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1001-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Guzzetta
THEME: Warm to Cold … we have a rebus puzzle today, with a word ladder found within the rebus squares. Apologies for not being able to fit the complete word into each rebus square in my grid. The word ladder runs roughly from the top-left to the bottom-right, with the rebus words being:
WARM
        WORM
                WORD
                        CORD
                                COLD
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Any old person, so to speak : WARM BODY
I’ll take ony old person, just give me a warm body to fill out the team, for example.

6. French connections : ETS
“Et” is the French word for “and”.

13. Mischievous : ARCH
Something described as “arch” can be cunning and sly, or mischievously playful.

15. Cooper preceder : MINI
The original mini was a fabulous car, one that I drove all over Ireland in my youth. It had a unique front-wheel-drive layout that took up very little space, allowing for a lot of room (relatively speaking) for passengers and baggage. One space-saving trick was to mount the engine transversely, so it sits rotated 90-degrees from the norm. That engine had a capacity of only 848cc. In 1961, a Mini Cooper model was introduced, a sporty version of the Mini. The Mini Cooper was a phenomenal hit, especially after repeated wins in the Monte Carlo Rally. The Mini marque has been owned by BMW since 1994.

16. Party spreads : PATES
Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version of the paste is pâté de foie gras, made from the fattened livers of geese ("foie gras" means "fat liver" in French).

18. Radio button : AM/FM
The radio spectrum is divided into bands based on frequency. "High band" is composed of relatively high frequency values, and "low band" is composed of frequencies that are relatively low. FM radio falls into the band called Very High Frequency, or VHF. Television signals use frequencies even higher than VHF, frequencies in the Ultra High Frequency band (UHF). AM radio uses lower frequencies that fall into the relatively low bands of Low, Medium and High Frequency (LF, MF, and HF).

19. Chat room overseers, for short : MODS
Moderator (mod.)

24. Command and control : KEYS
The Command key is found on an Apple keyboard, and the Control key on a PC keyboard.

25. Part of 52-Across : TRI-
(52A. Buster of rock : TNT)
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

31. Band with the 1988 #1 hit "Need You Tonight" : INXS
INXS (pronounced “in excess”) was a rock band from Australia. The band formed in 1977 in Sydney as the Farriss Brothers, as three of the original lineups were indeed brothers.

35. Currency that features architecture, not portraiture : EUROS
Euro coins carry a design on one side that indicates the country of issue (Ireland uses a harp, for example). Euro banknotes, on the other hand, lack any such indication. The banknotes all feature stylized architectural designs of bridges, arches and gateways that reflect the large number of historic structures found throughout the continent.

39. Bandleader who became a 1950s sitcom star : ARNAZ
Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

42. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

43. Desert royal : EMIR
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

47. Capital in sight of Kilimanjaro : NAIROBI
Nairobi is the capital and largest city in the African nation of Kenya. The city is named for the Nairobi River, which in turn takes its name from the Maasai “Enkare Nairobi” meaning “Cool Water”. Nairobi was founded in 1899 as a stop on the Kenya-Uganda railroad, at a time when the country was a British colony.

Kilimanjaro is a dormant volcano in Tanzania, and is the highest mountain in the whole of Africa. I was having lunch recently with the parents of my son’s girlfriend. The young lady’s mother casually mentioned in the conversation that she summited Kilimanjaro last year. I paid for lunch …

51. Post-surgery place : ICU
After being wheeled out of the Operating Room (OR) a patient might spend some time in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

52. Buster of rock : TNT
TNT might be used bust (blow up) rock.

55. Judge of 1980s-'90s TV : WAPNER
Joseph Wapner is a retired judge who was the first person to star in the reality show “The People’s Court”. With Wapner on the bench, the first manifestation of “The People’s Court” ran for almost 2,500 episodes, from 1981 to 1993. Prior to gracing our TV screens, Judge Wapner served for 18 years on the Los Angeles County Superior Court.

60. Leader Castro : RAUL
Raul Castro is the younger brother of Fidel Castro. Raul has been President of Cuba since 2008, when Fidel stepped aside.

61. Athletic shoe brand : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

62. ___ Field : CITI
Citi Field is the relatively new baseball stadium used by the New York Mets, and sits right next door to Shea stadium, where the Mets had played for decades. And the name of course comes from sponsor Citigroup.

66. Goddess in a chariot drawn by peacocks : HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealousy and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

67. ___ acid : AMINO
Amino acids are essential to life in many ways, not least of which is their use as the building blocks of proteins.

68. Field ration, for short : MRE
The Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) comes in a lightweight package that's easy to tote around. The MRE replaced the more cumbersome Meal, Combat, Individual (MCI) in 1981, a meal-in-a-can. In turn, the MCI had replaced the C-ration in 1958, a less sophisticated meal-in-a-can with a more limited choice.

69. Fifth on an eight-part scale : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

Down
3. German Expressionist who was blacklisted by the Nazis : OTTO DIX
Otto Dix was a German painter and printmaker. Dix fought in the military in WWI and was profoundly affected by his experiences. Many of his artistic works reflected those experiences.

4. Title judge of a 1995 sci-fi film : DREDD
The 1995 movie "Judge Dredd" starring Sylvester Stallone in the title role, was loosely based on the comic book character of the same name. Judge Dredd may be an American hero from the future in an American city, but the comic is written and published in the UK.

5. The P.L.O.'s Arafat : YASSER
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

6. You can't stop humming it : EARWORM
“Earworm” is a colloquial term used for a catchy tune that is also somewhat irritating, one that you can’t get out of your head.

7. "East of Eden" family name : TRASK
John Steinbeck considered "East of Eden" his magnus opus. Most of the storyline takes place near Salinas, just south of where I live here in the Bay Area. Two of the characters in the story are brothers Cal and Aron Trask, representative of the biblical Cain and Abel.

11. Dunces : DIMWITS
John Duns Scotus was a theologian and scholar in the Middle Ages, responsible for many writings that were used as textbooks in British universities of the day. New ideas developed during the English Renaissance, but Duns Scotus and his followers resisted the changes. The word "dunse" came into use as a way of ridiculing those refusing to learn anything new, a precursor to our modern usage of "dunce".

14. 2003 OutKast hit that was #1 for nine weeks : HEY YA!
OutKast is a hip hop duo made up from rappers André 3000 and Big Boi.

15. Dallas player, for short : MAV
The Mavericks are the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

21. German steel center : ESSEN
Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

22. Fat meas. : BMI
The body mass index (BMI) is the ratio of a person’s height to his or her mass.

23. Blue state majority, for short : DEMS
On political maps, red states are Republican and blue states Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

28. Books that may depict dragons, unicorns and griffins : BESTIARIES
Bestiaries were books that were relatively popular in the Middle Ages, books that described individual types of bird or animal. Each beast’s entry had an illustration, as well as a moral tale associated with the beast.

37. Mercury, in alchemy : AZOTH
In the world of alchemy, “azoth” as the name given to the universal medicine that was sought by many. The related “alkahest” was the elusive universal solvent, a solvent that might even dissolve gold. Over time, the term “azoth” came to be used for the element mercury.

41. Latex-like glove material : NITRILE
Nitrile rubber is a synthetic rubber that is sold under trade names such as Nipol, Krynac and Europrene. Also known as nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), it has many uses, especially in applications where ordinary rubber is not suitable. Examples are oil and fuel hoses in a car, protective gloves used in particularly harsh environment, and applications where there is concern about an allergic reaction to natural rubber.

45. Smallest NATO member by population : ICELAND
Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in the whole of Europe, with two-thirds of the nation's population residing in and around the capital city of Reykjavik. Iceland was settled by the Norse people in AD 874, and was ruled for centuries by Norway and then Denmark. Iceland became independent in 1918, and has been a republic since 1944.

46. Sci-fi play of 1921 : RUR
Karel Čapek was a Czech writer noted for his works of science fiction. Čapek’s 1920 play "R.U.R." is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word "robot". The words "automaton" and "android" were already in use, but Capek gave us "robot" from the original Czech "robota" meaning "forced labor". The initialism “R.U.R.”, in the context of the play, stands for “Rossum’s Universal Robots”.

50. Outcast : PARIAH
“Pariah” is an anglicized version of the Tamil word “Paraiyar”. The Paraiyar are a social group of about 9 million people found in some Indian states and in Sri Lanka. The term “pariah” came to be a general term for members of the lowest caste in society, outcasts.

56. "Star Wars" queen : PADME
In the "Star Wars" universe, Padmé Amidala is the Queen of the planet Naboo. Played very ably by Natalie Portman, Padmé becomes the secret wife of Anakin Skywalker, later revealed to be Darth Vader. As such, Padmé is also the mother of Luke Skywalker and his sister, Princess Leia Organa.

58. Scotland's Firth of ___ : TAY
The Firth of Tay is an inlet on the east coast of Scotland into which empties Scotland's largest river, the Tay. The city of Dundee lies on the Firth, and the city of Perth just inland on the Tay.

64. Peter out, as a trail : GO COLD
The verb phrase “to peter out”, meaning “to fizzle out”, originated in the 1840s in the American mining industry. While the exact etymology isn’t clear, it probably derives from the term “saltpetre”, a constituent of gunpowder.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Any old person, so to speak : WARM BODY
6. French connections : ETS
9. Top : LID
12. Super- : ULTRA-
13. Mischievous : ARCH
15. Cooper preceder : MINI
16. Party spreads : PATES
17. Like triple plays : RARE
18. Radio button : AM/FM
19. Chat room overseers, for short : MODS
20. Low camera perspective : WORM'S-EYE VIEW
22. Slept with : BEDDED
24. Command and control : KEYS
25. Part of 52-Across : TRI-
26. "Surely not me?" : MOI?
27. Yank's opposite : REB
29. Budding : NASCENT
31. Band with the 1988 #1 hit "Need You Tonight" : INXS
33. Eyesore : MESS
35. Currency that features architecture, not portraiture : EUROS
36. "Birthday" or "mother's maiden name," e.g. : PASSWORD HINT
39. Bandleader who became a 1950s sitcom star : ARNAZ
42. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
43. Desert royal : EMIR
47. Capital in sight of Kilimanjaro : NAIROBI
49. Percussive dance : TAP
51. Post-surgery place : ICU
52. Buster of rock : TNT
53. Mad rush : TEAR
55. Judge of 1980s-'90s TV : WAPNER
57. "Officially ..." : FOR THE RECORD ...
60. Leader Castro : RAUL
61. Athletic shoe brand : AVIA
62. ___ Field : CITI
63. What an endangered animal may get : ID TAG
65. Depend : RELY
66. Goddess in a chariot drawn by peacocks : HERA
67. ___ acid : AMINO
68. Field ration, for short : MRE
69. Fifth on an eight-part scale : SOL
70. Cause of a stuffed-up nose : HEAD COLD

Down
1. Get ready to play : WARM UP
2. Make the scapegoat for : BLAME ON
3. German Expressionist who was blacklisted by the Nazis : OTTO DIX
4. Title judge of a 1995 sci-fi film : DREDD
5. The P.L.O.'s Arafat : YASSER
6. You can't stop humming it : EARWORM
7. "East of Eden" family name : TRASK
8. What a tech specialist might ask you to send : SCREENSHOT
9. Constraint : LIMITER
10. Conflagration : INFERNO
11. Dunces : DIMWITS
14. 2003 OutKast hit that was #1 for nine weeks : HEY YA!
15. Dallas player, for short : MAV
21. German steel center : ESSEN
22. Fat meas. : BMI
23. Blue state majority, for short : DEMS
28. Books that may depict dragons, unicorns and griffins : BESTIARIES
30. Reply to a bit of cleverness : CUTE
32. Ship's pole : SPAR
34. Renaissance fair props : SWORDS
37. Mercury, in alchemy : AZOTH
38. "___ the light!" : I SAW
39. Provider of underground entertainment? : ANT FARM
40. Trampled : RAN OVER
41. Latex-like glove material : NITRILE
44. Detail : MINUTIA
45. Smallest NATO member by population : ICELAND
46. Sci-fi play of 1921 : RUR
48. Tree with burs : BEECH
50. Outcast : PARIAH
54. Hip again : RETRO
56. "Star Wars" queen : PADME
58. Scotland's Firth of ___ : TAY
59. After-dinner drink : CORDIAL
64. Peter out, as a trail : GO COLD


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0930-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Sep 15, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

Share today's solution with a friend:
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Freddie Cheng
THEME: Breakables … each of today’s themed answers starts with something that can be BROKEN:
62A. Extra-care items for movers ... or a hint to the starts of 17-, 24-, 28-, 44- and 49-Across : BREAKABLES

17A. High excitement : FEVER PITCH (break a fever)
24A. Desire of one submitting a demo CD : RECORD DEAL (break a record)
28A. Workout attire that became a 1980s fad : LEG WARMERS (break a leg)
44A. Bottom of a gym? : SWEATPANTS (break a sweat)
49A. Debut time for many TV shows : FALL SEASON (break a fall)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 9m 34s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. 2013 Twitter event, briefly : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

15. Café specification : AU LAIT
Café au lait (“coffee with milk”) is usually strong, drip coffee to which one adds steamed milk. At least that's the way we tend to make in this country.

16. Mad stepson in "I, Claudius" : NERO
"I, Claudius" is a 1934 novel penned by Robert Graves, written in the form of an autobiography of Emperor Claudius of Rome. Graves wrote a sequel in 1935 called "Claudius the God". Both books were adapted by the BBC into a fabulous television series that went by the name of the first book "I, Claudius".

19. Took a gander at : EYED
To take “a gander” is to take a long look. It’s a term we’ve been using since the 1880s and comes from the idea that in taking a long look one might be craning one’s neck like a goose (or gander).

20. Memorable hurricane of 2011 : IRENE
Hurricane Irene caused extensive flooding in 2011 as it travelled through the Caribbean, up the East Coast of the United States and into the Atlantic seaboard of Canada. The hurricane was unusual in that it came so far up north. Fifty-five deaths were attributed to Irene.

27. Profs' paper graders, often : TAS
Teaching Assistants (TAs)

42. Great Sphinx locale : GIZA
The Great Sphinx of Giza is a huge limestone statue of a mythical creature with the body of a lion and the head of a human. It is the largest monolithic statue in the world. Famously, the Great Sphinx is missing its nose and beard.

48. Suffix with planet : -OID
“Planetoid” is another word for "asteroid".

59. Flying nocturnal insect : OWLET MOTH
Owlet moths are a large family of moths known more formally the Noctuidae. Most owlet moths fly at night and are attracted to light. Many species are preyed upon by bats. Some of these species have a defense mechanism, organs in the ears that pick up the sonar signals emitted by bats and cause the moth wings to spasm. The erratic flying helps the moth evade its hunter.

60. Puts the kibosh on : NIXES
"Kibosh" is something that constrains or checks. "Kibosh" looks like a Yiddish word but it isn't, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

61. Greek goddess of the earth: Var. : GAIA
In ancient Greek religion, Gaia was the Earth goddess, the mother of everything. The Roman equivalent was the goddess Terra.

64. Libidinous god : EROS
Someone described as “libidinous” is lustful, ruled by his or her libido.

"Libido" is a term first popularized by Sigmund Freud. Freud's usage was more general than is understood today, as he used "libido" to describe all instinctive energy that arose in the subconscious. He believed that we humans are driven by two desires, the desire for life (the libido, or Eros) and the desire for death (Thanatos). Personally, I don't agree ...

65. Classic game consoles : ATARIS
At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

66. Greek H : ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character "H". Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

67. Mardi Gras follower : LENT
In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed "quadragesima" (meaning "fortieth"), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term "Lent" was introduced. "Lent" comes from "lenz", the German word for "spring".

68. Part of the Wyndham hotel group : RAMADA
The Ramada Inn hotel chain takes its name from the Spanish word for a shady resting place. A ramada is a shelter with a roof and no walls, mainly found in the American southwest. Nowadays a ramada can be temporary or permanent, but originally ramadas were makeshift shelters constructed by aboriginal Indians from branches or bushes.

69. Like a shrinking violet : SHY
Someone who is very shy might be described as a “shrinking violet”. The violet in this case is the flower, and not the girl’s name. The plant Viola odorata has been called “shrinking violet” because of its habit of hugging the ground as it grows.

Down
1. Players of 45s : HI-FIS
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm "single" the following year, in 1949.

2. "Cavalleria Rusticana," for one : OPERA
“Cavalleria rusticana” is an opera by Italian composer Pietro Mascagni that was first performed in 1890. The title translates as “Rustic Chivalry”, which is reference to the opera’s bucolic setting. The beautiful symphonic intermezzo from “Cavalleria rusticana” is often heard in “highlights from movie soundtracks” as it was used in the opening of “Raging Bull” and the finale of “The Godfather Part III”.

4. Ending with metal or mal- : -WARE
“Malware” is a collective term for software and program code that is created to intentionally disrupt and exploit computer systems. Viruses, worms, trojan horses and spyware are all covered by the term. “Malware” is short for “malicious software”.

7. Ronco Veg-o-___ : MATIC
Ronco is a company the builds and sells products mainly for the kitchen. Over the years the company has been closely associated with the “-O-Matic” suffix, especially the "Veg-O-Matic” vegetable slicer.

11. Like many mainstream economic theorists : KEYNESIAN
John Maynard Keynes was a British economist. Keynes argued that a country’s economy could and should be managed by fiscal and monetary policy in order to mitigate the effects of inevitable recessions and depressions.

12. Betel nut-yielding tree : ARECA
The betel nut is something that is chewed, especially in parts of Asia. “Betel nut” is a bit of misnomer, as the nut in question is actually an Areca nut from the Areca palm. For chewing, the Areca nut is wrapped in betel leaves and the whole thing is called a “betel nut”.

22. E.P.A.-banned pesticide : DDT
DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don't forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book "Silent Spring", suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

26. Kilmer who played Batman : VAL
Val Kilmer's first big leading role in a movie was playing Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's 1991 biopic "The Doors". A few years later, Kilmer was chosen for the lead in another big production, "Batman Forever". Things haven't really gone as well for Kilmer since then, I'd say. Off the screen, he flirted with the idea of running for Governor of New Mexico in 2010. A Hollywood actor as a Governor? Would never happen ...

29. "The Book of ___" (Denzel Washington movie) : ELI
2010’s "The Book of Eli" is one of those "end of the world" type movies, with Denzel Washington playing a tough guy traveling across what is left of the United States after some apocalyptic event.

Denzel Washington is an actor from Mount Vernon, just outside New York City. Washington’s big break came with a TV role, playing Dr. Phillip Chandler on “St. Elsewhere” from 1982 to 1988.

31. Backwoods parent : MAW
I guess that’s Maw and Paw …

33. Genetic messenger : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

36. Word before boss or bull : PIT
A pit boss (also “pit manager”) is a casino employee who works as a supervisor overseeing several floorpersons, who in turn supervise several dealers.

Sadly, the pit bull breed of dogs have earned themselves a poor reputation. I just read that pit bulls make up about 2% of the dogs in the US but about 40% of the dog attacks in the country have been attributed to the breed.

37. Ambulance letters : EMS
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

40. N.Y. sch. whose team is the Engineers : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

45. Ditch the script : AD LIB
"Ad libitum" is a Latin phrase meaning "at one's pleasure". In common usage the phrase is usually shortened to "ad lib". On the stage the concept of an "ad lib" is very familiar. For example, an actor may substitute his or her own words for forgotten lines using an ad lib, or a director may instruct an actor to use his or her own words at a particular point in a performance to promote a sense of spontaneity.

47. Guinness suffix : -EST
"The Guinness Book of World Records" holds some records of its own. It is the best-selling, copyrighted series of books of all time and is one of the books most often stolen from public libraries! The book was first published in 1954 by two twins, Norris and Ross McWhirter. The McWhirter twins found themselves with a smash hit, and eventually became very famous in Britain hosting a TV show based on world records.

49. 1993 Economics co-Nobelist Robert : FOGEL
Robert Fogel was a scientist and economist from New York City who jointly won the 1993 Nobel Prize in Economics. Fogel’s name is most associated with the concept of new economic history. Also known as “cliometrics”, new economic history is the application of economic theory to the study of history.

52. Line from the heart : AORTA
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

54. U.S. women's soccer star Kelley : O’HARA
Kelley O’Hara is soccer player who was a member of the national team when the US won the FIFA World Cup in 2015, and Olympic gold in 2012.

58. Op-ed piece : ESSAY
“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "___ goes it?" : HOW
4. Pow! : WHAMMO!
10. Rubber-stamp : OKAY
14. 2013 Twitter event, briefly : IPO
15. Café specification : AU LAIT
16. Mad stepson in "I, Claudius" : NERO
17. High excitement : FEVER PITCH (break a fever)
19. Took a gander at : EYED
20. Memorable hurricane of 2011 : IRENE
21. Performance with torches : FIRE DANCE
23. Cement mixer input : SAND
24. Desire of one submitting a demo CD : RECORD DEAL (break a record)
25. Fertility clinic eggs : OVA
27. Profs' paper graders, often : TAS
28. Workout attire that became a 1980s fad : LEG WARMERS (break a leg)
35. "Holy cow!" : YIPE!
38. Taking after : A LA
39. Driver's ed enrollee, e.g. : LEARNER
41. Deadeye's asset : AIM
42. Great Sphinx locale : GIZA
44. Bottom of a gym? : SWEATPANTS (break into a sweat)
46. Mineral suffix : -ITE
48. Suffix with planet : -OID
49. Debut time for many TV shows : FALL SEASON
55. After the bell : LATE
59. Flying nocturnal insect : OWLET MOTH
60. Puts the kibosh on : NIXES
61. Greek goddess of the earth: Var. : GAIA
62. Extra-care items for movers ... or a hint to the starts of 17-, 24-, 28-, 44- and 49-Across : BREAKABLES
64. Libidinous god : EROS
65. Classic game consoles : ATARIS
66. Greek H : ETA
67. Mardi Gras follower : LENT
68. Part of the Wyndham hotel group : RAMADA
69. Like a shrinking violet : SHY

Down
1. Players of 45s : HI-FIS
2. "Cavalleria Rusticana," for one : OPERA
3. Like wickerwork : WOVEN
4. Ending with metal or mal- : -WARE
5. Start of a drill sergeant's count : HUP!
6. Phrase in some biography titles : A LIFE
7. Ronco Veg-o-___ : MATIC
8. Smaller than small : MICRO
9. None of the above : OTHER
10. Vitamin frequency, often : ONE A DAY
11. Like many mainstream economic theorists : KEYNESIAN
12. Betel nut-yielding tree : ARECA
13. Alpine call : YODEL
18. Fund, as a foundation : ENDOW
22. E.P.A.-banned pesticide : DDT
24. Hardest-to-find items for a collector : RARES
26. Kilmer who played Batman : VAL
28. Online gaming annoyance : LAG
29. "The Book of ___" (Denzel Washington movie) : ELI
30. Huge amount, slangily : GAZILLION
31. Backwoods parent : MAW
32. Bard's preposition : ERE
33. Genetic messenger : RNA
34. Determined to achieve : SET ON
36. Word before boss or bull : PIT
37. Ambulance letters : EMS
40. N.Y. sch. whose team is the Engineers : RPI
43. "Maybe even more" : AT LEAST
45. Ditch the script : AD LIB
47. Guinness suffix : -EST
49. 1993 Economics co-Nobelist Robert : FOGEL
50. In the know : AWARE
51. Confine to jail : EMBAR
52. Line from the heart : AORTA
53. Early car powerer : STEAM
54. U.S. women's soccer star Kelley : O’HARA
56. Trucker's toll factor : AXLES
57. Elephants' tusks, essentially : TEETH
58. Op-ed piece : ESSAY
60. Probe-launching org. : NASA
63. Not be serious : KID


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0929-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 15, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Kurt Krauss
THEME: Ages … each of our themed answers starts with an AGE:
69A. A very long time ... or a hint to the starts of the answers to the five starred clues : AGES
17A. *English rock group? : STONEHENGE (giving “Stone Age”)
24A. *Many party games : ICEBREAKERS (giving “ice age”)
37A. *Railroad engine, in old lingo : IRON HORSE (giving “Iron Age”)
52A. *Seattle tourist attraction : SPACE NEEDLE (giving “Space Age”)
62A. *Medal for bravery, maybe : BRONZE STAR (giving “Bronze Age”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 17s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

16. Apple's apple, e.g. : LOGO
The logo of Apple, the computer company, is a silhouette of an apple with a bite taken out of it. The company’s original logo featured a picture of Sir Isaac Newton sitting under an apple tree.

17. *English rock group? : STONEHENGE (giving “Stone Age”)
37. *Railroad engine, in old lingo : IRON HORSE (giving “Iron Age”)
62. *Medal for bravery, maybe : BRONZE STAR (giving “Bronze Age”)
The magnificent Stonehenge monument in the south of England was built from 3000 to 2000 BC. “Stonehenge” has given its name to “henges”, a whole class of earthwork monuments that are circular in form with an internal ditch surrounded by a bank. Paradoxically, Stonehenge doesn’t qualify as a henge by this contemporary definition, as its earthen bank is surrounded by an external ditch.

Ancient societies can be classified by the "three-age system", which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:
- The Stone Age
- The Bronze Age
- The Iron Age
The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

19. River through Florence : ARNO
The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, passing through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

21. About 90 mg. of vitamin C a day, e.g. : RDA
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and are a set of recommendations for the standard daily allowances of specific nutrients. RDAs were effectively absorbed into a broader set of dietary guidelines in 1997 called Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs). RDIs are used to determine the Daily Values (DV) of foods that are printed on nutrition fact labels on most food that we purchase.

The essential nutrient referred to as vitamin C is also called L-ascorbic acid or ascorbate. A lack of vitamin C causes the disease scurvy.

22. Boston Bruins legend, to his teammates : ESPO
Phil "Espo" Esposito is a former professional hockey player who played for the Chicago Blackhawks, Boston Bruins and New York Rangers.

23. Simpson judge Lance : ITO
Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read the book that's Clark wrote about the trial called "Without a Doubt", and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as "Marcia", while addressing the men on both sides of the case as "Mister".

24. *Many party games : ICEBREAKERS (giving “ice age”)
Ice ages are periods in the Earth’s history when there are extensive ice sheets present in the northern and southern hemispheres. One might argue that we are still in an ice age that began 2.6 million years ago, as evidenced by the presence of ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica.

28. Cause of aberrant weather : EL NINO
When the surface temperature of the Pacific Ocean rises or falls more that half a degree centigrade, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for "the boy" and is a reference to the Christ child. It was given this Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

30. ___ Joe's (supermarket chain) : TRADER
Trader Joe's is a grocery store chain based in Monrovia, California that was founded in 1979 by Joe Coulombe. Trader Joe’s is very popular where I live, even though it stocks less than 10% of the items found in a typical grocery store. 80% of the items on the shelves are sold under a Trader Joe’s brand name, and are obviously chosen well. One of the more successful items is Charles Shaw wine, known as “Two Buck Chuck” here in California as it sold for many years at a price of $1.99.

31. Good area for snorkeling : REEF
Our word “snorkel” comes from German navy slang “Schnorchel” meaning “nose, snout”. The German slang was applied to an airshaft used for submarines, due to its resemblance to a nose, in that air passed through it and it made a “snoring” sound. “Schnorchel” comes from “Schnarchen”, the German for “snore”.

36. C.I.A. predecessor : OSS
The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

37. *Railroad engine, in old lingo : IRON HORSE (giving “Iron Age”)
The term “iron horse” starting appearing in Victorian times, describing those new-fangled steam-driven trains and trams that left horse-drawn vehicles in their dust. The term was especially popular in North America where it described steam locomotives.

40. Letters before an alias : AKA
Also known as (aka)

44. Top draft status : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

48. Minnesota range known for its mining of metal : MESABI
The Mesabi Range has the largest deposit of iron ore in the country, and is located in Minnesota. Robert Allen Zimmerman was raised in the area (whom we know him better as Bob Dylan) and he wrote a song called "North Country Blues" that tells of the decline of the mining industry in the Mesabi Range.

50. Historical records : ANNALS
“Annal” is a rarely used word, the singular of the more common “annals”. An annal would be the recorded events of one year, with annals being the chronological record of events in successive years. The term “annal” comes from the Latin “annus” meaning “year”.

52. *Seattle tourist attraction : SPACE NEEDLE (giving “Space Age”)
The famed Seattle landmark called the Space Needle was built for the 1962 World’s Fair. It stands at a height of 605 feet, and was once the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River.

56. Month, in Madrid : MES
Madrid is the largest city in Spain and the capital. Madrid is located very close to the geographical center of the country. It is the third-largest city in the European Union (after London and Paris). People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

57. Very, in Versailles : TRES
Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous of course as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles. The palace started out as a hunting lodge built in the village of Versailles in 1624, built for Louis XIII. Louis XIII extended the lodge into a full-blown château, but it was Louis XIV who expanded it into one of the largest palaces on the planet. Louis XIV moved the royal court from Paris to Versailles starting in 1678.

58. Prefix with center or genetics : EPI-
The “epicenter” is that point on the surface of the earth which is directly above the focus of an earthquake.

DNA contains nucleotide base sequences called genes, that are blueprints for used in the manufacture of proteins needed by the body. Our DNA is also “decorated” with epigenetic markers that modify the activity level of genes, and can even turn genes off. These epigenetic markers respond to environmental conditions, so that organisms with the same DNA can exhibit differences in behavior and appearance, as a result of differing environments. This explains which identical twins develop differences in appearance over time.

59. ___ Mundo (what Cristóbal Colón explored) : NUEVO
In Spanish, Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) explored the Nuevo Mundo (New World).

62. *Medal for bravery, maybe : BRONZE STAR (giving “Bronze Age”)
The Bronze Star Medal is awarded to members of the Army and Air Force for acts of valour. When introduced by President Roosevelt in 1944, its use was limited to US forces. President Kennedy expanded the use of the Bronze Medal to include friendly forces fight alongside the US military.

64. 60-Down mascot : MULE
(60D. West Point inst. : USMA)
The US Military Academy (USMA) houses two Army Mules that serve as mascots. The tradition of using mules as mascots started in 1899 when it was decided that the USMA needed something to counter the Navy's mascot, a goat. It should be noted that even though the Army Mules live at West Point, they are mascots for the US Army, and not the US Military Academy.

65. YouTube offering : VIDEO
YouTube is a video-sharing website, launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion, less than two years after it was founded ...

66. Dillon or Damon : MATT
Matt Dillon is a Hollywood actor who came to prominence as a teen idol in the eighties. Dillon’s most lauded performance might be the supporting role he played in the 2004 film “Crash”, as LAPD officer John Ryan. Matt’s brother is Kevin Dillon, who plays Johnny “Drama” Chase on HBO’s “Entourage”.

Matt Damon is an actor and screenwriter from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Damon’s big break came with the 1997 movie “Good Will Hunting” in which he starred. He co-wrote the screenplay with his childhood friend Ben Affleck.

67. British submachine gun : STEN
The STEN gun is an iconic armament that was used by the British military. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun's designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

68. "Nothing runs like a ___" (ad slogan) : DEERE
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere's invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of "stickiness".

Down
2. Dub : ENTITLE
Kneel, and the Queen might "dub thee a knight" if you're lucky. "Dub" is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean "make a knight". As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, "dub" has come to mean "give someone a name".

3. "Let's Make a Deal" choice : DOOR ONE
The game show "Let's Make a Deal" first aired way back in 1963. For many years the show was hosted by Monty Hall. There's a version airing right now that is hosted by Wayne Brady.

5. Prickly ___ : ASH
The Prickly Ash species of plant is more commonly referred to as Devil’s Walkingstick. It really is a prickly plant, viciously so.

6. Dear, as une amie : CHERE
“Cher” is the French for "dear". The spelling is “chère” when used with a feminine noun.

7. Genre of the old Stax record label : R AND B
Stax Records was founded in 1957 as Satellite Records. The biggest star to record with Stax was the great Otis Redding.

8. Poet ___ Lee Masters : EDGAR
Edgar Lee Masters was a poet and biographer from Kansas. His best known collection of poems is “Spoon River Anthology”, which was first published in 1915. He also wrote biographies of Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain and Walt Whitman.

9. Fifth word of "The Star-Spangled Banner" : SEE
“O say can you see by the dawn's early light” us the opening line of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key.

The lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner” were written first as a poem by Francis Scott Key, inspired by the bombarding by the British of the American forces at Fort McHenry that he witnessed during the Battle of Baltimore in September 1814. The words were then set to the tune of a popular British drinking song penned by John Stafford Smith called "The Anacreontic Song", with the Anacreontic Society being a men's club in London.

10. Denali's home : ALASKA
Denali means "the high one" in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. Denali’s summit stands at 20,237 feet, making it the highest mountain peak in North America. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

11. Ship sinker : TORPEDO
The naval weapon called a torpedo is named for the group of electric rays of the genus “Torpedo”. The name of the fish comes from the verb “torpere”, Latin for “to be stiffened, paralyzed”, which is what happens to someone who steps on an electric ray.

18. The Auld Sod : ERIN
“Auld Sod” (meaning simply “old sod”) is a familiar term for Ireland, especially when referring to the country as one’s homeland from abroad. ‘Tis true …

25. Fill with a Crayola, say : COLOR IN
In the year 2000 the Crayola company, very cleverly I think, held the “Crayola Color Census 2000” in which people were polled and asked for their favorite Crayola colors. President George W. Bush chose “Blue Bell” and Tiger Woods chose “Wild Strawberry”.

33. Part of E.S.L.: Abbr. : ENG
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

35. ___ Canals : SOO
In the summer of 2010 I spent a very interesting afternoon watching ships make their way through the Soo Locks and Soo Canals between Lake Superior and the lower Great lakes. The name "Soo" comes from the US and Canadian cities on either side of the locks, both called Sault Ste. Marie.

38. Hayseeds : RUBES
A “rube” is person lacking sophistication, often described as "a country bumpkin". The term derives from the masculine name “Reuben”, which was considered back in the early 1800s to be a typical name used in rural areas.

40. Mornings, for short : AMS
61. Evenings, for short : PMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

49. Sure winner in blackjack : ACE-TEN
The game of "twenty-one" was first referred to in a book by Cervantes, the author famous for writing "Don Quixote". He called the game "ventiuna" (Spanish for "twenty-one"). Cervantes wrote his story just after the year 1600, so the game has been around at least since then. Twenty-one came to the US but it wasn't all that popular so bonus payments were introduced to create more interest. One of the more attractive bonuses was a ten-to-one payout to a player who was dealt an ace of spades and a black jack. This bonus led to the game adopting the moniker "Blackjack".

51. Hawaiian goose : NENE
The bird called a nene is a native of Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name "nene" is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful.

53. Like the musical intro to "The Twilight Zone" : EERIE
The iconic television series called “The Twilight Zone” first aired in 1959 and then ran for 156 episodes before being pulled in 1964. “The Twilight Zone” was revived for four years in the late eighties, and was also spun-off into a movie by Steven Spielberg in 1983.

54. Lyric poem : EPODE
An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

60. West Point inst. : USMA
West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn't start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and today about 15% of all new cadets are women.

62. Underwear initials : BVD
The men’s underwear known as BVDs are made by the Bradley, Voorhees & Day. The company was started in 1876 to make bustles for women, and is named for its founders.

63. Orange "Sesame Street" Muppet : ZOE
The muppet called Zoe is a young orange monster that appears on “Sesame Street”. Zoe is best friends with Elmo. She is a great lover of ballet and always appears wearing a tutu.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Surrender : CEDE
5. Farmland units : ACRES
10. Working hard : AT IT
14. Like most adages, for short : ANON
15. Lamp cover : SHADE
16. Apple's apple, e.g. : LOGO
17. *English rock group? : STONEHENGE (giving “Stone Age”)
19. River through Florence : ARNO
20. One adding staff : HIRER
21. About 90 mg. of vitamin C a day, e.g. : RDA
22. Boston Bruins legend, to his teammates : ESPO
23. Simpson judge Lance : ITO
24. *Many party games : ICEBREAKERS (giving “ice age”)
28. Cause of aberrant weather : EL NINO
30. ___ Joe's (supermarket chain) : TRADER
31. Good area for snorkeling : REEF
32. Reduce : LESSEN
36. C.I.A. predecessor : OSS
37. *Railroad engine, in old lingo : IRON HORSE (giving “Iron Age”)
40. Letters before an alias : AKA
43. Encourage : URGE ON
44. Top draft status : ONE-A
48. Minnesota range known for its mining of metal : MESABI
50. Historical records : ANNALS
52. *Seattle tourist attraction : SPACE NEEDLE (giving “Space Age”)
56. Month, in Madrid : MES
57. Very, in Versailles : TRES
58. Prefix with center or genetics : EPI-
59. ___ Mundo (what Cristóbal Colón explored) : NUEVO
61. Mope : POUT
62. *Medal for bravery, maybe : BRONZE STAR (giving “Bronze Age”)
64. 60-Down mascot : MULE
65. YouTube offering : VIDEO
66. Dillon or Damon : MATT
67. British submachine gun : STEN
68. "Nothing runs like a ___" (ad slogan) : DEERE
69. A very long time ... or a hint to the starts of the answers to the five starred clues : AGES

Down
1. One checking you out : CASHIER
2. Dub : ENTITLE
3. "Let's Make a Deal" choice : DOOR ONE
4. Feminine suffix : -ENNE
5. Prickly ___ : ASH
6. Dear, as une amie : CHERE
7. Genre of the old Stax record label : R AND B
8. Poet ___ Lee Masters : EDGAR
9. Fifth word of "The Star-Spangled Banner" : SEE
10. Denali's home : ALASKA
11. Ship sinker : TORPEDO
12. Pays no attention to : IGNORES
13. "___ bad!" : TOO
18. The Auld Sod : ERIN
22. Is worthy of : EARNS
25. Fill with a Crayola, say : COLOR IN
26. Like some truths and flames : ETERNAL
27. Makers of some H.S. homecoming floats : SRS
29. "What ___ told you ...?" : IF I
33. Part of E.S.L.: Abbr. : ENG
34. Car, affectionately : SHE
35. ___ Canals : SOO
38. Hayseeds : RUBES
39. Very long time : EON
40. Mornings, for short : AMS
41. Excluded : KEPT OUT
42. Generally speaking : AS A RULE
45. Written introduction? : NAMETAG
46. Take to a higher level : ELEVATE
47. Categorizes : ASSORTS
49. Sure winner in blackjack : ACE-TEN
51. Hawaiian goose : NENE
53. Like the musical intro to "The Twilight Zone" : EERIE
54. Lyric poem : EPODE
55. Establishment with booths : DINER
60. West Point inst. : USMA
61. Evenings, for short : PMS
62. Underwear initials : BVD
63. Orange "Sesame Street" Muppet : ZOE


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0928-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Sep 15, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Bischof & Jeff Chen
THEME: AEIOU and Y … each of today’s themed answers one in exactly one instance of each of the vowels, including Y, because the vowels are “A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y”. To help us along, there is an example of each vowel circled in the grid, as well as a final across-answer that can be read as “AND Y”.
68A. "Toy Story" boy ... or, with the circled letters, a hint to 20-, 39- and 53-Across : ANDY (or AND Y)

20A. Gershwin composition in United Airlines ads : RHAPSODY IN BLUE
39A. Person about town : SOCIAL BUTTERFLY
53A. Ascending in economic class : UPWARDLY MOBILE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

19. Bright night lights : NEONS
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

20. Gershwin composition in United Airlines ads : RHAPSODY IN BLUE
“Rhapsody in Blue” is one of the most popular works by the great George Gershwin. The piece has a famous clarinet glissando at its opening, but is a work for solo piano and orchestra. Gershwin himself played the piano at its premiere in 1924. We can’t be certain how that original “Rhapsody” sounded as Gershwin improvised some of what he was playing, and didn’t write out the piano part until after the first performance.

United Airlines used the tagline “Fly the Friendly Skies” in its marketing materials from 1965 to 1996. It was then replaced with “It’s time to fly”. United chose George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” as the company’s theme music in 1976, and paid the Gershwin estate a fee of $500,000 for the privilege.

23. Fort Collins sch. : CSU
Colorado State University (CSU) was founded in Fort Collins in 1870 as the Colorado Agricultural College. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Colorado State Rams, although back in the days of the Colorado Agricultural College, the teams were referred to as the Aggies.

24. City south of Utah's Arches National Park : MOAB
Moab is a city in eastern Utah that attracts a lot of visitors each year, mainly those heading for Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, which are nearby.

The gorgeous Arches National Park is located in eastern Utah, just outside of Moab. The main focus of the park is the preservation of over 2,000 natural sandstone arches. The arches are relatively fragile, and 43 have collapsed since 1970, mainly due to erosion caused by wind and rain.

25. "That's overly personal about yourself, don't you think?!" : TMI
Too much information! (TMI)

34. ___ of Sandwich : EARL
Meats placed between slices of bread was first called a sandwich in the 18th century, named after the Fourth Earl of Sandwich. The Earl was fond of eating "sandwiches" while playing cards at his club.

44. Classic clown name : BOBO
Bobo the Clown was the stage name of Chester Barnett who worked the circus circuit from the 1920s to the 1970s. Barnett gave himself the nickname “Bobo” when he was a child, using it for a persona that he adopted when he ran around the house wearing a paper bag on this head, with two holes cut to allow him to see.

46. "Naked" rodent : MOLE-RAT
The naked mole-rat is an ugly-looking creature, I must say. Native to parts of East Africa, the naked mole-rat has very little hair and lives much of its life underground, hence its name. One reason that scientists are very interested in naked mole-rats is that they are exceedingly resistant to cancer. Discoveries made while studying the species led to the journal “Science” declaring the naked mole-rat “Vertebrate of the Year” for 2013.

49. Genre of 50 Cent and André 3000 : RAP
Rap star 50 Cent's real name is Curtis James Jackson III, and is from South Jamaica in Queens, New York. 50 Cent had a rough life starting out, first dealing drugs at the age of 12. He dropped his illegal activities to pursue a rap career, but still fell victim to an assailant who pumped nine bullets into him. The alleged shooter was himself shot three weeks later, and died. 50 Cent's alleged attacker was a bodyguard and close friend of Mike Tyson.

André 3000 is the stage name of rap star André Lauren Benjamin from Atlanta, Georgia. André 3000 used to use the name Dré, and was part of the hip-hop duo called OutKast with fellow rapper Big Boi. In 2004 PETA named André 3000 the “World’s Sexiest Vegetarian Celebrity”.

50. Winnie-the-Pooh's Hundred ___ Wood : ACRE
Hundred Acre Wood is where Winnie the Pooh lives with his friends. According to a map illustrating the books by A. A. Milne, Hundred Acre Wood is part of a larger forest, with Owl's house sitting right at the center.

53. Ascending in economic class : UPWARDLY MOBILE
In the world of economics, vertical mobility is cultural diffusion from one social level to a higher level. An example would be one social class adopting a fashion that pervaded a higher social class. The related term “horizontal mobility” describes cultural diffusion with the same economic class.

61. "Mon ___!" (French cry) : DIEU
“Mon Dieu” is French for “my God”.

62. Stratford-upon-___ : AVON
There are actually four rivers called the Avon in England, but "Shakespeare's Avon" lies mainly in Warwickshire. The name "Avon" comes from the Old English word for a river, "abona". Stratford-upon-Avon was William Shakespeare's birthplace.

65. Griffin who created "Wheel of Fortune" : MERV
Merv Griffin was quite the entertainer, truly a mogul in the business. He started his career as a singer on the radio during the big band era. In the sixties he hosted his own talk show, and then famously developed such great game shows as “Jeopardy!” and “Wheel of Fortune”.

67. "Collect $200 after passing Go," e.g. : RULE
“Collect $200 after passing Go” is a rule in the game of Monopoly.

68. "Toy Story" boy ... or, with the circled letters, a hint to 20-, 39- and 53-Across : ANDY (or AND Y)
1995’s “Toy Story” was the world’s first feature-length computer-animated movie. “Toy Story” was also the studio Pixar’s first production. The main roles in the film are Woody and Buzz, voiced by Tom Hanks and Tim Allen respectively. Hanks was the first choice to voice Woody, and Allen was asked to voice Buzz after Billy Crystal turned down the role. Woody and Buzz are toys owned by a boy named Andy Davis. Andy was voiced by John Morris who is now an actor, having graduated in 2007 from the UCLA School of Theater, Film & Television.

Down
2. Surge of adrenaline : RUSH
The naturally occurring hormone adrenaline is also known as epinephrine. Adrenaline takes its name from the adrenal glands that produce the hormone. The glands themselves take their name from their location in the body, right on the kidneys ("ad renes" meaning near or at the kidneys in Latin). The alternative name of epinephrine has a similar root ("epi-nephros" meaning upon the kidney, in Greek).

4. Three Stooges' hits? : SLAPS
If you've seen a few of the films starring "The Three Stooges" you'll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as "Moe, Larry and Shemp". Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, "Moe, Larry And Curly". Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then "Curly-Joe" DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

5. Bullets, informally : AMMO
The word “munitions” describes materials and equipment used in war. The term derives from the Latin “munitionem” meaning “fortification, defensive wall”. Back in the 17th century, French soldiers referred to such materials as “la munition”, a Middle French term. This was misheard as “l’ammunition”, and as a result we ended up importing the word “ammunition” (often shortened to “ammo”), a term that we now use mainly to describe the material fired from a weapon.

8. "Star Trek" warp drive fuel : ANTIMATTER
In the world of particle physics, antimatter is made up of particles that have the same mass as particles of ordinary matter, but with the opposite charge and quantum spin. Mixing matter and antimatter causes the annihilation of both, with a release of energy equal to the mass of the particles according to Einstein’s equation E=mc2.

In the "Star Trek" universe, the warp speed achieved by the warp drive engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh ...?

10. 16 oz. : ONE LB
The unit of mass that we know today as a “pound” is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

11. Baseball's Felipe : ALOU
Felipe Alou is a former professional baseball player and manager. Alou managed the Montreal Expos from 1992 to 2001, and the San Francisco Giants from 2003 to 2006. Alou was born and raised in the Dominican Republic and came to the US to play for the Giants in 1955. Felipe’s brothers Matty and Jesús followed him to the US, and into Major League baseball.

21. Hyundai's Santa Fe or Tucson : SUV
The term SUV, an initialism standing for Sports Utility Vehicle, was introduced by our marketing friends. Using the term Sports Utility Vehicle was a very clever way to get us to pay a lot of money for what was essentially a station wagon on a truck chassis, or at least it was back then.

22. Sine qua ___ : NON
"Sine qua non" is a Latin phrase that we use to mean "the essential element or condition". The literal translation is "without which not". One might say, for example, "a challenging crossword is the sine qua non of a good newspaper". Well, crossword fans might say that ...

26. Like about 15% of New Zealanders : MAORI
The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word "māori" simply means "normal", distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

29. Winter Olympian who may go 90 m.p.h. : BOBSLEDDER
“Bobsleds” are so called because competitors in the sport originally would bob in and out of the sled in order to increase its speed.

31. 1992 Clint Eastwood western that won Best Picture : UNFORGIVEN
“Unforgiven” is a 1992 film directed and produced by, and starring, Clint Eastwood. It’s a Western, with a storyline that goes deeper than the average “shoot-’em-up”. Eastwood has a great supporting cast that includes Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris. “Unforgiven” was only the third Western movie to win a Best Picture Oscar, after “Cimarron” in 1931, and “Dances with Wolves” in 1990. Eastwood stated that “Unforgiven” would be his last Western.

32. ___ toast : MELBA
Melba toast is a dry, thinly sliced toast that is usually served with soup or salad. Melba toast was created by chef Auguste Escoffier for opera singer Dame Nellie Melba, for who he also created the dessert called Peach Melba.

33. Military initiative that seeks to influence the enemy's mind, informally : PSYOP
Psychological Operations (PSYOP) is a contemporary name for propaganda, the "winning of hearts and minds in a combat zone.

41. Old "Up, up and away" carrier : TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan-Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the acronym TWA) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

The song "Up, Up and Away", famously used by TWA in its advertising, was released by the 5th Dimension in 1967.

47. Bobby who won three straight N.H.L. M.V.P. awards : ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn't skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

52. Only U.S. president whose surname is more than 50% vowels : OBAMA
Despite rumors to the contrary, I am pretty sure that Barack Hussein Obama II was indeed born in Hawaii. President Obama was born on August 4, 1961 at Kapi'olani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.

53. ___ Bator, Mongolia : ULAN
The name "Ulan Bator" translates from Mongolian as "the Red Hero", and is Mongolia's capital city. The "Red Hero" name was chosen in honor of the country's national hero, Damdin Sükhbaatar. Sükhbaatar fought alongside the Soviet Red Army in the fight for liberation from Chinese occupation.

55. Stead : LIEU
As one might perhaps imagine, "in lieu" comes into English from the Old French word "lieu" meaning "place", which in turn is derived from the Latin "locum", also meaning "place". So, "in lieu" means "in place of".

59. One of the seven deadly sins : ENVY
The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven deadly sins are:
- wrath
- greed
- sloth
- pride
- lust
- envy
- gluttony

60. Abbr. in a military address : APO
Army Post Office (APO)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Meows : cats :: ___ : dogs : ARFS
5. Locale : AREA
9. "Me too" : SO AM I
14. "F" on a gas gauge : FULL
15. Downright nasty : MEAN
16. Dark, as a room : UNLIT
17. Where ships go : ASEA
18. Ship's pole : MAST
19. Bright night lights : NEONS
20. Gershwin composition in United Airlines ads : RHAPSODY IN BLUE
23. Fort Collins sch. : CSU
24. City south of Utah's Arches National Park : MOAB
25. "That's overly personal about yourself, don't you think?!" : TMI
27. Lively, as colors : VIBRANT
31. Person who regularly cleans his plate? : UMP
34. ___ of Sandwich : EARL
36. Pillage : LOOT
37. Perfects, as one's skills : HONES
39. Person about town : SOCIAL BUTTERFLY
42. "___ words were never spoken" : TRUER
43. Fret (over) : STEW
44. Classic clown name : BOBO
45. Bro's sibling : SIS
46. "Naked" rodent : MOLE-RAT
49. Genre of 50 Cent and André 3000 : RAP
50. Winnie-the-Pooh's Hundred ___ Wood : ACRE
51. Not share : HOG
53. Ascending in economic class : UPWARDLY MOBILE
60. Put in a row : ALIGN
61. "Mon ___!" (French cry) : DIEU
62. Stratford-upon-___ : AVON
63. Walked like an expectant father, say : PACED
64. Slippery fish : EELS
65. Griffin who created "Wheel of Fortune" : MERV
66. How singers should sing : ON KEY
67. "Collect $200 after passing Go," e.g. : RULE
68. "Toy Story" boy ... or, with the circled letters, a hint to 20-, 39- and 53-Across : ANDY (or AND Y)

Down
1. Way off : AFAR
2. Surge of adrenaline : RUSH
3. Sideshow act that features "the smallest performers in the world" : FLEA CIRCUS
4. Three Stooges' hits? : SLAPS
5. Bullets, informally : AMMO
6. Enjoy literature : READ
7. Simple : EASY
8. "Star Trek" warp drive fuel : ANTIMATTER
9. Lie on the beach : SUNBATHE
10. 16 oz. : ONE LB
11. Baseball's Felipe : ALOU
12. See 13-Down : … MINE
13. With 12-Down, "Gimme that!" : IT’S ...
21. Hyundai's Santa Fe or Tucson : SUV
22. Sine qua ___ : NON
25. Exams : TESTS
26. Like about 15% of New Zealanders : MAORI
28. Bedridden, say : ILL
29. Winter Olympian who may go 90 m.p.h. : BOBSLEDDER
30. Mail deliverer's assignment : ROUTE
31. 1992 Clint Eastwood western that won Best Picture : UNFORGIVEN
32. ___ toast : MELBA
33. Military initiative that seeks to influence the enemy's mind, informally : PSYOP
35. Falsehood : LIE
38. Planet, to Shakespeare : ORB
40. Attractive companion on the red carpet : ARM CANDY
41. Old "Up, up and away" carrier : TWA
47. Bobby who won three straight N.H.L. M.V.P. awards : ORR
48. Howe'er : THO
50. Words before "You shouldn't have" : AW GEE ...
52. Only U.S. president whose surname is more than 50% vowels : OBAMA
53. ___ Bator, Mongolia : ULAN
54. What may help break the ice : PICK
55. Stead : LIEU
56. Raise one's voice : YELL
57. Ponder, with "on" : MUSE
58. Word before "have mercy!" : LORD
59. One of the seven deadly sins : ENVY
60. Abbr. in a military address : APO


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0927-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 15, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: Mark My Words … today’s themed answers are famous quotations, and starts and finish with a quotation mark. That “double apostrophe” has a different meaning in the down direction, where it indicates a repetition of the letter above:
29A. Magical phrase in an old tale : "OPEN SESAME"
50A. Schwarzenegger film catchphrase : "I'LL BE BACK"
58A. Comment after a betrayal : "ET TU, BRUTE?"
74A. Catchphrase for one of the Avengers : "HULK SMASH"
84A. Repeated bird call? : "NEVERMORE"
103A. What the ring in "The Lord of the Rings" is called : "MY PRECIOUS"

4D. Money, in modern slang : CHEDDAR
21D. Soda can feature : PULL TAB
31D. Assistant number cruncher : SUBBOOKKEEPER
33D. Art critic, stereotypically : SNOOT
34D. Not seemly : UNMEET
70D. How one person might resemble another : EERILY
77D. Wool source : LLAMA
85D. ___ rate (tax amount per $1,000) : MILLAGE
95D. Be a gentleman to at the end of a date, say : SEE HOME
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 49m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "I Am Not ___" (1975 show business autobiography) : SPOCK
Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original "Star Trek" television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he keeps popping up in "Star Trek" spin offs to this day. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (I loved that show!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

12. Cassio's jealous lover in "Othello" : BIANCA
Shakespeare’s “Othello” was first performed in 1604. The main characters in the play are:
- Othello, a general in the army of Venice
- Desdemona, Othello’s wife
- Cassio, Othello’s trusted ensign
- Iago, the villain of the piece

26. Colt, e.g. : ARM
Samuel Colt was fascinated as a young man by the science behind gunpowder and its used in weapons. He decided early on in his life, that he would respond to the challenge of the day, how to achieve the impossible, a weapon that fire more than the two times available at the time using a double-barreled rifle. He came up with the concept of the revolver while at sea, modeling his design on the spoked wheel that steered the ships on which he served. His revolver made him a very rich man in his own lifetime. By the time he died in 1862, his estate was valued at around $15 million. Can you imagine? $15 million back in 1862?

27. Ones doing a decent job in the Bible? : FIG LEAVES
The third plant named in the Bible, after the Tree of Life and the Tree of Knowledge, was the fig tree. Adam and Eve used leaves from the fig tree to sew garments when they realized that they were naked.

29. Magical phrase in an old tale : "OPEN SESAME"
In the folk tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, the title character is a poor woodcutter who discovers the magic words “Open Sesame” that open the thieves’ den.

32. "Shoot!" : NERTS!
“Nerts” is a slang term, a corruption of "nuts!" and with the same meaning.

43. LeBron James or Kevin Durant : NBA STAR
Basketball player LeBron James seems to be in demand for the covers of magazines. James became the first African American man to adorn the front cover of "Vogue" in March 2008. That made him only the third male to make the "Vogue" cover, following Richard Gere and George Clooney.

Kevin Durant is a professional basketball player with the Oklahoma City Thunder of the NBA. You might come across Durant on the big screen as well, as he starred in the children’s film “Thunderstruck” in 2012.

50. Schwarzenegger film catchphrase : "I'LL BE BACK"
The 1984 movie "The Terminator" was directed by James Cameron. It was a relatively low budget production, costing $6.4 million. It has grossed around $80 million to date, so no wonder the Terminator "came back".

The body-builder, actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger was born in Graz in Austria, the son of the local police chief. Schwarzenegger’s family name translates into the more prosaic "black plough man". In his bodybuilding days, he was often referred to as the Austrian Oak. When he was Governor of California he was called “the Governator”, a play on his role in the “The Terminator” series of movies.

52. Amazon's industry : ETAIL
"Etail" is the term used these days for online shopping. Etail is often compared to regular shopping in the "real world" by juxtaposing it with a "brick and mortar" store.

58. Comment after a betrayal : "ET TU, BRUTE?"
It was Shakespeare who popularized the words "Et tu, Brute?" (And you, Brutus?), in his play "Julius Caesar", although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It's not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life just before he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

64. Link between two names : AKA
Also known as (aka)

71. Where batters eventually make their way to plates? : IHOPS
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn't do too well in marketing tests ...

74. Catchphrase for one of the Avengers : "HULK SMASH"
The comic book superhero Hulk has two catchphrases. One is “Hulk is the strongest one there is”, and the other is “HULK SMASH!”

77. Gap in a manuscript : LACUNA
A lacuna is a missing piece of text (or music) in a larger work. Usually the text has been lost due to damage of an older manuscript. Lacunae can be very controversial as experts vie with each other to suggest what words have been lost.

84. Repeated bird call? : "NEVERMORE"
"The Raven" is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student's bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven's shadow and shall be lifted "nevermore" …

89. Bygone record co. : EMI
EMI was a British music company, with the initialism originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

90. Site of the "crown of palaces" : AGRA
“Mahal” is the Urdu word for “palace”, as in “Taj Mahal” meaning “crown of palaces”. The Taj Mahal is a mausoleum holding the body of Mumtaz Mahal, the third wife of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. The name “Mumtaz Mahal” translates as “the chosen one of the palace”.

93. Travel over seas? : PARASAIL
Parasailing is hanging below a tethered parachute that is towed by a boat.

96. N.Y.C. museum, with "the" : MET
The Metropolitan Museum of Art ("the Met") was founded in 1870 by a group of private citizens. The current museum is huge, with 2 million square feet of floor space.

97. Honeymooners' site : ISLE
The concept of a honeymoon vacation only started in the early 1800s. In Britain, wealthy couples would take a “bridal tour” together after wedding, visiting those friends and relatives who could not attend the ceremony. The etymology of “honeymoon” isn’t very clear, and may even have a negative derivation as it might suggest that the sweetness (honey) of love is doomed to wane like a passing phase of the moon. The equivalent terms in some other languages are “moon of honey” (French), “honey month” (Welsh) and “tinsel week” (German).

98. GPS calculation : ETA
A Global Positioning System (GPS) provides an estimated time of arrival (ETA).

101. Author ___-René Lesage : ALAIN
Alain-René Lesage was a novelist and playwright from France. Lesage is best known for his novels “The Devil upon Two Sticks” (1707) and “Gil Blas” (1715-1735).

103. What the ring in "The Lord of the Rings" is called : "MY PRECIOUS"
The words "Bless us and splash us, my precioussss!" are spoken by Gollum, in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy novel “The Hobbit”. Gollum is a Hobbit with a split personality, which he developed under the influence of “the Ring”.

107. Nepalis live in them : HIMALAYAS
The magnificent Himalaya range of mountains in Asia takes its name from the Sanskrit for “abode of snow”. Geographically, the Himalayas separate the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau to the north.

113. Google browser : CHROME
Google’s Chrome is now the most popular web browser used in the US, with Mozilla Firefox in second place and Internet Explorer in third. I find Chrome to be much, much more user-friendly than Internet Explorer, and more featured than Firefox. Chrome also works more seamlessly with other Google products and with Android phones.

120. Beezus's sister, in children's literature : RAMONA
“Ramona and Beezus" is a 2010 kid’s movie based on the “Ramona” series of children’s novels by Beverly Cleary. The title characters are played by Joey King (Ramona) and Selena Gomez (Beezus).

123. Something matzo lacks : YEAST
Matzo is a unleavened bread, that is very brittle. The bread is crushed, creating Matzo meal that is then formed into balls using eggs and oil as a binder. The balls are usually served in a chicken stock.

Down
1. ___ Lanka : SRI
The name Sri Lanka translates from Sanskrit into English as "venerable island". Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule.

3. It works for workers, in brief : OSHA
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

7. Leader of a procession : HEARSE
We use the term “hearse” for a vehicle used to transport a dead body to the place of burial. The original meaning, still used sometimes today, is for a framework hanging over a coffin that holds candles.

8. ___ War, "The Charge of the Light Brigade" event : CRIMEAN
The disastrous "Charge of the Light Brigade" took place in Balaclava in the Crimea on October 25th 1854 during the Crimean War. Commander of the British Army that day was Lord Raglan, and in overall command of the Calvary unit was the Earl of Lucan. Under Lucan, in command of the Light Brigade was the Earl of Cardigan. Raglan sent a Captain Nolan to Lucan with orders to attack "the guns". When Lucan asked Nolan which guns, it appears that Nolan indicated the wrong ones. Lucan then instructed Cardigan to lead the Light Cavalry in a charge on the designated guns, which he dutifully did. As the charge started, Nolan noted the error and rode onto the field to intercept the Light Brigade, but was killed by an artillery shell. The charge continued into an overwhelming artillery battery ("into the Valley of Death" to use Tennyson's famous words), causing the loss of over 2/3 of the mounted brigade, a loss of 400 horses and 250 men killed or wounded, for no military purpose at all. Cardigan survived, left the field of battle immediately and boarded his yacht in Balaklava Harbor and had a champagne lunch. Lucan was made a member of the Order of the Bath the following year, and Raglan was promoted to Field Marshal ...

9. Swanson on "Parks and Recreation" : RON
“Parks and Recreation” is a sitcom that started airing on NBC in 2009, and it is a show that has grown on me. It stars the "Saturday Night Live" alum Amy Poehler. The creators of "Parks and Recreation" are part of the team responsible for the American version of “The Office”, so you’ll notice some similarities in the style of the two shows, and some actors that have appeared in both.

11. Material sometimes sold ripped : DENIM
Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase "de Nimes" (from Nimes) gives us the word "denim". Also, the French phrase "bleu de Genes" (blue of Genoa) gives us our word "jeans".

12. Scourge : BANE
Today we tend to use the word “bane” to mean anathema, a source of persistent annoyance. A few centuries ago, a bane was a cause of harm or death, perhaps a deadly poison.

17. @@@ : ATS
The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of all email addresses.

19. Paint type : TEMPERA
Tempera is a painting medium made from a colored pigment mixed with a binder such as egg yolk. Tempera painting dates back at least to Ancient Egypt, and is a medium that is very long-lasting. Tempera was the primary medium for painted works of art for centuries, until the introduction of oil paints between the 5th and 9th centuries.

21. Soda can feature : PULL TAB
The oldest method of opening a can with a device included in the can’s design is the pull-tab or ring pull, invented in Canada in 1956. The design was long-lived but it had its problems, so the world heaved a sigh of relief with the invention of the stay-on-tab in 1975. The new design led to less injuries and eliminated all those used pull-tabs that littered the streets.

30. Guessed nos. : ESTS
Estimate (est.)

33. Art critic, stereotypically : SNOOT
"Snoot" is a variant of "snout" and is a word that originated in Scotland. The idea is that someone who is “snooty”, or snouty, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

34. Not seemly : UNMEET
Something described as “meet” is suitable, fitting.

36. "Hakuna ___" ("The Lion King" song) : MATATA
"Hakuna Matata" is a Swahili phrase, with a literal translation of "there are no worries", or more colloquially perhaps, "no problem". It is a hit song from “The Lion King”.

42. Site of the U.S.'s only royal palace : OAHU
The ‘Iolani Palace in downtown Honolulu is unique within this country. It is the only royal palace in the US that was used as an official residence by a reigning monarch. The Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown in 1893 so the palace was used by successive governments even after Hawaii was awarded statehood in 1959. The palace has been a public museum since 1978.

49. Kettle's accuser : POT
The pot sometimes calls the kettle black.

53. "Lord, is ___?" : IT I
At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:
And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

54. Wolfish : LUPINE
The term “lupine” means “wolf-like”, coming from the Latin “lupus” meaning “wolf”.

56. Teachers' grp. : NEA
The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

60. Royale carmaker of old : REO
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom E. Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

67. Language in Southeast Asia : LAO
The Lao people are an ethnic group found mainly in Laos, but who also have a significant presence in Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam.

69. One seeking the philosopher's stone : CHEMIC
Something described as “chemic” pertains to alchemy.

To an alchemist, the “philosopher’s stone” is a legendary substance with the power of turning base metals into gold. The philosopher’s stone also has the power to extend life, and is sometimes called the elixir of life.

72. Revolutionary thinker? : PTOLEMY
Claudius Ptolemy was an Egyptian of Greek ethnicity who lived in the days when Egypt was ruled by Ancient Rome. Ptolemy was, among other things, a mathematician and astronomer. He published a famous treatise on astronomy called “Almagest” which included a list of 48 constellations in a star catalogue. The Ptolemaic system described the cosmos geocentrically, with the Earth at the center and other celestial bodies orbiting.

75. L.A. institution : USC
The University of Southern California (USC) is a private school in Los Angeles. Apart from its excellent academic record, USC is known the success of its athletic program. USC athletes have won more Olympic medals than the students of any other university in the world. The USC marching band is very famous as well, and is known as the “Spirit of Troy”. The band has performed with many celebrities, and is the only college band to have two platinum records.

77. Wool source : LLAMA
The wool from a llama is much softer than that from a sheep, and it is also free from lanolin.

78. Pasta variety : ANGEL HAIR
Capellini is a pasta that is like a thin spaghetti. An even thinner version of the pasta is known as “capelli d’angelo”, which translates as “angel hair”.

80. The Wahoos of the A.C.C. : UVA
The University of Virginia sports teams are known officially as the Cavaliers. The unofficial nickname is the Wahoos.

82. Romanian currency : LEU
The currency of Romania is the leu (plural: lei), a word meaning "lion". The leu is also the name of the currency of neighboring Moldova. Romania joined the European Union in 2007, and had planned to join the Euro zone in 2014. This implementation date is in jeopardy as Romania struggles to meet economic goals set by the EU.

85. ___ rate (tax amount per $1,000) : MILLAGE
A millage tax is a property tax. The property tax rate is often expressed as a percentage of the property’s appraised value, and this rate is sometimes called the millage rate. The term “millage” comes from the Latin word for a “thousandth”.

87. iPod model : NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

92. Dictation takers : STENOGS
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

94. "Git!" : AMSCRAY!
Pig Latin is in effect a game. One takes the first consonant or consonant cluster of an English word and moves it to the end of the word, and then adds the letters "ay". So the Pig Latin for the word "nix" is "ix-n-ay" ... ixnay, and for "scram" is "am-scr-ay"

99. Shrewdness : ACUMEN
Acumen is such a lovely word, I think, meaning “keenness of judgment or insight”. “Acumen” is Latin, meaning “point, sting”, the idea being that someone with acumen has mental sharpness.

104. Presidential perk until 1977 : YACHT
The US has had several presidential yachts over the years the most recent being the USS Sequoia that was used by presidents from Herbert Hoover to Jimmy Carter. The Sequoia was retrofitted with an elevator for President Franklin D. Roosevelt, but President Lyndon Johnson had that removed, and replaced with a bar!

108. Muscles worked by pull-ups, briefly : LATS
The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

111. Greek portico : STOA
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greece. A stoa usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

112. 1940s prez : HST
The initial “S” in the middle of the name Harry S. Truman doesn’t stand for anything. The future-president was named “Harry” in honor of his mother’s brother Harrison “Harry” Young. The initial “S” was chosen in honor of young Harry’s two grandfathers: Anderson S-hipp Truman and S-olomon Young.

114. Genetic stuff : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

117. Monopoly token that replaced the iron in 2013 : CAT
There are eight tokens included in the game of Monopoly as of 2013. These are the wheelbarrow, battleship, racecar, thimble, boot, Scottie dog, top hat and cat. The latest to be introduced was the cat in 2013, replacing the iron. The battleship and the cannon (aka howitzer, now retired) had been added to the Monopoly game as part of a recycling exercise. The pieces were intended for the game "Conflict" released in 1940, but when Parker Bros. pulled "Conflict" off the market due to poor sales, they added their excess battleships and cannons to Monopoly.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "I Am Not ___" (1975 show business autobiography) : SPOCK
6. "Shoot, shoot, shoot" : OH CRUD
12. Cassio's jealous lover in "Othello" : BIANCA
18. Charge : RUSH AT
20. Got up again : REROSE
21. Comes to fruition : PANS OUT
22. "Psst! Come hide with me!" : IN HERE!
23. Come closer to catching : GAIN ON
24. Takes out, as some beer bottles : UNCASES
25. First in a race? : ADAM
26. Colt, e.g. : ARM
27. Ones doing a decent job in the Bible? : FIG LEAVES
29. Magical phrase in an old tale : "OPEN SESAME"
32. "Shoot!" : NERTS!
34. Takes apart : UNMAKES
37. Drink at un café : EAU
38. Amt. often measured in ozs. : NT WT
40. Drink at un café : VIN
41. Not as far from : NEARER TO
43. LeBron James or Kevin Durant : NBA STAR
46. One trillionth: Prefix : PICO-
47. Welcome site? : MAT
48. When some tasks must be done : ASAP
50. Schwarzenegger film catchphrase : "I'LL BE BACK"
52. Amazon's industry : ETAIL
55. Person of the hour : HONOREE
57. Still : AT REST
58. Comment after a betrayal : "ET TU, BRUTE?"
61. Pen : WRITE
63. Go on foot : TRAIPSE
64. Link between two names : AKA
66. Large goblet : CHALICE
71. Where batters eventually make their way to plates? : IHOPS
74. Catchphrase for one of the Avengers : "HULK SMASH"
77. Gap in a manuscript : LACUNA
81. Like some storefronts : TO LEASE
83. Farmer, in the spring : SOWER
84. Repeated bird call? : "NEVERMORE"
86. Is unable to : CAN’T
89. Bygone record co. : EMI
90. Site of the "crown of palaces" : AGRA
91. Multicar accidents : PILEUPS
93. Travel over seas? : PARASAIL
96. N.Y.C. museum, with "the" : MET
97. Honeymooners' site : ISLE
98. GPS calculation : ETA
100. What the ruthless show : NO MERCY
101. Author ___-René Lesage : ALAIN
103. What the ring in "The Lord of the Rings" is called : "MY PRECIOUS"
107. Nepalis live in them : HIMALAYAS
109. Hebrew letter before samekh : NUN
110. 75- and 80-Down, e.g.: Abbr. : SCHS
112. Tote : HANDBAG
113. Google browser : CHROME
115. Steamy : EROTIC
118. Place : SITUATE
119. Wrinkle preventer, of sorts : HANGER
120. Beezus's sister, in children's literature : RAMONA
121. Ones making an effort : TRYERS
122. Contraction with two apostrophes : ‘TWASN’T
123. Something matzo lacks : YEAST

Down
1. ___ Lanka : SRI
2. "Let us spray," e.g. : PUN
3. It works for workers, in brief : OSHA
4. Money, in modern slang : CHEDDAR
5. Something that may have bad keys : KARAOKE
6. Church keys? : ORGAN
7. Leader of a procession : HEARSE
8. ___ War, "The Charge of the Light Brigade" event : CRIMEAN
9. Swanson on "Parks and Recreation" : RON
10. Ol' red, white and blue's land : US OF A
11. Material sometimes sold ripped : DENIM
12. Scourge : BANE
13. Recite : INCANT
14. "What ___!" (cry after some spectacular goalie play) : A SAVE
15. What zero bars means on a cellphone : NO SERVICE
16. Tools for people picking pockets? : CUE STICKS
17. @@@ : ATS
19. Paint type : TEMPERA
21. Soda can feature : PULL TAB
28. Like a softball interview vis-à-vis a grilling : GENTLER
30. Guessed nos. : ESTS
31. Assistant number cruncher : SUBBOOKKEEPER
33. Art critic, stereotypically : SNOOT
34. Not seemly : UNMEET
35. More nifty : NEATER
36. "Hakuna ___" ("The Lion King" song) : MATATA
39. Rings on doors : WREATHS
42. Site of the U.S.'s only royal palace : OAHU
44. Go on : AIR
45. Host : SLEW
46. Course standard : PAR
49. Kettle's accuser : POT
51. Groups that never get started : B-TEAMS
53. "Lord, is ___?" : IT I
54. Wolfish : LUPINE
56. Teachers' grp. : NEA
59. C equivalents : B-SHARPS
60. Royale carmaker of old : REO
62. "Gross" : ICK
65. "So you admit it!" : AHA!
67. Language in Southeast Asia : LAO
68. "Cross my heart and hope to die" : I SWEAR
69. One seeking the philosopher's stone : CHEMIC
70. How one person might resemble another : EERILY
72. Revolutionary thinker? : PTOLEMY
73. Feeling the effects of a workout : SORE
75. L.A. institution : USC
76. Bound : LEAP
77. Wool source : LLAMA
78. Pasta variety : ANGEL HAIR
79. Conviction ... or what's almost required for a conviction : CERTAINTY
80. The Wahoos of the A.C.C. : UVA
82. Romanian currency : LEU
85. ___ rate (tax amount per $1,000) : MILLAGE
87. iPod model : NANO
88. Kind of leg : TROUSER
92. Dictation takers : STENOGS
94. "Git!" : AMSCRAY!
95. Be a gentleman to at the end of a date, say : SEE HOME
97. Where many shots are taken : IN A BAR
99. Shrewdness : ACUMEN
102. "Things are bound to go my way soon" : I’M DUE
104. Presidential perk until 1977 : YACHT
105. "That's nothing" : PSHAW
106. Not reacting : INERT
108. Muscles worked by pull-ups, briefly : LATS
111. Greek portico : STOA
112. 1940s prez : HST
114. Genetic stuff : RNA
116. Stand-___ : INS
117. Monopoly token that replaced the iron in 2013 : CAT


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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