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0228-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Court Jesters … each of today’s themed answers is a phrase heard around the basketball COURT. However, our JESTER of a constructor has reinvented those phrases with some punny clues:
23A. Fly swatter? : BUZZER BEATER
34A. Drool from both sides of the mouth? : DOUBLE DRIBBLE
51A. Tip of an épée? : POINT GUARD
58A. Busted timer? : SHOT CLOCK
66A. Desi Arnaz? : BALL HANDLER
79A. Winning an Oscar for "Norma Rae"? : FIELD GOAL
88A. Acrophobe's term for a route through the mountains? : NO-LOOK PASS
101A. Lament from an unlucky shrimper? : NOTHING BUT NET
116A. Writing "30 and single" when it's really "50 and married," e.g.? : PERSONAL FOUL
16D. Violation of Yom Kippur? : FAST BREAK
79D. Rug dealer's special? : FREE THROW
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Sleep lab study : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

16. Small invention : FIB
To "fib" is to "to tell a lie". The term likely comes from "fibble-fable" meaning "nonsense", itself derived from "fable".

19. Eagle constellation : AQUILA
The name of the constellation Aquila is Latin for “eagle”. The brightest star in Aquila is Altair. The name “Altair” comes from the Arabic “al-nasr al-tair” meaning “the flying eagle”.

20. Signature Michael Jackson wear : GLOVE
Michael Jackson introduced his one-glove look that same day that he debuted his little dance move known as the Moonwalk. It all took place on an NBC TV special in 1983 called “Motown 25”.

23. Fly swatter? : BUZZER BEATER
In basketball, a “buzzer beater” is a shot taken just before the game ends, which successfully passes through the net after the buzzer has sounded.

26. Attack order : SIC!
“Sic 'em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with "sic" being a variation of "seek".

30. "The Good Wife" figures: Abbr. : ATTS
“The Good Wife” is a legal drama showing on CBS starring Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, a litigator who returns to practicing the law after spending 13 years as a stay-at-home mom. I like this show, and find it to be very well written, and with some great performances by some fine actors.

31. Confer : POWWOW
“Powwow” is a gathering, a term used by Native Americans. The term derives from the Algonquian Narragansett word “powwow” which means “spiritual leader”. The Narragansett also gave us such words as “moose”, “papoose” and “squash”.

34. Drool from both sides of the mouth? : DOUBLE DRIBBLE
In basketball, a “double dribble” is an infraction in which a player dribbles using both hands simultaneously.

42. Quaker of note? : ASPEN
The “quaking” aspen tree is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble, quake”.

47. Sound near a spittoon : PTUI!
"Ptui" is an exclamation of disgust.

50. Brooding music genre : EMO
The musical genre of "emo" originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from "emotional hardcore". “Emo” is also the name given to the associated subculture. Not my cup of tea …

51. Tip of an épée? : POINT GUARD
The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, both of which are also thrusting weapons. However, the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

53. Sci-fi film with a 2010 sequel : TRON
Released in 1982, Disney’s "Tron" was one of the first mainstream films to make extensive use of computer graphics. The main role in the movie is played by Jeff Bridges. The original spawned a 2010 sequel called “Tron: Legacy”, as well as a 2012 TV show called “Tron: Uprising”.

56. Palindromic girl : ANA
One of my favorite words is "Aibohphobia", although it doesn't appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. "Aibohphobia" is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix "-phobia".

57. " : DITTO
"Ditto" was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, "ditto" is just another wonderful import from that lovely land ...

58. Busted timer? : SHOT CLOCK
Basketball’s shot clock was first used in a scrimmage game by the Syracuse Nationals in 1954. Team owner Danny Biasone and general manager Leo Ferris convinced the NBA to use for the 1954-55 season. Coincidentally, the Syracuse Nationals emerged as NBA champions that season.

62. Anderson of "WKRP" : LONI
Loni Anderson's best-remembered role was Jennifer Marlowe on the sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati". Anderson has been married four times, most famously to actor Burt Reynolds from 1988 to 1993.

64. Historic siege site : ALAMO
The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna's camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry "Remember the Alamo!".

65. Legendary siege site : TROY
The ancient city of Troy was located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey. The Trojan War of Greek mythology was precipitated by the elopement of Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, with Paris of Troy. The war itself largely consisted of a nine-year siege of Troy by the Greeks. We know most about the final year of that siege, as it is described extensively in Homer’s “Iliad”. The city eventually fell when the Greeks hid soldiers inside the Trojan Horse, which the Trojans brought inside the city’s walls. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts …

66. Desi Arnaz? : BALL HANDLER
Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

76. Karaoke bar sight : MIKE
A microphone is sometimes referred to as a “mike” or “mic”.

"Karate", means "open hand", and the related word "karaoke" means "open orchestra".

77. Key of Brahms's Symphony No. 4 : E MINOR
Symphony No. 4 in E minor by Johannes Brahms was his last symphony.

Johannes Brahms was a leading German composer during the Romantic period. Brahms is one of the "Three Bs", often grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven.

79. Winning an Oscar for "Norma Rae"? : FIELD GOAL
"Norma Rae" is a 1979 movie starring Sally Field as Norma Rae Webster in a tale of union activities in a textile factory in Alabama. The film is based on the true story of Crystal Lee Sutton told in a 1975 book called "Crystal Lee, a Woman of Inheritance".

81. One of the Gabor sisters : MAGDA
Magda Gabor was the elder sister of Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor. Like her sisters, Magda was an actress and socialite. Magda married six times in all. Her most famous husband was probably the fifth, the English actor George Sanders, although that only lasted for 32 days. Sanders had been married to Magda's younger sister Zsa Zsa.

85. Actress Thomas : MARLO
The actress Marlo Thomas’s most famous role was playing the title character in the television sitcom “That Girl”. Thomas is also well known as a spokesperson for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

88. Acrophobe's term for a route through the mountains? : NO-LOOK PASS
A “no-look pass” in basketball is a play in which a pass is made in one direction while look in another.

Our prefix "acro-" comes from the Greek "akros" meaning "at the top". Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

94. One of the Furies : ALECTO
The Furies of Greek and Roman mythology were the female personification of vengeance. They were also known as the Dirae, "the terrible". There were at least three Furies:
- Alecto: the "unceasing"
- Megaera: the "grudging"
- Tisiphone: the "avenging murder"

97. Asian territory in Risk : SIAM
Siam was the official name of Thailand up to 1939 (and from 1945 to 1949).

Risk is a fabulous board game, first sold in France in 1957. Risk was invented by a very successful French director of short films called Albert Lamorisse. Lamorisse called his new game "La Conquête du Monde", which translates into English as "The Conquest of the World". A game of Risk is a must during the holidays in our house ...

101. Lament from an unlucky shrimper? : NOTHING BUT NET
“Nothing but net” is a phrase used in basketball to describe a “clean basket”. A clean basket is a score in which the ball doesn’t touch the backboard or even the ring, and touches only the net.

105. Devotee : VOTARY
A “votary” is a devotee. Back in the mid-1500s, a votary was someone consecrated by a vow, from the Latin “votum” meaning “promise to a god”.

108. Fallout from the 2000 election? : CHAD
We are familiar with "hanging chads" after the famous Florida election recounts of 2000. A chad is any piece of paper punched out from a larger sheet. So, those round bits of paper we've all dropped over the floor when emptying a hole punch, they're chads.

114. Nougaty treats : MARS BARS
Having lived on both sides of the Atlantic, I find the Mars Bar to be the most perplexing of candies! The original Mars Bar is a British confection (and delicious) first manufactured in 1932. The US version of the original Mars Bar is called a Milky Way. But there is candy bar called a Milky Way that is also produced in the UK, and it is completely different to its US cousin, being more like an American "3 Musketeers". And then there is an American confection called a Mars Bar, something different again. No wonder I gave up eating candy bars ...

120. Reduces to smithereens : ATOMIZES
"Smithereens" is such a lovely word and I am proud to say that it comes from Irish. The Irish word "smiodar" means fragment. We add the suffix "-in" (anglicized as "-een") to words to indicate the diminutive form. So, "little fragment" is "smidirin", anglicized as "smithereen".

122. Canadian smacker : LOONIE
The great northern loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and the state bird of Minnesota. The loon once appeared on Canadian $20 bills and also appears on the Canadian one-dollar coin, giving the coin the nickname "the Loonie".

“Smacker” is American slang for “money”, with “smackers” often being used to mean ”dollars”. It is suggested that the term might come from “smacking” a banknote into one’s hand.

124. Chichi : TONY
Something described as “tony” is elegant or exclusive. The term derives from “high-toned”.

Someone who is "chichi" is showily trendy and pretentious. “Chichi” is a French noun meaning “airs, fuss”.

125. Cantina appetizers : TAPAS
"Tapa" is the Spanish word for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

Down
3. World Heritage Site in the Andes : CUZCO
Cusco (also Cuzco) is a city in the southeast of Peru. Historically, Cusco was the historic capital of the Inca Empire, and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983.

4. Oft-married Taylor : LIZ
Actress Elizabeth Taylor married eight times, to seven husbands. Those marriages were to:
- Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, the young hotel heir
- Michael Wilding, the English actor
- Mike Todd, the film and stage producer
- Eddie Fisher, the singer
- Richard Burton (twice), the Welsh actor
- John Warner, who went on to become a US Senator for Virginia
- Larry Fortensky, a construction worker whom Taylor met at the Betty Ford Clinic

11. Oxygen-dependent bacterium : AEROBE
An aerobe is an organism that lives in an environment rich in oxygen. An anaerobe on the other hand does not require oxygen for survival.

12. Card table cloth : BAIZE
Baize is a coarse woellen, or sometimes cotton, cloth. These days, baize is most often used to cover the playing surface on snooker and billiard tables, as well as on gaming tables in casinos.

14. Piece corps, briefly? : NRA
National Rifle Association (NRA)

“Piece” is underworld slang for “gun”.

16. Violation of Yom Kippur? : FAST BREAK
Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people and is also known as the Day of Atonement.

17. Batting .200, maybe : IN A SLUMP
In baseball, a player's batting average is the number of hits divided by the the number of at bats.

18. Queen ___ (pop music nickname) : BEY
Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny's Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical "Dreamgirls". Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”.

35. Virtual address : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

36. Père d'un prince : ROI
In French, a “roi” (king) is the “père d'un prince” (father of a prince).

37. 1961 space chimp : ENOS
Enos was a chimpanzee that was launched into Earth orbit in 1961 by NASA on a Mercury Atlas 4 rocket. Enos’s flight was a rehearsal for the first orbital flight made by an American, astronaut John Glenn. Enos returned from his mission safely, but died the following year from dysentery.

39. Improvise, in a way : SCAT
Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren't any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

43. Echolocator : SONAR
The British developed the first underwater detection system that used sound waves. Research was driven by defence demands during WWI, leading to production of working units in 1922. This new sound detection system was described as using "supersonics", but for the purpose of secrecy the term was dropped in favor of an acronym. The work was done under the auspices of the Royal Navy's Anti-Submarine Division, so ASD was combined with the IC from "superson-ic-s" to create the name ASDIC. The navy even went as far as renaming the quartz material at the heart of the technology "ASDivite". By the time WWII came along, the Americans were producing their own systems and coined the term SONAR, playing off the related application, RADAR. And so the name ASDIC was deep-sixed ...

44. Softly : PIANO
The term “piano” on a musical score is direction to play “softly”.

46. "Three Billy Goats Gruff" villain : TROLL
“Troll” is a term that comes from Norse mythology. Trolls are less than helpful creatures that tend to live on isolated mountains, in caves and under bridges.

“Three Billy Goats Gruff” is a fairy tale from Norway.

49. "You win!" : UNCLE!
To "say uncle" is an American expression meaning to submit or yield. Its usage dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how "uncle!" came to mean "stop!"

52. Stabilizer of a ship's compass : GIMBAL
A “gimbal” is a pivoted support, usually in the shape of a ring. The supported item is located in the center of the ring. One gimbal allows the supported item to tilt freely around one axis. By using two gimbals, one inside the other, the item can tilt freely in two directions. A ship’s compass is often housed within three gimbals. The two gimbals tend to isolate the compass from the movement of the ship in all three axes.

54. CD-___ : ROM
CD-ROM stands for "compact disc read only memory". The name indicates that you can read information from the disc (like a standard music CD for example), but you cannot write to it. You can also buy a CD-RW, which stands for "compact disc - rewritable", with which you can read data and also write over it multiple times using a suitable CD drive.

55. Ground beef contaminant : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

59. Rio Grande city : LAREDO
Laredo is a border city in Texas, situated on the banks of the Rio Grande across the border from Nuevo Laredo in Mexico.

The Rio Grande (Spanish for “big river”) is a river forming part of the border between Mexico and the United States. Although we call the river the Rio Grande on this side of the border, in Mexico it is called the Río Bravo or Río Bravo del Norte (Spanish for “furious river of the north”).

61. "Downton Abbey" daughter : SYBIL
In the incredibly successful period drama “Downton Abbey", the patriarch of the family living at Downton is Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham or Lord Grantham. The character is played by Hugh Bonneville. Lord Grantham married American Cora Levinson (played by Elizabeth McGovern. Lord and Lady Grantham had three daughters, and no son. The lack of a male heir implied that the Grantham estate would pass to a male cousin, and out of the immediate family. The Grantham daughters are Lady Mary (played by Michelle Dockery), Lady Edith (played by Laura Carmichael) and Lady Sybil (played by Jessica Brown Findlay). Lady Sybil had the audacity to marry the family chauffeur, an Irish nationalist. The shame of it all …

68. De jure : LEGAL
Conceptually, "de jure" and "de facto" are related terms, one meaning "concerning, according to law", and the other meaning "concerning, according to fact". There is an example of the use of the two terms together from my homeland of Ireland. According to our constitution, Irish is the first language of the country, and yet almost everyone in the country uses English as his or her first language. One might say that Irish is the de jure first language, but English is the first language de facto.

72. Trackpad alternative : MOUSE
A touchpad (also “trackpad”) is a pointing device found mainly on laptop computers. It serves as a fairly decent alternative to a mouse.

75. Astral lion : LEO
The constellation called Leo can be said to resemble a lion. Others say that it resembles a bent coat hanger. “Leo” is the Latin for “lion”, but I’m not sure what the Latin is for “coat hanger” …

80. Prepares for a Mr. Universe competition, say : OILS UP
There are several bodybuilding competitions that have used or continue to use the title “Mr. Universe”. I think that the original dates back to 1953.

82. "___ the day!" (cry repeated in Shakespeare) : ALAS
“Alas the day”, and variants thereof, is a phrase used a few times by William Shakespeare. For example, Iago says “Alas the day!” in “Othello”, as does Viola in “Twelfth Night”. Also in “Othello”, Desdemona says “Alas the heavy day!”.

88. Say "When I met the Dalai Lama last year," say : NAME-DROP
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

89. "Qué ___?" : PASA
In Spanish, “que pasa?” translates literally as “what's happening?” but is used to mean “how are things going with you?”

92. Goth-looking, in a way : WAN
The goth subculture developed from the gothic rock scene in the early eighties, and is a derivative of the punk music movement. It started in England and spread to many countries around the globe. The term "goth" of course comes from the Eastern Germanic tribe called the Goths. Frankly, I don't understand the whole goth thing ...

96. Morsel : TIDBIT
A “morsel” is a small bite, a mouthful of food. The term comes from the Latin “morsus” meaning “a bite”.

98. 1994 bomb based on an "S.N.L." character : IT’S PAT
The androgynous character known as “Pat” on “Saturday Night Live” was played by the comedienne Julia Sweeney. Pat appeared in a 1994 movie called “It’s Pat”, which is one of the worst films of all time, or so I am told ...

102. Bridge whiz : GOREN
Charles Goren was a world champion bridge player from Philadelphia. Goren published many books on the subject, and had a daily bridge column that appeared in almost 200 newspapers. He even had a weekly column in “Sports Illustrated”. Goren introduced several techniques and systems that eventually became part of the modern Standard American bidding system that is used by many bridge players today (including me!).

104. Actress Thompson of "Creed" : TESSA
Tessa Thompson is an actress from Los Angeles who is known for playing the supporting role of Jackie Cook on the TV show “Veronica Mars”, and for playing student leader Diane Nash in the 2014 film “Selma”.

106. River along Avignon : RHONE
Avignon is a city in the southeast of France on the Rhône river. Avignon is sometimes called the “City of Popes” as it was home to seven popes during the Catholic schism from 1309 to 1423.

115. Kind of dye : AZO
Azo compounds have very vivid colors and so are used to make dyes, especially dyes with the colors red, orange and yellow. The term “azo” comes from the French word “azote” meaning “nitrogen”. French chemist Lavoisier coined the term “azote” from the Greek word “azotos” meaning “lifeless”. He used this name as in pure nitrogen/azote animals die and flames are snuffed out (due to a lack of oxygen).

117. The Depression, for one : ERA
The Wall Street Crash of 1929 that signalled the start of the Great Depression did not happen on just one day. The first big drop in the market took place on October 24 (Black Thursday). Things stabilized on Friday, and then the slide continued on the 28th (Black Monday) and the 29th (Black Tuesday).

118. Smoked deli purchase : LOX
Lox is a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

119. Popinjay : FOP
Back in the 12th century a “popinjay” was a colorful parrot. By the 14th century the word was being applied to people who were considered beautiful, but by the mid-16th century the term applied to people who were vain and talkative.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Make less dangerous, in a way : DECLAW
7. Sleep lab study : APNEA
12. Some school edicts : BANS
16. Small invention : FIB
19. Eagle constellation : AQUILA
20. Signature Michael Jackson wear : GLOVE
21. Runway model? : AIRPLANE
23. Fly swatter? : BUZZER BEATER
25. "It seems to me ..." : I DARE SAY ...
26. Attack order : SIC!
27. Rationale : BASIS
28. Trickle : OOZE
30. "The Good Wife" figures: Abbr. : ATTS
31. Confer : POWWOW
34. Drool from both sides of the mouth? : DOUBLE DRIBBLE
38. Screams bloody murder : HOWLS
40. Brought up : BRED
41. Narrow lead in baseball : ONE RUN
42. Quaker of note? : ASPEN
45. In base 8 : OCTAL
47. Sound near a spittoon : PTUI!
50. Brooding music genre : EMO
51. Tip of an épée? : POINT GUARD
53. Sci-fi film with a 2010 sequel : TRON
54. Brings in : REAPS
56. Palindromic girl : ANA
57. " : DITTO
58. Busted timer? : SHOT CLOCK
60. Illicit sum : RANSOM
62. Anderson of "WKRP" : LONI
64. Historic siege site : ALAMO
65. Legendary siege site : TROY
66. Desi Arnaz? : BALL HANDLER
70. Unsteady gait : LIMP
74. Cutting edge : BLADE
76. Karaoke bar sight : MIKE
77. Key of Brahms's Symphony No. 4 : E MINOR
79. Winning an Oscar for "Norma Rae"? : FIELD GOAL
81. One of the Gabor sisters : MAGDA
84. Prompt : CUE
85. Actress Thomas : MARLO
87. Reclined : LAIN
88. Acrophobe's term for a route through the mountains? : NO-LOOK PASS
90. Encouraging word : OLE!
91. Fire place? : HELL
92. Attended : WAS AT
93. Soothes : EASES
94. One of the Furies : ALECTO
97. Asian territory in Risk : SIAM
99. Round after the quarters : SEMIS
101. Lament from an unlucky shrimper? : NOTHING BUT NET
105. Devotee : VOTARY
108. Fallout from the 2000 election? : CHAD
109. "My bad!" : OOPS!
110. Put off : DEFER
112. Short flight : HOP
114. Nougaty treats : MARS BARS
116. Writing "30 and single" when it's really "50 and married," e.g.? : PERSONAL FOUL
120. Reduces to smithereens : ATOMIZES
121. Cropped up : AROSE
122. Canadian smacker : LOONIE
123. Morning condensate : DEW
124. Chichi : TONY
125. Cantina appetizers : TAPAS
126. Go through : EXPEND

Down
1. Applies gingerly : DABS
2. Outfit : EQUIP
3. World Heritage Site in the Andes : CUZCO
4. Oft-married Taylor : LIZ
5. Keg contents : ALE
6. Archer's battle weapon : WAR BOW
7. Forever : AGES
8. Like lumberjack jackets : PLAID
9. O.K. : NOT SO BAD
10. Time for last-minute planning : EVE
11. Oxygen-dependent bacterium : AEROBE
12. Card table cloth : BAIZE
13. Not fully independent : AIDED
14. Piece corps, briefly? : NRA
15. Almost dislocate : SPRAIN
16. Violation of Yom Kippur? : FAST BREAK
17. Batting .200, maybe : IN A SLUMP
18. Queen ___ (pop music nickname) : BEY
22. Don't bother : LET BE
24. Give a tongue-lashing : BAWL OUT
29. Veteran : OLD PRO
32. A question of time : WHEN?
33. Is unacceptable : WON'T DO
35. Virtual address : URL
36. Père d'un prince : ROI
37. 1961 space chimp : ENOS
39. Improvise, in a way : SCAT
42. Isolated : APART
43. Echolocator : SONAR
44. Softly : PIANO
46. "Three Billy Goats Gruff" villain : TROLL
48. Smash up : TOTAL
49. "You win!" : UNCLE!
52. Stabilizer of a ship's compass : GIMBAL
53. "Use your head!" : THINK!
54. CD-___ : ROM
55. Ground beef contaminant : E COLI
58. Mobile home resident? : SNAIL
59. Rio Grande city : LAREDO
61. "Downton Abbey" daughter : SYBIL
63. "Jeez!" : OH MAN!
67. Flummox : ADDLE
68. De jure : LEGAL
69. Showroom models : DEMOS
71. Residents of 3-Down : INCAS
72. Trackpad alternative : MOUSE
73. Lean on : PRESS
75. Astral lion : LEO
78. Achieve success : MAKE IT
79. Rug dealer's special? : FREE THROW
80. Prepares for a Mr. Universe competition, say : OILS UP
82. "___ the day!" (cry repeated in Shakespeare) : ALAS
83. Settled the score : GOT EVEN
85. Ghostly sound : MOAN
86. Apportion : ALLOCATE
88. Say "When I met the Dalai Lama last year," say : NAME-DROP
89. "Qué ___?" : PASA
91. Sugar : HON
92. Goth-looking, in a way : WAN
95. It's hard to get across : CHASM
96. Morsel : TIDBIT
98. 1994 bomb based on an "S.N.L." character : IT’S PAT
100. Something to boost : MORALE
102. Bridge whiz : GOREN
103. Domineering : BOSSY
104. Actress Thompson of "Creed" : TESSA
106. River along Avignon : RHONE
107. "Wanna play?" : YOU IN?
111. Anti bodies? : FOES
113. Petitioned : PLED
114. Whacked : MAD
115. Kind of dye : AZO
117. The Depression, for one : ERA
118. Smoked deli purchase : LOX
119. Popinjay : FOP


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6 comments :

Lou Sander said...

Love those basketball clues! I'll share them with Coach K when I have dinner with him next week. His wife's a good cook, and thinking about the meal makes me drool from both sides of the mouth. We'll have a nip of North Carolina moonshine. (A foul shot, of course). What a great job of straightforward and very clever cluing, not to mention putting so many themed words into the puzzle.

Dave Kennison said...

30:51, no errors. Sports terms aren't my thing, but I managed to stumble through this with a certain amount of educated guessing.

Anonymous said...

As humor goes, these "forced up" puns were a total "air ball" in terms of cleverness.

Couldn't get in sync with this puzzle, and struggled more than I should have: 44:36, no errors.

BruceB said...

33:23, 4 errors. 63D OH MAD, 87A LAID; 89D PASE, 105 VOTERY. In whatever defense I may claim, the clue for 89D was misprinted in my paper as 'Oue' vice 'Que'. Still don't like foreign language clues in English crosswords.

Enjoyed the puzzle, just wasn't very good at it today.

Dale Stewart said...

Took me the better part of a Sunday morning to complete this but "scored" no errors at the final "buzzer". The theme helped immensely.

David Presberry said...

Once I got the theme, it was easy.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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