chemist called John McLoughlin from Ontario. Prohibition in the United States helped sales of the drink as it was particularly effective in masking the taste of illegally-produced homemade liquor.

35. ___ mater : ALMA
The literal translation for the Latin term "alma mater" is "nourishing mother". “Alma mater” was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one's alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one's last place of education.

36. The "O" in S.R.O. : ONLY
Standing room only (SRO)

42. Building designer I. M. ___ : PEI
I. M. Pei (full name: Ieoh Ming Pei) is an exceptional American architect who was born in China. Of Pei's many wonderful works, my favorite is the renovation of the Louvre in Paris, especially the Glass Pyramid in the courtyard.

43. Terrier's expression of terror : ARF
Most terrier breeds of dog originated in the British Isles. Terriers were developed as working dogs, with the job of controlling populations of rats, rabbits and foxes by rooting them out above and below the ground. The name “terrier” comes via Middle French from the the Latin “terra” meaning “earth”, a reflection of the breeds habit of burrowing into the earth looking for its prey.

45. Entertainers Carvey and Delany : DANAS
Dana Carvey, along with the likes of Phil Hartman and Kevin Nealon, was part of the new breed of "Saturday Night Live" comedians credited with resurrecting the show in the late eighties. One of Carvey's most popular characters was the Church Lady, and he became so associated with her that among fellow cast members Carvey was often referred to simply as "the Lady". Another favorite Carvey character was Garth Algar who went to feature in the “Wayne’s World” movies. Carvey had open-heart surgery in 1997 to clear a blocked artery, but the surgical team operated on the wrong blood vessel. To recover, he had to have five more procedures. He ended up suing for medical malpractice and donated his $7.5 million compensation payment to charity.

Dana Delaney is an actress from New York who had her big break playing Colleen McMurphy on the TV show “China Beach” in the late eighties. More recently, Delaney played Megan Hunt, the lead role on the drama series “Body of Proof”.

50. Circa-W.W. I art movement : DADA
Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe. According to the Dada Manifesto of 1918:
DADA DOES NOT MEAN ANYTHING. Every man must shout: there is great destructive, negative work to be done. To sweep, to clean. Dada means nothing... Thought is produced in the mouth.

53. Pre-W.W. II public works project, for short : TVA
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America's great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

56. Eighty-sixed : DITCHED
“To eighty-six” something is to eject it, to throw it out. The origin of the term is unclear. One story is that it originated in the days of prohibition in the West Village of Lower Manhattan, New York City. Whenever there was a scheduled raid on the establishment called Chumley’s, an informant would call ahead and tell the bartender to “86” his customers i.e. to send them out the door on 86 Bedford Street. The cops would then turn up at the entrance on Pamela Court.

62. Pakistani language : URDU
Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

65. Holiday-time song : NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for "birth" (natalis). Noel has come to be used as an alternative name for a Christmas carol.

Down
2. Actress Munn of "Deliver Us From Evil" : OLIVIA
Olivia Munn is an actress who started her on-screen career as a TV journalist, using the name Lisa Munn. She co-hosted television’s “Attack of the Show!” before becoming a correspondent on “The Daily Show”.

"Deliver Us from Evil" is a 2014 horror movie that is based on 2001 book titled "Beware the Night". I don't do horror ...

3. Title characters in Disney's first full-length feature : SEVEN DWARFS
In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale "Snow White", the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic animated film from Walt Disney called "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs". The seven dwarfs are:
- Doc (the leader of the group)
- Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife ...)
- Happy
- Sleepy
- Bashful
- Sneezy
- Dopey

5. Prefix with centric : ETHNO-
To be ethnocentric is to believe in the superiority of one's own race, or to have an obsessive concern with race.

6. Word before north or process : DUE
“Due process” calls for the state to respect the legal rights of the individual. The concept was first articulated in the historic English charter known as the Magna Carta in 1215. Due process is incorporated into the US Constitution, although the words “law of the land” are used instead of “due process”, but with the same meaning.

7. "I need ___" (yawner's words) : A NAP
I really do …

8. Pertaining to the time of castles and knights : MEDIEVAL
European history is often divided in three major periods: classical antiquity and the modern period, with the Middle Ages in between. Specifically, the Middle Ages are said to have begun in 476 AD, when the last Roman Emperor was deposed by a Germanic chieftain. The end date for the Middle Ages is less specific, but is about 1500 AD. The list of events signalling the end of the Middle Ages includes Christopher Columbus’s first voyage to the New World (1492) and the Protestant Reformation (1517). The term “medieval” is used to describe something belonging to the Middle Ages.

11. Hosp. hookups : IVS
One might need an intravenous drip (IV) in a hospital (hosp.).

12. Teen's facial blemish : ZIT
The slang term “zit”, meaning "a pimple", came into the language in 1966, but no one seems to know its exact derivation.

14. The Vatican's ___ Chapel : SISTINE
The Sistine Chapel, in the Pope's residence in Rome, takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV who was responsible for restoring the old Capella Magna in the 15th century. It was about a century later (1508-1512) that Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel under the patronage of Pope Julius II.

19. What to light on a stick of dynamite : FUSE
The explosive called dynamite contains nitroglycerin as its active component. Dynamite also contains diatomaceous earth and sodium carbonate that absorb the nitroglycerin. The absorbed nitroglycerin is far less sensitive to mechanical shock, making it easier to transport and to handle. Famously, dynamite was invented by Alfred Nobel, the man who used his fortune to institute the Nobel Prizes.

27. Vogue rival : ELLE
"Elle" magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. "Elle" is the French word for "she". “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

“Vogue” magazine has been published an awfully long time, with the first issue appearing in 1892. Over the decades the magazine has picked up a lot of criticism as well as its many fans. Famously, an assistant to the editor wrote a novel based on her experiences working with the magazine’s editor, and called it “The Devil Wears Prada”.

28. "The Bridge of San Luis ___" : REY
“The Bridge of San Luis Rey” is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder that won the PUlitzer Prize in 1928. The title refers to an Inca rope bridge in Peru that collapses, causing several people to perish. A friar who witnesses the incident then embarks on a quest to discover why those particular individuals had to die. He inquires into the lives of the victims, piecing together the events that led to their being on the bridge that fateful day.

36. Draft-worthy : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

37. "Gone With the Wind" plantation : TARA
Rhett Butler hung out with Scarlett O'Hara at the Tara plantation in Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind". Tara was founded not far from the Georgia city of Jonesboro by Scarlett's father, Irish immigrant Gerald O'Hara. Gerald named his new abode after the Hill of Tara back in his home country, the ancient seat of the High King of Ireland.

44. Musical symbol : CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

55. Feng ___ (harmonizing philosophy) : SHUI
Feng shui is the ancient Chinese tradition of arranging objects, buildings and other structures in a manner that is said to improve the lives of the individuals living in or using the space. "Feng shui" translates as "wind-water", a reference to the belief that positive and negative life forces ride the wind and scatter, but are retained when they encounter water.

57. PC brains : CPUS
The Central Processing Unit (CPU) is the main component on the "motherboard" of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

59. Pizarro's gold : ORO
Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incas in 1526, marking the beginning of the end for an ancient civilization that was to be ravaged by brutal Spanish colonists and by imported smallpox. The last leader of the Inca was Atahualpa. Pizarro staged a mock trial and then condemned Atahualpa to execution by burning. A Spanish friar intervened on behalf of the condemned man, as Atahualpa believed that if he was burned his soul would not move on to the afterlife. Pizarro, was kind enough to have Atahualpa garroted instead.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___ pit (area at a punk concert) : MOSH
5. Cheese named after a town in Holland : EDAM
9. Phenom : WHIZ
13. Butterlike spreads : OLEOS
15. Adjust the strings of, as a guitar : TUNE
16. Shankar who mentored George Harrison : RAVI
17. Attack an endeavor vigorously : DIVE IN HEADFIRST
20. Allen whose #3 was retired by the 76ers : IVERSON
21. Papal name chosen 12 times : PIUS
22. What a priest may absolve : SIN
23. Stepped (on) : TROD
25. Heroine of Purim : ESTHER
29. Pilgrim to Mecca : HADJI
31. Locale for Christmas lights : EAVE
33. Ginger ___ (soft drink) : ALE
34. Prevailed : WON
35. ___ mater : ALMA
36. The "O" in S.R.O. : ONLY
37. Get hitched : TAKE THE PLUNGE
40. Lacking adornment : BARE
41. Good things to have about you in an emergency : WITS
42. Building designer I. M. ___ : PEI
43. Terrier's expression of terror : ARF
44. Name, as sources : CITE
45. Entertainers Carvey and Delany : DANAS
48. M's and N's, in pronunciation : NASALS
50. Circa-W.W. I art movement : DADA
53. Pre-W.W. II public works project, for short : TVA
54. Moistens : WETS
56. Eighty-sixed : DITCHED
58. Lose one's mind : GO OFF THE DEEP END
62. Pakistani language : URDU
63. Expel from power : OUST
64. Jolt of power : SURGE
65. Holiday-time song : NOEL
66. Micro : millionth :: ___ : trillionth : PICO
67. Viewed : SEEN

Down
1. In fashion : MODISH
2. Actress Munn of "Deliver Us From Evil" : OLIVIA
3. Title characters in Disney's first full-length feature : SEVEN DWARFS
4. Gardener in the weeds : HOER
5. Prefix with centric : ETHNO-
6. Word before north or process : DUE
7. "I need ___" (yawner's words) : A NAP
8. Pertaining to the time of castles and knights : MEDIEVAL
9. Where to wear a watch : WRIST
10. Part of a sarcastic laugh : HAR
11. Hosp. hookups : IVS
12. Teen's facial blemish : ZIT
14. The Vatican's ___ Chapel : SISTINE
18. Neither's partner : NOR
19. What to light on a stick of dynamite : FUSE
24. X'd out : DELETED
26. "Don't give up now!" : HANG IN THERE!
27. Vogue rival : ELLE
28. "The Bridge of San Luis ___" : REY
30. Rib-tickler : JOKE
32. Charges (up) : AMPS
35. Score ___ (enjoy some success) : A HIT
36. Draft-worthy : ONE-A
37. "Gone With the Wind" plantation : TARA
38. Like some easy-open bottles : TWIST-TOP
39. Subjects of some software pop-ups : UPDATES
40. Outlaw : BAN
44. Musical symbol : CLEF
46. Exact retribution for : AVENGE
47. Make melancholy : SADDEN
49. Terrible : AWFUL
51. Supplement : ADD TO
52. Go pfft : DIE
55. Feng ___ (harmonizing philosophy) : SHUI
57. PC brains : CPUS
58. Rev, as an engine : GUN
59. Pizarro's gold : ORO
60. Praiseful poem : ODE
61. Abort key : ESC


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0830-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 15, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Lee Taylor
THEME: Conflicting Advice … each of today’s themed answers is a piece of advice, a well-known saying. And, each themed answer is clued with another saying, with the opposite meaning:
24A. "He who hesitates is lost, but ..." : … LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
111A. "You can't judge a book by its cover, but ..." : … CLOTHES MAKE THE MAN
3D. "Birds of a feather flock together, but ..." : … OPPOSITES ATTRACT
6D. "Great minds think alike, but ..." : … FOOLS SELDOM DIFFER
34D. "Slow and steady wins the race, but ..." : … TIME WAITS FOR NO MAN
38D. "Knowledge is power, but ..." : … IGNORANCE IS BLISS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Many establishments on Paris's Boulevard Saint-Germain : CAFES
Paris’s Boulevard Saint-Germain is a street on the Left Bank of the River Seine that cuts right through the Saint-Germain-des-Prés area of the city. Saint-Germain-des-Prés is home to lots of cafés, including Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore, which have been frequented by many famous people over the years. The most celebrated customers have been writers and painters such Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Ernest Hemingway and Pablo Picasso.

14. Ex-Mrs. Trump : IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald's marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in the early nineties.

20. Cause of a 2014 epidemic : EBOLA
The Ebola virus causes a very nasty form of hemorrhagic fever. The name of the virus comes from the site of the first known outbreak, in a mission hospital in the Ebola River Valley in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The disease is transmitted from human to human by exposure to bodily fluids. In nature, the main carrier of Ebola is the fruit bat.

21. Word with light or horse : OPERA
"Horse opera" is a slang term for a western movie or show.

22. Figure in Jewish folklore : GOLEM
Golem is Yiddish slang for "dimwit". In Jewish folklore a golem is an anthropomorphic being made out of inanimate matter, somewhat like an unintelligent robot.

29. Mathematician Fibonacci : LEONARDO
Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t "discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

30. N.B.A. team once coached by Larry Bird : PACERS
The Indiana Pacers are the professional basketball team based in Indianapolis, who play in the NBA. The name was chosen when the team was formed in 1967. "Pacers" is a homage harness racing pacers (famed in Indiana) and the pace car used in the Indianapolis 500.

Larry Bird played basketball for the Boston Celtics from 1978 to 1992. Bird has a lot of very loyal fans, and some might even be described as fanatical. In 2005 an Oklahoma City man was convicted of a crime involving a shooting. On being sentenced to 30 years imprisonment, the guilty man requested that the sentence be changed to 33 years so that it matched the number on Larry Bird's jersey. The judge obliged ...

33. Rich cake : TORTE
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

34. Brown who wrote "The Diana Chronicles" : TINA
Tina Brown is a British/American journalist and author. Brown wrote "The Diana Chronicles", a biography of Diana, Princess of Wales, of whom Brown was a personal friend. She emigrated to the US in 1984 to become editor for “Vanity Fair”, and later took the helm at “The New Yorker”.

49. Kind of arch : OGEE
An ogee is a type of S-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S). An ogee arch is composed of two ogees, with one being the mirror of the other and meeting at the arch’s apex.

51. ___ Soetoro, stepfather of Barack Obama : LOLO
Barack Obama, Sr. was first married at the age of 18 in his home country of Kenya, and had two children during that marriage. He left his wife and children back in Kenya when he enrolled in the University of Hawaii in 1959 as the school’s first African foreign student. There Obama met Ann Dunham in a Russian language course. The two entered into a romantic relationship and Dunham became pregnant. Obama told Dunham that he was divorced from his first wife (not true), and the pair were married on Maui in 1961. Six months later, Barack Obama II was born, destined to become the 44th President of the United States. The couple divorced in 1964. After the divorce, Dunham was able to marry Lalo Soetoro, a Javanese surveyor who she met while he was studying for a masters degree at the university. Soetoro returned to Indonesia in 1966, and Dunham joined him there the following year with her 6-year-old son. Barack Obama spent four years in Indonesia before returning to Hawaii to live with his grandparents.

52. Longest river entirely within Switzerland : AARE
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

53. Group of Coyotes, for short : NHL
The Arizona Coyotes are the National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Glendale, a suburb of Phoenix. The team was founded in 1971 as the Winnipeg Jets of the World Hockey Association. After the team joined the NHL, they became the Phoenix Coyotes in 1996, and finally the Arizona Coyotes in 2014.

54. Name on a toy truck : HESS
The Hess Corporation is an oil company based in New York City. In 1964, the company started selling toy trucks with the Hess logo on them, in Hess gas stations. The company has been selling them every since, bringing out new models just before Christmas. Hess toy trucks have become quite collectible and the old ones can fetch a pretty penny.

56. To the point : AD REM
The Latin term “ad rem” translates literally as "to the matter".

62. Crumbly cheeses : FETAS
Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep's milk, or a mixture of sheep's and goat's milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

64. Arctic lights : AURORAE
The spectacular aurorae phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

69. Locale of the 15-Down Eyjafjallajökull : ICELAND
(15. See 69-Across : VOLCANO)
The Eyjafjallajökull volcano of Iceland was the one that spewed ash into the atmosphere over Europe in 2010, disrupting air travel for weeks.

71. Like pop-ups : ARCED
In a baseball game, a pop-up arcs across the infield.

74. 2006 Pixar film : CARS
“Cars” is a 2006 animated feature from Pixar. The great cast of voice actors includes Paul Newman in his last movie role before he passed away in 2008.

75. Heavy drinker, in slang : DIPSO
"Dipsomania" is a craving for alcohol to the point of damaging one's health. "Dipsa" is the Greek for "thirst", hence dipsomania is a "manic thirst".

79. ESPNU covers it : NCAA
ESPNU (ESPN Universities) is a sports channel focused on college athletics.

82. Celestial altar : ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for "altar".

83. Gladly, old-style : FAIN
“Fain” is an old way of saying “gladly, joyfully”.

84. Steer closer to the wind : LUFF
When a sailboat sails too close to the wind, the leading edge of the sail starts to flap slightly, as air passes behind it. The boat is said to be luffing, with the same term being used for the flapping of the sail. The leading edge of the sail is also known as the luff.

85. It borders the N. Atl. : EUR
The continent of Europe was named for Europa, a Phoenician princess of Greek mythology.

96. Head of an inn? : BOAR
Lots of inns are named “The Boar’s Head”.

97. Caliban in "The Tempest," e.g. : SLAVE
William Shakespeare's play "The Tempest" tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. The island is home to a devilish character called Caliban, who is forced into slavery on the arrival of the exiles. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island's shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

102. Pooh-bah : NABOB
A nabob is a person of wealth and prominence. "Nabob" comes from the title of a governor in India.

The term "pooh-bah" (also “poobah”), meaning an ostentatious official, comes from the world of opera. Pooh-Bah is a character in the wonderful Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera "The Mikado". Famously, Pooh-Bah holds many, many offices, including that of "Lord High Everything Else".

106. Part of a dominatrix's outfit : STILETTO
The stiletto knife was developed in Italy, and is a knife intended for thrusting and stabbing as opposed to slashing and cutting. The term “stiletto” comes from the Latin “stilus”, which was a thin pointed writing instrument used in Ancient Rome to engrave wax or clay tablets. And, there are also stiletto heels on some women’s shoes, heels that are long and thin.

115. Blazing stars : NOVAE
A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

117. Emulate Isocrates : ORATE
Isocrates was an influential ancient Greek orator. He is listed as one of the ten Attic orators, the greatest orators of the classical era.

121. Trig functions : SINES
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent. For example, the arctangent can be read as “What angle is equivalent to the following ratio of opposite over adjacent?”

122. Boom source : SST
Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot "get out of the way". When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

Down
2. All-Star second baseman Infante : OMAR
Omar Infante is a professional baseball player from Venezuela who mainly plays as a second baseman.

4. Solo features of six Bach suites : CELLOS
Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello” include some of the most recognizable pieces of cello music in the repertoire. The actual instrument for which Bach wrote these pieces (if any) is the subject of some debate.

5. Blood type system : ABO
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a "universal donor".

7. Actress Sommer : ELKE
Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964's "The Prize". She also sings and has released several albums. Now Sommer focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by the work of Marc Chagall.

8. Clog : SABOT
There is a story that disgruntled textile workers would kick their wooden shoes, called sabots, into the looms in order to disable them so that they didn't have to work. This act of vandalism was named for the shoe, an act of "sabot-age".

10. Left at sea : APORT
The left side of a ship used to be called the "larboard" side, but this was dropped in favor of "port" as pronunciation of "larboard" was easily confused with "starboard", the right side of the vessel. The term "port" was chosen as it was customary to dock a ship, for loading in port, with the left side of the vessel against the dock.

11. Like some salsa : VERDE
"Salsa verde" is simply Spanish for "green sauce".

13. 2004 musical biopic for which the star won Best Actor : RAY
Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker, Ray Charles Robinson. His life was a wild ride, well represented in the excellent biopic called “Ray” released in 2004 and starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray Charles was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

14. Pet in the comic strip "FoxTrot" : IGUANA
“FoxTrot” is a comic strip by Bill Amend that was first published in 1988. Originally appearing seven days a week, “Foxtrot” has been a Sunday-only offering since 2007. The strip’s main characters are the five members of the Fox family, and Quincy, the pet iguana belonging to the youngest Fox child.

16. "Helm ___!" (captain's cry) : ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

25. Ambient music innovator Brian : ENO
Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the “ambient” genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks somewhat inventively: 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

35. Shanghai nursemaid : AMAH
"Amah" is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet it actually comes from the Portuguese "ama" meaning "nurse". Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

Shanghai is a major city on the west coast of China that is home to the busiest container port in the world. The name “Shanghai” translates as “Upon-the-Sea”.

36. Winter Olympics sport : LUGE
A luge is a small sled used by one or two people, on which one lies face up and feet first. The luge can be compared to the skeleton, a sled for only one person and on which the rider lies face down and goes down the hill head-first.

39. 1943 conference site : TEHRAN
The leaders of the Big Three Allies in WWII held several conferences during the war, the first of which was held in Tehran in 1943. The meeting between Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill was held in Tehran, Iran in the Soviet Embassy. The main decision made during the meeting was to open a second front against Nazi Germany.

40. Checked online reviews of, modern-style : YELPED
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”. I have a young neighbor here who used to work for yelp ...

44. One on staff? : CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

46. Trifle : BAGATELLE
A bagatelle is a bauble or trinket and is a word that we imported from French, in which language it has the same meaning.

47. Cousin of Sven : LARS
Sven is a Scandinavian name. “Sven” is derived from the Old Norse word for “young man” or “young warrior”.

Lars is a Nordic name that is derived from the Roman name Laurentius, and so is related to the English names Laurence and Lawrence. The root name means “crowned with laurel”.

48. Michael Sheen's character in "Twilight" : ARO
The reference is to a character in "The Twilight" series of books by Stephenie Meyer. "The Twilight Saga" is a series of films based on the books. “The Twilight” books feature vampires, and I don’t do vampires ...

Michael Sheen is a gifted actor from Wales who has played former British prime minister Tony Blair in three films: “The Deal” (2003), “The Queen” (2006), and “The Special Relationship” (2010). He also played comedian Kenneth Williams In “Fantabulosa!” (2006), broadcaster David Frost in “Frost/Nixon” (2008) and soccer team manager Brian Clough in “The Damned United” (2009). He is now playing Dr. William Masters on the Showtime TV series “Masters of Sex”.

55. Mystical Muslims : SUFIS
A Sufi is a Muslim mystic, an ascetic.

58. Ill-gotten gains : LUCRE
Our word “lucre” meaning “money, profits” comes from the Latin “lucrum” that means the same thing.

59. Port on the Panama Canal : COLON
Colón is a sea port near the Caribbean Sea entrance to the Panama Canal.

61. D.C.'s ___ Constitution Hall : DAR
In order to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), an applicant has to prove that she is a descendant of someone closely associated with, and supportive of, the American Revolution.

DAR Constitution Hall is a concert hall that was built in Washington, D.C. by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) in 1929. The facility was originally built to house the DAR’s annual convention as the membership had outgrown the nearby Memorial Continental Hall that had been used in prior years.

65. "Born to Die" singer Lana Del ___ : REY
Lana Del Rey is the stage name of singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant. Del Rey calls herself a “self-styled gangsta Nancy Sinatra”. Nice …

71. Part of SEATO : ASIA
The Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) was set up in 1954, a defense organization with the mission to block communist influence growing in Southeast Asia. The driving force behind the organization's creation was President Eisenhower’s Secretary of State, John Dulles. The list of SEATO members included Australia, France, the Philippines, the UK and the US. The organization was never really considered effective and it fell apart in 1977 largely due to a lack of interest by the members.

72. Billet-___ : DOUX
Billet-doux is a French term for a love letter. A "billet" is a short note, and "doux" means sweet.

81. Part of M.F.A. : ARTS
Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

88. Oh-so-bored : BLASE
“Blasé”, meaning “nonchalant, bored from overindulgence” comes from the French verb “blaser”, meaning "to satiate".

90. "Glee" star ___ Michele : LEA
Lea Michele is both an actor and a singer and started performing as a child actor on Broadway, including appearances in "Les Miserables" and "Fiddler on the Roof". These days Michele plays Rachel Berry on the Fox TV show "Glee".

The TV show called "Glee" has proven to be very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio called New Directions.

93. Comedian Daniel and musician Peter : TOSHES
Daniel Tosh is a stand-up comedian and host of “Tosh.0”, a video clip show on Comedy Central.

Peter Tosh was a musician from Jamaica, a member of the Wailers reggae band. Sadly, Tosh was murdered in a home invasion and extortion attempt in 1987.

100. Nov. 11 honoree : VET
Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

104. Lummox : CLOD
The word "lummox" comes from East Anglian slang (northeast of London). The term is probably a contraction of "lumbering ox".

106. Beijing problem : SMOG
"Smog" is a portmanteau formed by melding "smoke" and "fog". The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s.

The city of Beijing was given its name in 1403, with “Beijing” chosen as it translates as “Northern Capital”. The name distinguished it from the city of Nanjing, which name translates as “Southern Capital”.

107. Hatcher of "Desperate Housewives" : TERI
Teri Hatcher's most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in "Desperate Housewives". I've never seen more than a few minutes of "Housewives" but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in "Tomorrow Never Dies".

I haven’t even seen one episode of the hit show “Desperate Housewives”, I must admit. During pre-production, the show was called "Wisteria Lane" and then "The Secret Lives of Housewives".

110. Emoji holder : TEXT
An emoji is a character found on many cell phones now that is like an emoticon, but more elaborate.

112. Place for a "me day" : SPA
The word "spa" migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name "Spa" comes from the Walloon word "espa" meaning "spring, fountain".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fake blood, e.g. : GOO
4. Many establishments on Paris's Boulevard Saint-Germain : CAFES
9. Enjoy thoroughly : SAVOR
14. Ex-Mrs. Trump : IVANA
19. Person behind a strike? : UMP
20. Cause of a 2014 epidemic : EBOLA
21. Word with light or horse : OPERA
22. Figure in Jewish folklore : GOLEM
23. One time around : LAP
24. "He who hesitates is lost, but ..." : … LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
27. Beat around the bush? : PROWL
29. Mathematician Fibonacci : LEONARDO
30. N.B.A. team once coached by Larry Bird : PACERS
31. DVR lineup : SHOWS
33. Rich cake : TORTE
34. Brown who wrote "The Diana Chronicles" : TINA
35. Handles : ALIASES
37. Silliness : INANITY
41. Half-and-half, maybe : MUTT
42. Park place : BENCH
46. ___ game : BLAME
49. Kind of arch : OGEE
50. Frequent subject of fibbing : AGE
51. ___ Soetoro, stepfather of Barack Obama : LOLO
52. Longest river entirely within Switzerland : AARE
53. Group of Coyotes, for short : NHL
54. Name on a toy truck : HESS
56. To the point : AD REM
57. Empty stomach sound : GROWL
59. ___ limit (sign at the edge of town) : CORP
60. Sound : AUDIO
62. Crumbly cheeses : FETAS
64. Arctic lights : AURORAE
66. Regimented resort : FAT FARM
68. See 73-Across : FIT
69. Locale of the 15-Down Eyjafjallajökull : ICELAND
70. Decked out : ATTIRED
71. Like pop-ups : ARCED
73. Check for 68-Across : TRY ON
74. 2006 Pixar film : CARS
75. Heavy drinker, in slang : DIPSO
77. Out of the barn, say : LOOSE
79. ESPNU covers it : NCAA
82. Celestial altar : ARA
83. Gladly, old-style : FAIN
84. Steer closer to the wind : LUFF
85. It borders the N. Atl. : EUR
86. Prison escape path, maybe : DUCT
88. A sharp equivalent : B-FLAT
89. Sing the praises of : EXTOL
91. Unused : MINT
92. Give the right : ENTITLE
94. Second chances for students : RETESTS
96. Head of an inn? : BOAR
97. Caliban in "The Tempest," e.g. : SLAVE
102. Pooh-bah : NABOB
103. Get into : ACCESS
106. Part of a dominatrix's outfit : STILETTO
108. Babe in the woods : OWLET
111. "You can't judge a book by its cover, but ..." : … CLOTHES MAKE THE MAN
114. "___ no idea" : I’VE
115. Blazing stars : NOVAE
116. Pairs are seen in it : POKER
117. Emulate Isocrates : ORATE
118. Birth certificate datum : SEX
119. Paradises : EDENS
120. Chemical ___ : AGENT
121. Trig functions : SINES
122. Boom source : SST

Down
1. [Um, this can't be good] : GULP
2. All-Star second baseman Infante : OMAR
3. "Birds of a feather flock together, but ..." : … OPPOSITES ATTRACT
4. Solo features of six Bach suites : CELLOS
5. Blood type system : ABO
6. "Great minds think alike, but ..." : … FOOLS SELDOM DIFFER
7. Actress Sommer : ELKE
8. Clog : SABOT
9. Till now : SO FAR
10. Left at sea : APORT
11. Like some salsa : VERDE
12. Stackable dessert item : OREO
13. 2004 musical biopic for which the star won Best Actor : RAY
14. Pet in the comic strip "FoxTrot" : IGUANA
15. See 69-Across : VOLCANO
16. "Helm ___!" (captain's cry) : ALEE
17. Within view : NEAR
18. Ratchets (up) : AMPS
25. Ambient music innovator Brian : ENO
26. Put forward : OPINE
28. "Huh?" : WHAT?
32. It's a trap : WEB
34. "Slow and steady wins the race, but ..." : … TIME WAITS FOR NO MAN
35. Shanghai nursemaid : AMAH
36. Winter Olympics sport : LUGE
38. "Knowledge is power, but ..." : … IGNORANCE IS BLISS
39. 1943 conference site : TEHRAN
40. Checked online reviews of, modern-style : YELPED
43. Here/there connector : NOR
44. One on staff? : CLEF
45. Sphere of civilian activity during war : HOME FRONT
46. Trifle : BAGATELLE
47. Cousin of Sven : LARS
48. Michael Sheen's character in "Twilight" : ARO
55. Mystical Muslims : SUFIS
56. Broadcast : AIRED
58. Ill-gotten gains : LUCRE
59. Port on the Panama Canal : COLON
61. D.C.'s ___ Constitution Hall : DAR
63. Personal quirk : TIC
65. "Born to Die" singer Lana Del ___ : REY
66. Pretense : FACADE
67. Galloping : AT A RUN
71. Part of SEATO : ASIA
72. Billet-___ : DOUX
76. Gal ___ : PAL
78. More than once in a while : OFT
80. You may have a great one in your family : AUNT
81. Part of M.F.A. : ARTS
87. Like some mountain guides : TIBETAN
88. Oh-so-bored : BLASE
90. "Glee" star ___ Michele : LEA
91. It may mean "Pet me!" : MEOW!
93. Comedian Daniel and musician Peter : TOSHES
95. Broadsides, informally : T-BONES
97. Rooting interest : STAKE
98. Compare : LIKEN
99. Not nodding : ALERT
100. Nov. 11 honoree : VET
101. Community spirit : ETHOS
103. Red in the face? : ACNE
104. Lummox : CLOD
105. Inlet : COVE
106. Beijing problem : SMOG
107. Hatcher of "Desperate Housewives" : TERI
109. Holiday lead-ins : EVES
110. Emoji holder : TEXT
112. Place for a "me day" : SPA
113. Gorged on : ATE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0829-15 New York Times Crosword Answers 29 Aug 15, Saturday



QuickLinks:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Evan Birnholz
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 32m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Minuteman III, e.g. : ICBM
There are still hundreds Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) in service, with most of them dotted around the landscape of the plain states. I was driving through the area a couple of years ago and counted five missile silos and two launch control centers, just sitting there, at the side of the road.

8. Page formatting aid : TAB SET
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the space bar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to "jump" across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

14. Group of shooting stars, for short? : NBA
The National Basketball Association (NBA) was founded in 1946 as the Basketball Association of America. The NBA name was adopted in 1949. Of the four major sports leagues in North America, the NBA has the highest average annual salary per player.

16. Piece heard in "Immortal Beloved" : EROICA
Beethoven originally dedicated his Symphony No. 3 to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was "born" out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from "Bonaparte" to "Eroica", meaning "heroic" or "valiant".

“Immortal Beloved” is one of my favorite movies of all time, although that is partly because I have a penchant for biographical films about the lives of classical composers. This 1994 film is an exploration of who might be the “immortal beloved” that Beethoven referred to in three letters that he wrote that were found among his private papers after he died. It’s a great tale and of course the musical score is just wonderful ...

17. "Not marble, ___ the gilded monuments / Of princes ...": Shak. : NOR
Here is William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 55” …
Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmear'd with sluttish time.
When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.
'Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.

18. Stereotypical pennant waver, colloquially : ALUM
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

20. Much-debated grammar subject : OXFORD COMMA
Also called an Oxford comma and Harvard comma, a serial comma is the comma in a list of terms before the word “and”, as in “clues, answers, and crosswords”. The use of the Oxford comma is controversial, accepted more on this side of Atlantic than the other. Personally, I use the Oxford comma when it seems appropriate verbally, when a pause adds to the sentence. But then, my English teacher really didn’t approve of any of my opinions ...

23. Battle of Isengard participant : ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

25. Perianth component : SEPAL
The perianth is that part of the flower that is non-reproductive, usually the envelope surrounding the flower’s sexual organs. The perianth normally comprises the calyx, made up from the sepals, and the corolla, made up from the petals.

26. Recurring Shakespearean figure : FOOL
“The Fool” is a character that turns up in many, many Shakespearean plays. For example:
- The Fool, in “King Lear”
- Touchstone in “As you Like It”
- Nick Bottom in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
- Clown in “Othello”
- The Gravediggers in “Hamlet”
- Falstaff in “Henry IV, Part 1” and “Henry IV, Part 2”

33. First name in 2000s pop music : MILEY
Miley Cyrus became famous playing the Disney Channel character "Hannah Montana". Miley is of course the daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus. When she was born, Billy Ray and his wife named their daughter "Destiny Hope", but soon they themselves calling her "Smiley" as she was always smiling as a baby, and this got shortened to Miley over time. Cute ...

34. * * * * *, say : RAVE
A "rave" is a 5-starr (*****) review.

35. Part of ;-) : WINK
An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters to represent facial features, and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face :-)

38. Where a bowler might go on a date : HATCHECK
I think a bowler hat is usually called a derby here in the US. The bowler was first produced in 1849 in London by hatmakers Thomas and William Bowler, hence the name. The alternative name of "derby" comes from the tradition of wearing bowler hats at the Derby horse race (a major race held annually in England).

42. It : SEX APPEAL
Clara Bow was a fabulous star of silent film, with her most famous movie being "It" from 1927. Clara Bow's performance was so celebrated in the movie that she was forever to be known as the "It-girl". The term "it" was a euphemism for "sex appeal", and that is what Clara Bow was known to "exude". Bow applied her red lipstick in the shape of a heart, and women who copied this style were said to put on a "Clara Bow".

44. President #36, #41 or #43 : TEXAN
President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) is one of only four people to have held all four elected federal offices, namely US Representative, US Senator, US Vice-President and US President (along with John Tyler, Andrew Johnson, and Richard Nixon). As President he is perhaps best remembered for escalating involvement in the Vietnam War, and for his “Great Society” legislation.

President George H. W. Bush served in the US Navy during WWII. Future President Bush postponed his entry into college after the attack on Pearl Harbor and enlisted in the navy instead. When he earned his wings, he was the youngest aviator in the US Navy at that time.

President George W. Bush was born on July 6, 1946 in New Haven, Connecticut. President Bush shares his birthday with one of the tough guys of Hollywood. Sylvester Stallone was born on the same day, in New York City.

45. Eminem's "___ I Collapse" : TILL
Rap star Eminem's real name is Marshall Mathers, a native of Saint Joseph, Missouri. Mathers grew up poor, raised by a single-mom as the family was abandoned by his father when he was 18 months old. Marshall and his mother moved around the country before settling in a suburb of Detroit. He didn't do well at school, and dropped out at the age of 17. But in the end he made it pretty big ...

48. "La Dolce Vita" setting : ROME
The title of the celebrated 1960 Federico Fellini film "La Dolce Vita" translates from Italian as "The Good Life". There is a character in the film called Paparazzo who is a news photographer. It is this character who gives us our word "Paparazzi", a term used for photographers who make careers out of taking candid shots of celebrities.

49. Count six E's in this puzzle clue, for example : ERR
Yep, there aren’t six letters E in the clue, only five …

50. Marks of derision : SCARE QUOTES
I must admit, I probably overuse “scare quotes” in this blog. Scare quotes are quotation marks placed around a word or phrase implying a non-standard usage. Yes, a “non-standard” usage …

52. God, in Hebrew literature : ADONAI
In the Hebrew tradition, “Adonai” is a title of reverence for God.

54. Savanna sights : GNUS
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. "Wildebeest" is actually the Dutch word for "wild beast".

A savanna (also savannah) is a grassland. If there are any trees in a savanna, by definition they are small and widely spaced so that light can get to the grasses allowing them to grow unhindered.

55. Govt. org. with roots going back to the Civil War : IRS’
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

56. Spice mixture in an Indian restaurant : MASALA
Garam masala is a mixture of ground spices that is particularly associated with Indian cuisine. A typical composition of garam masala includes:
- black and white peppercorns
- cloves
- cinnamon
- black and white cumin seeds
- black, brown, and green cardamom pods
All of the ingredients are toasted, and then ground together.

57. One of the housewives on "Desperate Housewives" : EDIE
Edie Britt is a character on television’s “Desperate Housewives” played by Nicollette Sheridan. I’m told that her name is now Edie William, and that she used to be called Edie McLain and also Edie Rothwell. She must be a desperate housewife …

58. Longtime Washington Post theater critic Richard : COE
The theater critic Richard L. Coe worked for “the Washington Post” for more than forty years. Coe has been around a while, and reviewed the original productions of “Hello Dolly!” and “Carnival”.

Down
2. Microsoft release of 2013 : XBOX ONE
The XBox line of video game consoles is made by Microsoft. The original XBox platform was followed by XBox 360 and most recently by XBox One. Microsoft’s XBox competes directly with Sony’s PlayStation and Nintendo’s Wii.

3. Feature of a bomber hat : EARFLAP
A bomber cap or aviator cap is a leather cap with a chin strap and ear flaps. The bomber cap was developed in the days of open-cockpit airplanes.

6. He died while filming "Game of Death" : BRUCE LEE
Bruce Lee was born not far from here in San Francisco although he was raised in Hong Kong, returning to the US to attend college. Sadly, Bruce Lee died when he was only 32 years old, due to cerebral edema (a swelling of the brain) attributed to adverse reactions to the pain killing drug Equagesic.

9. Integration calculation : AREA
In the world of calculus, the integration function calculates the area between a curve and the x-axis or y-axis.

21. "My Darling Clementine" locale : OK CORRAL
"My Darling Clementine" is a 1946 Western about the Gunfight at the OK Corral. The film was directed by John ford and stars Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp. The title of the movie is taken from its theme song, “Oh My Darling, Clementine”.

28. Lady love? : TRAMP
"Lady and the Tramp" is a classic animated feature from Walt Disney, released in 1955. Who can forget the scene where the Tramp and Lady are "on a date" and together eat that one strand of spaghetti? So cute!

30. Color : TINCT
To tinct is to do just that, add a little color to something.

32. The Oscars, e.g. : TV SPECIAL
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the "Oscars". The root of the name "Oscar" is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named "Oscar" in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days ...

35. "Flying" one : WALLENDA
The Flying Wallendas are a circus act noted for highwire routines that are performed without a net. The original Wallenda troupe was from Germany, and first performed in the US in Madison Square Garden in 1928. The safety net that was used by the act was lost in transit and so the Wallendas made their first American performance without a net to the delight of the crowd. Working without a net then became the act’s trademark. Despite many tragic incidents that have resulted in deaths, Wallenda family members are performing without a net to this day.

36. Big producer of novelty records, informally : WEIRD AL
“Weird Al” Yankovic is a singer-songwriter who is noted for writing and performing parodies of popular songs. Of the 150 or so such songs, the best known are probably “Eat It” (parodying “Beat It” by Michael Jackson) and “Like a Surgeon” (parodying “Like a Virgin” by Madonna).

37. "Sweet Child O' Mine" rocker : AXL ROSE
Axl Rose is the lead vocalist of the American rock band, Guns N' Roses.

40. Brown's follower : CAMERON
David Cameron is the Prime Minister of the UK, after a cliffhanger of a general election in May of 2010. The Labor Party, led for so many years by Tony Blair and then by Gordon Brown after Blair stepped down, lost the majority of seats in Parliament and the Conservatives emerged with the most seats. However, the Liberal Democrats, led by Nick Clegg, had enough seats to hold the balance of power. Cameron had to agree to form a coalition government in order to rule, with Nick Clegg holding the office of Deputy Prime Minister.

41. Mideast diet : KNESSET
The Knesset is the legislative branch of the Israeli government, and does its business in the Givat Ram neighborhood of central Jerusalem.

43. "Little" girl of fiction : EVA
Little Eva is a character in the 1852 novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Harriet Beecher Stowe. Eva’s full name is Evangeline St. Clare.

47. News filler : SQUIB
A “squib” is short and humorous piece in a newspaper or magazine. The term might possible be imitative of the small firework called a squib, as a newspaper’s squib might be intended to ignite thinking and discourse.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Dump : AXE
4. Minuteman III, e.g. : ICBM
8. Page formatting aid : TAB SET
14. Group of shooting stars, for short? : NBA
15. Do some drills? : BORE
16. Piece heard in "Immortal Beloved" : EROICA
17. "Not marble, ___ the gilded monuments / Of princes ...": Shak. : NOR
18. Stereotypical pennant waver, colloquially : ALUM
19. Aid in target shooting : RED DOT
20. Much-debated grammar subject : OXFORD COMMA
23. Battle of Isengard participant : ENT
24. One getting a beating in the kitchen? : YOLK
25. Perianth component : SEPAL
26. Recurring Shakespearean figure : FOOL
27. Pass : ENACT
29. "I'm listening" : LAY IT ON ME
31. Forced out at home? : DEPORTED
33. First name in 2000s pop music : MILEY
34. * * * * *, say : RAVE
35. Part of ;-) : WINK
36. Gets toasty : WARMS
38. Where a bowler might go on a date : HATCHECK
42. It : SEX APPEAL
44. President #36, #41 or #43 : TEXAN
45. Eminem's "___ I Collapse" : TILL
46. Necessary things, perhaps : EVILS
48. "La Dolce Vita" setting : ROME
49. Count six E's in this puzzle clue, for example : ERR
50. Marks of derision : SCARE QUOTES
52. God, in Hebrew literature : ADONAI
54. Savanna sights : GNUS
55. Govt. org. with roots going back to the Civil War : IRS
56. Spice mixture in an Indian restaurant : MASALA
57. One of the housewives on "Desperate Housewives" : EDIE
58. Longtime Washington Post theater critic Richard : COE
59. Surveying device with letter-shaped rests : Y-LEVEL
60. Where to find solutions : LABS
61. Member of a small work force? : ANT

Down
1. Got to : ANNOYED
2. Microsoft release of 2013 : XBOX ONE
3. Feature of a bomber hat : EARFLAP
4. Skyscraper piece : I-BAR
5. Unpleasant things to pass around : COLDS
6. He died while filming "Game of Death" : BRUCE LEE
7. Place for minutes : MEMO PAD
8. Restriction for some offices : TERM LIMIT
9. Integration calculation : AREA
10. Hottie's hot thing : BOD
11. Start of a record : SIDE ONE
12. High class? : ECONOMY
13. Tell : TATTLE
21. "My Darling Clementine" locale : OK CORRAL
22. "___ I?" : MAY
26. Romanticized figure : FOLK HERO
28. Lady love? : TRAMP
30. Color : TINCT
32. The Oscars, e.g. : TV SPECIAL
35. "Flying" one : WALLENDA
36. Big producer of novelty records, informally : WEIRD AL
37. "Sweet Child O' Mine" rocker : AXL ROSE
38. Do stuff : HAIR GEL
39. Things rarely seen : EXOTICA
40. Brown's follower : CAMERON
41. Mideast diet : KNESSET
42. Blue, say : STEAMY
43. "Little" girl of fiction : EVA
47. News filler : SQUIB
50. Good time to get the goods : SALE
51. Milks : USES
53. ___ system (car's built-in GPS) : NAV


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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