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1101-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Nov 15, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Frame Job … today’s grid contains circled letters. These letters “FRAME” the themed answers, i.e. are at either end of those answers. And the circled letters in each answer spell out a type of JOB:
23A. No-hunting zone ANIMAL SANCTUARY (giving “ACTUARY”)
32A. Longtime California senator BARBARA BOXER (giving “BARBER”)
55A. Info on a parking ticket PLATE NUMBER (giving “PLUMBER”)
58A. Something that doesn't follow the letter of the law? MAIL FRAUD (giving “MAID”)
77A. It contains a lot of balloons COMIC BOOK (giving “COOK”)
80A. Rap sheet entry PRIOR ARREST (giving “PRIEST”)
97A. Weightlifting technique CLEAN AND JERK (giving “CLERK”)
115A. Brazilian tourist destination COPACABANA BEACH (giving “COACH”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. 2014 Emmy-winning miniseries based on a 1996 film FARGO
"Fargo" is one of my favorite films of all time, and stars perhaps my favorite actress, Frances McDormand. “Fargo” was directed by the Coen brothers, Joel and Ethan. Frances McDormand is Joel's wife.

21. Amu Darya outlet, once ARAL SEA
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

The Amu Darya is a major river in Central Asia that empties into the Aral Sea. It is also called the Oxus or Amu River.

23. No-hunting zone ANIMAL SANCTUARY (giving “ACTUARY”)
In the world of insurance, an actuary is a person who works out the appropriate premium based on risk.

26. Certifications in some college apps GEDS
The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of five tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

28. Part of the neck? FRET
A fret is a metal strip embedded in the neck of a stringed instrument, like a guitar perhaps. The fingers press on the frets, shortening a string and hence changing the note played. The note increases by one semitone as a finger shortens a string by one fret.

32. Longtime California senator BARBARA BOXER (giving “BARBER”)
Barbara Boxer has been a US Senator representing California since 1993. When elected in 1992, she broke the record for the most popular votes in a US Senate election, receiving almost 7 million votes.

36. Computer data acronym ASCII
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) lists codes for 32 "control" characters, as well as the 95 printable characters. These binary codes are the way that our computers can understand what we mean when we type say a letter, or a number. Unicode is a more contemporary standard, and is like “Ascii on steroids”, encompassing more characters.

40. Part of the biosphere FAUNA
The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

43. Mt. Olive offerings DILLS
The Mt. Olive Pickle Company’s main product is pickled cucumbers. The company is based in Mount Olive, North Carolina and was founded in 1926.

49. "Helm's ___!" (nautical cry) ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

50. Marsh birds SORAS
A sora is a waterbird, sometimes called the sora rail or sora crake. Soras can be found in breeding season in marshes across most of North America.

51. World Series of Poker's Vegas home THE RIO
The Rio casino in Las Vegas was opened in 1990, originally targeting the local population as it is located off the famous Strip where most of the tourists hang out. Famously, the Rio opened up the adults-only Sapphire Pool in 2008, a pay-to-enter (only men paid) topless pool club that featured music and dancers. A year later the Sapphire Pool was closed down after there were eleven arrests for drugs and prostitution offences during an undercover police operation.

53. Order from a sports doc MRI
MRI scans can be daunting for many people as they usually involve the patient lying inside a tube with the imaging magnet surrounding the body. Additionally, the scan can take up to 40 minutes in some cases. There are some open MRI scanners available that help prevent a feeling of claustrophobia. However, the image produced by open scanners are of lower quality as they operate at lower magnetic fields.

55. Info on a parking ticket PLATE NUMBER (giving “PLUMBER”)
"Plumbum" is the Latin for lead, explaining why the symbol of the element in the Periodic Table is "Pb". It also explains why the original lead weight on the end of a line used to check vertical was called a "plumb line". And, as pipes were originally made of lead, we call in a "plumber" if one of them is leaking.

60. Mars : Roman :: ___ : Norse TYR
Týr is the Norse god of single combat, victory and heroic glory. According to legend, Týr showed great courage when he and his fellow gods were attempting to shackle the wolf monster called Fenrir. The wolf was tricked into accepting bindings that were actually magical ribbons of great strength. Fenrir submitted to the bonds because Týr agreed to place his hand in the wolf’s mouth, as a gesture of assurance that the ribbon was harmless. When Fenrir recognized the deceit, he bit off Týr’s hand. As a result, the god Týr is almost always depicted with only one hand.

64. L. Frank Baum princess OZMA
L. Frank Baum wrote a whole series of books about the Land of Oz, and Princess Ozma appears in all of them except the one that's most famous, namely "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz".

67. Bar mitzvahs, e.g. RITES
A Jewish girl becomes a Bat Mitzvah at 12 years of age, the age at which she becomes responsible for her actions. Boys become Bar Mitzvahs at 13. The terms translate into English as daughter and son of the commandments.

68. City from which Vasco da Gama sailed, to locals LISBOA
Lisbon (“Lisboa” in Portuguese) is the capital of Portugal. Lisbon is the westernmost capital city in Europe, and indeed is the westernmost large city on the continent. It is also the oldest city in Western Europe and was founded hundreds of years before London, Paris and Rome.

72. It might be full of baloney HOAGIE
Hoagy is another name for a submarine sandwich. The term “hoagy” (or hoagie) originated in Philadelphia, apparently introduced by Italians working in the shipyards during WWI. The shipyards were located on Hog Island, and the sandwich was first called the Hog Island, which morphed into the hoagy.

The deli meat known as "baloney" is an American invention. It was given the name "baloney" because it resembles Italian mortadella sausage, which originated in the city of Bologna in northern Italy.

80. Rap sheet entry PRIOR ARREST (giving “PRIEST”)
A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap” and “to beat the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

84. Sun Devils' sch. ASU
Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

87. Indie rock band Yo La ___ TENGO
Yo La Tengo is an indie rock band from Hoboken, New Jersey that formed in 1984 as the husband/wife duo Ira Kaplan and Georgia Hubley. The band’s name translates from Spanish as “I have it”, and was chosen with reference to baseball anecdote. Elio Chacon was a baseball player from Venezuela, the seventh person to play in the Majors from that country. There's a story that Mets center fielder Richie Ashburn was always running into Elio Chacon in the outfield, because he would call for the ball in English, and Chacon only understood Spanish. Ashburn started to call for the ball in Spanish "Yo la tengo!" (I've got it!), at which point he’d be run down by left fielder Frank Thomas who only understood English ...

88. The black ball in el juego de billar OCHO
In Spanish, the black ball in “el juego de billar” (the game of billiards) is numbered “ocho” (eight).

89. Kerry's 2004 running mate EDWARDS
John Edwards is a former US Senator for the state of North Carolina. Edwards ran for the US vice-presidency with Democrat John Kerry in the 2004 race, and ran for president in 2008. Edwards got himself in a world of hurt trying to cover up an extramarital affair that resulted in him fathering a child with his mistress.

93. Capital of Minorca MAHON
Mahón is the capital city of the Spanish island of Minorca in the Mediterranean Sea. Mahón has the distinction of being the origin of what we called “mayonnaise”. The original recipe was named for the city by Spanish as “salsa mahonesa”, which morphed into the French name “mayonnaise” that we use today.

95. Homes for Gila woodpeckers CACTI
Gila woodpeckers live in desert regions of the US and Mexico. They nest in holes that the “peck” into mesquite trees and saguaro cacti.

97. Weightlifting technique CLEAN AND JERK (giving “CLERK”)
There are two weightlifting events in the Olympics. One is the “snatch” in which the competitor lifts the barbell from the platform over his or head in one continuous movement. The “clean and jerk” is a two-part lift. The “clean” brings the barbell off the platform mainly using the knees. The “jerk” brings the barbell over the head to complete the lift.

106. What a pitching wedge provides LOFT
For the uninitiated, that would be on a golf course …

107. Tip of Italy, once? LIRA
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

113. Where Rigel is ORION
Rigel is the sixth brightest star in the night sky, and the brightest star in the constellation of Orion. If you can imagine the stars in Orion laid out, Rigel is at his left foot. The name “Rigel” is an abbreviated version of the Arabic term for “Left Foot of the Central One”.

115. Brazilian tourist destination COPACABANA BEACH (giving “COACH”)
Copacabana is a neighborhood in the city of Rio de Janeiro that is home to a famous (and much-used) beach. The neighborhood is named for a chapel there, dedicated to the Virgen de Copacabana (Our Lady of Copacabana). The virgen de Copacabana is the patron saint of Bolivia, with the original Copacabana being a Bolivian town located on the southeastern shore of Lake Titicaca.

121. Honored academic retiree EMERITA
Emeritus (female form “emerita”, plural “emeriti”) is a term in the title of some retired professionals, particularly those from academia. Originally an emeritus was a veteran soldier who had served his time. The term comes from the Latin verb "emerere" meaning to complete one's service.

122. First name in Disney villains CRUELLA
Cruella de Vil is the villain in the 1956 novel “The Hundred and One Dalmatians” written by Dodie Smith. Most famously perhaps, Cruella was played so ably by Glenn Close in the Disney movie adaption “101 Dalmatians”, released in 1996.

124. Force under Stalin RED ARMY
Joseph Stalin was Soviet Premier from 1941 to 1953. Stalin's real name was Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili. Not long after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1903 he adopted the name “Stalin”, which is the Russian word for “steel”.

Down
1. Goodie bag filler SWAG
“Swag” is “loot, stolen property”, a term that started out as criminal slang in England in the 1830s. We now use the term more innocuously to describe the gifts given at a party in a “goodie bag” or “swag bag”.

3. Xeric ARID
A location described as “xeric” is extremely dry, arid. The Greek prefix “xero-” means “dry, withered”. The derivative “xeriscaping” is landscaping that reduces or eliminates the need for irrigation, i.e. drought-tolerant landscaping.

4. Sleep stages REMS
REM is an acronym standing for Rapid Eye Movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one's most vivid dreams.

5. Delta calculation, briefly ETA
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

Delta was the world's largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta's roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

6. "Damage" director Louis MALLE
Louis Malle was a film director from France who has a had a successful career on both sides of the Atlantic. Malle’s second wife was American actress Candice Bergen.

“Damage” is a 1992 film starring Jeremy Irons and Juliette Binoche. Directed by Louis Malle, the film is based on a novel of the same name by Josephine Hart. It’s all about a British government minister (Irons) who develops an obsession and has an affair with his son’s girlfriend (Binoche).

7. Big name in printers EPSON
Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world's first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

8. Primatologist Goodall JANE
Jane Goodall is a British anthropologist, famous for studying wild chimpanzees in Africa for 45 years. Working at Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania, Goodall made many discoveries. She was the first to see chimps constructing and using tools, an activity thought to be limited to the human species. She also found out that chimpanzees are vegetarians.

9. Tolkien beast ORC
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

10. Giant image in the sky over Gotham BAT
Batman is an ally of Police Commissioner Gordon of Gotham City. Gordon orders the shining of a searchlight into the sky, known as the Bat-Signal, to summon Batman when he is needed.

11. Actor Gulager CLU
Clu Gulager is a television and film actor. He is most remembered for playing Billy the Kid in the TV show "The Tall Man" in the early sixties, and then as Emmett Ryker in "The Virginian" in the late sixties.

12. Andrews or Dover: Abbr. US AFB
Joint Base Andrews is located just outside Washington, D.C. It is noted as the home base for the two Boeing VC-25A (Air Force One) aircraft that serve the US President. Joint Base Andrews is so called as it resulted from the merger of Andrews Air Force Base and the US Navy Naval Air Facility Washington.

Dover Air Force Base is located just outside the city of Dover, Delaware. The aircraft operating from Dover AFB are the huge C-5 Galaxy transport planes. Dover is also home to the Department of Defense’s largest mortuary, which has the sad mission of processing the remains of military personnel killed overseas and returned to the US before being transferred to family.

13. Tertius planeta from the sun TERRA
In Latin, “Terra” (Earth) is the “tertius planeta” (third planet) from the sun.

14. Leo with the 1977 #1 hit "You Make Me Feel Like Dancing" SAYER
Leo Sayer is a British singer who was big in the seventies with hits such as “You Make Me Feel Like Dancing” and “When I Need You”. Sayer now lives in Australia.

15. Evaluator of flight risks, for short FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 as the Federal Aviation Agency. The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

31. Put-down DIS
“Dis” is a slang term meaning “insult” that originated in the eighties, and is a shortened form of "disrespect” or "dismiss".

32. Fay Vincent's successor as baseball commissioner BUD SELIG
Bud Selig was the Commissioner of Baseball for Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2015. Selig became acting commissioner in 1992 after the resignation of Fay Vincent. The team owners searched for a new commissioner for six years, and finally gave the permanent job to Selig in 1998.

33. Suffix with hex- -ANE
A hexane is a hydrocarbon, an alkane with six carbon atoms. Hexanes of varying types are major components of gasoline.

36. Follow the advice "When in Rome ..." ADAPT
The proverb “when in Rome, do as the Romans do” probably dates back to the days of St. Augustine. St. Augustine wrote a letter around 390 AD in which he states:
When I go to Rome, I fast on Saturday, but here [Milan] I do not. Do you also follow the custom of whatever church you attend, if you do not want to give or receive scandal?

41. Like many OPEC nations ARAB
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded in 1960 at a conference held in Baghdad, Iraq that was attended by Iraq, Kuwait, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Nine more countries joined the alliance soon after, and OPEC set up headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and then Vienna, Austria in 1965. The basic aim of OPEC was to wrench control of oil prices from the oil companies and to put it in the hands of the sovereign states that own the natural resource.

45. Junior in the Football Hall of Fame SEAU
Junior Seau was an NFL linebacker, first playing for the San Diego Chargers and then the Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots. Sadly, Seau was found dead in his home in 2011, having committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest.

46. Plain to see WRIT LARGE
Something “writ large” is expressed in a more obvious way.

47. Voice-controlled device from the world's largest online retailer AMAZON ECHO
Amazon Echo is a voice-controlled hardware device that can be used to provide several services including playing radio programs and music, recording of shopping lists, and managing a calendar. The device just sits say in the home listening, until it hears a “wake up” command.

48. 1998 Jim Carrey comedy/drama, with "The" TRUMAN SHOW
“The Truman Show” is an interesting film starring Jim Carrey as a man who, although unaware of the fact, is living and starring in life-long reality show.

52. Managed care grps. HMOS
Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

54. Mrs. McKinley IDA
Ida Saxton met Bill McKinley at a picnic in 1867, just before she headed off to Europe on a "grand tour". So, the two had to wait until 1869 before they started courting. The couple married in 1871 in Canton, Ohio, Ida's hometown. Ida McKinley developed epilepsy before her husband was elected to President of the US and became very dependent on him to provide physical and moral support. She always sat by his side at public functions, breaking with the tradition of the President hosting some of the guests, and the First Lady others. After her husband was assassinated, Mrs. McKinley could not bring herself to attend her husband's funeral, and then withdrew from public view to her home in Canton. She passed away six years after her husband, in 1907.

56. Dump site monitor, for short EPA
Environmental Protection Agency(EPA)

63. Lyme disease transmitter DEER TICK
Lyme disease is an infectious disease that is becoming more and more common. The condition takes its name from the town of Lyme, Connecticut where several cases were diagnosed in 1975. Humans catch the disease when bitten by infected ticks. If caught early enough, the disease is usually successfully treated with antibiotics.

66. Outdoor sports store REI
REI is a sporting goods store, the initialism standing for Recreational Equipment Inc. REI was founded in Seattle by Lloyd and Mary Anderson in 1938 as a cooperative that supplies quality climbing gear to outdoor enthusiasts. The first full-time employee hired by the Andersons was Jim Whittaker, who was the first American to summit Mount Everest.

67. Libertine RAKE
A "rake" (short for “rakehell”) is a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn’t it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie "Bridget Jones’s Diary". "Rake" comes from the Old Norse "reikall", meaning "vagrant or a wanderer".

Someone who is described as “libertine” is free of restraint, sexually immoral. Back in the 14th century a libertine was an emancipated slave, someone given his or her freedom. The term derives from the Latin “libertinus” describing a freed person who was once a slave.

69. Golfer Aoki ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan's greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki's best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

70. What Marcie calls Peppermint Patty in "Peanuts" SIR
Peppermint Patty is a character in the long-running comic strip “Peanuts”, by Charles M. Schulz. Peppermint Patty has a friend named Marcie who famously refers to her as “Sir”, perhaps a reference to Peppermint Patty’s reputation as a tomboy. Tomboy or not, it is revealed in the strip that Peppermint Patty has quite a crush on Charlie Brown.

76. Some collars ETONS
An Eton collar is a wide, stiff, buttoned collar that is still part of the formal school uniform at Eton College near Windsor in England.

78. Macy's, e.g. CHAIN
The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early New York stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

82. The tiniest bit ONE IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small, as iota is the smallest of all Greek letters.

86. 88-Across + cuatro DOCE
(88A. The black ball in el juego de billar OCHO)
In Spanish, “ocho” (eight) + “cuatro” (four) = “doce” (twelve).

90. Circuit for Serena and Venus Williams, in brief WTA TOUR
The Williams Sisters appear in the WTA Tour, organized by the Women's Tennis Association.

93. Ones putting on acts MCS
Master or mistress of ceremonies (MC)

98. Dr. Seuss environmentalist LORAX
"The Lorax" is a children's book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. At one point in the story, the Lorax “speaks for the trees, for the trees have no tongues”. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

99. Paperless I.R.S. option E-FILE
E-file: that's what I do with my tax return ...

101. Suffix with hippo- DROME
A “hippodrome” is an arena used for equestrian events. The word "hippodrome" comes from the Greek "hippos" (horse) and "dromos" (racetrack).

102. Teased JAPED
"To jape" means "to joke or quip". The exact origins of "jape" are unclear, but it does seem to come from Old French. In the mid-1600's "to jape" was a slang term meaning "to have sex with". No joke!

105. Visible S O S FLARE
The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are also mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

108. "Buy it. Sell it. Love it" company EBAY
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

111. Home of the David Geffen School of Medicine, for short UCLA
The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA was established in 1951. It was renamed in 2001 following a donation of $200 million by business and entertainment magnate David Geffen.

112. "___ she blows!" THAR
“Thar she blows!” is a phrase that originated on whaling ships. A lookout spotting a whale surfacing to breathe might see the spray from the blowhole caused by the expulsion of carbon dioxide. Thar (there) she blows!

116. Parseghian of Notre Dame ARA
Ara Parseghian coached the Notre Dame football team from 1964 to 1974, a period known as "The Era of Ara".

117. Street sign abbr. CIR
Circle (cir.)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "I've heard enough" SPARE ME
8. Consequences of downsizing JOB CUTS
15. 2014 Emmy-winning miniseries based on a 1996 film FARGO
20. Relative of a bug WIRETAP
21. Amu Darya outlet, once ARAL SEA
22. Pop-up, sometimes ALERT
23. No-hunting zone ANIMAL SANCTUARY (giving “ACTUARY”)
25. Mete out ALLOT
26. Certifications in some college apps GEDS
27. Singular LONE
28. Part of the neck? FRET
30. Look shocked GAPE
31. What might result from a minor hit DENT
32. Longtime California senator BARBARA BOXER (giving “BARBER”)
36. Computer data acronym ASCII
40. Part of the biosphere FAUNA
42. Flowed RAN
43. Mt. Olive offerings DILLS
44. Get tough HARDEN
45. Cursed SWORE AT
49. "Helm's ___!" (nautical cry) ALEE
50. Marsh birds SORAS
51. World Series of Poker's Vegas home THE RIO
53. Order from a sports doc MRI
55. Info on a parking ticket PLATE NUMBER (giving “PLUMBER”)
58. Something that doesn't follow the letter of the law? MAIL FRAUD (giving “MAID”)
60. Mars : Roman :: ___ : Norse TYR
61. Father figures PAS
62. Expelled politely LED OUT
64. L. Frank Baum princess OZMA
65. Kind of rock GARAGE
67. Bar mitzvahs, e.g. RITES
68. City from which Vasco da Gama sailed, to locals LISBOA
71. Flower girl? ROSE
72. It might be full of baloney HOAGIE
74. "Try ___ might ..." AS I
75. Taipei-to-Seoul dir. NNE
77. It contains a lot of balloons COMIC BOOK (giving “COOK”)
80. Rap sheet entry PRIOR ARREST (giving “PRIEST”)
84. Sun Devils' sch. ASU
85. Cooperated with, e.g. HELPED
87. Indie rock band Yo La ___ TENGO
88. The black ball in el juego de billar OCHO
89. Kerry's 2004 running mate EDWARDS
91. "Aha!" OH, I SEE!
93. Capital of Minorca MAHON
94. One-to-one, e.g. TIE
95. Homes for Gila woodpeckers CACTI
96. Boasts CROWS
97. Weightlifting technique CLEAN AND JERK (giving “CLERK”)
103. Does in OFFS
106. What a pitching wedge provides LOFT
107. Tip of Italy, once? LIRA
108. Catchall abbr. ET AL
109. Google SafeSearch target SMUT
113. Where Rigel is ORION
115. Brazilian tourist destination COPACABANA BEACH (giving “COACH”)
120. Algebraic input VALUE
121. Honored academic retiree EMERITA
122. First name in Disney villains CRUELLA
123. Apply EXERT
124. Force under Stalin RED ARMY
125. Spousal agreement YES, DEAR

Down
1. Goodie bag filler SWAG
2. Long PINE
3. Xeric ARID
4. Sleep stages REMS
5. Delta calculation, briefly ETA
6. "Damage" director Louis MALLE
7. Big name in printers EPSON
8. Primatologist Goodall JANE
9. Tolkien beast ORC
10. Giant image in the sky over Gotham BAT
11. Actor Gulager CLU
12. Andrews or Dover: Abbr. US AFB
13. Tertius planeta from the sun TERRA
14. Leo with the 1977 #1 hit "You Make Me Feel Like Dancing" SAYER
15. Evaluator of flight risks, for short FAA
16. Used up ALL GONE
17. "Chill!" RELAX!
18. Search blindly GROPE
19. Furry frolicker OTTER
24. Elementary school science class item ANT FARM
29. Distilled coal product TAR OIL
31. Put-down DIS
32. Fay Vincent's successor as baseball commissioner BUD SELIG
33. Suffix with hex- -ANE
34. Hothead's response RANT
35. ___ soap BAR OF
36. Follow the advice "When in Rome ..." ADAPT
37. Foolish sort SILLY GOOSE
38. Opaque CLEAR AS MUD
39. "Before ___ you go ..." I LET
41. Like many OPEC nations ARAB
44. Survey unit HOUSEHOLD
45. Junior in the Football Hall of Fame SEAU
46. Plain to see WRIT LARGE
47. Voice-controlled device from the world's largest online retailer AMAZON ECHO
48. 1998 Jim Carrey comedy/drama, with "The" TRUMAN SHOW
50. Minor setback SNAG
52. Managed care grps. HMOS
54. Mrs. McKinley IDA
56. Dump site monitor, for short EPA
57. Fix, as a pool cue RETIP
59. Stick up ROB
63. Lyme disease transmitter DEER TICK
66. Outdoor sports store REI
67. Libertine RAKE
69. Golfer Aoki ISAO
70. What Marcie calls Peppermint Patty in "Peanuts" SIR
71. Home theater option RCA
73. "My mistake!" OOPS!
76. Some collars ETONS
78. Macy's, e.g. CHAIN
79. "Stop kidding yourself" BE REAL
81. Hair extension? -IEST
82. The tiniest bit ONE IOTA
83. Crowd sound ROAR
86. 88-Across + cuatro DOCE
90. Circuit for Serena and Venus Williams, in brief WTA TOUR
92. Derisive laugh sound HAR
93. Ones putting on acts MCS
97. Piece of garlic CLOVE
98. Dr. Seuss environmentalist LORAX
99. Paperless I.R.S. option E-FILE
100. More charming NICER
101. Suffix with hippo- DROME
102. Teased JAPED
104. Like black-tie affairs FANCY
105. Visible S O S FLARE
108. "Buy it. Sell it. Love it" company EBAY
109. Nut, basically SEED
110. Like father, like son? MALE
111. Home of the David Geffen School of Medicine, for short UCLA
112. "___ she blows!" THAR
114. After deductions NET
116. Parseghian of Notre Dame ARA
117. Street sign abbr. CIR
118. Casino convenience ATM
119. Staple of a rock band tour BUS


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1031-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 15, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter Went
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

17. Blueprint notation : SCALE
Blueprints are reproductions of technical or architectural drawings that are contact prints made on light-sensitive sheets. Blueprints were introduced in the 1800s and the technology available dictated that the drawings were reproduced with white lines on a blue background, hence the name “blue-print”.

20. Aural measure : SONE
In the acoustic world, the "sone" was introduced as a unit of perceived loudness in 1936.

21. Charlie Brown, e.g. : TOON
Charlie Brown is the main character in the long-running comic strip called “Peanuts”, created by Charles Schulz. Charlie has several persistent frustrations in his life, including an inability to fly a kite. The focus of his kite-flying frustration is the dreaded Kite-Eating Tree.

22. Accident figures, for short : EMTS
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

23. Coldwell Banker competitor : RE/MAX
RE/MAX is an international real estate company headquartered in Denver, Colorado. The name RE/MAX stands for “real estate maximum”, and the company’s logo is a hot air balloon with RE/MAX emblazoned on it.

The real estate company Coldwell Banker was founded in San Francisco, just after the 1906 earthquake.

24. "Radiolab" producer : WNYC
There are two WNYC radio stations, both based in New York City. Both stations (one AM, and one FM) are members of National Public Radio.

“Radiolab” is a very entertaining National Public Radio program broadcast weekly from New York City. The show tackles some profound scientific and philosophical topics, but does so in a very light-hearted way. Recommended …

27. 1946 Goethe Prize winner : HESSE
Hermann Hesse was not only a novelist, but also a poet and a painter. His best known work is probably his 1927 novel "Steppenwolf".

The Goethe Prize is currently a triennial award made by the city of Frankfurt, Germany. Most recipients are authors, and indeed the prize is named for Frankfurt writer and statesman Johann Wolfgang Goethe.

28. Progressive business: Abbr. : INS
Progressive is a popular auto insurance company, the one that uses the perky character named “Flo” as a spokeswoman. Flo is played by comedienne and actress Stephanie Courtney.

31. Bid for a balanced hand : NO TRUMP
“No-trump” bids are made in the excellent card game of bridge.

33. What clones share : GENE SET
Dolly is the most famous sheep in the world. She was a clone, and she was born in 1996 near Edinburgh in Scotland, grown from a cell taken from the mammary gland of a healthy donor sheep. When asked why she was called Dolly, the scientist responsible said, and I quote:
"Dolly is derived from a mammary gland cell and we couldn't think of a more impressive pair of glands than Dolly Parton's".
Like I said, I am simply quoting. I don't judge …

37. Planks work them : ABS
The plank is an isometric exercise that strengthens the abdominals, as well as the back and shoulder muscles.

40. Gangsta rap characters : THUGS
Gangsta rap is a type of hip hop music with lyrics that reflect the violent lifestyle experienced by some inner-city youth.

48. Former Baath Party stronghold : IRAQ
The Ba’ath Party was founded in Syria in 1947. The party promotes the unification of the Arab world into one nation, and has the motto “Unity, Liberty, Socialism”.

49. White matter component : AXON
A nerve cell is more correctly called a neuron, and the long nerve fiber that is part of a neuron is called the axon. A neuron that has no definite axon is referred to as “apolar” or “nonpolar”. In apolar neurons the nerve impulses radiate in all directions.

Grey matter and white matter are the two component of the central nervous system. Grey matter is mainly made up of neurons, and white matter is largely made of axons, the projections of the neurons that form nerve fibers.

50. Gaynor with the one-woman show "Razzle Dazzle!" : MITZI
Mitzi Gaynor’s most famous role has to be Ensign Nellie Forbush in the movie adaptation of the musical “South Pacific”. It is Gaynor who sings the song “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair”.

53. Johnny who used to cry "Come on down!" : OLSON
Johnny Olson was the announcer on "The Price is Right" from day one in 1972, until he passed away in 1985.

54. Deferential respect : OBEISANCE
“Obeisance” is an attitude of deference usually marked by gestures of respect such as a bow or a curtsey.

56. Like the explorer Henry Hudson : LOST AT SEA
Hudson Bay in northern Canada is the second largest bay in the world, after the Bay of Bengal. Hudson Bay was named by English explorers after Henry Hudson who explored the area in 1610 on his ship “Discovery”. Hudson’s crew mutinied during that voyage and set Hudson and his officers adrift in a small boat. It is presumed that the castaways didn’t survive for very long.

57. ___ Park : ESTES
Estes Park is a town in a beautiful part of the US, in northern Colorado. Estes Park is home to the headquarters of Rocky Mountain National Park. My firefighter brother-in-law was based at that park, so I’ve visited and can attest that it is a gorgeous place to live. He lives in Omaha now. The geography in Omaha is a little different ...

Down
2. 1960s-'80s Chevrolet coupe utility vehicle : EL CAMINO
The Chevrolet El Camino was originally produced from 1959 until 1960, and then again from 1964 until 1987. “El Camino” is Spanish for “the path”.

3. Car and Driver assignment : ROAD TEST
“Car and Driver” is an automotive magazine published in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “Car and Driver” first appeared in 1955, when it was called “Sports Cars Illustrated”.

5. Many a Snapchat user : TEEN
Snapchat is a messaging system that allows users to send photos and video clips to a limited list of recipients. The photos and clips, called “snaps”, can be viewed for only a few seconds before they are deleted from the recipient’s device and from the Snapchat servers.

6. Came clean : FESSED UP
The term “fess” is most often seen as part of the phrasal verb “to fess up” meaning “to admit to something”. “Fess” is simply a shortened form of “confess”.

7. Classic 1971 album that closes with "Riders on the Storm" : LA WOMAN
“Riders on the Storm” is 1971 rock song by the Doors that was inspired by the 1948 country/western song “(Ghost) Riders in the Sky”. Although “Riders on the Storm” wasn’t the biggest hit for the Doors, it is definitely my favorite of their songs …

8. Ways of sitting in yoga : ASANAS
"Asana" is a Sanskrit word literally meaning "sitting down". The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called "padmasana".

9. Test tube material : PYREX
Pyrex glassware is brand name owned by Corning. As well as being used in bakeware and laboratory glassware, Pyrex is often the material of choice for optics in large telescopes used in astronomy. Pyrex is made from borosilicate glass, the main ingredients of which at silica and boron trioxide.

12. Some printers : CANONS
The Japanese company called Canon is largely known in the US for producing quality cameras. The company started out as Precision Optical Industry Laboratory in 1937 making camera bodies. The name was changed in 1947 to Canon.

13. Former chain store for kids : KB TOYS
KB Toys was a chain of toy stores that was founded in 1922, but folded in 2009. The chain was established by Harry and Joseph Kaufman, which gave the store the name “KB”, standing for Kaufman Brothers.

14. Decorative fixture : SCONCE
A sconce is a light fixture that today uses electric bulbs, but in the past used candles and torches. The defining feature of a sconce is that it is supported by a wall and does not have a base that stands on the ground. Usually the light is indirect, projected upwards towards the ceiling.

23. Shares quarters (with) : ROOMS
We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

34. Puts up a jumper, say : SHOOTS IT
That would be in basketball …

35. Western union locale? : EUROZONE
The “eurozone” or “euro area” is a monetary and economic union within the European Union of 19 states (as of today) that use the euro as a shared legal tender and their sole currency. The last nation to adopt the euro was Lithuania, in 2015.

36. British Invasion group : THE KINKS
The Kinks were an English band that participated in the British Invasion of America in the sixties, although only briefly. After touring the US in the middle of 1965, the American Federation of Musicians refused permits for the Kinks to book concerts for four years, apparently in response to some rowdy on-stage behavior by band.

40. Soap dish, possibly? : TV IDOL
The original soap operas were radio dramas back in the fifties. Given the structure of society back then, the daytime broadcasts were aimed at housewives working in the home. For some reason the sponsors of those radio shows, and the television shows that followed, were soap manufacturers like Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive and Lever Brothers. And that's how the "soap" opera got its name ...

41. Candy company that makes gummy bears : HARIBO
Haribo is confectionary company based in Germany, in the city of Bonn. Founded by Johannes “Hans” Riegel, Sr. in 1920, the company name derives from the first two letters of the words “Hans”, “Riegel” and “Bonn”.

52. "It Can Wait" spot, e.g. : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA)

The “It Can Wait” campaign urges people not to text and drive. Some phone companies now offer an auto-reply service that lets callers know that you are driving and cannot respond.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Soft top : BERET
6. Diner stack : FLAPJACKS
15. Eating at the bar, perhaps : ALONE
16. Simple, simple, simple : EASY AS ABC
17. Blueprint notation : SCALE
18. Overrun : SWARM INTO
19. Invited over for coffee, say : HAD IN
20. Aural measure : SONE
21. Charlie Brown, e.g. : TOON
22. Accident figures, for short : EMTS
23. Coldwell Banker competitor : RE/MAX
24. "Radiolab" producer : WNYC
25. Light fountain selections : DIET SODAS
27. 1946 Goethe Prize winner : HESSE
28. Progressive business: Abbr. : INS
29. Word that can be common : NOUN
30. Considerably : FAR
31. Bid for a balanced hand : NO TRUMP
33. What clones share : GENE SET
37. Planks work them : ABS
38. Dope, say : DRUG
39. "What's that?" : HUH?
40. Gangsta rap characters : THUGS
43. One to one, e.g. : TIED SCORE
45. Site of an arrangement : VASE
46. Dance floor abilities : MOVES
47. Attention-grabbing riff, perhaps : HOOK
48. Former Baath Party stronghold : IRAQ
49. White matter component : AXON
50. Gaynor with the one-woman show "Razzle Dazzle!" : MITZI
51. Look to do some character assassination : DIG UP DIRT
53. Johnny who used to cry "Come on down!" : OLSON
54. Deferential respect : OBEISANCE
55. Short, sharp, metallic sound : PLINK
56. Like the explorer Henry Hudson : LOST AT SEA
57. ___ Park : ESTES

Down
1. Knocked down : BASHED IN
2. 1960s-'80s Chevrolet coupe utility vehicle : EL CAMINO
3. Car and Driver assignment : ROAD TEST
4. Secure, as help : ENLIST
5. Many a Snapchat user : TEEN
6. Came clean : FESSED UP
7. Classic 1971 album that closes with "Riders on the Storm" : LA WOMAN
8. Ways of sitting in yoga : ASANAS
9. Test tube material : PYREX
10. Get stuck : JAM
11. In a manner of speaking : AS IT WERE
12. Some printers : CANONS
13. Former chain store for kids : KB TOYS
14. Decorative fixture : SCONCE
23. Shares quarters (with) : ROOMS
26. Academy omissions : SNUBS
27. Socializes (with) : HANGS
30. Rows that run deep : FEUDS
32. Suddenly and angrily stop playing a game, in modern lingo : RAGE-QUIT
33. Healthful beverage high in antioxidants : GREEN TEA
34. Puts up a jumper, say : SHOOTS IT
35. Western union locale? : EUROZONE
36. British Invasion group : THE KINKS
38. Possible consequence of cheating : DIVORCE
40. Soap dish, possibly? : TV IDOL
41. Candy company that makes gummy bears : HARIBO
42. Linguists study them : USAGES
43. Targets of a so-called "juice cleanse" : TOXINS
44. Mellows out : CHILLS
46. Hardly pleased with : MAD AT
50. Sulk : MOPE
52. "It Can Wait" spot, e.g. : PSA


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1030-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 15, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Theme song of "The Doris Day Show" : IT’S MAGIC
Doris Day first sang “It’s Magic” in the movie “Romance on the High Seas” in 1947. That film was the first big-screen appearance for Ms. Day.

The actress and singer Doris Day was born Doris Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio. Day made more than 650 recordings as a singer with Columbia Records, and also appeared in 39 movies. Outside the world of entertainment, she has been an ardent supporter of animal rights. She now lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea in California, along with her many pets and stray animals that she has adopted over the years.

9. Autocrat's output : FIATS
A "fiat" is an arbitrary rule that is imposed, and is the Latin for "let it be done".

14. Land bordering France and Andorra : CATALONIA
Catalonia is an autonomous community in the very northeast of Spain. The capital of Catalonia is the city of Barcelona. Sandwiched between Catalonia and France to the north, is the lovely Principality of Andorra, nestled in the Pyrenees.

16. "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive" songwriter : ARLEN
Harold Arlen is a composer of popular music who will forever be associated with his composition “Over the Rainbow” from the movie “The Wizard of Oz”. Arlen also composed the music to “Come Rain or Come Shine”, “It’s Only a Paper Moon”, “Lydia the Tattooed Lady” and the wonderful “Stormy Weather”.

“Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive" is a song by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer first published in 1944. The first recording of the song was made by Johnny Mercer later that year, and it made it to number two in the charts early in 1945.

18. Very, on musical scores : MOLTO
"Molto" is the Italian for "very".

20. Demands payment from : DUNS
"To dun" is to insist on payment of a debt. The etymology of the term is unclear, with one suggestion that it dates back to a famous debt collector in London named Joe Dun.

22. Ankle covering : GAITER
A "gaiter" is a heavy cloth or piece of leather that covers the leg from the instep up to the ankle or perhaps knee.

24. Excellent, in 1990s slang : PHAT
In hip-hop circles, the term "phat" means excellent or first-rate.

25. It's loaded : CARGO
“Cargo” is freight carried by some vehicle. The term comes into English via Spanish, ultimately deriving from the Latin “carricare” meaning “to load on a cart”.

31. Hindu hermitages : ASHRAMS
“Ashram” is a Hindu term that traditionally describes a place of spiritual retreat, one that is typically located in a remote location conducive to spiritual instruction and meditation.

36. Twelver, religiously speaking : SHIITE
In the Shia Islam tradition, the Twelve Imams are the spiritual successors to the prophet Muhammad.

37. Drawing room furniture : SETTEES
“Settee” is another word for a couch. The term come from the Old English “setl”, which was a long bench with a high back and arms.

42. Teammate of Robinson : REESE
Pee Wee Reese met Jackie Robinson after Robinson was signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. As Reese tells the story, when he greeted Robinson it was the first time he had shaken hands with a black man. In those early days life was difficult for Robinson, and Reese made himself very visible as a friend, supporting the breaking down of racial barriers despite very vocal opposition.

43. Dot on the map : BURG
“Burg” is an informal term used in the US for a smaller town, from the German word “burg” meaning a fortified city.

48. Legendary mountain climber : YETI
A yeti is a beast of legend, also called an abominable snowman. "Yeti" is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

49. Shingle supporter : LATH
The words "lath" and "lattice" have the same root in Old French. Laths are thin strips of wood that are nailed across a frame forming a backing to which plaster can be applied to finish a wall. The term is also used for the main elements in a trellis, or the lengths of wood in a roof to which shingles are nailed.

53. Badly made dough? : LUCRE
Our word “lucre” meaning “money, profits” comes from the Latin “lucrum” that means the same thing.

54. Bronx cheer : RASPBERRY
Not so much here in America, but over in the British Isles "blowing a raspberry" is a way of insulting someone (I think it's called "a Bronx cheer" in the US). The verb "to razz" comes from a shortened form of "raspberry".

56. Cars made in Trollhättan, formerly : SAABS
SAAB stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. SAAB was, and still is, mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automotive division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011. A Chinese consortium purchased the assets of SAAB Automotive in 2012, and so SAAB vehicles are in production again. The new vehicles are using the SAAB name, but cannot use the SAAB griffin logo, the rights to which have been retained by the mother company.

Trollhättan is a city in Sweden located about 75 km north of Gothenburg, in the southwest of the country. Trollhättan is home to the headquarters and main manufacturing plant of National Electric Vehicle Sweden, formerly known as SAAB Automotive.

59. Result of upsetting a cup holder? : SPIT-TAKE
The comic maneuver in which someone spits out a drink in response to a joke or a surprising statement, that’s called a “spit-take”.

Down
1. Transoceanic flier, briefly : ICBM
An Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) is a ballistic missile with the range necessary to cross between continents. Being ballistic (unlike a cruise missile), an ICBM is guided during the initial launch phase, but later in flight just relies on thrust and gravity to arrive at its target. It is defined as intercontinental as it has a range greater than 3,500 miles. ICBMs are really only used for delivering nuclear warheads. Scary stuff ...

4. Knight club : MACE
A mace is a relatively simple weapon in essence, a heavy weight on the end of a handle that is used to deliver powerful blows on an opponent's body.

5. Music genre modifier : ALT-
Apparently there’s alt-rock, alt-country, alt-metal and alt-R&B, to name but a few music genres.

6. Brine-soaked cheese : GOUDA
Gouda is a cheese that originated in the Dutch city of the same name, although today Gouda is produced all over the world and very little of it comes from the Netherlands. Gouda is often smoke-cured, given it a yellowish-brown outer skin and that characteristic smoky taste.

9. Oscar-winning song of 1980 : FAME
Irene Cara (as well as acting in "Fame") sang the theme songs to the hit movies "Fame" and "Flashdance".

10. Deluded prospector's find : IRON PYRITE
Pyrite is a mineral, also known as a iron pyrite. Famously, it has an appearance very similar to gold, so has the nickname "fool's gold". Pyrite does find its way into some baubles, which go by the name of marcasite jewelry.

12. Private exchanges : TETE-A-TETES
A “tête-à-tête” is a one-on-one meeting, literally “head-to-head” in French.

15. Balance sheet column : ASSETS
The balance sheet of a company is a snapshot (single point in time) view of a company’s financial position. The balance sheet lists all the company’s liabilities, all of its assets, and all of its ownership equity. The assets of a company, less its liabilities equals the ownership equity. The term “balance” is used because assets always balance out with the sum of liabilities and shareholder equity.

23. Joe Buck's pal in a 1969 film : RATSO
Enrico Salvatore “Ratso” Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man, played by Dustin Hoffman.

The 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy” is a Hollywood adaptation of a novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy. It’s a pretty depressing story about a young Texan named Joe Buck (played by Jon Voight) who heads to New York City to make money as a hustler, hiring himself out to women for sex. Pretty soon the young man ends up selling his body for sex with males as well. Prior to release the MPAA gave the movie an R-rating, but the United Artists studio took advice and decided to release it with an X-rating. When “Midnight Cowboy” won the Best Picture Academy Award in 1969, it became the only X-rated film to be so honored.

25. Lewis ___, presidential also-ran of 1848 : CASS
Lewis Cass was a military officer and politician originally from New Hampshire. As a politician, Cass vied for the Democratic Party’s nomination for president in 1848, losing out to Zachary Taylor, who went on to win the presidential race. A few years later, Cass served as Secretary of State under President James Buchanan.

28. Mata Hari portrayer of 1931 : GRETA GARBO
Famously, Greta Garbo lived a life of seclusion in New York City after she retired from the entertainment business. Commentators often associated her need for privacy with a line she uttered in the great 1932 movie "Grand Hotel". Her character, Grusinskaya the Russian ballerina, said, "I want to be alone (...) I just want to be alone".

Mata Hari was the stage name used by Margaretha Geertruida Zella, born in the Netherlands in 1876. After an unsuccessful and somewhat tragic marriage, Zella moved to Paris in 1903 where she struggled to make a living. By 1905 she was working as an exotic dancer and using the name Mata Hari. She was a successful courtesan, notably moving in various circles of high-ranking military officers. She apparently worked as a double agent, both for the French and the Germans. When Mata Hari was accused by the French of passing information to the enemy, she was tried, found guilty and executed by firing squad at the height of WW1, in 1917.

“Mata Hari” is a 1931 film starring Greta Garbo in the title role. “Mata Hari” was a huge hit for MGM, and for Garbo. It is usually given the credit for popularizing the legendary stories surrounding the exotic dancer and WWI spy.

30. Setting of "Beau Geste" : SAHARA
“Beau Geste” is a 1924 novel by the British writer P. C. Wren. The hero of the piece is Michael “Beau” Geste, an upper-class Englishman who joins the French Foreign Legion and embarks on a life of adventure and intrigue.

32. "Halloween" antagonist's surname : MYERS
I really, really don’t do horror films. The one exception perhaps is the original “Halloween” movie, starring Jamie Lee Curtis and Donald Pleasance. To me, this first movie in the “Halloween” series is more in the style of Hitchcock’s “Psycho” whereas the sequels were just chock full of gore and graphic violence.

34. Lacoste of tennis : RENE
René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. And a “golf shirt” is basically the same thing.

38. Bacchus' attendants : SATYRS
The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the "rude" male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

Dionysus was the party animal of Greek mythology. Dionysus was the god of the wine, ritual madness and ecstasy! His Roman equivalent was Bacchus.

43. Wood used to make surfboards : BALSA
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it "The Wooden Wonder" and "The Timber Terror".

45. Hedren of "Marnie" : TIPPI
Tippi Hedren is an actress from New Ulm, Minnesota who is best known for her starring roles in two Alfred Hitchcock classics: “The Birds” (1963) and “Marnie” (1964). Famously, Hedren claimed that Hitchcock destroyed her movie career because she would not succumb to his sexual advances, a charge that has been denied.

“Marnie” is a good example of the Hitchcock genre of psychological thrillers, although it wasn’t as well received as so many of Hitchcock’s works. Released in 1964, “Marnie” stars Tippi Hedren (who also starred in Hitchcock’s “The Birds”) and Sean Connery of James Bond fame.

47. What matryoshka dolls do : NEST
Matryoshka dolls are those wooden nesting dolls that are on sale at every tourist trap across Russia. “Matryoshka” is Russian for “little matron”.

50. Scena component : ARIA
A scene in an opera is usually called a “scena”, the Italian term for “scene”.

52. London's ___ Park : HYDE
Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London. A famous element in Hyde Park is Speakers’ Corner, located in the northeast corner of the park. Speakers’ Corner was the site of the infamous Tyburn gallows that was used for public executions in centuries past. Today, Speakers’ Corner is a site for public speeches and debate, and a center for public protest. Some say that the tradition of allowing free speech at the site dates back to the condemned man being allowed to say his piece prior to execution at the Tyburn gallows.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Theme song of "The Doris Day Show" : IT’S MAGIC
9. Autocrat's output : FIATS
14. Land bordering France and Andorra : CATALONIA
16. "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive" songwriter : ARLEN
17. Minor additions to the bill? : B PICTURES
18. Very, on musical scores : MOLTO
19. No better than : MERE
20. Demands payment from : DUNS
21. Formal response to a knock : ENTER
22. Ankle covering : GAITER
24. Excellent, in 1990s slang : PHAT
25. It's loaded : CARGO
29. "Maybe someday" : NOT AS YET
31. Hindu hermitages : ASHRAMS
33. Provider of track shots? : STARTER
35. Expeditious : SPEEDY
36. Twelver, religiously speaking : SHIITE
37. Drawing room furniture : SETTEES
39. Craft workers : BOATMEN
40. Driving storms? : ROAD RAGE
42. Teammate of Robinson : REESE
43. Dot on the map : BURG
44. Stacked beds : STRATA
46. ___-American : ASIAN
48. Legendary mountain climber : YETI
49. Shingle supporter : LATH
53. Badly made dough? : LUCRE
54. Bronx cheer : RASPBERRY
56. Cars made in Trollhättan, formerly : SAABS
57. Rendered speechless : STUPEFIED
58. Parcel : ALLOT
59. Result of upsetting a cup holder? : SPIT-TAKE

Down
1. Transoceanic flier, briefly : ICBM
2. Stick with it : TAPE
3. To-do : STIR
4. Knight club : MACE
5. Music genre modifier : ALT-
6. Brine-soaked cheese : GOUDA
7. Completely fallen apart : IN RUINS
8. A hundred to Juan : CIENTO
9. Oscar-winning song of 1980 : FAME
10. Deluded prospector's find : IRON PYRITE
11. Constantly : ALL THE TIME
12. Private exchanges : TETE-A-TETES
13. Wordless rejoinder : SNORT
15. Balance sheet column : ASSETS
22. Provided provocation : GOADED
23. Joe Buck's pal in a 1969 film : RATSO
25. Lewis ___, presidential also-ran of 1848 : CASS
26. In the standard manner : AS PER USUAL
27. Like some unanswered questions : RHETORICAL
28. Mata Hari portrayer of 1931 : GRETA GARBO
30. Setting of "Beau Geste" : SAHARA
32. "Halloween" antagonist's surname : MYERS
34. Lacoste of tennis : RENE
38. Bacchus' attendants : SATYRS
39. Pummels : BEATS UP
41. People to remember : GREATS
43. Wood used to make surfboards : BALSA
45. Hedren of "Marnie" : TIPPI
47. What matryoshka dolls do : NEST
49. Took off : LEFT
50. Scena component : ARIA
51. Make arduous progress : TREK
52. London's ___ Park : HYDE
55. Venture : BET


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1029-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Sam Trabucco
THEME: Lion’s Share … we have the word “LION’S” spelled out by five circled letters in the grid. Each of those five letters in LION’S is SHARED in the across-answer in which the letter appears, meaning that it is used twice. It is used for the end of the first word in the answer, and for the beginning of the second word:
17A. Party-going and such : SOCIAL LIFE (shared L)
24A. One whose work is going downhill? : SKI INSTRUCTOR (shared I)
41A. Second chance : DO-OVER (shared O)
53A. Campbell's variety : CHICKEN NOODLE (shared N)
66A. Almost all ... and a hint to the five circled letters : LION’S SHARE (shared S)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Co. that bought out Applebee's in 2007 : IHOP
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn't do too well in marketing tests ...

The Applebee’s chain of “Neighborhood Bar & Grill” restaurants was founded in 1980, with the first Applebee's eatery opening in Decatur, Georgia. When it comes to “chain” restaurants, I like Applebee’s ...

9. Some causes of insomnia : DRIPS
That would be the faucet dripping, or perhaps a runny nose!

16. Dangerous emission : RADON
Radon is a radioactive gas, a byproduct produced when uranium decays naturally in the earth. Radon gas can collect and accumulate in buildings and rooms that are particularly well insulated with very little air exchange. The danger is very real, as radon is listed as the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke.

20. Final answer? : OTHER
Perhaps “answer A”, “answer B”, “answer C” or “other”.

23. Number of monosyllabic U.S. state names : ONE
I’m not going to tell you …

… oh, okay. It’s Maine.

27. Rasputin, for one : MYSTIC
Grigori Rasputin was a Russian Orthodox mystic who apparently had great influence over the Emperor Nicholas and his family, and over the Empress Alexandra in particular.

31. OPEC member: Abbr. : UAE
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

32. Locale for snow leopards : NEPAL
Snow leopards are creatures that tend to keep to themselves, living in high ground in the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia. Given that they are so "secretive" estimates of the size of the snow leopard population are pretty rough, with perhaps 3,500 to 7,000 in the wild.

39. Sign at the front of some bars : CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

44. 1881 novel "for children and those who love children" : HEIDI
“Heidi” is a Swiss children’s book written by Johanna Spyri and published in two parts. The first is “Heidi’s years of learning and travel”, and the second “Heidi makes use of what she has learned”. The books tell the story of a young girl in the care of her grandfather in the Swiss Alps.

46. "Cars" producer : PIXAR
“Cars” is a 2006 animated feature from Pixar. The great cast of voice actors includes Paul Newman in his last movie role before he passed away in 2008.

49. Rat : FINK
A “fink” is an informer, someone who rats out his cohorts.

51. Skim : NONFAT
What we call “skim” milk here in North America is known as “skimmed” milk on the other side of the Atlantic.

53. Campbell's variety : CHICKEN NOODLE
The Campbell’s Soup company is named for one of the enterprise's two founders, Joseph A. Campbell. He and Abraham Anderson started the business in 1869. The iconic design of the Campbell’s can was introduced in 1989 and has hardly changed since then. The gold seal in the design comes from the 1900 Paris Exhibition.

58. Director Besson : LUC
Luc Besson is a French film director and producer. One of the movies that he wrote and directed is “Nikita”, released in 1990. The actress who plays the title role in “Nikita” is Anne Parillaud, Besson’s wife.

60. Where to see Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
EPCOT Center (now just called Epcot) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away before that vision could be realized.

Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

64. Message from a server : EMAIL
In the world of computer science, a computer accessing a service is called a “client”. The service is provided on a computer called a “server”. These days, clients and servers often communicate via the Internet. I am typing up this blog post on my laptop (the client) and am connected via the Internet to the Google Drive service that resides on a computer somewhere (the server).

68. Pass up : FORGO
“To forego” means to precede. “To forgo” means “to do without”. That said, one is a variant spelling of the other. It’s all very confusing …

72. Addie's husband in "As I Lay Dying" : ANSE
“As I Lay Dying” is a novel by William Faulkner first published in 1930. The book has an unusual structure, with stream of consciousness writing throughout. There is one whole chapter that I’d like to quote here:
My mother is a fish.
That’s a five-word chapter …

Down
1. ___ facto : IPSO
“Ipso facto” is Latin, meaning "by the fact itself". Ipso facto describes something that is a direct consequence of particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen ("not" ipso facto).

5. Subj. for 6-Downs : ESL
(6D. See 5-Down : ALIEN)
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

8. Friedrich ___, first president of the German Republic : EBERT
Friedrich Ebert was President of Germany from 1919 until he passed away in 1925. He was the first person to hold the office, which was created under the Weimar constitution that officially governed the country from 1919 until 1945. Ebert was a pivotal figure in the German Revolution at the end of WWI that led to the Weimar Republic.

9. Source of the line "There is no one alive who is you-er than you!" : DR SEUSS
Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel was commander of the Animation Department of the USAF during WWII. He was behind many propaganda films including one called "Our Job in Japan". Even though the film was produced specifically as propaganda, this same movie was used after the war as a basis for the short feature "Design for Death", a study of Japanese culture released in 1947 and winner of an Oscar for best Documentary.

12. Film unlikely to have a costume designer? : PORNO
The word "pornography" comes from the Greek "pornographos" meaning "writing of prostitutes".

18. Hollywood's Alan or Adam : ARKIN
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in "Little Miss Sunshine" from 2006, a movie that I just did not understand ...

Actor Adam Arkin is the son of Oscar winner Alan Arkin. Adam played Aaron Shutt on the TV show "Chicago Hope".

22. Org. from which Óglaigh na hÉireann split off : IRA
“Óglaigh na hÉireann” translates from Irish as “soldiers of Ireland”.

26. Burmese and Himalayans : CATS
Most Burmese cats today can be traced back to a single ancestor, a female cat given the name Wong Mau that was brought from Burma to America in 1930. Amazing ...

The Himalayan breed of cat has long hair and is identical to the Persian, but with blue eyes and different colors at the extreme points of its coat.

28. Big lock maker : YALE
The Yale brand name comes from the name of the founder of the original company, Linus Yale Jr. Linus Yale was the inventor of the pin tumbler lock.

34. Bird: Prefix : AVI-
The prefix “avi-” means “bird-related” as in “aviculture”, the breeding of birds.

35. Big Apple thoroughfare, informally : LEX
Lexington Avenue in New York City is famous from many things, but my favorite fact is that it was the site of the first ever arrest for speeding in the city. In 1899 a police officer on a bicycle caught up with a cabdriver who was tearing down Lexington Avenue at the breakneck speed of 12 mph ...

Apparently the first published use of the term "Big Apple" to describe New York City dates back to 1909. Edward Martin wrote the following in his book "The Wayfarer in New York":
"Kansas is apt to see in New York a greedy city. . . . It inclines to think that the big apple gets a disproportionate share of the national sap."
Over ten years later, the term “big apple” was used as a nickname for racetracks in and around New York City. However, the concerted effort to “brand” the city as the Big Apple had to wait until the seventies and was the work of the New York Convention and Visitors Bureau.

37. Las Vegas casino opened in 2009 : ARIA
Aria is one of the newer casinos on the Las Vegas Strip. “Popular Mechanics” magazine described Aria as “the most technologically-advanced hotel ever built”.

38. Hide : PELT
The “pelt” is the skin of a furry animal.

40. Banking inits. : FDIC
During the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the Banking Act of 1933. The legislation established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), intended to be a temporary government corporation that provided insurance on deposits made by customers of qualified financial institutions. The first accounts to be covered, in 1934, had an insurance limit of $2,500. Since the financial crisis of 2008, that limit is $250,000.

42. South African money : RAND
The Rand is the currency of South Africa. Much of South Africa’s famed gold comes from mines around Johannesburg in the Witwatersrand (Afrikaans for “the ridge of white waters”). The Rand currency takes its name from this ridge.

45. Matter of interpretation : INKBLOT
The Rorschach test is a psychological test in which a subject is asked to interpret a series of inkblots. The test was created by Swiss Freudian psychoanalyst Hermann Rorschach in the 1920s.

50. Partner to Kenan in a 1990s Nickelodeon sitcom : KEL
"Kenan & Kel" is a sitcom that aired on Nickelodeon from 1996 to 2000. It starred Kenan Thompson (now of "Saturday Night Live"), and Kel Mitchell.

52. Dewey, to Donald : NEPHEW
Donald Duck’s nephews are identical triplets called Huey, Dewey and Louie, and they first appeared on the screen in 1938. Once in a while, due to errors in production, a fourth duck can be seen in the background. This little “mistake” is affectionately called “Phooey Duck” by folks in the industry.

55. Nabisco wafer : NILLA
As one might expect, Nilla is a shortened from of "vanilla". However, you won't find any vanilla in Nilla cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred ...?

56. Bagel variety : ONION
The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

63. Part of a hobo city : TENT
No one seems to know for sure how the term "hobo" originated, although there are lots of colorful theories. My favorite is that "hobo" comes from the first letters in the words "ho-meward bo-und", but it doesn't seem very plausible. A kind blog reader tells me that according to Click and Clack from PBS's "Car Talk" (a great source!), "hobo" comes from "hoe boy". Hoe boys were young men with hoes looking for work after the Civil War. Hobos differed from "tramps" and "bums", in that "bums" refused to work, "tramps" worked when they had to, while "hobos" traveled in search of work.

65. Supermarket chain : IGA
IGA stands for Independent Grocers Alliance, a chain of supermarkets that extends right around the world. IGA's headquarters is in Chicago. The company uses the slogan “Hometown Proud Supermarkets”.

67. Formerly known as : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Co. that bought out Applebee's in 2007 : IHOP
5. Rest : EASE
9. Some causes of insomnia : DRIPS
14. Come down hard : POUR
15. Hunk : SLAB
16. Dangerous emission : RADON
17. Party-going and such : SOCIAL LIFE
19. Skyline feature : SPIRE
20. Final answer? : OTHER
21. Unnatural, in a way : EERIE
23. Number of monosyllabic U.S. state names : ONE
24. One whose work is going downhill? : SKI INSTRUCTOR
27. Rasputin, for one : MYSTIC
30. Very quickly : ASAP
31. OPEC member: Abbr. : UAE
32. Locale for snow leopards : NEPAL
36. Backpack part : STRAP
39. Sign at the front of some bars : CLEF
41. Second chance : DO-OVER
43. Bothered : SORE
44. 1881 novel "for children and those who love children" : HEIDI
46. "Cars" producer : PIXAR
48. ___ change : OIL
49. Rat : FINK
51. Skim : NONFAT
53. Campbell's variety : CHICKEN NOODLE
58. Director Besson : LUC
59. Like some turns and dates : BLIND
60. Where to see Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
64. Message from a server : EMAIL
66. Almost all ... and a hint to the five circled letters : LION’S SHARE
68. Pass up : FORGO
69. Stuff of legends : LORE
70. Like 2016, but not 2015 : EVEN
71. Pay for : TREAT
72. Addie's husband in "As I Lay Dying" : ANSE
73. Into the sunset : WEST

Down
1. ___ facto : IPSO
2. Call at night : HOOT
3. "You got me" : OUCH!
4. Father figure : PRIEST
5. Subj. for 6-Downs : ESL
6. See 5-Down : ALIEN
7. Some hotel conveniences : SAFES
8. Friedrich ___, first president of the German Republic : EBERT
9. Source of the line "There is no one alive who is you-er than you!" : DR SEUSS
10. Knock : RAP
11. Easy-to-use : IDIOT-PROOF
12. Film unlikely to have a costume designer? : PORNO
13. Mean grin : SNEER
18. Hollywood's Alan or Adam : ARKIN
22. Org. from which Óglaigh na hÉireann split off : IRA
25. Put away : ICED
26. Burmese and Himalayans : CATS
27. A lot : MUCH
28. Big lock maker : YALE
29. "Do what you want!" : SEE IF I CARE!
33. Father figure : POP
34. Bird: Prefix : AVI-
35. Big Apple thoroughfare, informally : LEX
37. Las Vegas casino opened in 2009 : ARIA
38. Hide : PELT
40. Banking inits. : FDIC
42. South African money : RAND
45. Matter of interpretation : INKBLOT
47. Parts : ROLES
50. Partner to Kenan in a 1990s Nickelodeon sitcom : KEL
52. Dewey, to Donald : NEPHEW
53. Chin feature : CLEFT
54. "___ me" : HUMOR
55. Nabisco wafer : NILLA
56. Bagel variety : ONION
57. Aerosol targets : ODORS
61. Give in : CAVE
62. Contents of veins : ORES
63. Part of a hobo city : TENT
65. Supermarket chain : IGA
67. Formerly known as : NEE


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1028-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 15, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jay Kaskel & Daniel Kantor
THEME: Food Court … each of our themed answers is a food that sounds like it would end up in FOOD COURT, and is clued with reference to the “courtly” adjective in the answer:
34A. Legal setting for 17-, 25-, 45- and 53-Across? : FOOD COURT

17A. 34-Across case involving ... wrongful termination? : CANNED CORN
25A. ... divorce proceedings? : SPLIT PEAS
45A. ... political corruption? : DIRTY RICE
53A. ... marijuana possession? : BAKED BEANS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "The ___ is up!" : JIG
Back in Elizabethan times, a “jig” was a trick or game. So, the expression “the jig is up” has for some time meant “the trick or game is exposed”.

13. Hunky-dory : ACES
Surprisingly (to me), the term "hunky-dory" has been around a long time, and is documented back in the mid-1800s. Nobody's really sure of its origin, but some say it is an Anglicization of Honcho dori, that back in the day was a street of ill repute in Yokohama, Japan.

15. What might lead you to say "Whatever" : ENNUI
“Ennui” is the French word for boredom, a word that we now use in English. It's one of the few French words we've imported that we haven't anglicized and actually pronounce "correctly".

16. Spy Aldrich : AMES
Aldrich Ames worked for the CIA until he was convicted in 1994 of spying for the Soviet Union. Prior to identifying Ames as a spy, the CIA was highly concerned at the high rate of disappearance of their own agents behind the Iron Curtain and they struggled for years to find the mole that they assumed must be working within their own ranks. After he was finally arrested, the CIA was criticized for not having identified Ames sooner, particularly as he was living an extravagant lifestyle relative to his apparent means. Ames is serving a life sentence in the US Penitentiary in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

19. Like stallions : MALE
There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:
- Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
- Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
- Filly: female horse under the age of four
- Colt: male horse under the age of four
- Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
- Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
- Mare: female horse four years or older

23. Multiplication sign, in math class : DOT
Yep, 2 x 3 can be written as 2.3 …

24. Some razors : ATRAS
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

31. Fa follower : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

38. Hip dance : HULA
Hula is the name of the Polynesian dance. The chant or song that the dance illustrates, that's known as the mele.

42. Ouzo flavoring : ANISE
Ouzo is an aperitif from Greece that is colorless and flavored with anise. Ouzo is similar to pastis from France and also has a flavor like sambuca from Italy.

44. Subject of much Dave Chappelle humor : RACE
Dave Chapelle is a stand-up comedian who has also had some roles in big movies, like “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and “Con Air”. Chappelle lives on a 65-acre farm outside Yellow Springs, Ohio, the town where his father lived when Dave was growing up in Washington, D.C.

47. North Dakota city : MINOT
The city of Minot, North Dakota grew out of a tent city that flourished in 1886 at the end of a railway line that was being constructed in 1886. The tent city marked the end of the line only temporarily, as work stopped there for the winter. By the end of that winter, the tent city was home to 5,000 residents. It had sprung up as if “by magic”, and became known as “Magic City”, a nickname that persists to this day.

50. Common antiseptic : IODINE
Tincture of iodine is a disinfectant. A “tincture” is a substance used in dyeing. Since the 1600s, “tincture” has also been used for a solution of medicine in an alcohol mixture.

56. Asia's ___ Sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

57. Summer month in South America : ENERO
In Spanish, the year (el año) starts in January (enero) and ends in December (diciembre).

58. ___-free : SCOT
The phrase “scot-free” means “free from punishment, restraint or obligation”. The term derives from the Old English “scotfreo” meaning “exempt from royal tax”, with “scot” being a royal tax.

61. AARP members: Abbr. : SRS
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

Down
1. Onetime MTV reality stunt show : JACKASS
“Jackass” is a reality show that originally aired on MTV from 2000 to 2001. The show features a group of men doing stunts in which they usually get injured to some extent. The leader of the group is called Johnny Knoxville, who appears in the stunts and also created the show. Not my cup of tea …

3. Word in the names of two of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies : GENERAL
They would be General Motors and General Electric.

4. Jazzberry Jam and Razzmatazz in a Crayola box : REDS
In the year 2000 the Crayola company, very cleverly I think, held the “Crayola Color Census 2000” in which people were polled and asked for their favorite Crayola colors. President George W. Bush chose “Blue Bell” and Tiger Woods chose “Wild Strawberry”.

6. Chemical formula for tin monoxide : SNO
Tin monoxide (SnO)

The Latin word for tin is “stannum”, and so tin’s atomic symbol is “Sn”. One of the ores used as a source of tin is “stannite”.

8. 1950s Mideast hot spot : SINAI
The Sinai Peninsula is in the eastern part of Egypt, the triangular peninsula bounded by the Mediterranean to the north and the Red Sea to the south. It is the only part of Egypt that lies in Asia as opposed to Africa. The eastern land border of the peninsula is shared with Israel, and Israel occupied the Sinai during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Six Day War of 1967.

10. Famous middle name that means "love of God" : AMADEUS
The composer Mozart’s full name was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The name “Wolfgang” translates literally as “wolf journey”. Amadeus translates as “love god”!

12. Flying transmitter : TSETSE
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name "tsetse" comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as "fly". Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as "sleeping sickness". Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

18. What can take people for a loop? : ELS
Elevated railroad (El)

22. Nissan S.U.V. : XTERRA
The Xterra is a compact SUV built by Nissan in Smyrna, Tennessee (and in Brazil).

32. Unidentified hostile aircraft : BOGEYS
"Bogey" is WWII slang for an unidentified aircraft that is presumed to be hostile.

35. "Great" river of England : OUSE
“Ouse” is the name of several rivers in England, most notably the Great Ouse in Yorkshire. The name comes from the Celtic word “usa” meaning “water”.

40. Alito succeeded her on the bench : O'CONNOR
Sandra Day O’Connor is a former Associate justice on the US Supreme Court. O’Connor was the first woman appointed to the court, and was in office from 1981 after being appointed by President Reagan. As the court became more conservative she was viewed as the swing vote in many decisions. As a result, O’Connor was known as one of the most powerful women in the world. She retired in 2006 (replaced by Samuel Alito), and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009.

Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

43. Big name in 1980s jeans : GITANO
Gitano is a brand of jeans sold by Kmart.

44. Tilt-a-Whirl and Ferris wheel : RIDES
The Tilt-A-Whirl is the fairground ride that has seven cars on a spinning platform, with the cars rotating freely and randomly. Each of the cars hold 3-4 riders, pretty nauseated riders sometimes.

The first Ferris Wheel was built for the Chicago World’s Fair (officially known as the “World’s Columbian Exposition”) in 1893. That wheel was designed and constructed by George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr. who lent his name to wheels built from then on.

50. "American ___" : IDOL
Fox’s "American Idol" is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show "Pop Idol". I can't abide either program(me) ...

54. "The Star-Spangled Banner" writer : KEY
The lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner” were written first as a poem by Francis Scott Key, inspired by the bombarding by the British of the American forces at Fort McHenry that he witnessed during the Battle of Baltimore in September 1814. The words were then set to the tune of a popular British drinking song penned by John Stafford Smith called "The Anacreontic Song", with the Anacreontic Society being a men's club in London.

55. Measure opposed by Phyllis Schlafly, for short : ERA
Phyllis Schlafly is a conservative activist who is noted for her opposition to modern feminism. Schlafly led the STOP ERA campaign in the seventies that was influential in the stalling the state ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) that had passed both houses of Congress.

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was written by the American suffragist leader, Alice Paul. Although Paul was successful in her campaign to get passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution (guaranteeing voting rights regardless of sex), her 1923 Equal Rights Amendment didn't make it to the Senate floor until 1972. The amendment was passed by the Senate, and then headed to the state legislatures for the required ratification. 38 states had to approve the legislation for the amendment to be adopted, but only 35 states voted in favor before the deadline. So the amendment is still pending, although about half of the fifty states have adopted the ERA into their state constitutions.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "The ___ is up!" : JIG
4. Corrodes : RUSTS
9. What tiny fish and eyes do : DART
13. Hunky-dory : ACES
15. What might lead you to say "Whatever" : ENNUI
16. Spy Aldrich : AMES
17. 34-Across case involving ... wrongful termination? : CANNED CORN
19. Like stallions : MALE
20. Prepares to tie one's shoes, say : KNEELS
21. Put a strain on : TAX
23. Multiplication sign, in math class : DOT
24. Some razors : ATRAS
25. ... divorce proceedings? : SPLIT PEAS
28. Washing machine cycle : SOAK
29. Political group unlikely to be swayed : BASE
30. Give the slip : ELUDE
31. Fa follower : SOL
32. Far from fat : BONY
33. Peeved : CROSS
34. Legal setting for 17-, 25-, 45- and 53-Across? : FOOD COURT
36. Big gulps : SWIGS
38. Hip dance : HULA
39. Hip : MOD
42. Ouzo flavoring : ANISE
43. Main point : GIST
44. Subject of much Dave Chappelle humor : RACE
45. ... political corruption? : DIRTY RICE
47. North Dakota city : MINOT
48. Unlock, in verse : OPE
49. Fixed : SET
50. Common antiseptic : IODINE
51. Catches : NETS
53. ... marijuana possession? : BAKED BEANS
56. Asia's ___ Sea : ARAL
57. Summer month in South America : ENERO
58. ___-free : SCOT
59. Kids' road trip game : I SPY
60. True-blue : LOYAL
61. AARP members: Abbr. : SRS

Down
1. Onetime MTV reality stunt show : JACKASS
2. Confident counterclaim : I CAN TOO
3. Word in the names of two of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies : GENERAL
4. Jazzberry Jam and Razzmatazz in a Crayola box : REDS
5. Ma's his sis : UNC
6. Chemical formula for tin monoxide : SNO
7. Slowpoke : TURTLE
8. 1950s Mideast hot spot : SINAI
9. Stop for water : DAM
10. Famous middle name that means "love of God" : AMADEUS
11. Prepares for another round of shots : RELOADS
12. Flying transmitter : TSETSE
14. Tiptoer, e.g. : SNEAK
18. What can take people for a loop? : ELS
22. Nissan S.U.V. : XTERRA
25. Contents of some banks : SAND
26. Pro with a deck of cards, maybe : PSYCHIC
27. Cook up a conspiracy : PLOT
29. Chorus that's not nice to hear : BOOS
32. Unidentified hostile aircraft : BOGEYS
33. ___ of personality : CULT
34. Punch ingredient? : FIST
35. "Great" river of England : OUSE
36. Ones taking potshots : SNIPERS
37. Invasive bug : WIRETAP
39. Crazies : MANIACS
40. Alito succeeded her on the bench : O'CONNOR
41. Cannot stand : DETESTS
42. Hebrew name for God : ADONAI
43. Big name in 1980s jeans : GITANO
44. Tilt-a-Whirl and Ferris wheel : RIDES
46. Insurgent : REBEL
47. Underworld group : MOB
50. "American ___" : IDOL
52. Like a 14-Down : SLY
54. "The Star-Spangled Banner" writer : KEY
55. Measure opposed by Phyllis Schlafly, for short : ERA


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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