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0401-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 16, Friday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter Gordon
THEME: All Good Things Must Come To an End … today’s themed answers string together to make an announcement, a very sad announcement:
17A. With 34-, 40- and 60-Across, a somber message for our loyal fans : DUE TO BUDGET CUTS ...
34A. See 17-Across : … THE NEW YORK TIMES ...
40A. See 17-Across : … CROSSWORD PUZZLE ...
60A. See 17-Across : … WILL END TOMORROW
One might breathe a sigh of relief if one checks the date of today’s puzzle ...
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Sister brand of Scope : ORAL-B
Those would be brands of mouthwash.

6. Like blackjack hands with an ace counted as 11 : SOFT
In the card game called Blackjack, an ace has the point value of one or eleven. When one of the two cards dealt to a player is an ace, the hand is called “soft”. This means that the player cannot go bust by taking another card, as the ace can be revalued at “one” if necessary in order to stay under 21.

10. Feature of a modern zoo : MOAT
A “moat” is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say, or a an exhibit in a zoo. A moat may or may not be filled with water.

14. Athlete who uses steroids : DOPER
Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “roids” or simply "steroids") are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed "anabolic" as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “roid rage”.

15. Decorative enamelware : CLOISONNE
“Cloisonné” is an ancient technique that uses vitreous enamel to decorate metalwork. The technique involves the addition of metal compartments to the surface of the piece, made by soldering silver or gold wires that form the edges of each compartment. Vitreous enamels of various colors are then added to each compartment and the whole piece fired. “Cloison” is a French word meaning “compartment, partition”.

17. With 34-, 40- and 60-Across, a somber message for our loyal fans : DUE TO BUDGET CUTS …
34. See 17-Across : … THE NEW YORK TIMES ...
40. See 17-Across : … CROSSWORD PUZZLE ...
60. See 17-Across : … WILL END TOMORROW
April Fool's Day is celebrated on April 1st in the western world. In the US (and Ireland) one can make practical jokes all day long if one wants. But in the UK there is a noon deadline. Anyone pranking after midday is called an "April Fool".

23. Letters before Kitty Hawk : USS
The USS Kitty Hawk is an aircraft carrier launched in 1960 that is aptly named for the town of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, where the Wright brothers made the world’s first powered airplane flight. The Kitty Hawk was decommissioned in 2009 after nearly 49 years of service. The original USS Kitty Hawk was an aircraft transport ship that the US Navy acquired in 1941, and which was decommissioned in 1946.

26. Feet, in slang : DOGS
“Dogs” is a slang term for “feet”, as in “my dogs are killing me”.

29. Fruit with yellow skin : CASABA
A casaba is type of honeydew melon. The casaba takes its name from the Turkish city of Kasaba, from where the fruit was imported into America in the late 1800s.

37. The Gaels of collegiate sports : IONA
Iona College is a Roman Catholic school run by Christian Brothers in New Rochelle, New York. The school’s sports teams are called the Iona Gaels, and the team mascot goes by the name Killian.

38. Actress Issa ___ of "The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl" : RAE
Issa Rae is Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”.

39. Shield from the elements : TARP
Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word "tarpaulin" comes from "tar" and "palling", with "pall" meaning "heavy cloth covering".

47. Gloaming, to a sonneteer : E’EN
“Gloaming” is an alternative word for twilight or dusk, and is often used poetically. The word is particularly associated with Scottish poetry, and notably the work of Robert Burns.

A sonnet is a short poem with varying rhyming schemes but always with 14 lines. The sonnet form has been around at least since the 13th century. The Shakespearean sonnet is composed of three quatrains (4 lines) and a final couplet (2 lines).

48. 2 letters : ABC
The letters ABC appear on the 2-button of a telephone’s keypad.

50. Pennsylvania and others: Abbr. : RRS
The Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) was a large rail network in the northeast that was founded in 1846. Even though the “Pennsy” (as it was called) was the busiest railroad in the first half of the twentieth century, it went out of business in 1968. The PRR was also the largest public company in the world at one point, and it still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history, having paid out an annual dividend for over one hundred years in a row.

56. Vigorous reprimand : RIOT ACT
The Riot Act was a British law that was in force from 1715 to 1967. According to the Riot Act, government entities could declare any gathering of twelve or more people “unlawful”. Our expression “read the Riot Act” is derived from the requirement for the authorities to read out the Riot Act proclamation to an unlawful assembly before the Act could be enforced.

63. Cardio option : TAE BO
Tae Bo isn't an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of "taekwondo" and "boxing".

64. "___ Darkness Fall" (L. Sprague de Camp novel) : LEST
L. Sprague de Camp was a prolific writer, mainly of science fiction and fantasy. His 1939 novel “Lest Darkness Fall” is an alternate history work, and helped define the genre.

65. Chew (out) : REAM
I must admit that I find the slang term "to ream out", with its meaning "to scold harshly", to be quite distasteful. The usage of the word as a reprimand dates back to about 1950.

66. Collects a DNA sample from, say : SWABS
I've always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

Down
1. Parimutuel calculation : ODDS
Parimutuel betting is a system in which the bookmaker is guaranteed a pre-determined profit. In the system, all bets are pooled, taxes and house profit are removed, and the payoff is made with the resulting pool.

2. Marquis de Sade, e.g. : ROUE
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On an off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

5. Fancy fabric : BROCADE
Brocade is a very decorative fabric usually made from silk and often incorporating gold and silver thread. The name "brocade" comes from the Italian word "broccato" meaning "embossed cloth".

6. Long-range guided missile : SCUD
Scud missiles were developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The Soviets called them R-11 missiles at first, with later versions known as R-17 and R-300 Elbrus. The name "Scud" was actually the name NATO used for the missile, a name created by Western intelligence officers. Ballistic missiles haven't been used a lot in actual warfare, the exception being the German V-2 rocket attacks on England during WWII. After the V-2, the second most-used ballistic missile in warfare is the Scud, which featured in a number of conflicts:
- used by Egypt against Israel in the Yom Kippur War of 1973
- used by the USSR in Afghanistan
- used by Libya against a US Coast Guard station in the Mediterranean in 1986
- used by Iranians and Iraqis in the Iran-Iraq War of 1980-88
- used by Iraq in the Gulf War of 1990-91

7. "___ New Hampshire" (state song) : OLD
“Old New Hampshire” is a song that has been declared the state’s sole official song twice. It was first so designated in 1949, but was then relegated to “one of the state songs” with the addition of “New Hampshire, New Hampshire” as the second state song in 1963. These two songs were joined by “New Hampshire Hills” in 1973, and by “Autumn in New Hampshire” in 1977. Later in 1977, a further four state songs were added to the roster. But by the end of 1977, the decision was made to clear out the closet and leave just one state song, and that honor went once again to “Old New Hampshire”.

10. Comfy footwear : MOCS
"Moc" is short for “moccasin” shoe.

13. 1980 Oscar nominee directed by Roman Polanski : TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy's 1891 novel is "Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented". When it was originally published, "Tess ..." received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society's attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski's "Tess" released in 1979. Polanski apparently made "Tess" because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy's novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads "To Sharon".

23. Capital of the Roman province of Africa : UTICA
The ancient city of Utica was perhaps the first colony founded by the Phoenicians in North Africa. Located in modern-day Tunisia, Utica surrendered to Rome shortly before the Third Punic War after which it became the capital of the Roman province of Africa.

27. Sandwich topped with tzatziki sauce : GYRO
A gyro is a traditional Greek sandwich made with pita bread and containing meat, tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce). The meat for gyros is usually roasted on a tall vertical spit and is sliced from the spit as required.

30. ___ bath : SITZ
A “sitz bath” is one in which the water comes up to the hips. It is usually a therapeutic bath used to treat discomfort in the lower part of the body. The term comes from the German “Sitzbad” meaning a bath (bad) in which one sits. “Sitzen” is German for “to sit”.

32. Comedian who married Joyce Mathews in 1941, divorced her in 1947 and married her again in 1949 "because she reminded me of my first wife" : BERLE
Comedian Milton Berle was known as "Uncle Miltie" and "Mr. Television", and was arguably the first real star of American television as he was hosting "Texaco Star Theater" starting in 1948.

33. Winter X Games host city : ASPEN
Aspen, Colorado used to be known as Ute City, with the name change taking place in 1880. Like many communities in the area, Aspen was a mining town, and in 1891 and 1892 it was at the center of the highest production of silver in the US. Nowadays of course, it's all about skiing and movie stars.

The X Games are annual events, with a Summer X Games held every year as well as a Winter X Games. It's very much a commercial venture, with all aspects controlled by the TV station ESPN. The games focus on extreme action sports, like skateboarding and freestyle motocross in the summer and various extreme snowboarding events in the winter.

35. Curiosity org. : NASA
NASA’s Curiosity rover is the fourth in a series of unmanned surface rovers that NASA has sent to Mars. Previous rovers are the Sojourner rover (1997), Spirit rover (2004-2010) and Opportunity rover (2004-present). Curiosity rover was launched in November of 2011, and landed on Mars in August 2012 after having traveled 350 million miles. After that long journey, Curiosity landed just 1½ miles from its targeted touchdown spot.

41. Thing with a filament : STAMEN
The stamen is the male reproductive organ of a flower. The part of the stamen known as the anther sits on a stalk called the filament, and carried carries the pollen. The pollen is picked up by insects, especially bees, who then transfer pollen from flower to flower. The pistil is the female reproductive organ, and it accepts the pollen.

42. Online course : WEBINAR
Webinar is short for “Web-based seminar”, a presentation, lecture or similar event held online. In a Webinar there is two-way interaction, with the audience able to ask questions of the presenter.

43. Holiday a month before Passover : PURIM
Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther. During the celebration of Purim, the Book of Esther (or Megillah) is read aloud, once in the evening and once the following morning. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Old Testament that doesn't mention the word "God".

49. Military group : CADRE
A "cadre" is most commonly a group of experienced personnel at the core of a larger organization that the small group trains or heavily influences. "Cadre" is a French word meaning a "frame". We use it in the sense that a cadre is a group that provides a "framework" for the larger organization.

52. Taking unauthorized R&R : AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

Rest and relaxation/recuperation (R&R)

58. His .366 lifetime batting average is the best ever : COBB
Ty Cobb was one of the richest baseball players of all times. When he retired, Cobb was a major stockholder of the Coca-Cola Corporation. By the time he passed away in 1961, Cobb had an even bigger investment in General Electric. He left an estate after his death worth about $86m (in 2008 dollars).

59. Yahtzee category : TWOS
The dice game of Yahtzee was introduced in 1956, a variant of earlier dice games, especially the game "Yacht" (which even has a similar name). Yahtzee is required playing in our house at holidays. The game involves the rolling of five dice, with the intent of getting certain combinations. A lot of those combinations resemble poker hands, such as “three of a kind”, “four of a kind” and “full house”.

61. Quinceañera invitee : TIA
In Spanish, a “tia” (aunt) is a member of “la familia” (the family).

Quinceañera is a celebration of a girl's fifteenth birthday, an event common in many parts of Latin America.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sister brand of Scope : ORAL-B
6. Like blackjack hands with an ace counted as 11 : SOFT
10. Feature of a modern zoo : MOAT
14. Athlete who uses steroids : DOPER
15. Decorative enamelware : CLOISONNE
17. With 34-, 40- and 60-Across, a somber message for our loyal fans : DUE TO BUDGET CUTS ...
19. Led astray : SEDUCED
20. Agrostologists' study : GRASSES
21. Bud : PAL
22. "Whoopee!" : YAY!
23. Letters before Kitty Hawk : USS
26. Feet, in slang : DOGS
29. Fruit with yellow skin : CASABA
34. See 17-Across : … THE NEW YORK TIMES ...
37. The Gaels of collegiate sports : IONA
38. Actress Issa ___ of "The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl" : RAE
39. Shield from the elements : TARP
40. See 17-Across : … CROSSWORD PUZZLE ...
45. Make less flat : AERATE
46. You might put stock in it : SOUP
47. Gloaming, to a sonneteer : E’EN
48. 2 letters : ABC
50. Pennsylvania and others: Abbr. : RRS
52. Inability to sense smells : ANOSMIA
56. Vigorous reprimand : RIOT ACT
60. See 17-Across : … WILL END TOMORROW
62. Large marine fish tanks : OCEANARIA
63. Cardio option : TAE BO
64. "___ Darkness Fall" (L. Sprague de Camp novel) : LEST
65. Chew (out) : REAM
66. Collects a DNA sample from, say : SWABS

Down
1. Parimutuel calculation : ODDS
2. Marquis de Sade, e.g. : ROUE
3. Made like : APED
4. Pause : LET UP
5. Fancy fabric : BROCADE
6. Long-range guided missile : SCUD
7. "___ New Hampshire" (state song) : OLD
8. Not clear : FOGGY
9. Closet organizer : TIE RACK
10. Comfy footwear : MOCS
11. Responsibility : ONUS
12. Play money? : ANTE
13. 1980 Oscar nominee directed by Roman Polanski : TESS
16. Patronize, as a hotel : STAY AT
18. Later in the text : BELOW
23. Capital of the Roman province of Africa : UTICA
24. Coast : SHORE
25. "Sí" man? : SENOR
27. Sandwich topped with tzatziki sauce : GYRO
28. Goes up, up, up : SOARS
30. ___ bath : SITZ
31. Blow away : AMAZE
32. Comedian who married Joyce Mathews in 1941, divorced her in 1947 and married her again in 1949 "because she reminded me of my first wife" : BERLE
33. Winter X Games host city : ASPEN
35. Curiosity org. : NASA
36. Overhaul : REDO
41. Thing with a filament : STAMEN
42. Online course : WEBINAR
43. Holiday a month before Passover : PURIM
44. Pulls out : UPROOTS
49. Military group : CADRE
51. Drinker's bender? : STRAW
52. Taking unauthorized R&R : AWOL
53. "Good going!" : NICE!
54. Shouts of support : OLES
55. Crib part : SLAT
56. Go here and there : ROAM
57. Bay or gray follower : AREA
58. His .366 lifetime batting average is the best ever : COBB
59. Yahtzee category : TWOS
61. Quinceañera invitee : TIA


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4 comments :

Anonymous said...

I believe that "Song of Solomon" (also called Song of Songs) also does not mention God's name, in addition to the Book of Esther.

NY Auntie said...

When I saw the message in the puzzle that the Times was ending it, I went to your site for more information. So glad you pointed out the date (April 1). Whew.

BruceB said...

20:07, no errors. My syndicated paper started the clues with a note that made sure we knew the puzzle originally appeared on April 1, 2016. I did use the theme to help get through some of the difficult areas. Oddly, I worked it from the bottom up. Completing 60A first, then 40A, 34A, finally 17A.

Lou Sander said...

Clever puzzle, clever theme. My paper also published a note about April 1, which was very helpful to us in reducing anxiety.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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