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0201-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Feb 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: Road Movies … each of today’s themed answers is a MOVIE title, a title that is also the name of a famous ROAD:
58A. "Bonnie and Clyde" and "Thelma & Louise" ... or a hint to 18-, 26- and 44-Across : ROAD MOVIES

18A. Title locale in a 1987 Oliver Stone drama : WALL STREET
26A. Title locale in a 1950 Billy Wilder film noir : SUNSET BOULEVARD
44A. Title locale in a 2001 David Lynch thriller : MULHOLLAND DRIVE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Switch that changes bands on the radio : AM/FM
The radio spectrum is divided into bands based on frequency. "High band" is composed of relatively high frequency values, and "low band" is composed of frequencies that are relatively low. FM radio falls into the band called Very High Frequency, or VHF. Television signals use frequencies even higher than VHF, frequencies in the Ultra High Frequency band (UHF). AM radio uses lower frequencies that fall into the relatively low bands of Low, Medium and High Frequency (LF, MF, and HF).

14. ___ Crawley, heiress daughter on "Downton Abbey" : CORA
In the incredibly successful period drama “Downton Abbey", the patriarch of the family living at Downton is Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham or Lord Grantham. The character is played by Hugh Bonneville. Lord Grantham married American Cora Levinson (played by Elizabeth McGovern. Lord and Lady Grantham had three daughters, and no son. The lack of a male heir implied that the Grantham estate would pass to a male cousin, and out of the immediate family. The Grantham daughters are Lady Mary (played by Michelle Dockery), Lady Edith (played by Laura Carmichael) and Lady Sybil (played by Jessica Brown Findlay). Lady Sybil had the audacity to marry the family chauffeur, an Irish nationalist. The shame of it all …

15. One of the Great Lakes : ERIE
Lake Erie is the fourth largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake's edge.

16. Cut, as a pumpkin : CARVE
It’s thought that the tradition of pumpkin carving originated in Ireland, although turnips and beets were used over there instead of pumpkins. The turnips and beets were carved for the festival called Samhain, which marked the end of the harvest season.

18. Title locale in a 1987 Oliver Stone drama : WALL STREET
New York’s famous “Wall Street” was originally named by the Dutch as “de Waal Straat”.

“Wall Street” is a very entertaining 1987 film from Oliver Stone starring Charlie Sheen as an up and coming stockbroker and Michael Douglas as an amoral corporate raider.

21. Animal hide : PELT
The “pelt” is the skin of a furry animal.

22. Four-baggers : HOMERS
In baseball, a “four-bagger” is a home run.

25. Any old Joe : BUB
"Bub" is American slang, a term used to address males. “Bub” is possibly a variation of bud.

26. Title locale in a 1950 Billy Wilder film noir : SUNSET BOULEVARD
The Los Angeles thoroughfare Sunset Boulevard is 22 miles long, stretching from downtown Los Angeles to the Pacific Ocean. The most famous part of Sunset Boulevard is the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, a 1½-mile stretch that is home to high-end boutiques, restaurants and nightclubs.

“Sunset Boulevard” is a classic film noir co-written and directed by the great Billy Wilder, released in 1950. It’s a story about a faded film star (played by Gloria Swanson) who dreams about making a return to the screen. Andrew Lloyd Webber made a reasonably successful musical adaptation of the film using the same title, which opened in London in 1993.

33. Youth org. since 1910 : BSA
As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

35. Longtime N.B.A. coach Pat : RILEY
Pat Riley is a former professional basketball player and NBA head coach. Off the court, Riley is quite the celebrity and is noted as a snappy dresser. He is friend of Giorgio Armani and wears Armani suits at all his games. Riley even modeled suits at an Armani fashion show.

36. Hawaiian shindig : LUAU
The Hawaiian party or feast known as a “luau” really dates back to 1819, when King Kamehameha II removed religious laws that governed the eating of meals. These laws called for women and men to eat separately. At the same times as he changed the laws, the king initiated the luau tradition by symbolically eating with the women who moved in his circle.

“Shindig” is such a lovely word, I think, describing a party that usually includes some dancing. Although its origin isn’t really clear, the term perhaps comes from “shinty”, a Scottish game that is similar to field hockey.

40. "Love Story" author Segal : ERICH
Erich Segal wrote two hit screenplays, "Yellow Submarine" (the Beatles’ animated movie) and "Love Story" (starring Ryan O’Neal and Ali MacGraw). He wrote the novel "Love Story" after the screenplay. As the novel was published before the film was released, there's a popular misconception that the movie is based on the book.

43. A, in Berlin : EIN
Berlin is the capital and largest city in Germany, and is the second most populous city in the European Union (after London).

44. Title locale in a 2001 David Lynch thriller : MULHOLLAND DRIVE
Mulholland Drive is a famous, 21-mile long thoroughfare Southern California. Parts of the road offer spectacular views of the Los Angeles Basin, the San Fernando Valley and the Hollywood Sign. You might also spot some movie stars leaving or entering their expensive and exclusive homes on Mulholland.

"Mulholland Drive" is a thriller released in 2002 that was well received by the critics (although I didn't like it!). The original idea was for "Mulholland Drive" to be a pilot for a television series, but when ABC saw the filmed pilot they didn't like it and so passed on it for their schedule. The script was rewritten, some new scenes shot, and after re-editing the movie was released.

57. F.D.R.'s successor : HST
The letter “S” in the middle of the name Harry S. Truman (HST) doesn’t stand for anything. The future-president was named “Harry” in honor of his mother’s brother Harrison “Harry” Young. The initial “S” was chosen in honor of young Harry’s two grandfathers: Anderson S-hipp Truman and S-olomon Young.

58. "Bonnie and Clyde" and "Thelma & Louise" ... or a hint to 18-, 26- and 44-Across : ROAD MOVIES
“Bonnie and Clyde” is a 1967 crime film based on the life stories of outlaws Bobbie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway played the title roles. “Bonnie and Clyde” was among the first 100 films chosen for preservation in the US National Film Registry.

"Thelma & Louise" is a thought-provoking movie, but one that is very entertaining. It was directed by Ridley Scott in 1991, and stars two fabulous leads in Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon. You'll also spot Brad Pitt in there as well, in his first significant movie role.

61. Sleep disorder : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

66. Detective fiction writer ___ Stanley Gardner : ERLE
I must have read all of the Perry Mason books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn't get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

Down
2. Kind of pork at a Chinese restaurant : MOO SHU
Moo shu pork is a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg.

7. ___ at windmills : TILT
The phrase “tilting at windmills” means “attacking imaginary enemies”. The idiom comes from an episode in the novel “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes, in which the hero of the piece charges at windmills that he imagines are giants.

9. Month with Columbus Day : OCTOBER
The discovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus is celebrated with a national holiday in many countries. Here in the US we have Columbus Day, and in the Bahamas there is Discovery Day, and the Day of the Americas in Uruguay.

10. Old MacDonald's place : FARM
There was an American version of the English children's song "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" (E-I-E-I-O), that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the US version goes "Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o".

13. Brooklyn hoopsters : NETS
The NBA’s Brooklyn Nets until relatively recently were the New Jersey Nets, based in Newark. Prior to 1977, the team was known as the New York Nets and played in various locations on Long Island. Ten years earlier, the Nets were called the New Jersey Americans and were headquartered in Teaneck, New Jersey.

19. Jewish house of worship : SHUL
Shul is another word for a synagogue. "Shul" is the term mostly used in Orthodox Judaism, "synagogue" in Conservative Judaism, and "temple" in Reform Judaism.

27. Move up and down, as a doll's head : BOBBLE
Bobblehead dolls are those little toys with big heads that bobble around if tapped, while the body remains still. They're often given to ticket buyers at sports events as a promotion.

28. "Carmen" or "Rigoletto" : OPERA
Georg Bizet was a French composer active in the Romantic era. Bizet's most famous work has to be his opera "Carmen". "Carmen" initially received a lukewarm reception from the public, even though his fellow composers had nothing but praise for it. Sadly, Bizet died very young at only 36, before he could see "Carmen's" tremendous success.

"Rigoletto" is one of Giuseppe Verdi's most famous and oft-performed operas. The storyline comes from Victor Hugo's play "Le roi s'amuse" (usually translated as "The King's Fool"). Rigoletto is the king's fool, the jester.

29. Meredith of daytime TV : VIEIRA
Meredith Vieira is journalist and television personality. Vieira had a regular gig on “The View” and NBC’s “Morning” show. She also took over from Regis Philbin as host of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire”.

36. Moon landing craft, for short : LEM
In the Apollo program, the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) was the vehicle that actually landed on the moon and returned the astronauts to the command module that was orbiting overhead. The third LEM built was named "Spider", and it participated in the Apollo 9 mission which tested the functionality of the LEM design in space. The fourth LEM was called "Snoopy" and it flew around the moon in the Apollo 10 mission, the dress rehearsal for the upcoming moon landing. Apollo 11's LEM was called "Eagle" and it brought Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to and from the moon's surface. Another famous LEM was Apollo 13’s Aquarius. Although Aquarius never landed on the moon, it did serve as a “lifeboat” for the three astronauts after the explosive rupture of an oxygen canister in the Service Module.

37. Neighbor of Arg. and Braz. : URU
The official name of Uruguay is the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, reflecting the nation’s location on the eastern coast of South America. It is a relatively small country, the second-smallest on the continent, after Suriname. In 2009, Uruguay became the first country in the world to provide a free laptop and Internet access to every child. Now there's a thought ...

Argentina is the second largest country in South America (after Brazil), and geographically is the world’s largest Spanish-speaking nation. The name “Argentina” of course comes from the Latin “argentum”, the word for “silver”. It is thought that the name was given by the early Spanish and Portuguese conquerors who also named the Rio de la Plata (the “Silver River”). Those early explorers got hold of lots of silver objects that they found among the native population.

Brazil is the largest country in South America, and the largest Portuguese-speaking country in the world. Brazil is so large that it shares a border with every other South American country, except for Ecuador and Chile.

41. Dustin who won an Oscar for "Rain Man" : HOFFMAN
Dustin Hoffman’s big break in movies came with the starring role in 1967’s “The Graduate”, and he has been going strong ever since. He wasn’t always destined to be an actor though, as he did start college intending to study medicine. But he left after only a year and joined the Pasadena Playhouse. There he met his very good friend Gene Hackman. Even though the pair have been friends all their lives, it wasn’t until decades after they met that they shared the screen together, for just a few minutes in the excellent 2003 thriller “Runaway Jury”.

“Rain Man” is an entertaining and thought-provoking film released in 1988 starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It’s all about a self-possessed yuppie (Cruise, appropriate casting!) who discovers he has a brother who is an autistic savant (Hoffman). Hoffman won the Best Actor Oscar for his performance, and “Rain Man” won the Best Picture award.

45. Actor Jared of "Dallas Buyers Club" : LETO
Jared Leto is an actor and musician. In the world of music, Leto is the lead singer and rhythm guitarist for the rock band 30 Seconds to Mars. In the film world his most critically acclaimed role was that of a heroin addict in "Requiem for a Dream". He also appeared in "American Psycho", "Panic Room" and "Lord of War".

"Dallas Buyers Club" is a 2013 film that tells the real-life story of AIDS patient Ron Woodruff. Woodruff smuggled unapproved AIDS drugs across the US border into Texas in opposition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The movie won the Best Actor Oscar for Matthew McConaughey and Best Supporting Actor for Jared Leto.

46. Distressed maiden, in fairy tales : DAMSEL
A “damsel” is a young woman, often referring to a lady of noble birth. The term came into English from the Old French “dameisele”, which had the same meaning. The modern French term is “demoiselle”, which in turn is related to the term of address “mademoiselle”.

47. ___ virgin : VESTAL
In Ancient Rome the priestesses of the the goddess Vesta were known as the Vestals. They were also called the Vestal Virgins as they took a vow of chastity, although they weren't required to be celibate for life. Each priestess entered the order before puberty and promised to live a celibate life for thirty years. The first decade was spent as a student, the second in service, and the final ten years as a teacher. Upon completion of the thirty years the Vestal was free to marry, but few did. Life was a lot better for a woman in the priesthood than it was subject to Roman Law.

55. Japanese soup : MISO
Miso is the name of the seasoning that makes the soup. Basic miso seasoning is made by fermenting rice, barley and soybeans with salt and a fungus (!) to produce a paste. The paste can be added to stock to make miso soup, or perhaps to flavor tofu.

59. Big cheese : VIP
The phrase "the big cheese" doesn't have its roots in the word "cheese" at all. The original phrase was "the real cheese" meaning "the real thing", used way back in late 1800s (long before Coke picked it up). "Chiz" is a Persian and Hindi word meaning "thing", and it's not hard to see how the expression "the real chiz" would morph into "the real cheese". Then in early-20th century America, instead of a "real cheese", the most influential person in a group was labeled as "the big cheese". And I think that is about the only use of the word "cheese" that is in anyway complimentary!

60. Face on a fiver : ABE
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Switch that changes bands on the radio : AM/FM
5. Memo : NOTE
9. Frequently : OFTEN
14. ___ Crawley, heiress daughter on "Downton Abbey" : CORA
15. One of the Great Lakes : ERIE
16. Cut, as a pumpkin : CARVE
17. Like most college dorms nowadays : COED
18. Title locale in a 1987 Oliver Stone drama : WALL STREET
20. U-turn from WNW : ESE
21. Animal hide : PELT
22. Four-baggers : HOMERS
23. Sandbars : SHOALS
25. Any old Joe : BUB
26. Title locale in a 1950 Billy Wilder film noir : SUNSET BOULEVARD
33. Youth org. since 1910 : BSA
34. Make a selection : OPT
35. Longtime N.B.A. coach Pat : RILEY
36. Hawaiian shindig : LUAU
38. "$500 on the roan nag," e.g. : BET
39. "You and who ___?" (fighting words) : ELSE
40. "Love Story" author Segal : ERICH
42. "Hey ___, what's up?" : BRO
43. A, in Berlin : EIN
44. Title locale in a 2001 David Lynch thriller : MULHOLLAND DRIVE
49. Doctor's charge : FEE
50. "Time is money" and "Knowledge is power" : ADAGES
51. Floating aimlessly : ADRIFT
55. "Well, what do we have here!" : MY MY!
57. F.D.R.'s successor : HST
58. "Bonnie and Clyde" and "Thelma & Louise" ... or a hint to 18-, 26- and 44-Across : ROAD MOVIES
60. Lead-in to boy or girl : ATTA
61. Sleep disorder : APNEA
62. Dot on an ocean map : ISLE
63. Trounce : BEAT
64. Started : BEGAN
65. Topic of a pre-election news story : POLL
66. Detective fiction writer ___ Stanley Gardner : ERLE

Down
1. Means of entry : ACCESS
2. Kind of pork at a Chinese restaurant : MOO SHU
3. Conditionally released from custody : FREE ON BAIL
4. Seeing red : MAD
5. Most modern : NEWEST
6. Spoken, not written : ORAL
7. ___ at windmills : TILT
8. Sushi selection : EEL
9. Month with Columbus Day : OCTOBER
10. Old MacDonald's place : FARM
11. Arborist's focus : TREE
12. "Have I ___ told you ...?" : EVER
13. Brooklyn hoopsters : NETS
19. Jewish house of worship : SHUL
21. Earnest request : PLEA
24. In that capacity : AS SUCH
25. Campaign giveaway : BUTTON
27. Move up and down, as a doll's head : BOBBLE
28. "Carmen" or "Rigoletto" : OPERA
29. Meredith of daytime TV : VIEIRA
30. Crammer's last chance : ALL-NIGHTER
31. Hi-___ image : RES
32. Easter egg coating : DYE
36. Moon landing craft, for short : LEM
37. Neighbor of Arg. and Braz. : URU
41. Dustin who won an Oscar for "Rain Man" : HOFFMAN
43. Mini-whirlpool : EDDY
45. Actor Jared of "Dallas Buyers Club" : LETO
46. Distressed maiden, in fairy tales : DAMSEL
47. ___ virgin : VESTAL
48. Home for a Rockefeller or a Vanderbilt : ESTATE
51. Mideast native : ARAB
52. Narcotize : DOPE
53. Tolled, as a bell : RANG
54. Notion : IDEA
55. Japanese soup : MISO
56. Scream : YELL
59. Big cheese : VIP
60. Face on a fiver : ABE


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0131-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Yaakov Bendavid
THEME: Message to Buyers … each of today’s themed answers is a message that we might find on an item that we buy in a store. However, the message has been given a new meaning:
23A. Notice regarding voting in a state legislature? : ASSEMBLY REQUIRED
34A. Sign on the N.S.A.'s entrance? : INTEL INSIDE
56A. Audition caution for a movie with a cast of thousands? : CONTAINS SMALL PARTS
78A. Note on a watered-down assault indictment? : BATTERY NOT INCLUDED
97A. Offer of free pillow fill? : NO-MONEY DOWN
113A. Desert supermarket? : STORE IN A DRY PLACE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … OCTA- (octi-), RANGO (Ringo)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. ___ Bay, former U.S. base on Luzon : SUBIC
Subic Bay is in the Philippines, about 100 miles north of the capital Manila. Subic Bay was the famous site of a US Naval base until it was closed in 1992. I lived in the Philippines for a couple of years, and spent most weekends SCUBA diving. Subic Bay is a mecca for divers as there are many shipwrecks on the bottom of the bay that date back to the Spanish-American War of 1898, and to WWII.

Luzon is the largest of the Philippine Islands, home to the capital city of Manila.

19. Pope John X's successor : LEO VI
Pope Leo VI was in office for just 9 months, spanning the years 928 and 929. Leo VI apparently wasn’t his own man, and fell under the control of a wealthy Roman noblewoman called Marozia. Marozia had allegedly been the mistress of Pope Sergius III, had ordered the imprisonment and death of Pope John X, then making Leo VI head of the Roman Catholic church.

20. Latin 101 verb : AMAT
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

21. Italian fashion label : PRADA
Prada was started in 1913 as a leathergoods shop in Milan, by the two Prada brothers. One of the brothers, Mario Prada, prevented the female members of his family participating in the company as he didn't believe women should be involved in business (!). When the sexist brother died, his son had no interest in the business so it was his daughter who took over and ran the company for about twenty years, handing it over to her own daughter. I'd say the devil loved that ...

26. In ___ land : LA-LA
La-la land is a euphemism for a state of unconsciousness.

28. Prurient material : SMUT
“Smut” means “dirt, smudge” and more recently “pornographic material”. The term comes from the Yiddish “schmutz”, which is a slang word used in English for dirt, as in “dirt on one’s face”.

Someone described as “prurient” has an extreme interest in sexual matters. Back in the 1600s, “prurient” meant “to have an itch”. Today the meaning is exclusively limited to “to have an itching desire”.

30. Pride : lions :: mob : ___ : EMUS
A group of lions is known as a “pride” of lions. It’s possible that the term “pride” in this context derives from the Latin “”praeda” meaning “prey”.

31. Some G.I. duties : KPS
KP is a US military slang term, and stands for either "kitchen police" or "kitchen patrol".

32. Suited to serve : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

34. Sign on the N.S.A.'s entrance? : INTEL INSIDE
Intel is the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The company was founded in 1968, and the name “Intel” is a derived from the term "int(egrated) el(ectronics)". Recognition of the Intel brand has been greatly helped by the success of the “Intel Inside” campaign that started back in 1991.

The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname ... "No Such Agency".

37. Something to chew on : CUD
Animals that “chew the cud” are called ruminants. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work.

41. Person of interest to the I.R.S. : EARNER
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

42. Explorer for England who mistook Canada for Asia : CABOT
Giovanni Caboto (known in English as “John Cabot”) was an Italian explorer. Departing from Bristol in England, Cabot is believed to have been the first European to visit North America since the Vikings landed here in the 11th century. Many say that he landed in Newfoundland in 1497.

45. Deg. for a teacher-to-be : BSED
Bachelor of Science in Education (BSEd)

50. Biblical prophet : AMOS
Amos is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible.

51. Spanish royalty : REINAS
In Spanish, a “reina” (queen) often lives in “un palacio” (a palace).

53. Nomadic northerner : LAPP
Lapland is a geographic region in northern Scandinavia, largely found within the Arctic Circle. Parts of Lapland are in Norway, Sweden and Finland. The people who are native to the region are called the Sami people. The Sami don't like to be referred to as “Lapps” and they regard the term as insulting.

60. One side in "The Terminator" : HUMANS
The 1984 movie "The Terminator" was directed by James Cameron. It was a relatively low-budget production, costing $6.4 million. It has grossed around $80 million to date, so no wonder the Terminator said "I’ll be back".

61. Mexican cigar brand : TE-AMO
The Te-Amo brand of cigars have been made in the San Andres Valley in the state of Veracruz, Mexico since 1963.

72. It ends in Nov. : DST
On the other side of the Atlantic, Daylight Saving Time (DST) is known as "summer time". The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring (i.e. “spring forward”) and backwards in the fall (i.e. “fall back”) so that afternoons have more daylight.

73. Sporty car roof : T-TOP
A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

75. Pickled garnish : CAPER
The seasoning we know as “capers” are the edible flower buds of the caper bush, also known as Flinders rose. By the time we get them in a jar, the buds have been pickled and salted. I’m not a huge fan of capers ...

77. "Seinfeld" role : ELAINE
The character called Elaine Benes, unlike the other lead characters (Jerry, Kramer and George), did not appear in the pilot episode of "Seinfeld". NBC executives specified the addition of a female lead when they picked up the show citing that the situation was too "male-centric".

78. Note on a watered-down assault indictment? : BATTERY NOT INCLUDED
“Battery” is intentional contact with another person that is deemed to be either harmful or offensive. The related “assault” is the act of creating apprehension that such harmful or offensive contact is imminent.

85. Screen meas. : DIAG
The size of a TV screen is usually classified by the length of a diagonal.

86. 1914 battle locale : MARNE
The River Marne runs roughly northwestward for over 300 miles, running into the River Seine just outside Paris. The Marne was the site of two major battles in WWI, one fought in 1914, and one in 1918.

90. Some safari camping gear : NETS
"Safari" is a Swahili word, meaning "journey" or "expedition".

94. Feature of the Devil : GOATEE
A goatee is a beard formed by hair on just a man's chin. The name probably comes from the tuft of hair seen on an adult goat.

96. ___ Hots : RED
Red Hots are cinnamon-flavored candy pieces. I just found out that Red Hots are sometimes used in apple sauce ...

97. Offer of free pillow fill? : NO-MONEY DOWN
Down feathers are the very fine feathers found under the tougher exterior feathers of a bird. There is fossil evidence that some non-avian dinosaurs had down-like feathers.

100. Second-largest moon of Saturn : RHEA
Rhea is the second-largest of Saturn’s moons, and the ninth-largest of all the moons in our solar system. The moon is named after the Titan Rhea from Greek mythology. Unlike our moon, Rhea might have an atmosphere of sorts, and even rings.

105. Many a bush plane, in brief : STOL
STOL is an abbreviation standing for “short take-off and landing”

In Australia, the land outside of urban area is referred to as “the outback” or “the bush”. Although, I think that “outback” can also be used for the more remote parts of the bush.

106. Thrice, in prescriptions : TER
"Ter" is the Latin word for "three", commonly used in the medical world on prescriptions as part of the expression "ter in die". "Ter in die" is Latin for "three times a day", abbreviated to "TID". "Bis in die" (BID) would be twice a day, and "quater in die" (QID) would be four times a day.

107. Center of a Scrabble board : STAR
The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

112. Chum : MATE
A “chum” is a friend. The term originated in the late 1600s as an alternative spelling for “cham”. In turn “cham” was a shortened form of “chambermate”, a roommate at university.

118. Ex-Yankee Martinez : TINO
First baseman Tino Martinez has retired from Major League Baseball. Martinez played for a number of teams including the Mariners, Yankees, Cardinals and Devil Rays. Martinez was born and raised in Tampa, Florida and as a boy he worked in his father's cigar factory.

120. During whose reign Peter was crucified : NERO
Nero was Emperor of Rome from 54 to 68 CE. Nero had quite the family life. When he was just 16-years-old he married his step-sister Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and step-brother executed.

According to the Christian tradition, Saint Peter was crucified on the orders of Emperor Nero in Rome. Many hold that he requested to be crucified upside down as he felt that he was unworthy to have the same fate as Jesus Christ.

122. Panache : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e "style" or "flair".

Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially in a hat.

Down
2. "The Old Lion" storyteller : AESOP
In Aesop’s fable “The Old Lion”, an old lion lay dying in the mouth of a cave, when the animals he had hunted drew around him. A boar, bull and ass attacked the lion, as they felt free from danger. The moral illustrated by the fable is that it is cowardly to attack the defenseless, even though they may be the enemy.

6. Berry that's much sought after? : HALLE
The beautiful and talented actress Halle Berry was the first African American woman to win a Best Actress Oscar, which she received for her performance in the 2001 movie "Monster's Ball". Berry also won a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress in 2005 for playing the title role in "Catwoman", and she very graciously accepted that award in person. Good for her!

7. Musical documentary/biopic of 2015 : AMY
“Amy” is a documentary about the life and death of English singer Amy Winehouse. Released in 2015, “Amy” is a highest-grossing British documentary of all time.

Amy Winehouse was a much-ridiculed singer from the UK whose life was fraught with very public bouts of drug and alcohol abuse. Winehouse’s lifestyle caught up with her in 2011 when she was found dead from alcohol poisoning. The unfortunate singer was only 27 years old when she died, which means she is now viewed as a member of the “27 Club”. This “club” is made up of famous musicians who all died at the age of 27, including Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison of the Doors, and Kurt Cobain of Nirvana.

10. News sensation of 10/4/1957 : SPUTNIK
The Soviet Union launched the Sputnik satellite towards the end of 1957, a development that shocked the establishment in the US. Within months, President Eisenhower created the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA, now DARPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Space Race had begun ...

11. Ocean State sch. : URI
The University of Rhode Island (URI) was first chartered as an agricultural school, back in 1888. URI's main campus today is located in the village of Kingston.

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the union, but is the second most densely populated. (after New Jersey). Rhode Island is known as the Ocean State, largely because about 14% of the state’s area is made up of ocean bays and inlets. Exactly how Rhode Island got its name is a little unclear. What is known is that way back in 1524, long before the Pilgrims came to New England, the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano likened an island in the area to the Island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean. There were subsequent references to “Rhode Island” in English publications, before the colonists arrived.

12. Ballet dancer's support : BARRE
A “barre” is a handrail used by ballet dancers for warm-up exercises and to provide support when practicing certain moves.

14. Bag carrier : CADDIE
“Caddie” is a Scottish word, as one might expect given the history of the game of golf. “Caddie” is a local word derived from the French “cadet”, meaning a younger son or brother, and also a student officer in the military.

16. Bay Area newspaper : EXAMINER
“The San Francisco Examiner” is a newspaper that is distributed for free around the Bay Area. The paper was launched in 1863 as the “Democratic Press”, which was opposed to the positions held by President Abraham Lincoln. Two years later, the newspaper’s offices were destroyed by a mob on hearing of the president’s assassination. The paper started up publication again a few month’s later as the “Daily Examiner”.

35. Infection fighter : T CELL
T cells are a group of white blood cells that are essential components of the body's immune system. T cells are so called because they mature in the thymus, a specialized organ found in the chest.

36. "Forrest Gump" setting, for short : NAM
The epic 1994 movie “Forrest Gump” is based on a 1986 novel of the same name by Winston Groom. Groom said that he had envisioned John Goodman playing the title role, and not Tom Hanks.

37. Longtime Olympics TV host : COSTAS
Bob Costas has been a sportscaster for NBC since the early eighties. Costas has a son called Keith. Just before his son was born, Costas made (as a joke) a bet with Minnesota Twins center fielder Kirby Puckett that if he was batting over .350 by the time the child was born, he would name the baby "Kirkby". Well, Puckett won the bet, but the actual name chosen was Keith Michael Costas. When Puckett reminded Costas of the agreement, the birth certificate was changed to Keith Michael Kirkby Costas. My wife would have killed me ...

40. Mulishness : ADAMANCY
The words “adamant” and “adamantine” can mean hard like rock or stony, in the literal sense. In the more figurative sense, someone who is adamantine is stubborn or inflexible, like a mule, mulish.

42. Squirreled away : CACHED
A “cache” is a secret supply. We imported the term into English from French Canadian trappers in the 17th century. Back then, “cache” was as slang term for a “hiding place for stores”, derived from the French verb “cacher” meaning “to hide”.

43. Trysters : AMOURS
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

44. Witticism : BON MOT
“Bon mot” translates from French as "good word". We use "bon mot" (and sometimes just "mot") to mean a quip, a witticism.

45. With 70-Across, member of Hollywood's Frat Pack : BEN
(70A. See 45-Down : STILLER)
Ben Stiller is the son of actors Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara. Ben is perhaps as well-known as a director as he is an actor. He made his debut as a director in the film “Reality Bites” in 1994.

48. Old-timey footwear accessory : SPATS
Spats are footwear accessories that cover the ankle and instep. Spats were primarily worn by men, and originally had the purpose of protecting shoes and socks from mud or rain. Eventually, spats became a feature in stylish dress. The term “spats” is a contraction of “spatterdashes”.

51. Dish that's stirred constantly when being made : RISOTTO
Risotto is an Italian rice dish that is usually served as a first course in Italy, but as a main course here in North America.

52. Neighbors of Fijians : SAMOANS
The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. "Samoa" is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

57. Soul singer Baker : ANITA
Anita Baker is an R&B and soul singer who was raised in Detroit, Michigan. Baker’s most successful song is the Grammy-winning “Sweet Love” released in 1986.

58. Nadir : LOW POINT
The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith.

59. Herringbone, for example : TWILL
The verb "to twill" means to weave a cloth (called a twill) that has a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs.

63. Tried to avoid a tag, say : SLID IN
That would be in baseball …

64. Defender of Troy : AENEAS
In Roman and Greek mythology, Aeneas was a Trojan warrior. According to ancient Roman lore, Aeneas traveled to Italy and became the ancestor Romulus and Remus, and thus the ancestor of all Romans. Aeneas’s story is told in Virgil’s epic poem “The Aeneid”.

69. Parlor piece : SETTEE
“Settee” is another word for a couch. The term come from the Old English “setl”, which was a long bench with a high back and arms.

74. Super Bowl-winning coach Carroll : PETE
Pete Carroll is a former head coach for the New York Jets and the New England Patriots, and now has the same position with the Seattle Seahawks. Carroll is also a “Deadhead”, an avid fan of the Grateful Dead.

76. Target of a curfew, maybe : RIOTER
Our word “curfew” comes from an Old French word meaning “cover fire”. In medieval days a bell would be ring in the evenings as a signal to bank the hearths in preparation for sleeping. The intent was to prevent uncontrolled fires starting from fireplaces that were not tended during the night.

78. Old Southwest outlaw : BANDOLERO
“Bandelero” is a Spanish word for “bandit”.

79. Title chameleon of a 2011 animated film : RANGO
“Rango” is a 2011 animated feature film starring the voice of Johnny Depp. The anti-smoking organization known as Breathe California labelled “Rango” as a public health hazard because of 60 instances of smoking in the movie.

80. Fraternity letters : NUS
The Latin equivalent of the Greek letter “nu” is "N". An uppercase nu looks just like the Latin capital N, however, the lowercase nu looks like our lowercase "v". Very confusing ...

81. Throw a monkey wrench into : SABOTAGE
There is a story that disgruntled textile workers would kick their wooden shoes, called sabots, into the looms in order to disable them so that they didn't have to work. This act of vandalism was named for the shoe, an act of ... sabotage.

89. Low-quality material, in a saying : SOW’S EAR
The old proverb “you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear” was apparently coined by English clergyman Stephen Gross in his 1579 story “Ephemerides”. Gosson wrote therein “Seekinge too make a silke purse of a Sowes eare."

91. Unsmilingly : DEADPAN
The term "deadpan", slang for an impassive expression, comes from dead (expressionless) and pan (slang for "face").

99. Impurity : DROSS
When metals are smelted, there is a scum made up of impurities that floats on the surface of the molten metal. This scum is called "dross" and is drawn off and discarded. The term "dross" then came to mean any waste or impure matter.

103. 1961 Charlton Heston title role : EL CID
"El Cid" is an epic film released in 1961 that tells the story of the Castilian knight who was known as El Cid. The two big names at the top of the cast were Charlton Heston and Sophia Loren, but just who was the biggest star? When Loren discovered that a huge billboard promoting the movie in Times Square showed that her name was below Heston's, she sued the movie's producers.

104. Fort ___, Fla. : MYERS
Fort Myers is a city on the Gulf Coast of Florida. The city was built on the site of the old Fort Myers, a fort built by the US Army as a base of operations against the Seminole Native Americans.

108. Penny ___ : ANTE
Penny Ante poker is a game in which bets are limited to a penny, or some other small, friendly sum. The expression “penny-ante” has come to describe any business transaction that is on a small scale.

109. Commuter option : RAIL
Our verb “to commute”, meaning “to go back and forth to work”, ultimately derives from the Latin “commutare”, meaning “to often change”. Back in the late 1800s, a “commutation ticket” was a season pass, so named because it allowed one to “change” one kind of payment into another. Quite interesting …

114. Big name in camping gear : REI
REI is a sporting goods store, the initialism standing for Recreational Equipment Inc. REI was founded in Seattle by Lloyd and Mary Anderson in 1938 as a cooperative that supplies quality climbing gear to outdoor enthusiasts. The first full-time employee hired by the Andersons was Jim Whittaker, who was the American to climb Mount Everest.

115. Strands in a lab : DNA
Famously, James Watson and Francis Crick worked out that the structure of DNA is a double helix. Well, it turns out that some strands of DNA can twist into different shapes. For example, the DNA at the ends of our chromosomes can form a rectangular structure called a triplex or quadruplex.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Aspect : FACET
6. They're not tipped very much nowadays : HATS
10. ___ Bay, former U.S. base on Luzon : SUBIC
15. County center : SEAT
19. Pope John X's successor : LEO VI
20. Latin 101 verb : AMAT
21. Italian fashion label : PRADA
22. Weigh station unit : AXLE
23. Notice regarding voting in a state legislature? : ASSEMBLY REQUIRED
26. In ___ land : LA-LA
27. Fake : NOT REAL
28. Prurient material : SMUT
29. Cool, once : RAD
30. Pride : lions :: mob : ___ : EMUS
31. Some G.I. duties : KPS
32. Suited to serve : ONE-A
34. Sign on the N.S.A.'s entrance? : INTEL INSIDE
37. Something to chew on : CUD
38. Unchanging : STATIC
41. Person of interest to the I.R.S. : EARNER
42. Explorer for England who mistook Canada for Asia : CABOT
45. Deg. for a teacher-to-be : BSED
46. Command and Control : KEYS
49. Runs into : MEETS
50. Biblical prophet : AMOS
51. Spanish royalty : REINAS
53. Nomadic northerner : LAPP
55. Ace : PRO
56. Audition caution for a movie with a cast of thousands? : CONTAINS SMALL PARTS
60. One side in "The Terminator" : HUMANS
61. Mexican cigar brand : TE-AMO
62. Squirrel away : STOW
63. Blue : SAD
66. Shoreline problem : EROSION
68. Brings good news to skiers, say : SNOWS
70. See 45-Down : STILLER
72. It ends in Nov. : DST
73. Sporty car roof : T-TOP
75. Pickled garnish : CAPER
77. "Seinfeld" role : ELAINE
78. Note on a watered-down assault indictment? : BATTERY NOT INCLUDED
81. Where to get a mud wrap : SPA
83. Numerical prefix : OCTA-
84. Abstain : SIT OUT
85. Screen meas. : DIAG
86. 1914 battle locale : MARNE
88. Chick magnets? : HENS
90. Some safari camping gear : NETS
91. Unable to get it, say : DENSE
92. Houses : ABODES
94. Feature of the Devil : GOATEE
96. ___ Hots : RED
97. Offer of free pillow fill? : NO-MONEY DOWN
100. Second-largest moon of Saturn : RHEA
102. Beauty : GEM
105. Many a bush plane, in brief : STOL
106. Thrice, in prescriptions : TER
107. Center of a Scrabble board : STAR
110. Typically active voting group, with "the" : ELDERLY
112. Chum : MATE
113. Desert supermarket? : STORE IN A DRY PLACE
116. Stress, it's said : AGER
117. Bewildered : AT SEA
118. Ex-Yankee Martinez : TINO
119. Buzzing : ASTIR
120. During whose reign Peter was crucified : NERO
121. Formal letter opener : TO SIR
122. Panache : ELAN
123. Cell towers for cellphones, for example : NEEDS

Down
1. Steak cut : FLANK
2. "The Old Lion" storyteller : AESOP
3. Overhead items : COSTS
4. Always : EVER
5. Break : TIME OUT
6. Berry that's much sought after? : HALLE
7. Musical documentary/biopic of 2015 : AMY
8. Smears : TARS
9. Stick in the ground? : STEM
10. News sensation of 10/4/1957 : SPUTNIK
11. Ocean State sch. : URI
12. Ballet dancer's support : BARRE
13. 10, say : IDEAL
14. Bag carrier : CADDIE
15. Ones doing demos, maybe : SALES REPS
16. Bay Area newspaper : EXAMINER
17. Suggest : ALLUDE TO
18. Promos : TEASERS
24. Wedding expense : BAND
25. Computer command : QUIT
33. Court stat : ASSIST
35. Infection fighter : T CELL
36. "Forrest Gump" setting, for short : NAM
37. Longtime Olympics TV host : COSTAS
39. Conjugation factors : TENSES
40. Mulishness : ADAMANCY
42. Squirreled away : CACHED
43. Trysters : AMOURS
44. Witticism : BON MOT
45. With 70-Across, member of Hollywood's Frat Pack : BEN
47. Blathers : YAPS
48. Old-timey footwear accessory : SPATS
51. Dish that's stirred constantly when being made : RISOTTO
52. Neighbors of Fijians : SAMOANS
54. Guard : PROTECT
57. Soul singer Baker : ANITA
58. Nadir : LOW POINT
59. Herringbone, for example : TWILL
63. Tried to avoid a tag, say : SLID IN
64. Defender of Troy : AENEAS
65. Clear, as a channel : DREDGE
67. Belt mark : NOTCH
69. Parlor piece : SETTEE
71. Held in high esteem : LAUDED
74. Super Bowl-winning coach Carroll : PETE
76. Target of a curfew, maybe : RIOTER
78. Old Southwest outlaw : BANDOLERO
79. Title chameleon of a 2011 animated film : RANGO
80. Fraternity letters : NUS
81. Throw a monkey wrench into : SABOTAGE
82. Concert V.I.P. : PROMOTER
86. Masculine icon : MAN’S MAN
87. Poetic twilight : E’EN
89. Low-quality material, in a saying : SOW’S EAR
91. Unsmilingly : DEADPAN
93. Attacks : SETS AT
95. Opposing voice : ANTI
96. Count (on) : RELY
98. "The best is ___ come" : YET TO
99. Impurity : DROSS
101. Graceful bird : HERON
102. Hazard for high heels : GRATE
103. 1961 Charlton Heston title role : EL CID
104. Fort ___, Fla. : MYERS
108. Penny ___ : ANTE
109. Commuter option : RAIL
111. Alternatively : ELSE
114. Big name in camping gear : REI
115. Strands in a lab : DNA


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0130-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 16, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Samuel A. Donaldson & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. One of a trio in a children's story : MAMA BEAR
The story of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" was first recorded in 1837, in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three "nameless" bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

15. Lacking any sides : A LA CARTE
On a restaurant menu, items that are "à la carte" are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked "table d'hôte" (also called "prix fixe") is a fixed-price menu with limited choice.

16. Puffin relative : AUKLET
Auklet is the name given to several small auks found on around the coasts of the North Pacific.

Auks are penguin-like sea birds that live in colder northern waters including the Arctic. Like penguins, auks are great swimmers, but unlike penguins, auks can fly.

18. Prize at the top of a maypole : WREATH
A maypole is a tall pole used in various folk festivals in Europe, usually taking place in early to mid-summer. The pole is often used for a maypole dance in which men and women circle while holding ribbons attached to the top of the pole.

21. Start of many a dance routine : CHA-
The cha-cha-cha (often simplified to “cha-cha”) is a Latin dance with origins in Cuba, where it was introduced by composer Enrique Jorrin in 1953.

23. Large fern : BRACKEN
The fern known as bracken is one of the oldest ferns in the world. Fossil records have been found of bracken that lived over 55 million years ago.

25. Renegade and Renaissance, to the Secret Service : OBAMAS
By tradition, the Secret Service code names used for the US President and family all start with the same letter. For the current First Family, that letter is R:
- Barack Obama: Renegade
- Michelle Obama: Renaissance
- Malia Obama: Radiance
- Sasha Obama: Rosebud
For the previous First Family, the code names starts with the letter T:
- George W. Bush: Tumbler (later “Trailblazer”)
- Laura Bush: Tempo
- Barbara Bush: Turquoise
- Jenna Bush: Twinkle

29. Things bench players need? : PIANOS
What was remarkable about the piano when it was invented, compared to other keyboard instruments, was that notes could be played with varying degrees of loudness. This is accomplished by pressing the keys lightly or firmly. Because of this quality, the new instrument was called a “pianoforte”, with “piano” and “forte” meaning “soft” and “loud” in Italian. We tend to shorten the name these days to just “piano”.

30. Pandemonium : BABEL
We use the word "babel" now to describe a scene of confusion, lifting the term from the biblical story of the Tower of Babel. The Tower was built in the city of Babylon, and the construction was cursed with a confusion of languages due to the varied origins of all the builders.

31. Sackers in the sack of Rome, A.D. 410 : VISIGOTHS
The East Germanic tribe called the Goths has two main branches, called the Ostrogoths and the Visigoths. The Visigothic capital was the city of Toulouse in France, whereas the Ostrogoth capital was the Italian city of Ravenna just inland of the Adriatic coast. It was the Visigoths who sacked Rome in 410 CE, heralding the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

37. Treats as in "South Park" or "Doonesbury" : SATIRIZES
“South Park” is an adult-oriented cartoon series on Comedy Central. I don’t do “South Park” …

When cartoonist Garry Trudeau was deciding on a name for his comic strip in 1970, he opted for “Doonesbury”. He combined “doone”, which is slang for a “genial fool”, and the last syllables in “Pillsbury”, the family name of Trudeau’s roommate while he was at Yale.

42. Clothing company whose mail-order catalog debuted in 1905 : SPIEGEL
Spiegel is a company that sells women’s clothing and accessories, and which has a famous catalog sales business. The company was founded way back in 1865 by Joseph Spiegel as a home furnishings retail outlet in Chicago.

46. Trattoria entree : VEAL MARSALA
A trattoria is an Italian restaurant. In Italian, a “trattore” is the keeper of an eating house.

52. Saggy and crinkled : CREPEY
Something described as “crepey” has a wrinkled surface, looks like crepe paper.

55. Fidelity competitor : E*TRADE
E*Trade is mainly an online discount brokerage. It was founded in 1982 in Palo Alto, California, and I used to drive by its headquarters almost every day. The company is now run out of New York City. E*Trade produces those famous Super Bowl ads with the talking babies staring into a webcam.

Fidelity Investments is financial services corporation that is based in Boston. Fidelity was founded back in 1946.

57. Spy group : MOSSAD
The national intelligence agency of Israel is known as Mossad, which is short for HaMossad leModiʿin uleTafkidim Meyuḥadim (Hebrew for “Institute for Intelligence and Special Operations”).

Down
1. Traps and yaps : MAWS
“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

2. Like some rabbit ears : ALOP
I had to go to one of my two huge volumes of the OED to find the definition of "alop". It means "lop-sided". A lovely word ...

3. Certain dam : MARE
There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:
- Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
- Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
- Filly: female horse under the age of four
- Colt: male horse under the age of four
- Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
- Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
- Mare: female horse four years or older

A dam is a female parent, especially of four-footed domestic animals such as horses.

9. Huge stock purchase at the start of a day's trading : DAWN RAID
A “dawn raid” is a surprise purchase of a large number of shares right at the start of a day’s trading, a preliminary move in a bid to takeover control of a company.

10. Shorts popular in the 1920s and '30s : OUR GANG
Hal Roach made a whole series of comedy shorts with "The Little Rascals", also known as "Our Gang". This very likable bunch of kids included Spanky and his kid brother, Porky. Porky had a speech impediment so he couldn't pronounce "Okay, Spanky" very clearly and it came out as "Otay, Panky".

11. It might be picked for a song : UKE
The ukulele (“uke”) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

12. "The Great" magician whose signature trick was the "floating light bulb" : BLACKSTONE
The Great Blackstone was the stage name of magician and illusionist Harry Blackstone. Blackstone was a big name during WWII and appeared in many USO shows.

13. River of myth where one drinks to forget : LETHE
The Lethe is one of the five rivers of Hades in Greek mythology. All the souls who drank from the river Lethe experienced complete forgetfulness. The Greek word “lethe” means “oblivion, forgetfulness”.

14. ___ Edwards, John Wayne's role in "The Searchers," 1956 : ETHAN
“The Searchers” is a 1956 western movie directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. In 2008, the American Film Institute named “The Searchers” the greatest American western ever made.

20. Birds in hieroglyphics : IBISES
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. "Ibis" is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one "ibis" or two "ibises", and then again one has a flock of "ibis". And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two "ibises" you would have two "ibides"!

24. Cask maker : COOPER
A cooper is a craftsman who makes wooden vessels, such as barrels.

25. Eastern ties : OBIS
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

26. Eric of "Hulk" : BANA
Eric Bana is an Australian actor who enjoyed a successful career in his home country before breaking into Hollywood playing an American Delta Force sergeant in "Black Hawk Down". A couple of years later he played the lead in Ang Lee's 2003 movie "The Hulk", the role of Dr Bruce Banner. More recently he played the Romulan villain Nero, in the 2009 "Star Trek" movie.

29. Lab vessel : PIPET
A pipette (also “pipet”) is tool used in a lab to transport an accurately measured volume of liquid. Back in my day, we would suck up the liquid into the pipette by applying our mouths to the top of the instrument. This could be quite dangerous, as one ended up with a mouthful of something unsavory if one lifted the top of pipette out of the liquid too soon. Nowadays, things are much safer.

31. Hungarian hunting dog : VIZSLA
The Vizsla is a breed of sporting dog that originated in Hungary. The first Vizsla dogs, a mother and two of her pups, arrived in the US from Rome in 1950.

32. Tough : HOOD
“Hood” is a slang term for “gangster”, a shortening of “hoodlum”.

33. Some photog purchases : SLRS
SLR stands for "single lens reflex". Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

38. Ancient collection of Sanskrit hymns : RIG VEDA
The Rig Veda is a collection sacred hymns that is one of the four canonical texts of Hinduism known as the Vedas.

42. Dog command : SIC ’EM
“Sic 'em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with "sic" being a variation of "seek".

43. ___-Novo (capital on the Gulf of Guinea) : PORTO
Porto-Novo is the capital city of Benin in West Africa. Porto-Novo may be the capital of the country but it isn’t the biggest city, and it isn’t even the most economically important. That honor goes to the city of Cotonou.

49. Parenthetical figures? : ARCS
Parentheses (brackets) look like “arcs”.

51. Brand with a Gravy Cravers line : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

53. Announcement carriers, for short : PAS
Public address (PA) system

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One of a trio in a children's story : MAMA BEAR
9. Bar order after a very hard day, maybe : DOUBLE
15. Lacking any sides : A LA CARTE
16. Puffin relative : AUKLET
17. Haggard : WORN DOWN
18. Prize at the top of a maypole : WREATH
19. Mixing and matching? : SPEED DATING
21. Start of many a dance routine : CHA-
22. Suffix with market : -EER
23. Large fern : BRACKEN
25. Renegade and Renaissance, to the Secret Service : OBAMAS
29. Things bench players need? : PIANOS
30. Pandemonium : BABEL
31. Sackers in the sack of Rome, A.D. 410 : VISIGOTHS
34. Think tank, e.g.: Abbr. : INST
35. Spent : WIPED
36. Hotel amenity : POOL
37. Treats as in "South Park" or "Doonesbury" : SATIRIZES
39. Drift : TENOR
40. During : AMIDST
41. Viciously criticizes, informally : SHREDS
42. Clothing company whose mail-order catalog debuted in 1905 : SPIEGEL
44. It lacks letters on a telephone keypad : ONE
45. ___ cannon (sci-fi weapon) : ION
46. Trattoria entree : VEAL MARSALA
52. Saggy and crinkled : CREPEY
54. Following the beat? : ON PATROL
55. Fidelity competitor : E*TRADE
56. Toddler's handful : SIPPY CUP
57. Spy group : MOSSAD
58. Green-light : SAY YES TO

Down
1. Traps and yaps : MAWS
2. Like some rabbit ears : ALOP
3. Certain dam : MARE
4. Worrisome marks in high school? : ACNE
5. Source of buyer's remorse : BAD DEAL
6. Whittles away : ERODES
7. Battling : AT WAR
8. Torn : RENT
9. Huge stock purchase at the start of a day's trading : DAWN RAID
10. Shorts popular in the 1920s and '30s : OUR GANG
11. It might be picked for a song : UKE
12. "The Great" magician whose signature trick was the "floating light bulb" : BLACKSTONE
13. River of myth where one drinks to forget : LETHE
14. ___ Edwards, John Wayne's role in "The Searchers," 1956 : ETHAN
20. Birds in hieroglyphics : IBISES
24. Cask maker : COOPER
25. Eastern ties : OBIS
26. Eric of "Hulk" : BANA
27. Dry sorts : ABSTAINERS
28. What isn't working? : ME TIME
29. Lab vessel : PIPET
31. Hungarian hunting dog : VIZSLA
32. Tough : HOOD
33. Some photog purchases : SLRS
35. Innocent : WIDE-EYED
38. Ancient collection of Sanskrit hymns : RIG VEDA
39. Rehabilitative effort : THERAPY
41. Quick : SNAPPY
42. Dog command : SIC ’EM
43. ___-Novo (capital on the Gulf of Guinea) : PORTO
44. "___ cum pretio" ("Everything has its price") : OMNIA
47. Parenthetical figure, often : LOSS
48. Hot compress target, perhaps : STYE
49. Parenthetical figures? : ARCS
50. Vulgarian : LOUT
51. Brand with a Gravy Cravers line : ALPO
53. Announcement carriers, for short : PAS


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0129-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jan 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Phillips
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Shout when there's no cause for alarm? : I’M UP!
I’m out of bed!

5. 2008 R&B Grammy winner for "Growing Pains" : BLIGE
Mary J. Blige is a singer-songwriter from the the Bronx, New York. Her best known album is probably “My Life”, released in 1994. Blige is also making a name for herself as an actress and is slated to play jazz singer Nina Simone in the upcoming biopic “Nina”.

14. Little opening? : NANO-
The prefix “nano-” is used for units of one thousand-millionth part. “Nano-” comes from the Greek “nanos” meaning “dwarf”.

16. Like many flu sufferers : ACHY
Influenza (flu) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

19. Heat meas. that also names a major L.A. TV station : KCAL
KCAL is a TV (and radio) station located in Los Angeles. KCAL’s studios are in Studio City, and its transmitter is located on the top of Mount Wilson in the San Gabriel Mountains.

22. Bit of vaquero gear : LARIAT
Our word “lariat” comes from the Spanish “la reater” meaning “the rope”.

"Vaquero" is the Spanish word for "cowboy".

23. Product boasting "a unique blend of 23 flavors" : DR PEPPER
Dr Pepper was introduced in 1885 in Waco, Texas, one year before the competing Coca-Cola was released to the market.

25. Dungeons & Dragons race : ELVES
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game (RPG) first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son ...

26. University of Cincinnati squad : BEARCATS
The Bearcats are the athletic teams of the University of Cincinnati. The “Bearcat” name came from a specific football game back in 1914, against the UK Wildcats. Cincinnati’s fullback on the day was Leonard Baehr, so the crowd took up the chant:
They may be the wildcats, but we have a Baehr-cat on our side!

28. Norman who wrote "A River Runs Through It" : MACLEAN
“A River Runs Through It” is a 1992 film based on the novella of the same name published in 1976 by Norman Maclean. The movie was directed by Robert Redford and stars Brad Pitt among others.

29. Smidge : TAD
Back in the 1800s "tad" was used to describe a young child, and this morphed into our usage of "small amount" in the early 1900s. The original use of "tad" for a child is very likely a shortened version of "tadpole".

Our word “smidgen” (sometimes shortened to “smidge”) is used to describe a small amount. The term might come from the Scots word “smitch” that means the same thing or "a small insignificant person".

30. Resident : DENIZEN
Nowadays we use “denizen” to mean simply a resident, but historically a denizen was an immigrant to whom certain rights had been granted, something like today’s "resident alien".

31. Ed promoter : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

34. Green-glazed Chinese porcelain : CELADON
Celadon ceramics are pieces of pottery that have been glazed a distinctive green color. The name of the pottery comes from the “celadon” shade of green. In turn, “Celadon” was a character in the novel “L’Astree” by Honoré d'Urfé, a character who wore green clothes.

35. Attorney general under Bush 41 : BARR
William Barr was the US Attorney General for two years in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. When not working, Barr is a very enthusiastic player of the Scottish bagpipes!

36. Not fit for Passover : LEAVENED
“Leaven” is a substance that causes bread to rise, perhaps yeast or baking powder. The term comes into English via French from the Latin “levare” meaning “to rise”.

38. "Miss Julie" composer : ROREM
American composer Ned Rorem is famous for his musical compositions, but also for his book, "Paris Diary of Ned Rorem" that was published in 1966. Rorem talks openly about his sexuality in the book, and also about the sexuality of others including Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, much to some people’s chagrin.

39. Like literati : WELL-READ
Literati are men and women of letters, learned people. The Latin “literatus” means “lettered”.

40. Networking aid : SERVER
In the world of computer science, a computer accessing a service is called a “client”. The service is provided on a computer called a “server”. These days, clients and servers often communicate via the Internet. I am typing up this blog post on my laptop (the client) and am connected via the Internet to the Google Drive service that resides on a computer somewhere (the server).

42. It's similar to pale lager : BLONDE ALE
Blonde ales are a loosely-related group of beers that share a very pale color. I’d guess that the most famous of the genre in North America are Belgian blondes.

Lager is so called because of the tradition of cold-storing the beer during fermentation. "Lager" is the German word for "storage".

49. "One World" musician John : TESH
John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter. For many years Tesh presented the show "Entertainment Tonight". For "ET" he once covered the filming of an episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation". As part of the piece, he volunteered to act as a Klingon warrior and so if you see the "Star Trek: TNG" episode called "The Icarus Factor" in reruns, watch out for John Tesh engaging in ritual torture with Mr. Worf as his victim.

50. Mancala playing piece : STONE
There is no actual game called “mancala”, and rather it is the name given to a genre of hundreds of games. Mancala are “count and capture” games that are particularly popular in Africa. Some of the most popular examples of the genre are Bao la Kiswahili, Congkak, Kalah and Oware.

Down
2. The Ainapo Trail is on its slope : MAUNA LOA
The Ainapo Trail used to the main trail leading to the summit of the Mauna Loa volcano on the island of Hawaii. It was also known as the Menzies Trail, named for Archibald Menzies, the first outsider to climb Mauna Loa, back in 1794. The trail largely fell into disuse after the US Army built a new trail in 1915.

5. Lisa of "The Cosby Show" : BONET
Lisa Bonet is an actress best known for playing one of the daughters on the “The Cosby Show”. Bonet was married for a few years to the singer Lenny Kravitz, with whom she eloped in 1987. She changed her name to Lilakoi Moon in 1992, but still uses “Lisa Bonet” as her stage name.

6. Selene's Roman counterpart : LUNA
Selene was the Greek goddess of the moon, the equivalent of the Roman deity, Luna. Selene gave her name to the chemical element "selenium".

7. Relative of "Without a doubt" in a Magic 8 Ball : IT IS DECIDEDLY SO
The Magic 8-Ball is a toy, supposedly a fortune-telling device, introduced by Mattel in 1946. There are 20 answers that the Magic 8-Ball can provide, including:
- Without a doubt
- Ask again later
- My sources say no
- Outlook not so good
- Signs point to yes

8. Powerful foe of the Man of Steel : GENERAL ZOD
General Zod is a supervillain and enemy of Superman of DC Comics. Zod is from Krypton, Superman's home planet, so the two have many of the same superpowers. Zod appeared in the movies "Superman" and "Superman II", and was played by English actor Terence Stamp.

9. Watt-second fraction : ERG
An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, as there are 10 million ergs in one joule. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off.

10. Battery container? : CAKE PAN
A cake pan can contain cake batter, it can be “battery”.

13. Shortest-serving U.S. vice president (31 days) : TYLER
John Tyler was the tenth President of the US, and the first to take the office on the death of the incumbent. Tyler’s predecessor was President William Henry Harrison, who was in office only 32 days before he died of natural causes. For a while there was a little confusion about the wording in the constitution that covered such an eventuality. There was an argument made that Tyler would continue as Vice-President but would assume the responsibilities of the office of President, in effect as “Acting President”. However, Tyler proceeded as though he was taking over as President and took the oath of office in his hotel room in Washington. Soon afterwards, Congress declared that Tyler was indeed President, although many continued to dispute the fact. Many of President Tyler's opponents referred to him as “His Accidency”. His term in office ended in 1845. When the Civil War began in 1861, Tyler sided with the Confederacy and was even elected to the Confederate House of Representatives for the 3rd District of Virginia. President Tyler passed away only a few days after taking his seat in the House. His death was the only one in presidential history that was not recognized in the nation’s capital, as he sided with the Confederate States.

26. Vehicle that's loaded in a Harry Belafonte hit : BANANA BOAT
“Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)” is a traditional folk song from Jamaica. It is sung from the standpoint of dock workers unloading boats on the night shift, so daylight has come, and they want to go home. The most famous version of “Day-O” was recorded by Harry Belafonte, in 1956.

28. Highlight for some hockey fans : MELEE
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means "confused fight".

30. For-profit university with dozens of U.S. campuses : DEVRY
DeVry University was founded in 1931 as the DeForest Training School. DeVry is for-profit enterprise and has some under a lot of scrutiny and criticism from many groups, including the US government.

31. What a reverse stock split increases : PAR VALUE
The face value (also “par value”) of a stock changes with a stock split. For example, a 2-for-1 split results in twice as much stock outstanding, so the price is halved. In a reverse stock split, less stock is outstanding.

32. Like much of northern Siberia : TREELESS
Siberia is a vast area in Northern Asia. The region's industrial development started with the construction of the Trans-Siberian railway from 1891 to 1916, which linked Siberia to Russia in the west.

34. Prestigious Pasadena institution : CALTECH
Caltech is more properly known as the California Institute of Technology, and is a private research-oriented school in Pasadena. One of Caltech's responsibilities is the management and operation of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. If you watch "The Big Bang Theory" on television like me, you might know that the four lead characters all work at Caltech.

36. Delaware Valley tribe : LENAPE
The Lenape Native American people lived along the Delaware River when Europeans first landed in the Americas. As a result of the enforcement of the Indian Removal Act 1830, most Lenape now live in Oklahoma, with significant numbers also in Wisconsin and Ontario, Canada.

39. Oktoberfest fare : WURST
“Wurst” is simply a German word for “sausage”.

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I've been there twice, and it really is a great party ...

45. Atlanta-based media inits. : TBS
The tbs cable television station started out in 1967 as local broadcast TV station in Atlanta. The station’s first call letters were WJRJ-TV, and this was changed to WTCG in 1970 when it was acquired by Ted Turner (the TCG stood for Turner Communications Group). In 1976, Turner started distributing WTCG via satellite making its programming available in other parts of the country. WTCG was only the second channel to transmit via satellite, following HBO. The difference was that WTCG was broadcast without requiring a premium subscription. The station’s call sign was changed again in 1979, to WTBS, and in 1981 adopted the moniker “Superstation WTBS”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Shout when there's no cause for alarm? : I’M UP!
5. 2008 R&B Grammy winner for "Growing Pains" : BLIGE
10. Throw : CAST
14. Little opening? : NANO-
15. Peripheral : OUTER
16. Like many flu sufferers : ACHY
17. Taking some heat? : SUNTANNING
19. Heat meas. that also names a major L.A. TV station : KCAL
20. Request at a ticket window : ONE PLEASE
21. Really get to : PEEVE
22. Bit of vaquero gear : LARIAT
23. Product boasting "a unique blend of 23 flavors" : DR PEPPER
25. Dungeons & Dragons race : ELVES
26. University of Cincinnati squad : BEARCATS
27. Replies from con men? : NOES
28. Norman who wrote "A River Runs Through It" : MACLEAN
29. Smidge : TAD
30. Resident : DENIZEN
31. Ed promoter : PTA
34. Green-glazed Chinese porcelain : CELADON
35. Attorney general under Bush 41 : BARR
36. Not fit for Passover : LEAVENED
38. "Miss Julie" composer : ROREM
39. Like literati : WELL-READ
40. Networking aid : SERVER
41. Opposite of division : UNITY
42. It's similar to pale lager : BLONDE ALE
44. Going ___ : RATE
45. Possible purse pooches : TOY POODLES
46. Provide design details for : SPEC
47. Comparatively corrupt : BASER
48. Send packing : OUST
49. "One World" musician John : TESH
50. Mancala playing piece : STONE
51. Fiddle (with) : MESS

Down
1. Full of sauce : INSOLENT
2. The Ainapo Trail is on its slope : MAUNA LOA
3. Rattled : UNNERVED
4. Entrees from the frozen food department : POT PIES
5. Lisa of "The Cosby Show" : BONET
6. Selene's Roman counterpart : LUNA
7. Relative of "Without a doubt" in a Magic 8 Ball : IT IS DECIDEDLY SO
8. Powerful foe of the Man of Steel : GENERAL ZOD
9. Watt-second fraction : ERG
10. Battery container? : CAKE PAN
11. Come to terms with : ACCEPT
12. They often follow showers : SHAVES
13. Shortest-serving U.S. vice president (31 days) : TYLER
18. Interjection of dejection : ALAS
21. Tart flavor : PECAN
24. Primp : PREEN
26. Vehicle that's loaded in a Harry Belafonte hit : BANANA BOAT
28. Highlight for some hockey fans : MELEE
30. For-profit university with dozens of U.S. campuses : DEVRY
31. What a reverse stock split increases : PAR VALUE
32. Like much of northern Siberia : TREELESS
33. Chair pair : ARMRESTS
34. Prestigious Pasadena institution : CALTECH
35. A rut often leads to it : BOREDOM
36. Delaware Valley tribe : LENAPE
37. Groups of power brokers : ELITES
38. Change : REDO
39. Oktoberfest fare : WURST
40. Embarrassing sound in a lecture hall : SNORE
43. Start for seas or seasons : OPEN
45. Atlanta-based media inits. : TBS


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0128-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jan 16, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Helium Balloon .... we have a rebus puzzle today, with the letters “He” in eight squares. “He” is the element symbol for HELIUM, and if we joint the rebus squares we end up with a HELIUM BALLOON. The print version of the puzzle even has a string hanging out of the bottom of the balloon:
39A. Party staple suggested by connecting this puzzle's special squares : BALLOON
56A. 39-Across filler : HELIUM
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Fowl territory? : COOP
An Old English word for basket ("cypa") started to be used in the 14th century as the word "coop", meaning a small cage for poultry, a word we still use today.

11. Speaker's position? : AMP
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

16. Bagel shop order : LOX
Lox is a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

17. Lumberjack contests : ROLEOS
Roleo is the name given to a log-rolling competition traditionally engaged in by lumberjacks

23. Dessert wine : PORT
The city of Oporto in Portugal gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s, as it was the seaport through which most of the region's fortified red wine was exported.

24. Hirsuteness, for one : TRAIT
"Hirsute" means "hairy". The Latin word "hirsutus" means "rough, shaggy".

26. Both, for openers : AMBI-
The prefix "ambi-" that we use to mean "both" is a Latin word that actually means "around" or "round about". "Ambivalence" was originally just a psychological term, describing "serious conflicting feelings". Later it came to mean uncertainty about which course to follow.

29. Emulate Snidely Whiplash : SNEER
The evil Snidely Whiplash is a character on “The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show”, the nemesis of bungling mountie Dudley Do-Right.

36. Ostrichlike bird : RHEA
The rhea is a flightless bird native to South America. The rhea takes its name from the Greek titan Rhea, an apt name for a flightless bird as “rhea” comes from the Greek word meaning “ground”.

41. Mother of Eos and Selene : THEA
In Greek mythology, Theia (also “Thea”) is a goddess of the moon. Theia’s brother and consort is Hyperion, the god of the sun. Theia and Hyperion are the parents of Helios (the Sun), Selene (the Moon) and Eos (the Dawn).

44. Actress Laura of "ER" : INNES
Laura Innes is actress who is best known for playing Dr. Kerry Weaver on the long-running TV show “ER”. She also played the lead role of Sophia in the short-running TV drama “The Event” in 2010-2011.

47. Good name, informally : REP
Reputation (rep)

48. Pillowcases : SHAMS
A “sham” is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens a sham is also imitation and fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

52. High-end Swiss watch : RADO
Rado is a famous manufacturer of watches, noted for pioneering the use of scratch-proof materials. Rado make a watch that the Guinness Book of Records calls “the hardest watch on Earth”.

53. Candidate of 1992 and 1996 : PEROT
Ross Perot graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1953, as president of his class. Perot served his 4-year commitment but then resigned his commission, apparently having become somewhat disillusioned with the navy. He was ranked number 101 on the Forbes 400 List of Richest Americans in 2012, and at that time was worth about $3.5 billion. Back in 1992, Perot ran as an independent candidate for US president. He founded the Reform Party in 1995, and ran as the Reform Party candidate for president in 1996.

56. 39-Across filler : HELIUM
(39A. Party staple suggested by connecting this puzzle's special squares : BALLOON)
The element helium (He) has an atomic number (at. no.) of 2.

58. Fishy deli order : TUNA HERO
"Hero" is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name "hero" was coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the "New York Herald Tribune" when he wrote that "one had to be a hero" to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

60. Where service is lacking : DEAD SPOT
That would be cell service, mobile phone service.

65. Church offering : TITHE
Traditionally, a “tithe” is a payment of one tenth of a person's annual income and is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

67. Wide receiver Welker : WES
Wes Welker is a wide receiver who made his NFL debut with the San Diego Chargers in 2004. Welker has built a successful career in football for himself, despite joining the NFL as an undrafted free agent. Notably, he owns a reasonably successful racehorse called “Undrafted”.

68. Yellow stick : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

Down
1. Prepares to streak : STRIPS
People have been running around naked for an awfully long time, but the application of the word “streaking” to the phenomenon only dates back to 1973. A journalist was reporting on a mass nude run of 533 people at the University of Maryland in 1973, and used the words “they are streaking (i.e. moving quickly) past me right now. It’s an incredible sight!”. The Associated Press picked up the story the next day, and interpreting “streaking” as the term to describe “running naked”, and we’ve been using it that way ever since.

2. Former liberal, informally : NEOCON
By definition, a neoconservative (neocon) is a former left-aligned politician who has moved to the right and supports the use of American power and military to bring democracy, liberty, equality and human rights to other countries.

7. "Burlesque" co-star, 2010 : CHER
“Burlesque” is a 2010 musical film starring Cher and Christina Aguilera. Aguilera plays a singer who finds work in a Neo-Burlesque club in Los Angeles, where she meets a former dancer who becomes her mentor (played by Cher).

10. Van Gogh's "Portrait of ___ Tanguy" : PERE
“Portrait of Père Tanguy” is an 1887 painting by Vincent van Gogh. The subject was someone who sold art supplies and was an art dealer, someone who offered some of van Gogh’s works for sale.

12. Monsieur Marceau spoke the only one in all of Mel Brooks's "Silent Movie" : MOT
“Mot” is the French word for “word”.

Marcel Marceau was the most famous mime of all time, a native of Strasbourg in France. Marceau made a cameo appearance in Mel Brooks's "Silent Movie", playing himself. In the scene, Mel Brooks is asking Marceau to appear in his movie (a question asked silently of course, in subtitles), and Marceau turns to the camera and speaks the only word in the whole film, "Non!" (French for "No!"). The mime speaks! Brilliant ...

13. G.I. suppliers : PXS
A PX is a Post Exchange, a retail store operating on a US Army Base. The equivalent store on an Air Force Base is called a Base Exchange (BX). At a Navy installation it's a Navy Exchange (NEX), at a Marine Corps installation it's a Marine Corps Exchange (MCX) and at a Coast Guard Installation it's a CGX.

19. Big name in games : ATARI
At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

25. Drawing room? : ATELIER
An atelier is an artist's studio, with "atelier" being the French word for "studio" or "workshop".

28. Ingrid's "Casablanca" role : ILSA
Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie "Casablanca". I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: "she paints his face with her eyes". Wow ...

30. Souvenir of a Russian trip : RUBLE
The ruble (also “rouble”) is the unit of currency in Russia, as well as several other countries of the former Soviet Union. One ruble is divided into one hundred kopecks (also “kopeks”).

36. Simba's warning : ROAR
Among the group of lions at the center of “The Lion King” story, young Simba is the heir apparent, the lion cub destined to take over as leader of the pride. His uncle is jealous of Simba, and plots with a trio of hyenas to kill Simba, so that he can take his position. The uncle was originally named Taka (according to books) but he was given the name Scar after being injured by a buffalo. The trio of hyenas are called Shenzi, Banzai and Ed.

37. Dyeing wish? : HENNA
Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, not just for leather and wool, but also for the hair and skin. In modern days, henna is also used for temporary tattoos.

38. Frequent trip takers : ACID-HEADS
"Acid-head" is a slang term for a frequent user of the psychedelic drug LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide).

40. Cannabis-using : ON POT
“Potiguaya” is the Mexican-Spanish word for “marijuana leaves”. The slang name “pot” comes from “potiguaya”.

45. Spa offering : SHIATSU
“Shiatsu” is a Japanese word meaning “finger pressure”, and is the name given to a style of massage.

54. Home of Carthage Palace : TUNIS
Carthage Palace in Tunis is the official residence of the President of Tunisia. The palace is located in the modern city of Carthage, which in turn is about ten miles from the ancient ruins of of Ancient Carthage.

60. Financial average : DOW
Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company's most famous publication has to be "The Wall Street Journal". In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day, including the renowned Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), also known as the “Dow 30”.

62. One of TV's Huxtables : THEO
Malcolm-Jamal Warner was the child actor who played Theo Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”. You can see the grown-up Warner today, playing Dr. Alex Reed on the BET sitcom “Reed Between the Lines”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Stop daydreaming : SNAP TO
7. Fowl territory? : COOP
11. Speaker's position? : AMP
14. Betray, in a way : TELL ON
15. Starting now : HENCE
16. Bagel shop order : LOX
17. Lumberjack contests : ROLEOS
18. Takes back : RETRACTS
20. Response to "How'd you get the answer so fast?" : I CHEATED
22. Boil : SEETHE
23. Dessert wine : PORT
24. Hirsuteness, for one : TRAIT
26. Both, for openers : AMBI-
29. Emulate Snidely Whiplash : SNEER
31. Mineral suffix : -ITE
32. Kind of separation : TRIAL
33. Twofold : DUPLE
35. Raises : HOISTS
36. Ostrichlike bird : RHEA
39. Party staple suggested by connecting this puzzle's special squares : BALLOON
41. Mother of Eos and Selene : THEA
42. Available, as for work : ON CALL
44. Actress Laura of "ER" : INNES
46. "What ___ surprise!" : A NICE
47. Good name, informally : REP
48. Pillowcases : SHAMS
52. High-end Swiss watch : RADO
53. Candidate of 1992 and 1996 : PEROT
55. Toolbar image : ICON
56. 39-Across filler : HELIUM
58. Fishy deli order : TUNA HERO
60. Where service is lacking : DEAD SPOT
63. Within walking distance, say : NOT FAR
64. Approved : OK’D
65. Church offering : TITHE
66. It's found under an arch : INSOLE
67. Wide receiver Welker : WES
68. Yellow stick : OLEO
69. Became bitter : SOURED

Down
1. Prepares to streak : STRIPS
2. Former liberal, informally : NEOCON
3. Present, groupwise : ALL HERE
4. Like some skirts and lampshades : PLEATED
5. Tugboat's greeting : TOOT
6. Word go : ONSET
7. "Burlesque" co-star, 2010 : CHER
8. Toddler's wear : ONESIE
9. This puzzle's special squares, e.g. : OCTET
10. Van Gogh's "Portrait of ___ Tanguy" : PERE
11. Seeker of the elixir of life : ALCHEMIST
12. Monsieur Marceau spoke the only one in all of Mel Brooks's "Silent Movie" : MOT
13. G.I. suppliers : PXS
19. Big name in games : ATARI
21. Fire safety measure : DRILL
25. Drawing room? : ATELIER
27. Take a dip : BATHE
28. Ingrid's "Casablanca" role : ILSA
30. Souvenir of a Russian trip : RUBLE
32. Mutes, with "down" : TONES
34. Homeboy : PAL
35. Babe : HON
36. Simba's warning : ROAR
37. Dyeing wish? : HENNA
38. Frequent trip takers : ACID-HEADS
40. Cannabis-using : ON POT
43. "Feed ___, starve ..." : A COLD
45. Spa offering : SHIATSU
47. Out-of-studio broadcast : REMOTE
49. Want in the worst way : ACHE FOR
50. Team leader's concern : MORALE
51. Was obviously asleep : SNORED
53. Homework assignee : PUPIL
54. Home of Carthage Palace : TUNIS
57. Words in an analogy : IS TO
59. "Tsk, tsk" elicitor : NO-NO
60. Financial average : DOW
61. Just get (by) : EKE
62. One of TV's Huxtables : THEO


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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