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0207-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 Feb 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Arbesfeld
THEME: Adding Insult … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with an insulting “DIS” added:
22A. Damage a St. Louis team's reputation? : DISCREDIT CARDS (Dis + “credit cards”)
29A. Ones giving the waiter a hard time? : TABLE OF DISCONTENTS (Dis + “table of contents”)
48A. Harlequin exhibitions? : DISPLAYS FOR A FOOL (Dis + “plays for a fool”)
63A. Flee in separate directions? : DISBAND ON THE RUN (Dis + “Band on the Run”)
86A. Result of the Queen of Scat's backup group messing up? : ELLA DISENCHANTED (Dis + “Ella Enchanted”)
101A. Jewel heist outcome? : CAMEO DISAPPEARANCE (Dis + “cameo appearance”)
113A. Question harshly after not allowing to practice? : DISBAR AND GRILL (Dis + “bar and grill”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SELENE (Selena), DE SICA (Da Sica)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Like the Pantheon : DOMED
The Pantheon in Rome was built as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome. Even though the Pantheon was built almost two thousand years ago, the dome at its center remains the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome.

13. Dugout figure : BAT BOY
A “dugout” is an underground shelter. The term was carried over to baseball because the dugout is slightly depressed below the level of the field. This allows spectators behind the dugout to get a good view of home plate, where a lot of the action takes place.

19. City with a Penn State campus : ALTOONA
Altoona is in central Pennsylvania, and is home to the Ivyside Park Campus of Pennsylvania State University.

20. Luna's Greek counterpart : SELENE
Selene was the Greek goddess of the moon, the equivalent of the Roman deity Luna. Selene gave her name to the word "selenology", the study of the geology of the moon, and also gave her name to the chemical element "selenium". According to mythology, Selene fell in love with the handsome hunter/shepherd Endymion, a mere mortal.

22. Damage a St. Louis team's reputation? : DISCREDIT CARDS (Dis + “credit cards”)
The St. Louis Cardinals baseball team was originally called the "Brown Stockings", changing their name to the "Perfectos" in 1899. The new name obviously didn't go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

24. Southern constellation that holds the second-brightest star in the night sky : CARINA
The constellation of Carina used to be part of the larger constellation Argo Navis. Argo Navis (“Argo the Ship” in Latin) was divided into three parts: Puppis (“The Poop Deck”), Vela (“The Sails”) and Carina (“The Keel”). Carina is home to Canopus, the second brightest star in the night sky (after Sirius).

26. Resort island in the Firth of Clyde : ARRAN
The Isle of Arran is in Scotland, and is the largest island in the Firth of Clyde. The Isle of Arran is often confused with the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland, because of the similarity in names.

37. Most NPR stations : FMS
National Public Radio (now just called NPR) was launched in 1970 after President Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The intent of the act was to provide funding for radio and television broadcasting that wasn’t simply driven by profit. As a longtime fan of the state-funded BBC in the UK, I’d have to agree with that intent …

39. Sugar suffix : -OSE
Sugars are usually named using the “-ose” suffix e.g. glucose, fructose, sucrose.

41. "___ Ben Adhem" : ABOU
Abou Ben Adhem, also known as Ibrahim Bin Adham, was an Arab Muslim saint. He was made famous in the western world with the publication in 1838 of the poem "Abou Ben Adhem" that was composed by the English poet James Henry Leigh Hunt.

44. Sadists, e.g. : HURTERS
A sadist is someone who derives pleasure from inflicting pain, with that pleasure often being sexual in nature. The term “sadist” comes from the Marquis de Sade who was known to exhibit such tendencies.

48. Harlequin exhibitions? : DISPLAYS FOR A FOOL (Dis + “plays for a fool”)
“Commedia dell'arte” translates literally from Italian as “comedy of craft”. It is a style of theater that started out in Italy in the mid-1500s. The commedia featured a cast of stock characters such as devious servants and foolish old men, most of whom wore distinctive and recognizable masks. Some of the better known characters are Harlequin (a foolish but acrobatic servant), and Pantalone (a lascivious old merchant).

53. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
Sarah McLachlan is singer/songwriter from Halifax, Nova Scotia who lives in Vancouver. In 1997, McLachlan married Ashwin Sood, the drummer in her band. Apparently the 1998 hit song "Adia", that she co-wrote and recorded, was intended as an apology to her best friend ... for stealing her ex-boyfriend and then marrying him!

58. Serengeti grazer : ELAND
An eland is a large African antelope, in fact the largest on the continent. Both male and female elands have horns, and those horns have a steady spiral ridge along their length.

The Serengeti is a region in Africa, located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

60. Orthodox Jewish honorific : REB
“Reb” is a Yiddish term used as an equivalent of “mister” in English.

63. Flee in separate directions? : DISBAND ON THE RUN (Dis + “Band on the Run”)
“Band on the Run” is a marvelous 1973 song released by Paul McCartney and Wings.

78. St. Patrick's Day quaff : IRISH ALE
There is a fair amount known about St. Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as St. Patrick's Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

80. Monroe or Taylor : ACTRESS
Marilyn Monroe was born in 1926 in LA County Hospital, the child of Gladys Pearl Baker. The young girl was given the name of Norma Jeane Mortenson on her birth certificate, but her mother changed this to Norma Jeane Baker almost immediately. She and her estranged husband, Martin Edward Mortensen, had separated before Baker became pregnant so it is suggested that the Mortensen name was used just to give Norma Jeane "legitimacy". Norma Jeane married a Jim Dougherty when she 16 years old, and took his name to become Norma Jeane Dougherty in 1932. During WWII she was discovered by a photographer and became quite a successful model. The modelling earned her a screen test, at which time it was suggested that Norma Jean change her name yet again. The first name chosen for her by studio executives was Carole Lind (after Carole Lombard and Jenny Lind), but then Norma Jeane chose "Jeane Monroe" for herself, using her mother's maiden name. It didn't take long before the studio intervened again, suggesting that they had too many "Jeans" already. The name Marilyn Monroe was floated as it had a nice ring to it. Along with the new name, Marilyn changed from a brunette to a blonde, and a star was born ...

Actress Elizabeth Taylor married eight times, to seven husbands. Those marriages were to:
- Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, the young hotel heir
- Michael Wilding, the English actor
- Mike Todd, the film and stage producer
- Eddie Fisher, the singer
- Richard Burton (twice), the Welsh actor
- John Warner, who went on to become a US Senator for Virginia
- Larry Fortensky, a construction worker whom Taylor met at the Betty Ford Clinic

84. "___ Flux" (Charlize Theron film) : AEON
“Aeon Flux” is a sci-fi film from 2005 starring Charlize Theron in the title role. The movie was inspired by an animated TV series of the same name that aired on MTV in the nineties.

85. Year that Spenser's "The Faerie Queene" was published : MDXC
"The Faerie Queene" is an epic poem by Edmund Spenser, one of the longest poems written in the English language.

86. Result of the Queen of Scat's backup group messing up? : ELLA DISENCHANTED (Dis + “Ella Enchanted”)
Ella Fitzgerald, the "First Lady of Song", had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

"Ella Enchanted" is a fantasy novel written by Gail Carson Levine, and published in 1997. It is a retelling of the story of Cinderella, with lots of mythical creatures added. A film adaptation was released in 2004, starring Anne Hathaway in the title role.

89. Childish : PUERILE
Something described as “puerile” is foolishly childish or immature. The term comes from the Latin “puer” meaning “boy”.

91. Subj. of David Foster Wallace's "The Pale King" : IRS
American author David Foster Wallace's most famous work was his 1996 novel "Infinite Jest". Wallace’s books are known for extensive use of explanatory footnotes and endnotes, which can take up as many pages as the novel’s text. Wallace struggled with depression for about twenty years. Sadly, he ended up committing suicide in 2008 by hanging himself, when he was only 46 years old. Wallace left an unfinished novel called “The Pale King” that, even though published unfinished, became a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

93. 1945 battle site, for short : IWO
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. The name is Japanese for “Sulfur Island”, referring to the sulfur mining on which Iwo Jima’s economy once depended. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there since.

94. Jardin ___ Plantes (Paris botanical garden) : DES
France’s main botanical garden is the Jardin des Plantes in Paris.

95. Brashness, informally : ‘TUDE
Attitude ('tude)

97. Hollywood's locale: Abbr. : FLA
Hollywood is a coastal city in Florida that was founded in 1925. It was named after Hollywood, California as the founder’s dream was to build a motion picture colony on the East Coast.

99. Gold medalist : WINNER
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

101. Jewel heist outcome? : CAMEO DISAPPEARANCE (Dis + “cameo appearance”)
Cameo is a method of carving, often the carving of a gemstone or a piece of jewelry. The resulting image is in relief (sits proud of the background), whereas an engraved image would be produced by the similar carving method known as intaglio. Nowadays, the term cameo is used for any piece of oval-shaped jewelry that contains the image of a head, usually in profile (maybe even a photograph).

Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it's easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

106. It's not busy : OPEN LINE
That would be an open telephone line …

108. Major in astronomy? : URSA
The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for "Larger Bear") is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that's what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland, the "plough".

123. Pet guinea pig food, typically : PELLETS
The guinea pig species of rodent is also known as a cavy. Guinea pigs aren’t related to pigs, and not are they from Guinea (in West Africa). Guinea pigs actually come from the Andes. They were commonly used for research in the 1800s and 1900s, and as a result we use the term “guinea pig” for a test subject to this day.

Down
6. Suffix with elephant : -INE
Something “elephantine” resembles an elephant, or more figuratively is huge and clumsy.

7. Djokovic rival : NADAL
Rafael “Rafa” Nadal is a Spanish tennis player, noted for his expertise on clay courts, earning him the nickname "The King of Clay".

Novak Djokovic is a Serbian tennis player, currently the world No. 1. Djokovic is quite the character off the court it seems and he is very popular on the talk-show circuit, all around the world. It also helps that Djokovic is fluent in several languages.

9. Charlie Chan portrayer Warner : OLAND
Warner Oland was a Swedish actor, best remembered for his portrayal of Charlie Chan in a series of 16 highly successful Hollywood movies. Before playing Charlie Chan, Oland made a name for himself playing another Asian role on screen, that of Dr. Fu Manchu.

10. Boulogne-sur-___ (city on the English Channel) : MER
Boulogne-sur-Mer in the very north of France is the country’s largest fishing port.

12. "The Bicycle Thief" director Vittorio : DE SICA
Vittoria De Sica was an Italian director and actor. De Sica was director of the film "The Bicycle Thief", released in 1948. Many deem "The Bicycle Thief" to be the greatest movie ever made.

15. Like top ratings from Michelin : THREE-STAR
Michelin is a manufacturer of tires based in France. The company was founded by brothers Édouard and André Michelin in 1888. The brothers were running a rubber factory at the time, and invented the world’s first removable pneumatic tire, an invention that they used to launch their new company. Michelin is also noted for rating restaurants and accommodation in its famous Michelin Travel Guides, awarding coveted Michelin “stars”.

18. Poet who originated the phrase "no country for old men" : YEATS
American novelist Cormac McCarthy published the novel "No Country for Old Men" in 2005, and saw it adapted into a very successful film of the same name released in 2007. The title comes from the opening line of the William Butler Yeats poem "Sailing to Byzantium", which we Irish schoolkids all had to read and learn to recite ...

20. Longtime senator Thurmond : STROM
Strom Thurmond was a US Senator for the state of South Carolina for 48 years, until he stepped down in 2003. Thurmond was the oldest-serving senator in US history. He retired from his office at the age of 100-years-old, and passed away just a few months after leaving Washington.

30. Name on a Kazakh map : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was the last of the former Soviet Republics (SSRs) to declare itself independent from Russia.

31. Rum-soaked cakes : BABAS
Rum baba (also “baba au rhum” in French) is a small yeast cake saturated in rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream. Rum baba is derived from the recipe for the tall "babka" yeast cake that was introduced to the world by the Polish communities. The Polish words "baba" and "babka" mean "old woman" or "grandmother" in English. I guess someone must have thought that all grandmothers were saturated in rum!

33. Lowly worker : SERF
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. "Serf" comes from the Latin "servus", meaning "slave".

34. Tight group : CADRE
A "cadre" is most commonly a group of experienced personnel at the core of a larger organization that the small group trains or heavily influences. "Cadre" is a French word meaning a "frame". We use it in the sense that a cadre is a group that provides a "framework" for the larger organization.

36. Legendary Washington hostess : MESTA
Perle Mesta was a socialite and fundraiser for the Democratic Party. She was made U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg in 1949. Mesta was played by Ethel Merman in the movie titled "Call Me Madam".

42. Olive ___ : OYL
"Thimble Theater" was the precursor comic strip to the famous "Popeye" drawn by E. C. Segar. Before Popeye came into the story, the brother and sister characters Castor Oyl and Olive Oyl were the main protagonists. And then along comes a sailor ...

43. Schnozzola : PROBOSCIS
A proboscis is a long appendage attached to the head of an animal, sometimes referred to as an elongated “nose”. Many an insect has a proboscis, as does the elephant.

“Schnoz” is a slang term for a nose, particularly a large one.

45. Kind of nerve : ULNAR
The ulnar nerve runs alongside the ulna (one of the bones in the lower arm). The ulnar nerve is the largest unprotected (not surrounded by muscle or bone) nerve in the human body. The nerve can be touched under the skin at the outside of the elbow. Striking the nerve at this point causes and an electric-type shock, known as hitting one's "funny bone" or “crazy bone”.

51. Feature usually near readers' letters : OP-ED
Op-Ed is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-Eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

52. Quick "however" : OTOH
On the other hand (OTOH)

57. Together, musically : A DUE
“A due” is a musical term meaning "together", and translates literally from Italian as "by two".

59. DirecTV requirement : DISH
DirecTV is a company providing television and audio programming via satellite. The company was founded in 1985 as Hughes Electronics Corporation, and became DirecTV in 1990.

64. "Delphine" author Madame de ___ : STAEL
Germaine de Staël was a French-speaking Swiss author active at the turn of the 19th century. She was commonly referred to as "Madame de Staël". Staël was noted for her outspoken criticism of Napoleon in her native France, for which she suffered exile in Switzerland.

66. Third man : ABEL
According to the Bible’s Book of Genesis, Adam was the first man. Adam’s sons Cain and Abel were the second and third men respectively.

67. Barclays Center team : NETS
The Barclays Center is an arena in Brooklyn, New York that is home to the Brooklyn Nets of the NBA, and to the New York Islanders of the NHL. Barclays ending up paying over $200 million for the naming rights, even though the London-based banking group has no retail banks or ATMs in the US.

69. Nitwit : SIMP
"Simp" is slang for a simple or foolish person.

70. Language that gave us "khaki" : URDU
“Khaki” is an Urdu word, translating literally as “dusty”. The word was adopted for its current use as the name of a fabric by the British cavalry in India in the mid-1800s.

76. "My Fair Lady" composer : LOEWE
Frederick Loewe was a composer best known for his collaborations with the lyricist Alan Jay Lerner, the most famous of which were “My Fair Lady”, “Gigi” and “Camelot”.

77. Where King Saul consulted a witch : ENDOR
According to the First Book of Samuel, the Witch of Endor called up the ghost of the deceased Samuel at the behest of Saul, the first King of the Israelites. Endor was a city in the land of Canaan.

81. Bygone online reference : ENCARTA
Microsoft badly wanted to get into the online encyclopedia business in the eighties, and approached the biggest and the best, "Encyclopaedia Britannica". "Britannica" declined, fearing that an online version would damage their print sales. "Britannica" had to sell eventually, but not to Microsoft, as the inevitable decline in print sales happened anyway. So Microsoft made a deal with "Funk & Wagnalls", and started publishing "Encarta" in disk form in the early nineties. Usage of Encarta grew until along came Wikipedia. Encarta was discontinued in at the end of 2009.

82. N.Y.U. or M.I.T. : SCH
The main campus of the private New York University (NYU) is located right in Manhattan, in Washington Square in the heart of Greenwich Village. NYU has over 12,000 resident students, the largest number of residents in a private school in the whole country. NYU’s sports teams are known as the Violets, a reference to the violet and white colors that are worn in competition. Since the 1980s, the school’s mascot has been a bobcat. “Bobcat” had been the familiar name given to NYU’s Bobst Library computerized catalog.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1861 and first offered classes in 1865, in the Mercantile building in Boston. Today’s magnificent campus on the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge opened in 1916.

83. William ___, longtime editor of The New Yorker : SHAWN
William Shawn was the editor of “The New Yorker” from 1952 until 1987.

87. New York Met performance 1,000+ times : AIDA
"Aida" is a famous opera by Giuseppe Verdi, actually based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first performed in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline, Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course complications arise!

98. Scottish landowner : LAIRD
“Laird” is just the word “lord” in the local English dialect in Scotland and the north of England.

100. Kind of network : NEURAL
It used to be that a neural network was just the name given to a network nerve cells in an organism. In the modern world, the term "neural net" (short for “neural network) also applies to virtual or electronic devices designed to mimic the function of the human brain, and in particular learning from past experiences.

101. U.S.M.C. member? : CORPS
The US Marine Corps (USMC) is the smallest of the four branches in the US Department of Defense (DOD).

102. Vertically, to a sailor : APEAK
"Apeak" is a nautical term meaning "vertical", as in "the oarsmen held their oars apeak".

103. Cousins of levees : DIKES
A dike is an embankment usually made of earth and rock that is used to prevent floods.

A levee is an artificial bank usually made of earth, running along the length of a river. A levee is designed to hold back river water at a time of potential flooding. "Levée" is the French word for "raised" and is an American term that originated in French-speaking New Orleans around 1720.

104. N'awlins sandwich : PO’ BOY
A po' boy is a submarine sandwich from Louisiana. There are a lot of theories about where the name came from, and none sound too convincing to me. A po' boy differs from a regular submarine sandwich in that it uses Louisiana French bread, which is soft in the middle and crusty on the outside.

Apparently the “N’awlins” pronunciation of “New Orleans” is common, but is usually uttered by tourists. Locals are more likely to say “New Awlins”.

109. Frosty coating : RIME
Rime is that beautiful coating of ice that forms on surfaces like roofs, trees and grass, when cold water freezes instantly under the right conditions.

111. Locale for 10 Winter Olympics : ALPS
The 10 Winter Olympic Games held in the Alps were:
- 1924 in Chamonix, France
- 1928 and 1948 in St. Moritz, Switzerland
- 1936 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
- 1956 in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy
- 1964 and 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria
- 1968 in Grenoble, France
- 1992 in Albertville, France
- 2006 in Turin, Italy

115. Campus Greek grp. : SOR
Sorority (sor.)

116. Dr. featured in 2015's "Straight Outta Compton" : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

N.W.A was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton". I hear that the movie is being well received, although I probably won’t be seeing it …

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Ornamental projection on some 1950s cars : TAIL FIN
8. Like the Pantheon : DOMED
13. Dugout figure : BAT BOY
19. City with a Penn State campus : ALTOONA
20. Luna's Greek counterpart : SELENE
21. Stick : ADHERE
22. Damage a St. Louis team's reputation? : DISCREDIT CARDS (Dis + “credit cards”)
24. Southern constellation that holds the second-brightest star in the night sky : CARINA
25. "Comin' ___!" : AT YA
26. Resort island in the Firth of Clyde : ARRAN
27. "God forbid!" : I HOPE NOT!
29. Ones giving the waiter a hard time? : TABLE OF DISCONTENTS (Dis + “table of contents”)
34. Smartphone feature : CAMERA
37. Most NPR stations : FMS
38. Nitty-gritty : MEAT
39. Sugar suffix : -OSE
40. Were now? : ARE
41. "___ Ben Adhem" : ABOU
43. According to : PER
44. Sadists, e.g. : HURTERS
48. Harlequin exhibitions? : DISPLAYS FOR A FOOL (Dis + “plays for a fool”)
53. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
54. Assess : RATE
55. Take some time to think about : SLEEP ON
56. Sushi order : TUNA ROLL
58. Serengeti grazer : ELAND
60. Orthodox Jewish honorific : REB
61. "What a tragedy!" : SO SAD!
62. Something that's charged : FEE
63. Flee in separate directions? : DISBAND ON THE RUN (Dis + “Band on the Run”)
69. Bottom of a column : SUM
72. Concert mementos : STUBS
73. With 74-Across, coastal flier : SEA
74. See 73-Across : EAGLE
78. St. Patrick's Day quaff : IRISH ALE
80. Monroe or Taylor : ACTRESS
84. "___ Flux" (Charlize Theron film) : AEON
85. Year that Spenser's "The Faerie Queene" was published : MDXC
86. Result of the Queen of Scat's backup group messing up? : ELLA DISENCHANTED (Dis + “Ella Enchanted”)
89. Childish : PUERILE
91. Subj. of David Foster Wallace's "The Pale King" : IRS
92. Small talk : CHAT
93. 1945 battle site, for short : IWO
94. Jardin ___ Plantes (Paris botanical garden) : DES
95. Brashness, informally : ‘TUDE
97. Hollywood's locale: Abbr. : FLA
99. Gold medalist : WINNER
101. Jewel heist outcome? : CAMEO DISAPPEARANCE (Dis + “cameo appearance”)
106. It's not busy : OPEN LINE
107. Bypasses : OMITS
108. Major in astronomy? : URSA
112. New Jersey's state tree : RED OAK
113. Question harshly after not allowing to practice? : DISBAR AND GRILL (Dis + “bar and grill”)
118. Nevada tribe : PAIUTE
119. Past the cutoff age : TOO OLD
120. Neighborhood guide : AREA MAP
121. Pair for a pairs competition : SKATES
122. Sandwich spec : ON RYE
123. Pet guinea pig food, typically : PELLETS

Down
1. "There!" : TADA!
2. Settled (on) : ALIT
3. Teeny : ITSY
4. Track down : LOCATE
5. Pro : FOR
6. Suffix with elephant : -INE
7. Djokovic rival : NADAL
8. Some orders with dessert : DECAFS
9. Charlie Chan portrayer Warner : OLAND
10. Boulogne-sur-___ (city on the English Channel) : MER
11. Bottom of the ninth, say : END
12. "The Bicycle Thief" director Vittorio : DE SICA
13. Burger topper : BACON
14. International traveler's convenience : ADAPTOR
15. Like top ratings from Michelin : THREE-STAR
16. Require : BE IN NEED OF
17. "... then again, I might be wrong" : … OR NOT
18. Poet who originated the phrase "no country for old men" : YEATS
20. Longtime senator Thurmond : STROM
23. "You can't make me do it!" : I REFUSE!
28. Nursery locale : HOTHOUSE
30. Name on a Kazakh map : ARAL
31. Rum-soaked cakes : BABAS
32. "Er ... um ..." : I MEAN ...
33. Lowly worker : SERF
34. Tight group : CADRE
35. Popular typeface : ARIAL
36. Legendary Washington hostess : MESTA
42. Olive ___ : OYL
43. Schnozzola : PROBOSCIS
45. Kind of nerve : ULNAR
46. Perturb : RILE
47. Event that's taking off? : SALE
49. Remain undecided : PEND
50. Maidenhair and others : FERNS
51. Feature usually near readers' letters : OP-ED
52. Quick "however" : OTOH
57. Together, musically : A DUE
59. DirecTV requirement : DISH
61. Rubberneck : STARE
64. "Delphine" author Madame de ___ : STAEL
65. News flash : BULLETIN
66. Third man : ABEL
67. Barclays Center team : NETS
68. Indian flatbread : NAAN
69. Nitwit : SIMP
70. Language that gave us "khaki" : URDU
71. Hybrid art technique : MIXED MEDIA
75. Receive an acceptance letter : GET IN
76. "My Fair Lady" composer : LOEWE
77. Where King Saul consulted a witch : ENDOR
79. Exclude, as undesirable things : SCREEN OUT
80. Person of account, informally? : AD REP
81. Bygone online reference : ENCARTA
82. N.Y.U. or M.I.T. : SCH
83. William ___, longtime editor of The New Yorker : SHAWN
87. New York Met performance 1,000+ times : AIDA
88. Ending with idiom or axiom : -ATIC
90. Cut off : ISOLATE
96. Experienced with : USED TO
97. Like about half of all deliveries? : FEMALE
98. Scottish landowner : LAIRD
100. Kind of network : NEURAL
101. U.S.M.C. member? : CORPS
102. Vertically, to a sailor : APEAK
103. Cousins of levees : DIKES
104. N'awlins sandwich : PO’ BOY
105. Something easy : A SNAP
109. Frosty coating : RIME
110. Crib part : SLAT
111. Locale for 10 Winter Olympics : ALPS
114. Something that's charged : ION
115. Campus Greek grp. : SOR
116. Dr. featured in 2015's "Straight Outta Compton" : DRE
117. Come together : GEL


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4 comments :

John Napoli said...

A fun puzzle. Straight-forward clues are appreciated in a NYT crossword. Only missed one word (I had aria instead of Aida).

Dave Kennison said...

22:53, no errors. An easy one ...

Anonymous said...

45:58 and 4 errors. Didn't really like this one, being built on crappy wordplays themselves based on bad modern slang. A couple of really poorly edited clues: 44 ACROSS for one: HURTERS???? **Really?**

BruceB said...

42:46, exact same 2 errors as Bill. Never really felt comfortable with my answers on this one. Still enjoyed the workout.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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