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0403-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Apr 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Natan Last
THEME: Jumping to Conclusions … each of today’s themed answers includes a rebus square that contains the word EAR. That rebus square marks the spot where the CONCLUSION of the answer JUMPS from one themed answer to another. The first two themed answers swap CONCLUSIONS, then the next two, and then the final two:
23A. With 113-Across, heard but disregarded ... or a hint to interpreting the Across answers with circled letters : IN ONE EAR AND …
113A. See 23-Across : … OUT THE OTHER

31A. Common query from one about to leave the house : WHERE ARE MY KEYS?
46A. Indignant reply when someone withholds information : I HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW

55A. "Come on ... be daring" : TAKE A RISK
77A. "Oh, boo-hoo!" : CRY ME A RIVER!

86A. "Would you consider this suggestion?" : CAN I MAKE A REQUEST?
100A. Comment to the not-yet-convinced : YOU’LL COME AROUND
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
1. ___-Town (sobriquet in many a Kanye West song) : CHI
That would be Chicago …

4. "To Kill a Mockingbird" theme : RACISM
Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" was first published in 1960. The book is a mainstay in English classes all around the world and is a great ambassador for American literature, I'd say.

14. Distinctive Harry Potter feature : SCAR
Author J. K.Rowling’s famous character Harry Potter has a lightning-shaped scar on his forehead, the result of an attack on his life as a baby by the Dark wizard Lord Voldemort.

18. Overactors : HAMS
The word "ham", describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of "hamfatter" and dates back to the late 1800s. "Hamfatter" comes from a song in old minstrel shows called "The Ham-Fat Man". It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the "acting" qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

26. "___ Dei" (prayer) : AGNUS
"Agnus Dei" is Latin for "Lamb of God", a term used in Christian faiths for Jesus Christ, symbolizing his role as a sacrificial offering to atone for the sins of man.

27. Baldwin's "30 Rock" co-star : FEY
“30 Rock” is a sitcom on NBC that was created by the show’s star Tina Fey. Fey is an ex-performer and writer from “Saturday Night Live” and uses her experiences on that show as a basis for the “30 Rock” storyline. Fey plays Liz Lemon, the head writer for the fictional sketch comedy series “TGS with Tracy Jordan”.

28. Clean air org. : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

29. Mayan food staple : MAIZE
The Maya civilization held sway in Central America and Mexico from about 350 AD until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.

35. The left, informally : LIBS
The concept of left-right politics started in France during the French Revolution. When members of France's National Assembly convened in 1789, supporters of the King sat to the President's right, and supporters of the revolution to the President's left. The political terms "left" and "right" were then coined in the local media and have been used ever since.

39. ___-surfing : EGO
We’ve all done it, googling our own names to see what comes up. It’s called “ego surfing”.

41. Arcade game sound : BEEP
Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

53. P.M. after and before Churchill : ATTLEE
It looks there's a typo in this clue. In fact, Churchill was PM after and before Attlee, and not the other way round. The terms were:
# 1940 - 1945 Winston Churchill
# 1945 - 1951 Clement Attlee
# 1951 - 1955 Winston Churchill
Clement Attlee served as leader of Britain's Labour Party and as Deputy Prime Minister in the coalition government during the war years under the leadership of Winston Churchill, a Conservative. Attlee swept into power right after WWII in a landslide victory over Churchill and was responsible for major changes not only in Britain but around the waning British Empire. It was under Attlee that former British colonies like India, Pakistan, Burma, Sri Lanka and Jordan became independent. Also, the Palestine Mandate was terminated in 1948, while he was in office, with the state of Israel being declared the very next day.

54. Carson who won the 2001 T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry : ANNE
Anne Carson is a poet and essayist from Toronto. Carson’s most famous work is her 1986 nonfiction book “Eros the Bittersweet”, which traces the concept of “eros” in poetry from ancient Greece to the present day.

62. Look from Scrooge : SNEER
The classic 1843 novella "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to popular use of the phrase "Merry Christmas", and secondly it gave us the word "scrooge" meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Ebenezer Scrooge uttered the words "Bah! Humbug!".

63. Sally : RAID
A “sally” is a sudden and violent attack, especially a counterattack by forces under siege. The term comes into English via Middle French from the Latin “salire” meaning “to leap”. By extension, a passage in a fortification that is used to make that counterattack is known as a “sally-port”.

70. 24-note tune : TAPS
"Taps" is played nightly by the US military, indicating "lights out". It's also known as "Butterfield's Lullaby" as it is a variation of an older bugle call named the "Scott Tattoo", arranged during the Civil War by the Union Army's Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield. The tune is called "taps", from the notion of drum taps, as it was originally played on a drum, and only later on a bugle. The whole tune comprises just 24 notes, with there only being four different notes within the 24, i.e. “low G”, C, E and “high G”. Minimalism at its best ...

71. Quattros and TTs : AUDIS
The Audi name has an interesting history. The Horch company was founded by August Horch in 1909. Early in the life of the new company, Horch was forced out of his own business. He set up a new enterprise and continued to use his own name as a brand. The old company sued him for using the Horch name so a meeting was held to choose something new. Horch's young son was studying Latin in the room where the meeting was taking place. He pointed out that "Horch" was German for "hear" and he suggested "Audi" as a replacement, the Latin for "listen".

75. Olympic sprinting champion Devers : GAIL
Gail Devers is a US Olympic champion, winning the 100m gold at the 1992 Games in Barcelona, and winning the 100m individual and relay golds at the 1996 Games in Atlanta. Back in 1990, doctors considered amputating Devers feet as they were in such poor condition as a result of treatment for Graves’ disease.

85. Some Ivy Leaguers : YALIES
The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

88. Nutritional figs. : RDAS
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and are a set of recommendations for the standard daily allowances of specific nutrients. RDAs were effectively absorbed into a broader set of dietary guidelines in 1997 called Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs). RDIs are used to determine the Daily Values (DV) of foods that are printed on nutrition fact labels on most food that we purchase.

90. Roman statesman known as "the Censor" : CATO
Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

92. Label for a suit? : MBA
The world's first Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

“Suit” is a slang term for a business executive or manager.

93. Some Johnny Hart panels : BCS
"B.C." is a comic strip that was drawn by Johnny Hart, and now since Hart's passing, is produced by his grandson. Hart introduced "B.C." in 1958. One of the non-human characters in the strip is the Anteater, who sucks up ants with his sticky tongue making a "ZOT" sound. Hart's Anteater is the inspiration for Peter the Anteater, the team mascot for UC Irvine. Johnny Hart's other famous comic strip is the brilliant "The Wizard of Id".

99. Out of control : AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

105. Mountain goat : IBEX
Ibex is a common name for various species of mountain goat. “Ibex” is a Latin name that was used for wild goats found in the Alps and Apennines in Europe.

107. The Engineers of the N.C.A.A. : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

108. Disneyland's Main Street, ___ : USA
The first thing most people see when visiting Disneyland is Main Street, U.S.A. Main Street is designed to resemble a Midwest town in America’s Victorian period, and was inspired by Marceline, Missouri where Walt Disney spent his boyhood.

109. ___ rima (meter of Dante's "Divine Comedy") : TERZA
The Italian poet Dante invented the terza rima rhyming scheme. It has a chain rhyming pattern and so has the format ABA, BCB, CDC etc. Dante introduced terza rima in his epic poem called "Divine Comedy".

Dante Alighieri's "Divine Comedy" is an epic poem dating back to the 14th century. The first part of that epic is "Inferno", which is the Italian word for "Hell". In the poem, Dante is led on a journey by the poet Virgil, starting at the gates of Hell on which are written the famous words "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here".

111. Former name for Syracuse athletes : ORANGEMEN
The Orange are the athletic teams of the Syracuse University. I should know that as I lived in Syracuse for three years when I moved to the US back in 1983. And, I met my wife there, so happy memories …

118. Subject of 1972 negotiations with China : TAIWAN
Prior to 1945, the island that we know today as Taiwan was called “Formosa”, the Portuguese word for “beautiful”. Portuguese sailors gave the island this name when they spotted it in 1544. The official name for the state of Taiwan is the “Republic of China”.

120. Coins with fleurs-de-lis : ECUS
The ecu is an Old French coin. When introduced in 1640, the ecu was worth three livres (an older coin, called a "pound" in English). The word "ecu" comes from the Latin "scutum" meaning "shield". The original ecu had a coat of arms on it, a shield.

"Lys" (also “lis”) is the French word for "lily", as in "fleur-de-lys", the heraldic symbol often associated with the French monarchy.

122. Famed Six Flags Great Adventure roller coaster : EL TORO
The Six Flags Entertainment Corporation is an operator of amusement parks that is headquartered in Grand Prairie, Texas. Six Flags owns more amusement parks than any other company in the world. The first of these properties to open was Six Flags Over Texas. The park’s name was chosen as a homage to the flags of the six nations that have governed Texas, namely Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the United States of America, and the Confederate States of America.

Down
1. ___ Pets (1980s fad) : CHIA
Chia is a flowering plant in the mint family. Chia seeds are an excellent food source and are often added to breakfast cereals and energy bars. There is also the famous Chia Pet, an invention of a San Francisco company. Chia Pets are terracotta figurines to which are applied moistened chia seeds. The seeds sprout and the seedlings become the "fur" of the Chia Pet.

3. 2009 Grammy nominee with the lyric "But this ain't SeaWorld, this is real as it gets" : I’M ON A BOAT
“I’m on a Boat” is a rap parody performed by the comedy trio called the Lonely Island, comprising Akiva Schaffer, Andy Samberg and Jorma Taccone.

4. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV's “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

5. Nabokov heroine : ADA
"Ada" is a 1969 novel by Vladimir Nabokov. The story takes place in the 1800s on Antiterra, an Earth-like planet that has a history similar to ours but with interesting differences. For example, there is a United States, but that country covers all of North and South America. What we call eastern Canada is a French-speaking province called "Canady", and western Canada is a Russian-speaking province called "Estody". The storyline is about a man called Van Veen who, when 14 years old, meets for the first time his cousin, 11-year-old Ada. The two cousins eventually have an affair, only to discover later that they are in fact brother and sister.

11. Israeli leaders? : ALEPHS
“Aleph” is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and “beth” the second.

13. Foe of Saruman, in Tolkien : ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

15. Director Michael : CIMINO
Director and producer Michael Cimino's major work is the incredible "The Deer Hunter" from 1978. However, his 1980 movie "Heaven's Gate" pulled in only $3 million dollars at the box office, after it had cost $42 million to make. So bad were the economics on this project, that it was a major contributor to the demise of the United Artists studio.

16. Company that passed Walmart in 2015 as the world's largest retailer by market value : AMAZON
Amazon.com is the largest online retailer in the world. The company was founded in 1994 by Jeff Bezos, in his garage in Bellevue, Washington. I’m a big fan of Amazon’s approach to customer service …

22. Mr. Noodle's friend on "Sesame Street" : ELMO
The man behind/under the character Elmo on “Sesame Street” is Kevin Clash. If you want to learn more about Elmo and Clash, you can watch the 2011 documentary “Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey”.

32. 2003 #1 hit for OutKast : HEY YA!
OutKast is a hip hop duo made up from rappers André 3000 and Big Boi.

33. Parts of Polynésie : ILES
French Polynesia (Polynésie française) is a vast overseas territory of France that is located in the South Pacific Ocean. It comprises 118 islands and atolls dispersed over 1,609 square miles, the most populous being Tahiti.

35. General of the Resistance in "The Force Awakens" : LEIA
“Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens” is the much-anticipated seventh episode in the “Star Wars” series of films. Some favorite characters return in “Star Wars VII”, including Han Solo (Harrison Ford), Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and General Leia Organa (or “Princess Leia” in earlier films, played by Carrie Fisher).

45. Fifth-century pope who was the first to be called "the Great" : SAINT LEO
The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

47. One waiting in "Waiting for Godot" : VLADIMIR
“Waiting for Godot” is a play by novelist and playwright Samuel Beckett that premiered in 1953. Irishman Beckett actually wrote the piece in French, under the title “En attendant Godot”. He then translated the play into English himself. I’ve tried sitting through “Waiting Godot” just one time, and failed. Mine is very much a minor opinion as “Waiting for Godot” was once voted the most significant English-language play of the 20th century.

55. Duke Ellington's "All ___ Soon" : TOO
Duke Ellington was a bandleader and composer believed by many to have elevated jazz to the same level as other respected genres of music. Ellington tended not to use the word “jazz” to describe his compositions, preferring the term “American Music”.

56. Sacha Baron Cohen persona : ALI G
Ali G is a fictional character created by British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. Baron Cohen achieved international fame playing another of his personae, Borat, the protagonist in the 2006 movie "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan".

58. Aphorisms : SAWS
An aphorism is a short and pithy statement that embodies a general truth or insightful observation. Some great examples are:
- Life is a journey, not a destination (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
- The average person thinks he isn’t (Larry Lorenzoni)
- To err is human, to forgive divine (Alexander Pope)
- Reality is an illusion, albeit a very persistent one (Albert Einstein)
- Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely (Lord Acton)

60. El ___ Real : CAMINO
El Camino Real is the Spanish for "The Royal Road". It was the name given to many roads in the Americas that connected different Spanish settlements. The name El Camino Real persists to this day in many parts of the United States. There's one just down the road from me in the Bay area.

61. Symbols on old manuscripts : OBELI
An ”obelus” (plural “obeli”) was a symbol like “-” or “÷” that was used in ancient texts to mark doubtful or superfluous words and passages.

65. Tennyson work : IDYL
An "idyll" (also "idyl") is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek "eidyllion", which literally translates to "little picture" but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

Alfred, Lord Tennyson was the Poet Laureate during for much of the reign of Queen Victoria. There are many phrases we use today that were first penned by Tennyson, including:
- ‘Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all
- Theirs not to reason why, / Theirs but to do and die

69. Post-menorah-lighting treats : LATKES
A latke is a delicious potato pancake (I'm Irish ... so anything made with potato is delicious!).

There is a seven-branched menorah used symbolically in ancient temples. However, the menorah that is lit during the eight-day holiday called Hanukkah (also “Chanukah”) is a nine-branched lampstand. “Menorah” is the Hebrew word for “lamp”.

78. Oscar ___, star of "Inside Llewyn Davis" : ISAAC
Oscar Isaac is an actor from Guatemala who was raised in Miami. Before acting, Isaac played lead guitar in his own band, called the Blinking Underdogs.

"Inside Llewyn Davis" is a 2013 film from the Coen brothers that stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan and John Goodman. The movie is about a week in the life of a folk singer in New York City in the early sixties. "Inside Llewyn Davis" has been well received, but based on the trailers I’ve seen, it looks a little too depressing for my taste. I could be wrong …

80. Facilities often referred to by their first letter : YMCAS
The YMCA is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of "a healthy spirit, mind and body". The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

82. 2010's "California Gurls" or 1996's "Macarena" : SUMMER HIT
“California Gurls" is a song recorded by Katy Perry, with Snoop Dogg contributing.

“Macarena” is a dance song in Spanish that was a huge hit worldwide for Los Del Río in 1995-1996.

83. Goal of having no unread emails : INBOX ZERO
“Inbox Zero” is a rigorous approach to handling emails that was developed by productivity expert Merlin Mann. Mann touts his approach inbox management as “how to reclaim your email, your attention, and your life”.

84. Lake Oahe locale: Abbr. : SDAK
Lake Oahe is a large reservoir in the Dakotas that was created on the Missouri River when the Oahe Dam was opened in 1962. Lake Oahe is fourth largest artificial reservoir in the US, after Lake Mead (Hoover Dam), Lake Powell (Glen Canyon Dam) and Lake Sakakawea (Garrison Dam).

86. Actress Blanchett : CATE
Cate Blanchett is a great Australian actress, and winner of an Academy Award for playing Katherine Hepburn in "The Aviator". Winning for that role made Blanchett the first person to win an Academy Award for playing an actor (Hepburn) who had also won an Oscar. Now that, that is trivial information ...

87. ___ Viv, caretaker of the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air : AUNT
The sitcom “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” originally ran from 1990 to 1996, and starred Will Smith as a teenager from Philadelphia who arrives in Bel Air to live in a mansion with his wealthy aunt and uncle.

94. Former "CBS Evening News" anchor : COURIC
Katie Couric left NBC's "The Today Show" in 2006 and took over as news anchor for "CBS Evening News". In so doing she became the first solo female anchor of a broadcast network evening news program. Couric also has the honor of being the only person to guest-host on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”. In fact she “swapped jobs” on that particular day, and Leno filled in for Couric on “The Today Show”. Since 2012, Couric has a hosted a daytime talk show called “Katie” on ABC.

95. Outback maker : SUBARU
The Subaru Outback is a station wagon with off-road capability that is made by Japan’s Fuji Heavy Industries.

99. Looks out for? : ABETS
The word "abet" comes into English from the Old French "abeter" meaning "to bait" or "to harass with dogs" (it literally means "to make bite"). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of "abet" meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

102. Calc figures : LOGS
As an example, the number 10,000 is equal to 10 to the power of 4, so the base-10 logarithm of 10,000 is said to be 4. Inversely, the antilogarithm of 4 (in the base-10) is 10,000. But, we all remember that from school, don’t we?

The Latin word “calculus” was originally used for a reckoning or an account, and originally applied to a pebble that was used to maintain a count. The Latin word came from the Greek for a pebble, “khalix”.

110. Lover of Aphrodite : ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros. The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

114. Brace : TWO
A brace is a pair, as in a brace of game birds that have been killed for sport.

116. "Lux" composer : ENO
“Lux” is a 2012 album released by musician Brian Eno. The album is a collection of ambient music that Eno previously composed as background “soundscapes” for art galleries and airport terminals.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___-Town (sobriquet in many a Kanye West song) : CHI
4. "To Kill a Mockingbird" theme : RACISM
10. Get heavily (into) : WADE
14. Distinctive Harry Potter feature : SCAR
18. Overactors : HAMS
20. Hebrew for "my Lord" : ADONAI
21. Period for reflection and recharging : ALONE TIME
23. With 113-Across, heard but disregarded ... or a hint to interpreting the Across answers with circled letters : IN ONE EAR AND ...
25. Gallant type : GENTLEMAN
26. "___ Dei" (prayer) : AGNUS
27. Baldwin's "30 Rock" co-star : FEY
28. Clean air org. : EPA
29. Mayan food staple : MAIZE
30. Browser navigation aids : TABS
31. Common query from one about to leave the house : WHERE ARE MY KEYS
35. The left, informally : LIBS
36. Meditate (on) : CHEW
37. Modern surgical aid : LASER
38. Come-___ : ONS
39. ___-surfing : EGO
40. Show wear : FRAY
41. Arcade game sound : BEEP
43. Nicknames : DUBS
46. Indignant reply when someone withholds information : I HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW
49. Contract part : CLAUSE
53. P.M. after and before Churchill : ATTLEE
54. Carson who won the 2001 T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry : ANNE
55. "Come on ... be daring" : TAKE A RISK
57. Increases, with "to" : ADDS
59. "No worries" : IT’S COOL
62. Look from Scrooge : SNEER
63. Sally : RAID
66. Tell : SAY TO
68. Bubbling : ABOIL
70. 24-note tune : TAPS
71. Quattros and TTs : AUDIS
73. "I had nothing to do with it" : WASN'T ME
75. Olympic sprinting champion Devers : GAIL
77. "Oh, boo-hoo!" : CRY ME A RIVER!
79. Overly ingratiating : OILY
81. Senior project : THESIS
85. Some Ivy Leaguers : YALIES
86. "Would you consider this suggestion?" : CAN I MAKE A REQUEST?
88. Nutritional figs. : RDAS
90. Roman statesman known as "the Censor" : CATO
91. Given the signal : CUED
92. Label for a suit? : MBA
93. Some Johnny Hart panels : BCS
96. Not true? : ATILT
98. Outlaws : BANS
99. Out of control : AMOK
100. Comment to the not-yet-convinced : YOU’LL COME AROUND
105. Mountain goat : IBEX
106. Politico with the autobiography "An American Son" : RUBIO
107. The Engineers of the N.C.A.A. : RPI
108. Disneyland's Main Street, ___ : USA
109. ___ rima (meter of Dante's "Divine Comedy") : TERZA
111. Former name for Syracuse athletes : ORANGEMEN
113. See 23-Across : … OUT THE OTHER
117. Rustic backyard plaything : TIRE SWING
118. Subject of 1972 negotiations with China : TAIWAN
119. Part of a bloodline : SIRE
120. Coins with fleurs-de-lis : ECUS
121. Remnants : ENDS
122. Famed Six Flags Great Adventure roller coaster : EL TORO
123. Talking-___ : TOS

Down
1. ___ Pets (1980s fad) : CHIA
2. "Just hold on" : HANG TIGHT
3. 2009 Grammy nominee with the lyric "But this ain't SeaWorld, this is real as it gets" : I’M ON A BOAT
4. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
5. Nabokov heroine : ADA
6. Heart: Lat. : COR
7. "Moments from now" : IN A FEW
8. More grounded : SANER
9. June and July : MIDYEAR
10. Feminist issue in the workplace : WAGE GAP
11. Israeli leaders? : ALEPHS
12. Helped the cause, say : DONATED
13. Foe of Saruman, in Tolkien : ENT
14. Hearty entree : STEAK
15. Director Michael : CIMINO
16. Company that passed Walmart in 2015 as the world's largest retailer by market value : AMAZON
17. Extends, in a way : RENEWS
19. Disinvites, e.g. : SNUBS
22. Mr. Noodle's friend on "Sesame Street" : ELMO
24. Tricky curve : ESS
31. Kapow! : WHAM!
32. 2003 #1 hit for OutKast : HEY YA!
33. Parts of Polynésie : ILES
34. Rig, e.g. : TRUCK
35. General of the Resistance in "The Force Awakens" : LEIA
36. Doctrines : CREEDS
40. Awesome : FEARED
41. Unlikely to be talked out of : BENT ON
42. Sight seers : EYES
44. Makes dim, as the 42-Down : BLEARS
45. Fifth-century pope who was the first to be called "the Great" : SAINT LEO
47. One waiting in "Waiting for Godot" : VLADIMIR
48. Sweaters, e.g. : KNITS
50. Layer of the 42-Down : UVEA
51. Slip (through) : SEEP
52. Slips up : ERRS
55. Duke Ellington's "All ___ Soon" : TOO
56. Sacha Baron Cohen persona : ALI G
58. Aphorisms : SAWS
60. El ___ Real : CAMINO
61. Symbols on old manuscripts : OBELI
63. Not for prudes : RACY
64. Energy field, of sorts : AURA
65. Tennyson work : IDYL
67. Jabber : YAK
69. Post-menorah-lighting treats : LATKES
72. Branded : SEARED
74. Impeccably : TO A T
76. "Rumor has it ..." : I HEARD ...
78. Oscar ___, star of "Inside Llewyn Davis" : ISAAC
80. Facilities often referred to by their first letter : YMCAS
82. 2010's "California Gurls" or 1996's "Macarena" : SUMMER HIT
83. Goal of having no unread emails : INBOX ZERO
84. Lake Oahe locale: Abbr. : SDAK
86. Actress Blanchett : CATE
87. ___ Viv, caretaker of the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air : AUNT
89. Enter angrily : STORM IN
90. Glades : CLEARINGS
93. From memory : BY ROTE
94. Former "CBS Evening News" anchor : COURIC
95. Outback maker : SUBARU
97. Loom : IMPEND
98. "Scram!" : BEAT IT!
99. Looks out for? : ABETS
101. Dialogue : LINES
102. Calc figures : LOGS
103. "And I ___ ..." : QUOTE
104. Accustomed : USUAL
105. "Were ___ hazard a guess ..." : I TO
110. Lover of Aphrodite : ARES
112. Farm female : EWE
114. Brace : TWO
115. Laugh half : HAR
116. "Lux" composer : ENO


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11 comments :

Anonymous said...

Best of luck in Stamford!

-BK

Willie D said...

OK challenge today. I got a god start but was bogged down to a normal time of about :40. An odd mix of literary references and modern phrases. I guess that's the new norm for the NYT. We can adapt.

Anonymous said...

sorry, but this theme is bizarre - and without interest.

Lou Sander said...

It is easy to DESPISE rebuses. To HATE them. To CURSE THEIR EXISTENCE. When they are combined with today's very strange word-end-switching, they are even WORSE THAN THAT. Sheesh! Give us a BREAK.

Dave Kennison said...

38:26, no errors. I filled in 23A and 113A early on, but it took me a while to grasp exactly how to apply the phrase to the puzzle. I agree with Willie. The second Anonymous and Lou ... not so much ... Lighten up, guys, it's a puzzle ... and puzzles are supposed to be puzzling ... :-)

Anonymous said...

What Lou said. I kind of figured it out, but not to perfection. So, after 1:02:31, I finished, but with lots of errors in the end (14, I think, when you factor in all the EAR rebus spaces, which I tried to fill with single letters).

@Dave: we like a fair mental challenge, but don't want to be "tricked" or "bamboozled". This one was a bamboozle, and it engenders RESENTMENT.

BruceB said...

58:37, 9 errors. Not in synch with the setter at all today. I also filled in 23A and 113A early, but did not help. Could not see the theme until about 90% complete. As odd as it may seem, I concur with all the previous posters. Required very broad horizons of knowledge, from ancient history to modern jargon. Throw in the rebuses and the split phrases. Then add my pet peeve of non-English words, Hebrew and Latin, today. Both frustrating and challenging, at the same time.

Tom M. said...

Simply out of reach. This isn't a Sunday puzzle. It's more like a shuffling of some of the toughest Thursday-Friday-Saturday puzzles into one.

Anonymous said...

But 53 Across clue is INCORRECT! Churchill served as PM before and after Attlee and NOT the other way around. Come on Shortz, can't get this wrong! Am I the only one who noticed this?!

Bill Butler said...

@Anonymous
Nope. The clue is correct.

Bill Butler said...

@Anonymous
Oops ... you're right. The clue is indeed incorrect. Apologies for not reading your comment carefully enough.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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