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0101-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jan 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: None … but, Happy New Year, everyone!!!
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 19s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Prominent feature of dubstep music : BASS
“Dubstep” is a type of electronic dance music that first surfaced in London, England in the nineties. I doubt there’s any in my music collection …

11. Fields of food? : MRS
The Mrs. Fields brand of snack foods was founded in the late seventies by Debbi Fields. Fields opened her first store in Palo Alto, California.

14. Mass observance : RITE
The principal act of worship in the Roman Catholic tradition is the Mass. The term “Mass” comes from the Late Latin word “missa” meaning “dismissal”. This word is used at the end of the Latin Mass in “Ite, missa est” which translates literally as “Go, it is the dismissal”.

19. Big source of coal: Abbr. : WVA
The state of West Virginia was formed during the civil war when the western counties in the old state of Virginia voted to secede from the Confederate state.

20. Song that Paul McCartney wrote at 16 : WHEN I'M SIXTY-FOUR
"When I'm Sixty-Four" is a 1967 Beatles song composed by Paul McCartney. McCartney may have been looking forward to “when he’s sixty-four”, but he wrote the song when he was only 16 years old.

24. Goddess who caused the Trojan women to riot in the "Aeneid" : IRIS
In Greek mythology the goddess Iris was viewed as the link between the gods and humanity, a messenger. She was also the goddess of the rainbow. In Virgil’s “Aeneid”, Iris takes the form of a Trojan woman and incites other Trojan mothers to set fire to Aeneas’ ships, preventing them from leaving Sicily.

31. Sinner's heart? : ENS
There are two letters N (ens) at the heart of the word “sinner”.

33. One side of the Mideast : RICE PILAF
“Pilaf” is a Persian word, and we use it to describe rice that is browned in oil and then cooked in a seasoned broth.

41. Mets' division, for short : NL EAST
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

49. Bordeaux toasting time : ETE
In French, one might toast, get overheated, in the “été” (summer).

Bordeaux is perhaps the wine-production capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the German's took France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

50. Ketchup base : TOMATO PASTE
The term “ketchup” may be of Chinese origin. One suggestion is that the name comes from “kôe-chiap”, meaning the brine of pickled fish. The name may also come from the Chinese “jyutping”, meaning “tomato sauce”.

52. "Ave Maria," e.g. : ORISON
“Orison” is another word for “prayer” that comes to us ultimately from Latin, via Middle English and Old French.

"Ave Maria" ("Hail Mary" in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the "Hail Mary" comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:
AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
The prayer has been adapted as a hymn. The two most famous musical versions of “Ave Maria” are by Charles Gounod (based on a piece by Bach) and by Franz Schubert.

54. Rock's ___ Soundsystem : LCD
LCD Soundsystem is a rock band from New York City that was founded in 2001.

Down
1. Base for some ice cream : BROWNIE
Apparently the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

3. First bishop of Paris : ST DENIS
Not only is Saint Denis (also “Denys”) the patron saint of France, but he is also the patron saint of Paris. Denis was the first Bishop of Paris, in the 3rd century AD, and was martyred by having his head chopped off. The legend surrounding this event is that the executed Denis picked up his head and walked for six miles, delivering a sermon the whole way.

7. "The Time Machine" people : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called "The Time Machine", there are two races that the hero encounter in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet's surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

8. Sauce thickener : ROUX
A roux is a mixture of wheat flour and clarified butter (or other fat) cooked together until it can be used as a thickening agent. Roux is an essential ingredient in French cooking, although "healthier" versions of roux are being used more and more these days.

11. 2009 million-selling Justin Bieber release : MY WORLD
Justin Bieber is a young pop singer from London, Ontario. Bieber was actually discovered on YouTube by talent manager Scooter Braun. Fans of Bieber call themselves “Beliebers”. Personally, I’m no believer in Bieber …

12. Some vaudeville fare : REVUES
“Revue” is the French word for “review”.

The Vire is a river that flows through Normandy in France. The poets of the Vire valley were known as the "Vau de Vire", a term that some say gave rise to our word "Vaudeville".

13. Grassy surface : SWARD
Sward is a version of the word "swarth", with both describing a grassy piece of land.

21. Symbol on a cello or tuba composition : F-CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

26. Slide presentation? : AMEBA
An ameba (or "amoeba" as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek "amoibe", meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

Microscope slides are thin pieces of glass on which are mounted samples for examination. Often a “cover slip”, a smaller and thinner sheet of glass, is placed on top of the sample. Originally called “sliders”, such specimens would “slide” into the gap between the stage and the objective lens on a microscope.

28. Historic computer : ENIAC
The acronym ENIAC stands for Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (although many folks insist that the C was for "Computer"). ENIAC was the first general-purpose electronic computer. It was designed to calculate artillery firing tables, but it ended up being used early on to make calculations necessary for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Given its uses, it's not surprising to hear that development of ENIAC was funded by the US Army during WWII.

29. Famed cabin site : WALDEN POND
Henry David Thoreau is a personal hero of mine. Thoreau is best known for his book called “Walden” published in 1854. The book outlines his philosophy of life and details his experiences living in a cabin near Walden Pond just outside Concord, Massachusetts.

30. Flight figures, for short : ETAS
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

32. Start of a Saturday night catchphrase : LIVE
“Live from New York, it’s Saturday Night” is a catchphrase heard near the start of the TV show “Saturday Night Live”. The show was originally titled “NBC’s Saturday Night”, a title for which the catchphrase makes a little more sense!

33. Big cheese wheels? : ROLLS
Henry Royce founded the Rolls-Royce company in 1904 with his partner, Charles Rolls. Royce died at 70 years of age in 1933. His last words were, reportedly, "I wish I had spent more time in the office ..."

34. "Walk on the Wild Side" singer, 1973 : LOU REED
Lou Reed was best known as a rock musician and songwriter, and was especially associated with the fabulous 1973 hit "Walk on the Wildside". Reed is less well known as a photographer, but he published two collections of his work. The first was released in 2003 under the title "Emotions in Action", and the second in 2006 called "Lou Reed's New York". Reed passed away in 2013.

35. Like Swiss steak : BRAISED
The dish known as Swiss steak has nothing to do with the country of Switzerland. Swiss steak is usually made with beef that has been rolled out or pounded and then braised in a pot of stewed tomatoes. The term “swissing” means to pound or roll out a material. Swissing makes tougher cuts of meat more tender.

36. Creamy, whitish dish : RISOTTO
Risotto is an Italian rice dish that is usually served as a first course in Italy, but as a main course here in North America.

39. Alaska's ___ Park Road : DENALI
Denali means "the high one" in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. Denali’s summit stands at 20,237 feet, making it the highest mountain peak in North America. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

44. Texter's "Alternatively ..." : OTOH …
On the other hand (OTOH)

45. Gumshoe Charles : NORA
High on the list of my favorite movies of all time is "The Thin Man" series starring William Powell and the incredibly attractive Myrna Loy. Powell and Loy played the characters Nick and Nora Charles. The film series is based on “The Thin Man” novel by Dashiell Hammett.

“Gumshoe” is a slang term for a private detective or private investigator (P.I.). Apparently the term "gumshoe" dates back to the early 1900s, and refers to the rubber-soled shoes popular with private detectives at that time.

46. "Lucky Jim" author : AMIS
Kingsley Amis (what a great name!) was a very successful English writer, famous for producing entertaining, comedic novels. His most famous novel probably is his first, "Lucky Jim" published in 1954, although he won a Booker Prize for a later novel, "The Old Devils" published in 1986. He passed on some of his talent through his genes, it seems, as his son Martin Amis is a very successful novelist too.

48. Winnebago relative : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Prominent feature of dubstep music : BASS
5. Try to avoid an accident, maybe : SWERVE
11. Fields of food? : MRS
14. Mass observance : RITE
15. Lit from above? : HALOED
16. It sounds like you : YEW
17. Boss : ORDER AROUND
19. Big source of coal: Abbr. : WVA
20. Song that Paul McCartney wrote at 16 : WHEN I'M SIXTY-FOUR
22. Generic : NO-NAME
23. Street ___ : CRED
24. Goddess who caused the Trojan women to riot in the "Aeneid" : IRIS
25. Parting chorus : FAREWELLS
31. Sinner's heart? : ENS
32. Having a protective cover, of a sort : LAMINATED
33. One side of the Mideast : RICE PILAF
34. Wear for a flower child : LOVE BEADS
35. Something you may need to get off your chest : BRA
38. Provocative performance : POLE DANCE
39. Create an icicle, say : DRIP
40. Heart's partner : SOUL
41. Mets' division, for short : NL EAST
43. Stance : PERSONAL OPINION
49. Bordeaux toasting time : ETE
50. Ketchup base : TOMATO PASTE
51. Stretch out : LIE
52. "Ave Maria," e.g. : ORISON
53. "Sure, I'm game" : LET’S
54. Rock's ___ Soundsystem : LCD
55. Worked (out) : HASHED
56. Binding exchange : I DOS

Down
1. Base for some ice cream : BROWNIE
2. Stadium noisemaker : AIR HORN
3. First bishop of Paris : ST DENIS
4. Perceived to be : SEEN AS
5. Embarrassed : SHAMEFACED
6. They take place in theaters : WARS
7. "The Time Machine" people : ELOI
8. Sauce thickener : ROUX
9. Scream one's head off : VENT
10. Start to go down the drain : EDDY
11. 2009 million-selling Justin Bieber release : MY WORLD
12. Some vaudeville fare : REVUES
13. Grassy surface : SWARD
18. Edge : RIM
21. Symbol on a cello or tuba composition : F-CLEF
26. Slide presentation? : AMEBA
27. Mature : RIPEN
28. Historic computer : ENIAC
29. Famed cabin site : WALDEN POND
30. Flight figures, for short : ETAS
32. Start of a Saturday night catchphrase : LIVE
33. Big cheese wheels? : ROLLS
34. "Walk on the Wild Side" singer, 1973 : LOU REED
35. Like Swiss steak : BRAISED
36. Creamy, whitish dish : RISOTTO
37. Relevance : APTNESS
38. Beautifully worded : POETIC
39. Alaska's ___ Park Road : DENALI
40. Brief period : SPELL
42. Edge : LIP
44. Texter's "Alternatively ..." : OTOH ...
45. Gumshoe Charles : NORA
46. "Lucky Jim" author : AMIS
47. Tie securely : LASH
48. Winnebago relative : OTOE


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1231-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Dec 15, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ben Tausig
THEME: Pass Go … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but one has to PASS GO (remove the letters GO) to make sense of the corresponding clue:
62A. Round a corner in 65-Across ... or what you must do to answer the clues for 20-, 34-, 43- and 56-Across : PASS GO

20A. Enjoy the swimsuit edition of The New England Journal of Medicine? : GOOGLE DOCS (giving “ogle docs”)
34A. Brief entries in an auto film festival? : CARGO SHORTS (giving “car shorts”)
43A. Sickly-looking overlord? : WAGON MASTER (giving “wan master”)
56A. People obsessed with being online? : EGOMANIACS (giving “e-maniacs”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Onetime gig for Wiig, in brief : SNL
Kristen Wiig is a comic actress who appears on "Saturday Night Live". She also made an appearance on the first season of Spike TV's quirky "The Joe Schmo Show", playing "Dr. Pat". More recently she co-wrote and starred in the 2011 hit film “Bridesmaids”.

8. ___ Simpson : GRAMPA
In the animated TV show called “The Simpsons”, Grampa Abe Simpson is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, the same actor who provides the voice for Homer.

17. Spider-Man's surrogate father : UNCLE BEN
Aunt May and Uncle Ben Parker are characters in the spider-Man universe created by Marvel Comics. The couple’s nephew is Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man.

20. Enjoy the swimsuit edition of The New England Journal of Medicine? : GOOGLE DOCS (giving “ogle docs”)
Google Docs is a word processing application that is part of the Google Drive suite of services. In fact, I am typing this blog post right now in Google Docs.

22. Giant Manning : ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback.

23. Club alternative : BLT
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

The club sandwich is a double-decker affair with three layers of bread and two layers of filling. This style of sandwich has been around since the end of the 19th century, and some say it was invented at an exclusive gambling "club" in Saratoga Springs, New York.

24. Organization in "The Da Vinci Code" : OPUS DEI
Opus Dei is Roman Catholic institution that was founded in Spain in 1928, and officially approved by the church in 1950. In 2010, Opus Dei had over 90,000 members, mostly lay people. The institution’s mission is to promote certain aspects of the Roman Catholic doctrine. Opus Dei was portrayed as a sinister organization by Dan Brown in his novel “The Da Vinci Code”.

27. Actress Gerwig of "Mistress America" : GRETA
Greta Gerwig is an actress from Sacramento whose best-known role is probably opposite Russell Brand in the remake of the film “Arthur”.

42. Flag : TIRE
Our verb “to flag” meaning “to tire” was originally used in the sense of something flapping about lazily in the wind. From this it came to mean “to go limp, droop”, and then “to tire”.

46. Bhikkhuni : Buddhism :: ___ : Catholicism : NUN
In the Buddhist tradition, a “bhikkhuni” is a female monk. The male equivalent is a bhikkhu.

48. Rotational speed meas. : RPS
Revolutions per second (rps)

54. Bank figure, for short : PIN
One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM).

55. Half of us? : ESS
Half of the word “us” is a letter S (ess).

62. Round a corner in 65-Across ... or what you must do to answer the clues for 20-, 34-, 43- and 56-Across : PASS GO
(65A. Game patented December 31, 1935 : MONOPOLY)
The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of "The Landlord's Game" created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord's Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

67. Words of rebuke : ET TU
In William Shakespeare’s play “Julius Caesar”, Caesar is stabbed by a group of conspirators, with Brutus delivering the final blow. Caesar’s last words are “Et tu, Bruté?—Then fall, Caesar.” After Caesar dies, the conspirators celebrate. Cinna declares, “Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead! Run hence, proclaim, cry it about the streets.” After which, Cassius continues with “Some to the common pulpits, and cry out, ‘Liberty, freedom, and enfranchisement!’”

68. Understanding : KEN
“Ken” is a noun meaning “understanding, perception”. One might say, for example, “half the clues in Saturday’s crossword are beyond my ken, beyond my understanding”.

70. Swiftly built home? : NEST
Swifts are birds that are related to hummingbirds. Swifts are aptly named, with larger swift species clocked at airspeeds of over 100 miles/hour.

71. Cable channel that airs "Portlandia" : IFC
“Portlandia” is a satirical sketch show that is aired on the Independent Film Channel (IFC). The show is set in Portland, Oregon and takes its name from a statue called “Portlandia” which sits above the entrance to a building in downtown Portland. The statue is a copper repoussé work, and is second in size in the US only to the Statue of Liberty.

Down
3. Spanish nuts : LOCO
In Spanish, if one isn't “sano” (sane) one might be described as “loco” (crazy).

4. Wallop : SHELLAC
“To shellac” is a slang term meaning “to defeat decisively, to strike severely”.

5. Terminus of the Qingzang railway : TIBET
The Qingzang-Tibet railway runs almost 2,000 kilometers from the Chinese city of Xining on the Tibetan Plateau to Lhasa, the capital of Tibet.

7. City near Sparks : RENO
Sparks is a city in Nevada that lies on the eastern side of Reno. The city was called Harriman originally, after a Southern Pacific Railroad president, and then renamed Sparks after a Nevada State Governor. The first non-Native American settlement in the area developed mainly from cattle trading. Cattle that were driven from Missouri and bound for California would stop in the area now known as Sparks, resting up before the arduous trek across the Sierra Nevada mountains. A business grew that involved trading cattle weary from the first part of the journey, swapping them for fresh animals. The tired beasts were then rested and fattened up to be traded again the following year for the journey on to California.

11. Cosmopolitan, e.g. : MIXED DRINK
Like so many famous cocktails, the actual origins of the cosmopolitan are disputed. It is a nice drink though. One of the standard recipes is 4 parts citrus vodka, 1.5 parts Cointreau, 1.5 parts lime juice and 3 parts cranberry juice.

12. Key's longtime partner in sketch comedy : PEELE
The Comedy Central sketch show “Key & Peele” starred comics Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele.

13. Computer acronym since the 1960s : ASCII
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) lists codes for 32 "control" characters, as well as the 95 printable characters. These binary codes are the way that our computers can understand what we mean when we type say a letter, or a number. Unicode is a more contemporary standard, and is like “Ascii on steroids”, encompassing more characters.

18. Modern civil rights initialism : LGBT
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

25. Escort, slangily : USH
“To ush” is to usher, to show to a seat.

28. 1971 documentary about Ravi Shankar : RAGA
The 1971 documentary “Raga” is about the life and music Ravi Shankar, the Indian sitar player. Most of the footage for the film was shot in the sixties, and features some musicians from the West including Yehudi Menuhin and George Harrison.

35. Convenience partly obviated by banking apps : ATM
ATM (Automatic Teller Machine)

44. Born on the bayou? : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

The exact origins of the term "bayou" is uncertain, but it is thought perhaps to come from the Choctaw (a Native American people from the southeast) word "bayuk", meaning "small stream".

51. "The choice of a new generation" sloganeer, once : PEPSI
Pepsi has used many, many slogans over the years. The slogans range from “The Choice of a New Generation” featuring Michael Jackson in eighties and nineties, to the original “Twice as Much for a Nickel” that ran from 1939 to 1950.

52. Challenges for future counsel, in brief : LSATS
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

54. Fly holder : PANTS
The term "fly" is used to describe the flap covering the buttons or zipper in the front of a pair of pants. Before "fly" was used for pants, it was the name given to a tent flap.

57. Harbinger : OMEN
A harbinger is a person or a thing that indicates what is to come. The word comes from the Middle English "herbenger", a person sent ahead to arrange lodgings.

58. Speck : MOTE
"Mote" is another word for a speck of dust.

59. Isao in the Golf Hall of Fame : AOKI
Isao Aoki is one of Japan's greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki's best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

60. Head of staff? : CLEF
Clef is the French word for "key". In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

63. "Law & Order" spinoff, familiarly : SVU
"Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" is a spin-off from the TV crime drama "Law & Order". "SVU" has been on the air since 1999, and is set in New York City. Interestingly, since 2007 there has been a very successful Russian adaptation of the show that is set in Moscow.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Onetime gig for Wiig, in brief : SNL
4. Keep the sauce from congealing, say : STIR
8. ___ Simpson : GRAMPA
14. Low note? : MOO
15. Stash : HIDE
16. Banks : RELIES
17. Spider-Man's surrogate father : UNCLE BEN
19. Commercial leader? : AD EXEC
20. Enjoy the swimsuit edition of The New England Journal of Medicine? : GOOGLE DOCS (giving “ogle docs”)
22. Giant Manning : ELI
23. Club alternative : BLT
24. Organization in "The Da Vinci Code" : OPUS DEI
27. Actress Gerwig of "Mistress America" : GRETA
30. "Yeah, that's the spot" : AAH!
32. Put down roots? : SOD
33. Oral vote : NAY
34. Brief entries in an auto film festival? : CARGO SHORTS (giving “car shorts”)
39. Like Scotch whisky : AGED
41. Rib : TEASE
42. Flag : TIRE
43. Sickly-looking overlord? : WAGON MASTER (giving “wan master”)
46. Bhikkhuni : Buddhism :: ___ : Catholicism : NUN
47. Tall one : LIE
48. Rotational speed meas. : RPS
49. Grilled : ASKED
51. Neither improve nor decline : PLATEAU
54. Bank figure, for short : PIN
55. Half of us? : ESS
56. People obsessed with being online? : EGOMANIACS (giving “e-maniacs”)
62. Round a corner in 65-Across ... or what you must do to answer the clues for 20-, 34-, 43- and 56-Across : PASS GO
65. Game patented December 31, 1935 : MONOPOLY
66. Psychologist Pinker who wrote "How the Mind Works" : STEVEN
67. Words of rebuke : ET TU
68. Understanding : KEN
69. What you may have with mom, dad or an overbearing boss : ISSUES
70. Swiftly built home? : NEST
71. Cable channel that airs "Portlandia" : IFC

Down
1. Like an "I told you so" look : SMUG
2. Proscription : NO-NO
3. Spanish nuts : LOCO
4. Wallop : SHELLAC
5. Terminus of the Qingzang railway : TIBET
6. Known to authorities : IDED
7. City near Sparks : RENO
8. Clutch : GRASP
9. With 10-Down, Irish draught : RED
10. See 9-Down : ALE
11. Cosmopolitan, e.g. : MIXED DRINK
12. Key's longtime partner in sketch comedy : PEELE
13. Computer acronym since the 1960s : ASCII
18. Modern civil rights initialism : LGBT
21. They share the air : CO-HOSTS
25. Escort, slangily : USH
26. Some air pollution : SOOT
27. Plague, with "at" : GNAW
28. 1971 documentary about Ravi Shankar : RAGA
29. Bridge sitter? : EYEGLASSES
30. Relative of a throw : AREA RUG
31. Audibly floored : AGASP
35. Convenience partly obviated by banking apps : ATM
36. "Got me now?" : SEE?
37. Align : TRUE
38. Texting button : SEND
40. Darer's cry : DO IT!
44. Born on the bayou? : NEE
45. Cause for a rescheduling : RAINOUT
50. Insignificant person : SNIP
51. "The choice of a new generation" sloganeer, once : PEPSI
52. Challenges for future counsel, in brief : LSATS
53. Bajillions of years : AEONS
54. Fly holder : PANTS
57. Harbinger : OMEN
58. Speck : MOTE
59. Isao in the Golf Hall of Fame : AOKI
60. Head of staff? : CLEF
61. Align : SYNC
63. "Law & Order" spinoff, familiarly : SVU
64. "Huh, never would've figured" : GEE


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1230-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Dec 15, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Mary Lou Guizzo & Jeff Chen
THEME: New Year's Eve … we have three famous names as themed answers today, with the words AULD, LANG and SYNE hidden inside. A very apt concept given that NEW YEAR’S EVE is fast approaching:
20A. Physics Nobelist who pioneered in quantum mechanics : PAUL DIRAC
37A. Federal Reserve chairman under four presidents : ALAN GREENSPAN
51A. Football Hall-of-Famer with a nickname befitting his elusiveness on the field : GREASY NEALE

64A. With 65- and 66-Across, when to sing the song in the shaded squares : NEW
65A. See 64-Across : YEAR’S
66A. See 64-Across : EVE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Big ray : MANTA
The manta ray is the biggest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds.

10. At the home of, abroad : CHEZ
"Chez" is a French term meaning "at the house of", which comes from the Latin word "casa" meaning "cottage" or "hut".

14. Last performer at Woodstock, informally : JIMI
Many of his contemporaries regarded Jimi Hendrix as the greatest electric guitarist in the history of rock music. Hendrix was from Seattle and didn't really have a really stellar start to his working life. He failed to finish high school and fell foul of the law by getting caught in stolen cars, twice. The courts gave him the option of the army or two years in prison. Hendrix chose the former and soon found himself in the famous 101st Airborne. In the army, his less-than-disciplined ways helped him (as he would have seen it) because his superiors successfully petitioned to get him discharged after serving only one year of his two-year requirement, just to get him out of their hair.

1969’s Woodstock Music & Art Fair was held on a dairy farm located 43 miles southwest of the town of Woodstock, New York. 400,000 young people attended, and saw 32 bands and singers perform over three days.

17. Palm starch : SAGO
When I was growing up in Ireland I was very familiar with pearl sago, which is very similar to pearl tapioca. Pearls of sago are simply little balls of sago starch used to make breads, pancakes, biscuits, or the steamed puddings that we ate as kids. Sago comes from pith of the sago palm tree. To get at the starch the tree has to be cut down and the trunk split to reveal the pith. The pith is crushed and manipulated to make the starch available, which is then washed out of a fibrous suspension. One sago palm tree yields about 150-300 kg of starch. Personally I love the stuff, but then, I am a bit weird …

18. Chutzpah : NERVE
Our word "chutzpah" meaning "nerve, gall, impudence" is derived from the Yiddish "khutspe", which has the same meaning.

19. Bloodhound's asset : NOSE
Bloodhounds have an amazing sense of smell, and are particularly bred to track humans. Bloodhounds have been used to follow humans since the Middle Ages.

20. Physics Nobelist who pioneered in quantum mechanics : PAUL DIRAC
Paul Dirac was an English theoretical physicist, and a co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1933. It was Dirac who predicted the existence of antimatter. What would the Starship Enterprise have done without antimatter?

23. TV monitors? : V-CHIPS
All television sets produced for the US market since the year 2000 have to include a component called a V-chip. A V-chip allows a TV to be configured so that programming of specific "ratings" can be blocked from viewing. The "V" in V-chip stands for "viewer control". It sounds like a great idea, but a lot of kids these days quickly do a search online and work out how to reset the password.

26. Antarctica, so to speak : ICEBOX
Antarctica is a continent, one covered with a permanent ice shelf. The Arctic, on the other hand, is in effect an ocean that is covered with year-round ice caps.

32. Old knockoff of an IBM product : PC CLONE
In the early days of desktop computing, an IBM clone (also a "PC clone") was a computer built by an IBM competitor that was designed to function just like an IBM, but without using any copyrighted material or trade secrets that were the intellectual property of IBM. Clones were always a competitive issue for IBM, and perhaps were part of the reason that IBM doesn't make desktop computers today ...

34. Everglades transport : AIRBOAT
An airboat is a boat with a flat bottom and aircraft type propeller on the stern that provides forward motion. The propeller is often connected to a small aircraft engine. Believe it or not, the first airboat was built in 1905 by a team led by Alexander Graham Bell, who famously invented the first practical telephone.

The Everglades are a tropical wetlands that cover much of southern Florida. The area was named “River Glades” by a British surveyor in 1773, and is suggested that poor transcription of the word “river” led to the use of “ever”. The southern 20% of the Everglades is a protected region that we know as Everglades National Park. The park is the third largest National Park in the lower 48 states, after Death Valley NP (the largest) and Yellowstone NP.

37. Federal Reserve chairman under four presidents : ALAN GREENSPAN
Alan Greenspan served as the Chairman of the Federal Reserve from 1987 to 2006, the longest anyone has held that post. He was appointed by President Reagan for a four-year term, and was reappointed by subsequent presidents until Greenspan retired. Outside of the world of economics, Greenspan is married to NBC journalist Andrea Mitchell, and back in the seventies he even dated Barbara Walters.

42. Many rushers : ENDS
That would be American football …

44. Maestro Zubin : MEHTA
Zubin Mehta is an Indian conductor of western classical music, from Mumbai. Mehta studied music in Vienna, where he made his conducting debut in 1958. In 1961 he was named assistant director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, creating a fuss with the music director designate of the orchestra, Georg Solti. Solti resigned as a protest, and Mehta took his job. In 1978 Mehta took over as Music Director and Principal Conductor of the New York Philharmonic, eventually becoming the longest holder of that position.

46. The shakes, for short : DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is "trembling madness".

47. Moon in "Return of the Jedi" : ENDOR
In the “Star Wars” universe, the moon of Endor is home to the Ewoks. The Ewoks are creatures who first appear in "Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi". They're the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

50. Big shrimp : PRAWNS
The terms “prawn” and “shrimp” are often used interchangeable on menus. Over in the UK, the term “prawn” is most common, while “shrimp” is seen more often here in North America. Sometimes there is a differentiation from a food standpoint, with “prawn” being used for larger species and “shrimp” for smaller species. As a result, “jumbo prawns” seems to be an acceptable descriptor for a dish, whereas “jumbo shrimp” seems to be an oxymoron.

51. Football Hall-of-Famer with a nickname befitting his elusiveness on the field : GREASY NEALE
Greasy Neale was head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles from 1941-1950.

55. Bamako is its capital : MALI
Bamako is the capital of the African country of Mali. It is the fastest growing city on the whole continent. Located on the Niger River, the name “Bamako” translates from the local language as “crocodile river”.

57. String quartet member : VIOLA
A standard string quartet is made up of two violins, a viola and a cello. A string quintet consists of a standard string quartet with the addition of a fifth instrument, usually a second viola or cello.

61. "___ on both your houses!" : A POX
In William Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”, Mercutio is a close friend of Romeo. Mercutio is stabbed in an altercation with Tybalt. As Mercutio dies, he cries out “A plague o' both your houses!", hence cursing both the Montagues (Romeo’s family) and Capulets (Juliet’s family). The curse is often cited mistakenly as “a pox on both your houses”.

63. Part of Y.S.L. : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from prison, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story ...

64. With 65- and 66-Across, when to sing the song in the shaded squares : NEW
65. See 64-Across : YEAR’S
66. See 64-Across : EVE
The song "Auld Lang Syne" is a staple at New Year's Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

Down
1. One- or two-piece attire, for short : PJS
Our word "pajamas" (“PJs” for short) comes to us from the Indian subcontinent, where "pai jamahs" were loose fitting pants tied at the waist and worn at night by locals and ultimately by the Europeans living there. And "pajamas" is another of those words that I had to learn to spell differently when I came to America. In the British Isles the spelling is "pyjamas".

2. Small inlet : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

3. Modern version of "Jumping Jehoshaphat!" : OMG
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

4. "Lincoln" or "Gandhi" : BIOPIC
The 2012 movie “Lincoln” is a historical drama that portrays the last four months of the life of President Abraham Lincoln. The main focus in the story is Lincoln’s work to have the US House of Representatives pass the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, the amendment that finally abolished slavery. “Lincoln” was co-produced and directed by Steven Spielberg and stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Field and Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln. It’s a film I’d recommend ...

“Gandhi” is a fabulous film released in 1982 that chronicles the life and times of Mahatma Gandhi. The film stars Ben Kingsley in the title role, and was directed by Sir Richard Attenborough. “Gandhi” won eight Oscars, including the award for Best Picture.

7. Almost any character on "The Big Bang Theory" : NERD
“The Big Bang Theory” is very clever sitcom aired by CBS since 2007. “The Big Bang Theory” theme song was specially commissioned for the show, and was composed and is sung by Canadian band Barenaked Ladies. The theme song was released in 2007 as a single and is featured on a Barenaked Ladies greatest hits album.

8. Rikki-tikki-___ : TAVI
In Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Book", one of the short stories is titled "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", the story about a mongoose, the brave pet of an English family that protects them from a succession of snakes.

9. Yanqui : AMERICANO
In Spanish, an "Americano" (American) might be called a "Yanqui" (Yankee), although the term is often used in a derogatory fashion.

The term “Yankee” originated back in the 1600s when Dutch settlers used to called English colonists “Jankes”, a disparaging term meaning “Little Johns”.

11. "Game of Thrones" airer : HBO
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that is adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually made in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland.

12. Center of excellence? : ELS
There are two letters L (els) in the center of the word “excellence”.

13. Letter after wye : ZEE
X, Y, Z (ex, wye, zee)

21. Beelike : APIAN
Something described as “apian” is related to bees. “Apis” is the Latin for “bee”.

35. With 32-Down, 1950s counterculture figures : BEAT
32. See 35-Down : POETS
The group of American writers known as the Beat Generation first came to prominence at a poetry reading at the Six Gallery in San Francisco in October of 1955. Five young poets presented their work that day:
- Allen Ginsberg
- Philip Lamantia
- Michael McClure
- Gary Snider
- Philip Whalen

38. French comic series that has sold 350+ million copies worldwide : ASTERIX
“The Adventures of Asterix” is a series of comics originally published in French, starting in 1959. The French version was a very popular choice for us as kids when we were required to read some French “literature” at school.

40. Big inits. in bowling : AMF
AMF Bowling Centers, Inc. is an operator of bowling allies, the largest such company in the world in fact.

45. The Who's "Who ___ You" : ARE
The Who's hit "Who Are You" is used as the theme song for the TV show "CSI". Old hits from the Who are also used as theme songs for the CSI spin-off shows, "CSI: New York" (theme: "Baba O'Riley"), "CSI: Miami" (theme: "Won't Get Fooled Again") and “CSI: Cyber” (theme: “I Can See for Miles”).

49. Last royal house of Italy : SAVOY
The House of Savoy was founded in 1003 in the historic Savoy region of Europe that took in parts of modern France, Italy and Switzerland. The descendent House of Savoy-Carignano ruled the Kingdom of Italy from 1861 until the end of WWII.

53. Film character who says "Adventure. Excitement. A Jedi craves not these things" : YODA
Yoda is one of the most beloved characters of the "Star Wars" series of films. Yoda's voice was provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of "Muppets" fame.

55. Simian cousin of a 56-Down : MAN
56. Simian cousin of a 55-Down : APE
“Simian” means “pertaining to monkeys or apes”, from the Latin word “simia” meaning “ape”.

59. Title for M.L.K. Jr. : REV
Martin Luther King, Jr. was only 35 years old when he won the Nobel Peace Prize, making him the youngest person to be so honored. King was given the award for his work to end racial segregation and discrimination using non-violent means. The following year he was awarded the American Liberties Medallion by the American Jewish Community.

60. Trading place in Japan: Abbr. : TSE
The Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) is the third largest stock exchange in the world, after New York and London.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "No ___" ("Sure thing") : PROB
5. Big ray : MANTA
10. At the home of, abroad : CHEZ
14. Last performer at Woodstock, informally : JIMI
15. Letter-shaped construction piece : I-BEAM
16. Competent : ABLE
17. Palm starch : SAGO
18. Chutzpah : NERVE
19. Bloodhound's asset : NOSE
20. Physics Nobelist who pioneered in quantum mechanics : PAUL DIRAC
23. TV monitors? : V-CHIPS
26. Antarctica, so to speak : ICEBOX
30. Dead-on : PRECISE
32. Old knockoff of an IBM product : PC CLONE
33. Vast expanse : SEA
34. Everglades transport : AIRBOAT
36. Sinful : BAD
37. Federal Reserve chairman under four presidents : ALAN GREENSPAN
40. Sums: Abbr. : AMTS
41. "That's really cool!" : NEATO!
42. Many rushers : ENDS
44. Maestro Zubin : MEHTA
46. The shakes, for short : DTS
47. Moon in "Return of the Jedi" : ENDOR
48. Equipment at fast-food restaurants : FRYERS
50. Big shrimp : PRAWNS
51. Football Hall-of-Famer with a nickname befitting his elusiveness on the field : GREASY NEALE
55. Bamako is its capital : MALI
57. String quartet member : VIOLA
58. Lip-puckering : TART
61. "___ on both your houses!" : A POX
62. "At-ten-SHUN!," e.g. : ORDER
63. Part of Y.S.L. : YVES
64. With 65- and 66-Across, when to sing the song in the shaded squares : NEW
65. See 64-Across : YEAR’S
66. See 64-Across : EVE

Down
1. One- or two-piece attire, for short : PJS
2. Small inlet : RIA
3. Modern version of "Jumping Jehoshaphat!" : OMG
4. "Lincoln" or "Gandhi" : BIOPIC
5. Something that makes a difference? : MINUS SIGN
6. Man's name that's a homophone of 16-Across : ABEL
7. Almost any character on "The Big Bang Theory" : NERD
8. Rikki-tikki-___ : TAVI
9. Yanqui : AMERICANO
10. Nix : CANCEL
11. "Game of Thrones" airer : HBO
12. Center of excellence? : ELS
13. Letter after wye : ZEE
21. Beelike : APIAN
22. Sales reps maintain them: Abbr. : ACCTS
23. No. 2s : VPS
24. Nondairy coffee additive : CREAMER
25. Ruddiness : HEALTHY GLOW
27. Try to avoid getting punched, say : BOB AND WEAVE
28. Incessantly : ON AND ON
29. Struck (out) : XED
31. Goofed : ERRED
32. See 35-Down : POETS
35. With 32-Down, 1950s counterculture figures : BEAT
38. French comic series that has sold 350+ million copies worldwide : ASTERIX
39. Fine, e.g. : PENALTY
40. Big inits. in bowling : AMF
43. Soon-to-be grads : SRS
45. The Who's "Who ___ You" : ARE
47. Long time : ERA
49. Last royal house of Italy : SAVOY
50. Some still-life fruit : PEARS
52. Royal title : SIRE
53. Film character who says "Adventure. Excitement. A Jedi craves not these things" : YODA
54. Met or Card : NLER
55. Simian cousin of a 56-Down : MAN
56. Simian cousin of a 55-Down : APE
59. Title for M.L.K. Jr. : REV
60. Trading place in Japan: Abbr. : TSE


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1229-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Dec 15, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Stillman
THEME: Compliments … each of today’s themed answers is a compliment, but clued with reference to an apt recipient for said compliment:
18A. Compliment for a fruit-of-the-month club? : NOT BAD AT ALL!
24A. Compliment for a planetarium? : STELLAR!
29A. Compliment for an airline? : KEEP IT UP!
46A. Compliment for a steakhouse? : WELL DONE!
50A. Compliment for a GPS manufacturer? : WAY TO GO!
60A. Compliment for a charcoal seller? : YOU'RE ON FIRE!
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Marquee names : STARS
A marquee is a large sign that is placed over the entrance to a theater. The marquee usually displays the names of the film or play currently showing, as well as the principal actors performing.

14. Dr. J's first pro league : ABA
The American Basketball Association (ABA) merged with the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1976. The ABA used a ball with the colors red, white and blue. The NBA uses a more traditional orange ball.

Julius Erving is a retired professional basketball player who was known as “Dr. J”, a nickname he picked up in high school. Dr. J was a trailblazer in many ways, being the first player associated with slam dunking and other moves above the rim.

15. Screeching baby? : OWLET
There are over twenty species of screech owls, all of which are native to the Americas. Named for their eerie trill heard mainly during the night, screech owls are about the size of a pint glass.

20. Duds : GARB
“Duds” is an informal word for clothing, coming from the word “dudde” that was used around 1300 as the name for a cloak.

22. Gettysburg opponent of Lee : MEADE
George Meade was a career army officer with a depth of experience in civil and military operations even before the onset of the Civil War. During the war he rose to the level of commander of the Army of the Potomac, and is best remembered for leading the Union forces that defeated General Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg in 1863.

23. Bus driver on "The Simpsons" : OTTO
Otto Mann drives the school bus on the TV show "The Simpsons". Otto is a Germanic character voiced by Harry Shearer, and his name is a play on "Ottoman Empire". Whenever Bart sees him, he greets Otto with the words "Otto, man!"

26. Recipe amt. : TSP
Teaspoon (tsp.)

34. Rebound, as a billiard shot : CAROM
A carom is a ricochet, the bouncing of some projectile off a surface. Carom has come to mean the banking of a billiard ball, the bouncing of the ball off the side of the table.

37. Genetic messenger : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

38. Big bang maker, informally : H-BOMB
The first successful detonation of a hydrogen bomb was in a test codenamed Ivy Mike. The test was conducted by the US on an atoll in the Pacific Ocean named Enewetak.

39. 72, at Augusta National Golf Club : PAR
The Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia was founded in 1933 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Famously, Augusta hosts the Masters Tournament each year. Augusta is very much a private club, and some of its policies have drawn criticism over the years. Prior to 1959, the club had a bylaw requiring that all caddies be African American. There were no African-American club members admitted until 1990, and no women until 2012.

40. Stradivari's teacher : AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo's son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

43. "Dragon Ball Z" genre : ANIME
Anime is cartoon animation in the style of Japanese Manga comic books.

“Dragon Ball Z” is an anime TV series produced in Japan.

45. Original "American Idol" judge with Randy and Paula : SIMON
Simon Cowell was invited to be a judge on “Pop Idol”, a British show that spawned “American Idol”. Cowell was then asked to take part in the US spin-off, and we haven’t stopped seeing him since …

48. British buddy : CHAP
“Chap” is an informal term for “lad, fellow”, especially in England. The term derives from “chapman”, an obsolete word meaning “purchaser” or “trader”.

50. Compliment for a GPS manufacturer? : WAY TO GO!
Global Positioning System (GPS)

53. Where something unpleasant sticks : CRAW
“Craw” is another name for the “crop”, a portion of the alimentary tract of some animals, including birds. The crop is used for the storage of food prior to digestion. The crop allows the animal to eat large amounts and then digest that food with efficiency over an extended period. The expression “to stick in one’s craw” is used one when one cannot accept something, cannot “swallow” it.

59. Rickman of the Harry Potter films : ALAN
Alan Rickman is a marvelous English actor, famous for playing bad guy Hans Gruber in the original "Die Hard" film, Severus Snape in the "Harry Potter" series and my personal favorite, Eamon de Valera in "Michael Collins".

63. Addams Family member : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.
They're creepy and they're kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They're altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

65. Maestro's stick : BATON
“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

66. Grant source, for short : NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though ...

69. Mind-reading skill, for short : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

Down
1. Chillaxes : HANGS
“Chillax” is a slang term meaning “chill and relax”. Who’da thunk it …?

2. Destroyer destroyer : U-BOAT
“U-boat” stands for the German "Unterseeboot" (undersea boat). Notably, a U-boat sank the RMS Lusitania in 1915, an event that helped propel the US into WWI.

3. Air show maneuver : BARREL ROLL
A barrel roll is an aerial stunt in which a plane makes a complete rotation around the longitudinal axis. The manoeuvre is so called as the corkscrew path that the aircraft executes makes it appear as though it is rotating through the inside of an enormous barrel.

4. Trinity member : SON
In the Christian tradition, the Father, Son and Holy Spirit are three persons in One Divine Being, the Holy Trinity.

7. Country's McEntire : REBA
Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called "Reba" that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

8. Dutch burg : STAD
“Stad” is the Dutch, and Boer, word for “city”.

“Burg” is an informal term used in the US for a smaller town, from the German word “burg” meaning a fortified city.

9. Org. in "Homeland" : CIA
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I saw the first series of this show and highly recommend it ...

10. Cousins of squids : OCTOPI
The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Language does evolve, even though it drives me crazy ...

11. Pepperoni or sausage : MEAT
Pepperoni originated in the US and is reminiscent of a spicy salami sausage from southern Italy. The name "pepperoni" is a corruption of the Italian "peperone", the name for the red or green pepper plant.

13. Scandinavian capital : OSLO
Oslo is the capital of Norway. The city of Oslo burns trash to fuel half of its buildings, including all of its schools. The problem faced by the city is that it doesn’t generate enough trash. So, Oslo imports trash from Sweden, England and Ireland, and is now looking to import some American trash too.

21. Leopold ___, "Ulysses" protagonist : BLOOM
Regular readers will know that I am unashamedly supportive of my native Irish culture, but I have to tell you that I can't handle the works of James Joyce. I have spent many a fine day traipsing around Ireland learning about his life, but I have yet to appreciate one of his books. To me, his life is more absorbing than his writing. Having said that, "Ulysses" is an interesting novel in that it chronicles just one ordinary day in the life of a Dubliner named Leopold Bloom. There's a huge celebration of "Ulysses" in Dublin every year on June 16th, called Bloomsday. The festivities vary from readings and performances of the storyline, to good old pub crawls. “Ulysses” was made into a film of the same name in 1967 starring Milo O’Shea. Back in 1921 however, the book was effectively banned in the US after a New York court declared the magazine in which was serialized was declared obscene. The US Post Office burned many copies of the novel throughout the 1920s, until the US became the first English-speaking country where the book became freely available.

25. Brazilian dance popular in the 1980s : LAMBADA
The lambada is a dance from Brazil that is sometimes called “the forbidden dance”. Back in the days when Brazil was a Portuguese colony the dance was “forbidden” as is was deemed too “sexy”.

29. ___ Kilpatrick, ex-mayor of Detroit : KWAME
Kwame Kilpatrick is a former mayor of Detroit, in office from 2002 until his resignation in 2008. The resignation was precipitated by his conviction on counts of perjury and obstruction of justice, for which he was sentenced to four months in jail. Kilpatrick then received a sentence of 18 months to 5 years for violating his probation after the first incarceration. A third and final conviction took place for mail fraud, wire fraud and racketeering for which he was sentenced to 28 years in prison. Kilpatrick is now in incarcerated in a federal prison in El Reno, Oklahoma.

30. Dublin's land : EIRE
The city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is known as Baile Átha Cliath in Irish (“town of the hurdled ford”). The English name “Dublin” is an anglicized form of the older Irish name for the city “Dubh Linn”, meaning “black pool”.

31. Bouncer's place : TRAMPOLINE
The first modern trampoline was developed in 1936. The apparatus was given its name from the Spanish “trampolín” meaning “diving board”. Trampolines were used during WWII in the training of pilots, to give them exposure to some spatial orientations that would be encountered during flight. Trampolines were also used by astronauts training in the space flight program.

32. "For ___ us a child is born" : UNTO
According to the Bible’s, Book of Isaiah:
For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.

34. Ruminate (on) : CHEW
Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work. We also use the verb “to ruminate” in a figurative sense, to mean “to muse, ponder, chew over”.

36. ___ room (site of postdebate political commentary) : SPIN
A “spin room” is an area where reporters can meet with candidates and their representatives after an election debate. Set up by the campaigns, a spin room is designed to influence the reporting of the debate in favor of a particular candidate. The first spin room was set up by the Reagan campaign in 1984, when President Reagan was being challenged for a second term by Walter Mondale.

41. Roadster from Japan : MIATA
The Mazda MX-5 is sold as the Miata in North America, and as the Roadster in Japan. I've always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan.

48. Grammy-nominated rapper with the 2002 hit "Oh Boy" : CAM’RON
Cam'ron is the stage name of rapper Cameron Giles. Giles also used to go by the name Killa Cam.

51. Slalom obstacles : GATES
“Slalom” is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word "slalam" that translates as "skiing race". There is a longer version of the traditional slalom that is called giant slalom.

57. Org. for the New York Liberty : WNBA
The New York Liberty was founded in 1997 and was one the original eight teams to play in the Women’s NBA. The franchise is based in Newark, New Jersey.

58. Light years away : AFAR
A light-year (lt. yr.) is a measure of distance, not time. It is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year. The accepted abbreviation for a light-year is “ly”. A light-second is a lot shorter distance: about 186,282 miles.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Airport with many connecting flights : HUB
4. Marquee names : STARS
9. Small jazz band : COMBO
14. Dr. J's first pro league : ABA
15. Screeching baby? : OWLET
16. Some frozen drinks : ICEES
17. Neither's partner : NOR
18. Compliment for a fruit-of-the-month club? : NOT BAD AT ALL!
20. Duds : GARB
22. Gettysburg opponent of Lee : MEADE
23. Bus driver on "The Simpsons" : OTTO
24. Compliment for a planetarium? : STELLAR!
26. Recipe amt. : TSP
28. Money to tide one over : LOAN
29. Compliment for an airline? : KEEP IT UP!
34. Rebound, as a billiard shot : CAROM
36. Go round and round : SWIRL
37. Genetic messenger : RNA
38. Big bang maker, informally : H-BOMB
39. 72, at Augusta National Golf Club : PAR
40. Stradivari's teacher : AMATI
42. Building add-on : ELL
43. "Dragon Ball Z" genre : ANIME
45. Original "American Idol" judge with Randy and Paula : SIMON
46. Compliment for a steakhouse? : WELL DONE!
48. British buddy : CHAP
49. Breakfast grain : OAT
50. Compliment for a GPS manufacturer? : WAY TO GO!
53. Where something unpleasant sticks : CRAW
56. Throng : SWARM
59. Rickman of the Harry Potter films : ALAN
60. Compliment for a charcoal seller? : YOU'RE ON FIRE!
63. Addams Family member : ITT
64. Toss about, as petals : STREW
65. Maestro's stick : BATON
66. Grant source, for short : NEA
67. Poke fun at : TEASE
68. "Why ___ you in bed?" : AREN’T
69. Mind-reading skill, for short : ESP

Down
1. Chillaxes : HANGS
2. Destroyer destroyer : U-BOAT
3. Air show maneuver : BARREL ROLL
4. Trinity member : SON
5. Like some beach volleyball teams : TWO-MAN
6. ___ ego : ALTER
7. Country's McEntire : REBA
8. Dutch burg : STAD
9. Org. in "Homeland" : CIA
10. Cousins of squids : OCTOPI
11. Pepperoni or sausage : MEAT
12. Slug : BELT
13. Scandinavian capital : OSLO
19. Dissuade : DETER
21. Leopold ___, "Ulysses" protagonist : BLOOM
25. Brazilian dance popular in the 1980s : LAMBADA
27. Eye-catching : SPLASHY
29. ___ Kilpatrick, ex-mayor of Detroit : KWAME
30. Dublin's land : EIRE
31. Bouncer's place : TRAMPOLINE
32. "For ___ us a child is born" : UNTO
33. Suffering : PAIN
34. Ruminate (on) : CHEW
35. Up to the job : ABLE
36. ___ room (site of postdebate political commentary) : SPIN
41. Roadster from Japan : MIATA
44. "False!" : NOT SO!
47. Less than 300 dots per inch, commonly : LOW-RES
48. Grammy-nominated rapper with the 2002 hit "Oh Boy" : CAM’RON
50. "Don't forget to ___" : WRITE
51. Slalom obstacles : GATES
52. Ready to be drawn : ON TAP
53. Skin abnormality : CYST
54. Mechanical learning : ROTE
55. Distinctive quality : AURA
57. Org. for the New York Liberty : WNBA
58. Light years away : AFAR
61. Ram's mate : EWE
62. Suffix with differ : -ENT


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1228-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Dec 15, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: STS … each of today’s themed answers is a three-word phrase with the initials S-T-S:
17A. Navy special force in the bin Laden raid SEAL TEAM SIX
23A. Sterling service for an afternoon break SILVER TEA SET
40A. "Arabian Nights" voyager SINBAD THE SAILOR
50A. Say something before immediately being proven wrong SPEAK TOO SOON
63A. Completely STEM TO STERN
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Breaks the Ten Commandments SINS
According to the Book of Exodus, the stone tablets on which the Ten Commandments are inscribed were placed in a chest called the Ark of the Covenant. The Ark was built according to instructions given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai.

14. Slender woodwind OBOE
The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name "oboe" comes from the French "hautbois" which means "high wood". When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you'll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an "A". The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe's "A".

17. Navy special force in the bin Laden raid SEAL TEAM SIX
The US Special Forces unit that is popularly referred to as SEAL Team Six, is more correctly known as the US Naval Warfare Development Group (NSWDG). “SEAL Team Six” was actually the name of the unit’s predecessor, which was disbanded in 1987. The original group was created soon after the Iran hostage crisis of 1979. Two SEAL teams were deployed, and the name SEAL Team Six was used as a ruse in order to confuse the Russian intelligence services about the actual number of teams in existence.

19. Airport alternative to JFK LGA
Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia's name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to "New York" and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city's limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called "LaGuardia" as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as "LaGuardia" (LGA) in 1947.

21. Abril or mayo MES
In Spanish, the “mes” (month) of “abril” (April) comes before “mayo” (May).

23. Sterling service for an afternoon break SILVER TEA SET
Pure silver is too soft for use in production of the likes of knives and forks or salvers. So, it is converted into an alloy with a second metal, usually copper. The designation “sterling” is reserved for alloys containing 92.5% silver.

27. Money set aside for later years, in brief IRA
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

32. Singer Del Rey LANA
Lana Del Rey is the stage name of singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant. Del Rey calls herself a “self-styled gangsta Nancy Sinatra”. Nice …

40. "Arabian Nights" voyager SINBAD THE SAILOR
Sinbad is the hero of a set of fictional tales from the Middle East. Sinbad comes from the port city of Basra and had fantastic adventures on voyages throughout the sea east of Africa and south of Asia.

The marvelous collection of folk tales from the Middle East called “One Thousand and One Nights” is sometimes known as “Arabian Nights” in the English-speaking world. The original collection of tales did not include the three with which we are most familiar in the West. European translators added some stories, including “Aladdin’s Wonderful Lamp”, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, and “The Seven Voyages of Sinbad”.

44. Morales of "NYPD Blue" ESAI
The actor Esai Morales is best known for his role in the 1987 movie "La Bamba", which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai).

47. Mom's forte, briefly TLC
Tender loving care (TLC)

57. "Livin' Thing" band, 1976, informally ELO
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England. The band's manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne (wife of Ozzy).

67. ___ of Cancer TROPIC
Lines of latitude are the imaginary horizontal lines surrounding the planet. The most "important" lines of latitude are, from north to south:
- Arctic Circle
- Tropic of Cancer
- Equator
- Tropic of Capricorn
- Antarctic Circle

69. Gym shirt TEE
Our word “gymnasium” comes from the Greek “gymnasion” meaning “public place where exercise is taken”. The Greek term comes from “gymnos” meaning "naked", as that physical training was usually done unclothed.

70. Window frames SASHES
A movable (up and down) window frame is called a sash, from the French word for a frame "châssis". The term is also applied to that part of a door or window into which windows are set.

71. War-torn Syrian city HOMS
Homs is a city in Syria in the west of the country, located just north of Damascus and not far from the Mediterranean coast.

Down
3. Ark builder NOAH
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah's life-preserver during the flood.

4. Monica ___, two-time U.S. Open champ SELES
Monica Seles has a Hungarian name as she was born to Hungarian parents in former Yugoslavia. Seles was the World No. 1 professional tennis player in 1991 and 1992 before being forced from the sport when she was stabbed by a spectator at a match in 1993. She did return to the game two years later, but never achieved the same level of success.

5. Golfer Michelle WIE
Michelle Wie is an American golfer on the LPGA Tour. Wie began playing golf at the age of four and was the youngest player ever to qualify for an LPGA tour event. She turned pro just before her 16th birthday ...

6. Obama's signature health law, for short ACA
The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

8. Tool with a beam LASER
The term “laser” is an acronym, coming from “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (LASER). It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “Light Oscillation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn't quite so appealing, namely LOSER …

11. What a raconteur does TELLS TALES
A raconteur is an accomplished storyteller. The term comes from the French “raconter” meaning “to relate”.

13. Chris of "Jurassic World" PRATT
Chris Pratt is an actor who really got his big break playing the rather dopey Andy Dwyer on the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”. Pratt then played a pretty macho role as a SEAL team operator in “Zero Dark Thirty”, before taking leading heroic roles in “Guardians of the Galaxy” and “Jurassic World”. Pratt is married to Anna Faris, the comedic actress who plays Christy Plunkett on the sitcom “Mom”.

18. Chi-town daily TRIB
"The Chicago Tribune" was first published in 1847. The most famous edition of "The Trib" was probably in 1948 when the headline was "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN", on the occasion of that year's presidential election. When it turned out Truman had actually won, the victor picked up the paper with the erroneous headline and posed for photographs with it ... a famous, famous photo, that must have stuck in the craw of the editor at the time.

22. Irish language family GAELIC
There are three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

25. Sporty Chevy ‘VETTE
The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small maneuverable warship called a corvette. The Corvette has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

26. 2013 film queen who sings "Let It Go" ELSA
“Let It Go” is an incredibly successful song from the Disney animated film “Frozen” released in 2013. It was performed in the movie by Idina Menzel, who also was the voice actor for the character Elsa. “Let It Go” is one of the very few Disney songs to make it into the Billboard Top Ten.

27. "Casablanca" woman ILSA
Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie "Casablanca". I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: "she paints his face with her eyes". Wow ...

29. Poe poem that concludes "In her tomb by the sounding sea" ANNABEL LEE
“Annabel Lee” was the last complete poem written by Edgar Allan Poe. The opening lines are:
It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
The closing lines are:
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride,
In her sepulchre there by the sea—
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

39. One-named Art Deco artist ERTE
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T."

41. Run ___ (rampage) AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

42. Farm tower SILO
“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English, originally coming from the Greek word "siros" that described a pit in which one kept corn.

51. Aplomb POISE
“Aplomb” is such a lovely word, meaning confidence and assurance. It is a French word that literally means "perpendicularity", or "on the plumb line". The idea is that someone with aplomb is poised, upright, balanced.

63. Aves. ... or the initials of 17-, 23-, 40-, 50- and 63-Across STS
Avenue (ave.) or street (st.)

65. Where Army brass is trained, in brief OCS
Officer Candidate School (OCS)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Breaks the Ten Commandments SINS
5. Money and ID holder WALLET
11. Faucet TAP
14. Slender woodwind OBOE
15. Aid in climbing a snowy peak ICE AXE
16. Make a mistake ERR
17. Navy special force in the bin Laden raid SEAL TEAM SIX
19. Airport alternative to JFK LGA
20. "___ than that ..." OTHER
21. Abril or mayo MES
22. Oversupply GLUT
23. Sterling service for an afternoon break SILVER TEA SET
27. Money set aside for later years, in brief IRA
30. Honey maker BEE
31. Allow LET
32. Singer Del Rey LANA
34. Little matter ATOM
37. Group of candidates running together SLATE
40. "Arabian Nights" voyager SINBAD THE SAILOR
43. Warner of danger ALARM
44. Morales of "NYPD Blue" ESAI
45. Dollar division CENT
46. Ghost's cry BOO!
47. Mom's forte, briefly TLC
49. "Told ya!" SEE?!
50. Say something before immediately being proven wrong SPEAK TOO SOON
56. Frigid COLD
57. "Livin' Thing" band, 1976, informally ELO
58. Pig out GORGE
62. ___ and vinegar OIL
63. Completely STEM TO STERN
66. Capitalize on USE
67. ___ of Cancer TROPIC
68. Dressed CLAD
69. Gym shirt TEE
70. Window frames SASHES
71. War-torn Syrian city HOMS

Down
1. Just O.K. SO-SO
2. "Yeah, right" I BET
3. Ark builder NOAH
4. Monica ___, two-time U.S. Open champ SELES
5. Golfer Michelle WIE
6. Obama's signature health law, for short ACA
7. "___ at 'em!" LEMME
8. Tool with a beam LASER
9. Live and breathe EXIST
10. State below Okla. TEX
11. What a raconteur does TELLS TALES
12. Bicker ARGUE
13. Chris of "Jurassic World" PRATT
18. Chi-town daily TRIB
22. Irish language family GAELIC
24. Show the way LEAD
25. Sporty Chevy ‘VETTE
26. 2013 film queen who sings "Let It Go" ELSA
27. "Casablanca" woman ILSA
28. Train transportation RAIL
29. Poe poem that concludes "In her tomb by the sounding sea" ANNABEL LEE
33. Overseas ABROAD
35. Excited cries OHS
36. Turkey and roast beef MEATS
38. Synonym and anagram of "note" TONE
39. One-named Art Deco artist ERTE
41. Run ___ (rampage) AMOK
42. Farm tower SILO
48. Gear teeth COGS
50. One collecting merit badges SCOUT
51. Aplomb POISE
52. Four: Prefix TETRA-
53. Butter substitutes OLEOS
54. Pizazz OOMPH
55. V-shaped cut NOTCH
59. Move, for short RELO
60. Unit of fat GRAM
61. Two slices of a loaf of bread ENDS
63. Aves. ... or the initials of 17-, 23-, 40-, 50- and 63-Across STS
64. Knot TIE
65. Where Army brass is trained, in brief OCS


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1227-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Dec 15, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Don Gagliardo & Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Binary Code … each of today’s themed clues is a pair of letters. That pair of letters appears in the first word of the corresponding themed answer, and is cleverly (and cryptically) referred to by the answers itself. And, each answer is a common phrase:
23A. PP SHOPPING CENTER (there are two letters P at the center of “shopping”)
36A. DD DEAD ENDS (there is a letter D at either end of “dead”)
46A. AA NCAA FINALS (the final letters of “NCAA” are two letters A)
64A. WW WINDOW FRAME (there are two letters W framing, at either end of, “window”)
82A. OO ONION RINGS (two letters O look like rings in “onion”)
95A. ZZ JAZZ DUET (there are two letters Z, a duets of Zs, in “jazz”)
110A. NN MINNESOTA TWINS (there are two letters N, twins, in “Minnesota”)
15D. RR MARRIED COUPLE (there are a couple of letters R in “married”)
52D. FF LEADOFF DOUBLE (there is a double-F at the end of “leadoff”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … ABASES (abates!!!), SANGRITA (Tangrita)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Je t'aime : French :: ___ : Spanish TE AMO
“I love you” translates in “te amo” in Spanish, and “je t’aime” in French.

19. Female toon with a "dollink" Boris NATASHA
Natasha Fatale is a cartoon character who hangs out with Rocky and Bullwinkle in the cartoon series from the sixties. Natasha is a spy in the cartoon storylines, hence the "Fatale" name.

21. Grackles and grebes AVIANS
Grackles are birds native to North and South America. Examples are the Nicaraguan grackle and the Colombian mountain grackle.

A grebe is a small to medium-sized freshwater diving bird. Although they appear to be very different, recent molecular studies have shown that grebes and flamingos are closely related.

25. Attic GARRET
A garret is a room on the top floor of a house, under a gabled roof. It can be another word for an attic.

26. Horror franchise beginning in 2004 SAW
The “Saw” franchise of movies is gruesome in the extreme. I’ve only seen a few minutes of "Saw" footage (accidentally). The stories are about imprisoned victims who are faced with having to mutilate themselves to escape. Ugh …

30. Melee FRAY
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means "confused fight".

31. Street of film fame ELM
“A Nightmare on Elm Street” is a Wes Craven slasher-horror film, released in 1984. As I don’t do “slasher” nor “horror”, I only learned relatively recently that Johnny Depp was in the movie, making his feature film debut.

32. You might take it out for a drive IRON
That would be the golf club sometimes used to drive the ball.

33. Court, for short RHYME
“Court” rhymes with “short”.

35. Pile of stones used to mark a trail CAIRN
A cairn is a man-made pile of stones that can have various uses. A cairn might be a prosaic trail marker, or a distinctive landmark or monument. Our term “cairn” derives from the Gaelic “carn” meaning “rocky hill, heap of stones”.

39. First antibacterial soap brand DIAL
Dial was the first antibacterial soap introduced in the US. It was given the name “Dial” as it was touted as offering “round-the-clock” protection against any odors caused by perspiration.

45. Portrait on Chinese renminbi bills MAO
Even though we generally refer to the currency of China as the “yuan”, the yuan is actually the basic unit of the “renminbi”. Similarly, “sterling” is the official currency of the UK, with the “pound” being the basic unit of sterling.

53. The Jedi and the Sith, e.g. FOES
The Sith are characters in the "Star Wars" universe who use the "dark side" of "the Force", and as such are the antithesis of the Jedi Knights.

55. Alaska tourist attraction AURORA
The spectacular aurora phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

57. Director of 2015's "Chi-Raq" LEE
“Chi-Raq” is a 2015 musical film directed by Spike Lee. A satirical movie, it is based on the classical Greek comedy play “Lysistrata” by Aristophanes. “Chi-Raq” deals with gang violence in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago, with the title being a portmanteau of “Chicago” and “Iraq”.

58. Capital with the Norsk Folkemuseum OSLO
The Norsk Folkemuseum (Norwegian Museum of Cultural History) is located on the Bygdøy peninsula on the western side of Oslo. The Bygdøy peninsula is also home to the Viking Ship Museum and the Kon-Tiki Museum.

60. Travel info source, for short AAA
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

61. London cathedral ST PAUL’S
The famous and very beautiful St. Paul’s Cathedral in London was designed by Sir Christopher Wren. St. Paul's was completed in 1708 and was constructed as part of a rebuilding program necessary after the devastation of the Great Fire of London of 1666. St. Paul’s is the second largest church building in the country, after Liverpool Cathedral.

68. Historic German admiral Maximilian von ___ SPEE
Maximilian Graf von Spee was actually born in Denmark, but of a noble German family. By the time WWI started, Spee had risen to the rank of Rear Admiral in the German Navy. He was killed in the Battle of the Falkland Islands (the original 1914 version!). He gave his name to the powerful pocket battleship, the Admiral Graf Spee, which was damaged in the Battle of the River Plate during WWII. The Graf Spee took refuge in the neutral port of Montevideo and when the boat was expelled by the government of Uruguay, the captain scuttled her rather than face the Allied flotilla waiting for her just outside the port.

71. Michael of "Saturday Night Live" CHE
Michael Che is a standup comedian from New York City. Che had worked as a writer for “Saturday Night Live” (SNL), and started to appear in front of SNL cameras in September 1914 as co-anchor for the “Weekend Update” segment of the show.

72. Cry to a husky MUSH!
“Mushing” is the use of one of more dogs to pull a sled. “Mush” is thought to come from the French “marche” meaning “go, run”.

76. Locale for cranberries BOG
When early European settlers came across red berries growing in the bogs of the northern part of America, they felt that the plant's flower and stem resembled the head and bill of a crane. As such, they called the plant "craneberry", which later evolved into "cranberry".

85. Hodges who managed the Mets to a World Series title GIL
Gil Hodges was a professional baseball player and manager. Perhaps Hodges’ most celebrated achievement was managing the New York Mets team (the “Miracle Mets”) that won the 1969 World Series. Hodges died from a heart attack just a few years later in 1972, when he was only 48 years old.

86. Little Rascals boy FARINA
Farina is a character in “The Little Rascals” (also known as “Our Gang”) series of comedy shorts. Farina is played by child actor Allen Hoskins, who appeared in “Our Gang” from the age of one year old until eleven.

88. Tolkien tree creatures ENTS
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

89. Mars features, mistakenly CANALS
Back in 1877, Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli reported observing a network of long straight lines on the surface of the planet Mars. Schiaparelli called the phenomena “canali”, which was translated into English as “canals”, although the meaning “channels, gullies” is also accurate. In the following decades, other astronomers confirmed the sighting, whereas others disagreed that such lines could be seen. Some observers even suggested that the lines were irrigation canals built by an intelligent civilization that resided on the planet. It turns out that the “canals” were actually illusions caused by the chance alignment of craters and other natural features on the planet’s surface, illusions that were only observed at the limit of the resolution available in telescopes of the day.

94. Peeps heard by Bo Peep BAAS
The lines that are most commonly quoted for the rhyme about "Little Bo Peep" are:
Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, And they'll come home,
Wagging their tails behind them.
But, there are actually four more verses, including this one:
It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

97. When repeated, a Yale fight song BOOLA
“Boola Boola” is a fight song of Yale University that was composed in 1900, although it was based on a song called “La Hoola Boola” that had been around in the 1800s. The tune of “Boola Boola” is used by the University of Oklahoma for its fight song, “Boomer Sooner”.

98. Playwright Clifford ODETS
Clifford Odets was a playwright, screenwriter and director from Philadelphia. Odets wrote a play called "Golden Boy" that was first performed in 1937 on Broadway. There was a film adaptation released in 1939 that starred a young William Holden. "Golden Boy" was the film that launched Holden's career. There was also a 1964 musical of the same name that was based on the play.

101. Modern TV feature, for short DVR
DVR (Digital Video Recorder)

103. Grps. with the motto "Every child. One voice" PTAS
The National Parent Teacher Association (National PTA) was founded back in 1897 as the National Congress of Mothers. The PTA uses the slogan “everychild. onevoice” (sic).

104. Conquest of 1953 EVEREST
Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepali sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

107. Susan of "The Partridge Family" DEY
The actress Susan Dey first appeared on “The Partridge Family” when she was 17-years-old when she had no acting experience. Years later, Dey won a Golden Globe for playing the leading role of Grace Van Owen in “L. A. Law”.

108. Silas in "The Da Vinci Code," notably ALBINO
In Dan Brown's novel “The Da Vinci Code”, Silas is a Opus Dei monk who is an albino. He is a sinister character, someone who self-flagellates and who kills while convinced that he is saving the Catholic Church. In the movie, Silas is played (extremely ably) by English actor Paul Bettany.

110. NN MINNESOTA TWINS
The Minnesota Twins baseball team started out life as the Kansas City Blues in 1894, before becoming the Washington Senators in 1901. The team arrived in Minneapolis in 1961.

113. Dances at the Tropicana Club SALSAS
The genre of music called salsa is a modern interpretation of various Cuban traditional music styles.

The Tropicana Club is a world-famous cabaret in Havana, Cuba.

114. Santa Claus portrayer in 81-Across ED ASNER
(81A. See 114-Across ELF)
“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role with James Caan supporting, and Ed Asner playing Santa Claus. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City.

116. Witherspoon of "Legally Blonde" REESE
“LEGALLY blonde” is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon as a girlish sorority president who heads to Harvard to earn a law degree. “LEGALLY blonde” was successful enough to warrant two sequels as well as a spin-off musical that played most successfully in London’s West End (for 974 performances).

117. Shot put and long jump EVENTS
Shot put, or events like shot put, have been around for millennia, but the first events that truly resemble today's track and field event had to come with the invention of the cannonball. Soldiers would "putt" (throw) cannonballs as far as possible in attempts to outperform each other. Shot put has been in the modern Olympic Games since day-one, with an American winning the gold in the first games in 1896, one Robert Garrett.

118. "Auld Lang Syne" and others POEMS
The song "Auld Lang Syne" is a staple at New Year's Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written as a poem by Scottish poet Robbie Burns, and the tune is that of a traditional folk song. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

Down
3. Agricultural figure in "The Canterbury Tales" PLOWMAN
Canterbury is a city in the southeast of England in the county of Kent. Canterbury is famous for Canterbury Cathedral where Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170, making it a pilgrimage destination for Christians. It was one of these pilgrimages that was the inspiration for Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” written in the 14th century.

4. Alley ___ OOP
"Alley Oop" is a comic strip that ran for four decades starting in 1932. "Alley Oop" was drawn by V. T. Hamlin. The title character lived in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo, although for much of the strip’s life, Alley Oop had access to a time machine. Alley Oop also had a girlfriend called Ooola. I had assumed that Ooola’s name was a play on “hula hoop”, but that wasn't invented until the 1950s (a kind blog reader informs me) ...

5. Pep Boys competitor NAPA
The National Automotive Parts Association (NAPA) is a retailers’ cooperative that supplies replacement parts for cars and trucks.

The Pep Boys automotive stores started out in Philadelphia when four friends pooled their money ($800, in 1921) to open an auto parts store. The name “Pep” was taken from a Pep Valve grinding compound that they carried. They changed the name to Pep Boys as at least one local used to refer to the store as “the boys at Pep”. One of the friends cashed out of the business, and the remaining trio eventually rebranded the store as “The Pep Boys - Manny, Moe & Jack”.

9. Spicy fruit beverage often used as a tequila chaser SANGRITA
“Sangrita” is a spicy and citrus non-alcoholic beverage that is often served as a chaser to a straight shot of 100% agave tequila. The name “sangrita” translates from Spanish as “little blood”, a reference to its bright red color. One sangrita recipe includes the juice of Seville oranges, lime and pomegranate, along with chili powder to add heat.

11. Singer Crow SHERYL
Sheryl Crow famously dated cyclist Lance Armstrong from 2003-2006. Armstrong has stated publicly more than once that Crow’s music cured his cancer.

13. A Perón EVA
Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. "Evita" was also the follow-up musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and was based on the life of Eva Perón.

16. Like macho push-ups ONE-ARM
A man described as “macho” shows pride in his masculinity. “Macho” is a Spanish word for “male animal”.

20. Calla lily family ARUM
The Calla Lily is a common name for a lily of the genus Zantedeschia. There is a lily genus called Calla, but the Calla Lily isn't in it. Now that, that is confusing …

22. "Gypsy" composer STYNE
Jule Styne was an English songwriter who made a name for himself in America with a series of popular musicals. Styne wrote a number of famous songs including “Don’t Rain on My Parade” from “Funny Girl”, “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” from “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, and “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” from “Gypsy”.

"Gypsy" is a 1962 musical film based on the book by Gypsy Rose Lee titled "Gypsy: A Memoir". Stars of the movie are Natalie Wood as Louise Hovick (Gypsy's real name) and Rosalind Russell as Gypsy's mother Rose Hovick. By the way, the real-life Gypsy Rose Lee became a fiction author in 1942 when her mystery thriller was published called "The G-String Murders". The novel was adapted into a movie a couple of years later and released as "Lady of Burlesque" starring Barbara Stanwyck.

29. Gasless car TESLA
Tesla Motors is a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The current base price of a roadster is about $100,000, should you be interested …

34. Java order that packs less of a punch HALF-CAF
Back in 1850, the name "java" was given to a type of coffee grown on the island of Java, and the usage of the term spread from there.

35. What Brits call "red sauce" CATSUP
“Catsup” is an American spelling of “ketchup” that is sometimes used, especially in the south of the country.

37. Major-___ DOMO
A majordomo is a person in charge, or the senior person who might act in the absence of a boss. The term derives from the Latin “major domus” meaning “senior in the house”.

38. Muse for D. H. Lawrence ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry and is often depicted playing a lyre.

D. H. Lawrence was very much a reactionary novelist, in the sense that his work tended to decry the social impact of the industrial revolution. His novels were also criticized for their erotic content, so much so that Lawrence was publicly labelled as a pornographer by the end of his days. His most famous novels are “Sons and Lovers”, “The Rainbow”, “Women in Love” and “Lady Chatterley’s Lover”.

43. Put away ICE
“To ice” is to kill, to put away.

44. Annapolis grad. ENS
Ensign (ens.)

The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is located in Annapolis, Maryland. The USNA was founded in 1845 and educates officers for both the US Navy and the US Marine Corps. The motto of the USNA is “Ex Scientia Tridens”, which translates as “From Knowledge, Sea Power”.

46. It comes before one NOON
Our word “noon”, meaning “midday”, comes from the Latin “nona hora” that translates as “ninth hour”. Back in Ancient Rome, the “ninth hour” was three in the afternoon. Over the centuries, traditions such as church prayers and “midday” meals shifted from 3 p.m. to 12 p.m., and so “noon” became understood as 12 noon.

49. Susan who wrote "The Orchid Thief" ORLEAN
“The Orchid Thief” is a 1998 book by journalist Susan Orlean about the poaching of the rare Ghost Orchid from a Florida State Park. The book was adapted into the 2002 film “Adaptation” starring Meryl Streep as the author Orlean.

56. Dorm V.I.P.s RAS
RAs are resident assistants or resident advisers, the peer leaders found in residence halls, particularly on a college campus.

57. Durable stocking fabric LISLE
Lisle is a cotton fabric that has been through an extra process at the end of its manufacture that burns off lint and the ends of fibers leaving the fabric very smooth and with a clean edge.

61. X-rated material SMUT
“Smut” means “dirt, smudge” and more recently “pornographic material”. The term comes from the Yiddish “schmutz”, which is a slang word used in English for dirt, as in “dirt on one’s face”.

63. D.C. athlete NAT
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

65. Pest control brand D-CON
“d-Con” is a line of rodent control products that has been around for over 50 years.

67. Tori of pop/rock AMOS
Tori Amos is an American pianist and singer. Amos started playing the piano at two years old, and was composing piano pieces by age five. She was playing in piano bars (chaperoned by her father) when she was 14. I'm going to have to find some of her music (I lead such a sheltered life ...)!

70. Symbol of Middle America PEORIA
Peoria is the oldest European settlement in the state of Illinois, having been settled by the French in 1680. The city is famous for being cited as “the average American city”. The phrase, “Will it play in Peoria?” is used to mean, “Will it appeal to the mainstream?” It is believed the expression originated as a corruption of, “We shall play in Peoria”, a line used by some actors in the 1890 novel "Five Hundred Dollars" by Horatio Alger, Jr.

73. Big name in 35-Down HEINZ
(35D. What Brits call "red sauce" CATSUP)
The HJ Heinz Company is an American concern, based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The company was founded in 1869, by Henry John Heinz. It was Heinz himself who came up with the marketing slogan of “57 Varieties”. The “57” really doesn’t have any relevance to the range of products available as Heinz chose the “5” because it was his lucky number, and the “7” because it was his wife’s lucky number.

78. Some TVs and smartphones LGS
LG is a very large, South Korean manufacturer of electronics, chemicals and telecom products. LG used to be known as Lucky-Goldstar.

80. The Impaler VLAD
Vlad III was a 15th century ruler in modern-day Romania. He was given the name “Vlad the Impaler” after he died, and this suggests that he was in the habit of impaling his enemies. His father, Vlad II, was known as Vlad Dracul, which translates as Vlad the Devil or Dragon. As a result, Vlad the Impaler was also known by the diminutive form of his father’s name, i.e. Dracula! Bram Stoker borrowed this name for his famous 1897 novel titled “Dracula”.

83. Fort Knox valuable INGOT
Fort Knox is actually a US Army base, but it lends its name to the adjacent facility that is more correctly called the United States Bullion Depository. Most of the US gold reserves are in "Fort Knox", although it isn't the biggest gold repository in the US. That honor goes to the vault under the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in Manhattan. Most of the gold stored in the New York vault belongs to foreign nations and banks.

89. West Pointer CADET
West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn't start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and today about 15% of all new cadets are women.

90. Opposite of an early adopter LUDDITE
In contemporary usage, a “Luddite” is someone who is slow to adopt new technology. This usage has even been extended to “Neo-Luddism”, meaning the active opposition to some technologies. It has been suggested that the term “Luddism” commemorates a youth called Ned Ludd, who smashed two mechanical knitting machines in 1779, in the belief that they represented automation that took away jobs. In the following decades, Luddism became an active movement, with Luddites going on rampages, smashing equipment that was deemed to create unemployment.

92. Arafat's successor as Palestinian president ABBAS
Mahmoud Abbas took over as Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) in 2004 after the death of Yasser Arafat. Abbas is also the President of the Palestinian National Authority, equivalent to "head of state".

93. Budget alternative DOLLAR
Dollar Rent A Car was founded in 1965. Chrysler acquired the company in 1990 and merged it with Thrifty Car Rental, which Chrysler had purchased a year earlier.

The Budget Rent a Car company started out in 1958 with the intent of undercutting the existing price of renting a car at airports. Budget was founded by Morris Mirkin. Mirkin enlisted Julius Lederer as a co-founder the following year. Lederer was the husband of newspaper columnist “Ann Landers”.

96. Meetings arranged through Ashley Madison TRYSTS
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

AshleyMadison.com is an online dating siervice that is based in Canada. The business’s slogan seems to encapsulate its mission quite well: “Life is short, Have an affair.” There is no Ashley Madison in reality, as the company name was simply created from the two popular female names “Ashley” and “Madison”.

99. Helen Mirren, e.g. DAME
Helen Mirren, one of my favorite English actresses, won her Best Actress Oscar for playing the title role in the marvelous 2006 film “The Queen”. Mirren has played three different queens on film and television including Queen Elizabeth II. She also played the title role in the TV drama “Elizabeth I”, and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of the title character in the 1994 film “The Madness of King George”.

105. ___ diagram VENN
Englishman John Venn was an expert in the field of logic, and introduced the Venn diagram in his book "Symbolic Logic" in 1881. Venn diagrams are used in Set Theory, to illustrate the logical relationships between sets of variables.

106. 'Vette choice T-TOP
A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small maneuverable warship called a corvette. The Corvette has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

109. "N.Y. State of Mind" rapper NAS
Rapper Nas used to go by another stage name, Nasty Nas, and before that by his real name, Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones. Nas released his first album "Illmatic" in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Savor, as a drink SIP ON
6. Takes down a peg ABASES
12. Je t'aime : French :: ___ : Spanish TE AMO
17. Sell at a discount, say UNLOAD
19. Female toon with a "dollink" Boris NATASHA
21. Grackles and grebes AVIANS
23. PP SHOPPING CENTER
25. Attic GARRET
26. Horror franchise beginning in 2004 SAW
27. Lasting for years and years AGELONG
28. Dirt road hazards RUTS
30. Melee FRAY
31. Street of film fame ELM
32. You might take it out for a drive IRON
33. Court, for short RHYME
35. Pile of stones used to mark a trail CAIRN
36. DD DEAD ENDS
39. First antibacterial soap brand DIAL
40. "Oh, please, that's enough" SPARE ME
42. Derisive sounds SNORTS
43. Abbr. in many airport names INTL
44. Jubilant ELATED
45. Portrait on Chinese renminbi bills MAO
46. AA NCAA FINALS
48. Extra bed, maybe COT
51. Bad thing on a record BLOT
53. The Jedi and the Sith, e.g. FOES
54. "Thursday Night Football" airer CBS
55. Alaska tourist attraction AURORA
57. Director of 2015's "Chi-Raq" LEE
58. Capital with the Norsk Folkemuseum OSLO
60. Travel info source, for short AAA
61. London cathedral ST PAUL’S
62. Volunteer's response I CAN
64. WW WINDOW FRAME
68. Historic German admiral Maximilian von ___ SPEE
69. Fizzy drink SODA POP
71. Michael of "Saturday Night Live" CHE
72. Cry to a husky MUSH!
74. "When I was a ___ ..." LAD
75. Riot opportunist LOOTER
76. Locale for cranberries BOG
77. Very much A LOT
79. Uniform EVEN
81. See 114-Across ELF
82. OO ONION RINGS
85. Hodges who managed the Mets to a World Series title GIL
86. Little Rascals boy FARINA
88. Tolkien tree creatures ENTS
89. Mars features, mistakenly CANALS
92. Befuddling ADDLING
94. Peeps heard by Bo Peep BAAS
95. ZZ JAZZ DUET
97. When repeated, a Yale fight song BOOLA
98. Playwright Clifford ODETS
100. "How ___!" RUDE
101. Modern TV feature, for short DVR
102. Hazy memory BLUR
103. Grps. with the motto "Every child. One voice" PTAS
104. Conquest of 1953 EVEREST
107. Susan of "The Partridge Family" DEY
108. Silas in "The Da Vinci Code," notably ALBINO
110. NN MINNESOTA TWINS
113. Dances at the Tropicana Club SALSAS
114. Santa Claus portrayer in 81-Across ED ASNER
115. Greet from behind the wheel TOOT AT
116. Witherspoon of "Legally Blonde" REESE
117. Shot put and long jump EVENTS
118. "Auld Lang Syne" and others POEMS

Down
1. Figured (out) SUSSED
2. Has an inspiration INHALES
3. Agricultural figure in "The Canterbury Tales" PLOWMAN
4. Alley ___ OOP
5. Pep Boys competitor NAPA
6. Whites, informally ANGLOS
7. Strips shortly after getting up in the morning? BACON
8. Rate ___ (be perfect) A TEN
9. Spicy fruit beverage often used as a tequila chaser SANGRITA
10. Cornerstone abbr. EST
11. Singer Crow SHERYL
12. Identifies in a Facebook photo TAGS
13. A Perón EVA
14. Soaring cost? AIRFARE
15. RR MARRIED COUPLE
16. Like macho push-ups ONE-ARM
18. Explore deeply DIG INTO
20. Calla lily family ARUM
22. "Gypsy" composer STYNE
24. Techies, stereotypically NERDS
29. Gasless car TESLA
34. Java order that packs less of a punch HALF-CAF
35. What Brits call "red sauce" CATSUP
37. Major-___ DOMO
38. Muse for D. H. Lawrence ERATO
39. Some lab samples DNAS
41. Assets for food critics PALATES
43. Put away ICE
44. Annapolis grad. ENS
46. It comes before one NOON
47. Building beam I-BAR
49. Susan who wrote "The Orchid Thief" ORLEAN
50. Hit with a stun gun TASED
51. "Chill out, will you" BE COOL
52. FF LEADOFF DOUBLE
53. Wig out FLIP
56. Dorm V.I.P.s RAS
57. Durable stocking fabric LISLE
59. Like courtroom witnesses SWORN IN
60. Floor AWE
61. X-rated material SMUT
63. D.C. athlete NAT
65. Pest control brand D-CON
66. Sarcastic "Wonderful" OH GREAT
67. Tori of pop/rock AMOS
70. Symbol of Middle America PEORIA
73. Big name in 35-Down HEINZ
76. Gaudy wrap BOA
77. Industrious workers ANTS
78. Some TVs and smartphones LGS
80. The Impaler VLAD
83. Fort Knox valuable INGOT
84. To some degree IN A SENSE
85. Beholds GAZES AT
87. It's heard at a hearing ALL RISE
89. West Pointer CADET
90. Opposite of an early adopter LUDDITE
91. Morning run time, maybe SEVEN AM
92. Arafat's successor as Palestinian president ABBAS
93. Budget alternative DOLLAR
94. Next to BESIDE
95. Peers in a box JURORS
96. Meetings arranged through Ashley Madison TRYSTS
99. Helen Mirren, e.g. DAME
100. Like an alarm clock, night after night RESET
103. It may be struck on a runway POSE
105. ___ diagram VENN
106. 'Vette choice T-TOP
109. "N.Y. State of Mind" rapper NAS
111. ___ system (luxury car option, briefly) NAV
112. Romance WOO


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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