Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

0515-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 May 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: Exhibit A … today’s themed answers are well-known phrase, but a word beginning with the letter A has been rewritten. That word sounds like the original, but has the letter A written as the indefinite article:
23A. Repeatedly cried "Land ho!" with no land in sight, maybe? : AGGRAVATED A SALT (sounds like “aggravated assault”)
28A. Fighting off drowsiness? : RESISTING A REST (sounds like “resisting arrest”)
46A. "Conger eel? Au contraire!" : THAT'S A MORAY (sounds like “That’s Amore”)
50A. Stuck to the corkboard? : UNDER A TACK (sounds like “under attack”)
65A. Whirlybird whose paint job is flaking off? : A PATCHY HELICOPTER (sounds like “Apache helicopter”)
85A. Adversary who shows up at romantic dinners? : A RIVAL DATE (sounds like “arrival date”)
87A. "Finally, I can buy that house!" : A LOAN AT LAST (sounds like “alone at last”)
107A. What Carrie needed after the prom? : CHANGE OF A DRESS (sounds like “change of address”)
114A. "Major shopping centers aren't among the prizes!" : YOU CAN'T WIN A MALL (sounds like “you can’t win ‘em all”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Tired runner? : CAR
The British spelling of “tyre”, for what we call a “tire” here in North America, was indeed the original spelling. The English started to use “tire” spelling in the 17th century, and then shifted back to the current “tyre” in the 19th century.

10. Production Code org. : MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

The Motion Picture Production Code that was in place from 1930 to 1968 was named for Presbyterian elder Will H. Hays. Hays was hired by the movie studios to help clean up Hollywood’s image after several scandals had hit the industry. The actual list of standards was drawn up by Catholic layman Martin Quigley and Jesuit priest Father Daniel A. Lord in 1929, but the code still came to bear the name of Will Hays.

19. Singer with a palindromic name : ONO
Yoko Ono was born into a prosperous Japanese family, and is actually a descendant of one of the emperors of Japan. Her father moved around the world for work, and she lived the first few years of her life in San Francisco. The family returned to Japan, before moving on to New York, Hanoi and back to Japan just before WWII, in time to live through the great fire-bombing of Tokyo in 1945. Immediately after the war the family was far from prosperous. While Yoko's father was being held in a prison camp in Vietnam, her mother had to resort to begging and bartering to feed her children. When her father was repatriated, life started to return to normal and Yoko was able to attend university. She was the first woman to be accepted into the philosophy program of Gakushuin University.

21. Magazine with a palindromic name : ELLE
"Elle" magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. "Elle" is the French word for "she". “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

22. Out of bounds : TABOO
The word "taboo" was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean". Cook described "tabu" (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

23. Repeatedly cried "Land ho!" with no land in sight, maybe? : AGGRAVATED A SALT (sounds like “aggravated assault”)
“Salt” is a slang word for a sailor.

27. Rains pellets : SLEETS
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls. It's the second definition that I have always used ...

30. Like tweets : TERSE
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so (but one should never say “never”). Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

31. One of the "cities of the plain" : SODOM
The two cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, as well as Admah and Zeboim, were destroyed by God for the sins of their inhabitants, according to the Bible. The name Sodom has become a metaphor for vice and homosexuality, and gives us our word "sodomy".

33. Belarussian capital : MINSK
Minsk is the capital of Belarus, formerly known as the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. One of Minsk’s more infamous residents was Lee Harvey Oswald who lived there from 1960 to 1962.

37. "Peanuts" girl : EUDORA
Eudora is one of the major characters in the “Peanuts” comic strip by Charles Schulz. She was the last character that Schulz introduced, and her lifetime was only nine years, in a strip that lasted for almost five decades.

42. 2016 campaigner : CRUZ
US Senator Ted Cruz served as Solicitor General for the state of Texas before heading to Washington. Cruz was appointed Solicitor General in 2003 at the age of 32, making him the youngest Solicitor General in the country. Famously, Cruz is an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and made a speech in 2013 in the US Senate on the subject that lasted for 21 hours and 19 minutes. It was the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate.

44. Jack ___ (member of the Royal Navy) : TAR
A Jack Tar, or just "tar", was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor's various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing his clothes and using tar in his hair to slick down his ponytail.

46. "Conger eel? Au contraire!" : THAT'S A MORAY (sounds like “That’s Amore”)
Morays are a large group of about 200 species of eels found across the world's oceans. They are carnivorous and look pretty scary but they're quite shy when confronted and present no threat to humans. One interesting thing about morays is that they will sometimes work in cooperation with the grouper fish found in reefs, the two helping each other hunt for food.

Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

"That's Amore" is a pop standard written by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks in 1952. "That's Amore" became the signature song for Dean Martin after he sang it (with some help from Jerry Lewis) in the 1953 comedy film "The Caddy". “When the moon hits you eye like a big pizza pie, that's amore …”

54. "Not with a bang but a whimper" poet : ELIOT
"This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper" are lines from T.S. Eliot’s 1925 poem “The Hollow Men”.

57. La Scala premiere of 1887 : OTELLO
Giuseppe Verdi's opera "Otello" was first performed in 1887 at La Scala Theater in Milan. The opera is based on Shakespeare's play "Othello" and is considered by many to be Verdi's greatest work.

60. Erwin of 1950s TV : STU
Stu Erwin played the title role of Joe Palooka in the 1934 movie “Palooka”, but the film’s star was the great Jimmy Durante. In fact, the movie was released in the UK as “The Great Schnozzle”.

65. Whirlybird whose paint job is flaking off? : A PATCHY HELICOPTER (sounds like “Apache helicopter”)
The 4-bladed Apache helicopter was introduced back in 1975 as a replacement for the 2-bladed Cobra. The Apache first entered service in 1986, and is still very much in use, mainly with the US Army, the Israel Air Force, the Egyptian Air Force and the Royal Netherlands Air Force.

70. Christian in Hollywood : SLATER
Christian Slater is an actor from New York City. My favorite roles that he has played are in “Broken Arrow” with John Travolta, and in the TV series “The West Wing”.

72. "___ All Too Much" (Beatles song) : IT'S
“It’s All Too Much” is a song from the 1969 album “Yellow Submarine” released by the Beatles. It is one of the relatively few Beatles tunes that wasn’t written by Lennon and/or McCartney, and rather by George Harrison.

73. Cuba ___ : LIBRE
The cocktail known as a Cuba Libre is basically a rum and Coke although the traditional recipe calls for some lime juice to be added.

84. Down-filled garment : PARKA
A parka is a hooded, often fur jacket that is worn in cold weather. The original parka was a pullover design, but nowadays it is usually zipped at the front. "Parka" is the Russian name for the garment , absorbed into English in the late 1700s via the Aleut language.

92. Company that sold Spirographs : KENNER
One of my favorite toys as a child was my Spirograph. A Spirograph is a geometric drawing device that uses cogs and gears with holes for pens and pencils. Movement of gears in combinations produces lovely geometric patterns on paper.

93. "Santa Baby" singer : KITT
Eartha Kitt really did have a unique voice and singing style. Her rendition of "Santa Baby" has to be one of the most distinctive and memorable recordings in the popular repertoire. Some of you will no doubt remember Eartha playing Catwoman on the final series of the TV show "Batman".

96. "___ Body?" (first Peter Wimsey novel) : WHOSE
Lord Peter Wimsey is delightful character created by Dorothy L. Sayers in a series detective novels. Wimsey is a gentleman sleuth living in Britain in the twenties and thirties, and a man who loves the good life. The Lord Peter Wimsey stories are favorites for adaptation by the BBC into radio and television series. An excellent TV version was aired by the BBC in the seventies, starring Ian Carmichael as the lead (available on DVD, and often shown in PBS). I also listen to Ian Carmichael as Wimsey in BBC radio episodes that air quite regularly ...

98. Its symbol is a star and crescent : ISLAM
Although the star and crescent emblem has been around for some centuries, it was only adopted as a symbol of Islam or the Muslim community starting in the 1950s.

102. Quarters : AREAS
We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

107. What Carrie needed after the prom? : CHANGE OF A DRESS (sounds like “change of address”)
In the Stephen King novel “Carrie”, the title character is humiliated in a cruel prank during her high school prom in which she ends up covered in the blood of an animal. This trauma leads to a fit rage, with Carrie slaughtering her classmates and the rest of her hometown’s inhabitants. At least, that’s what I read. I don’t do horror …

112. 1980s-'90s Olympian Jackie Joyner-___ : KERSEE
Jackie Joyner-Kersee is retired now, but in her day was one of the greatest heptathletes in the world, as well as an Olympic medal winner in the long jump. Jackie was named Jackie Joyner at birth, after Jackie Kennedy. She got the Kersee moniker when she married her coach Bob Kersee, in 1986.

113. Maker of Caplio cameras : RICOH
Ricoh is a Japanese company that started out in 1936 and by the year 2000 was the biggest manufacturer of copiers in the world. The company is also well known as a supplier of cameras. The most successful of Ricoh’s lines of cameras is the compact model called a Caplio.

114. "Major shopping centers aren't among the prizes!" : YOU CAN'T WIN A MALL (sounds like “you can’t win ‘em all”)
Surprisingly, our word “mall”, meaning “shady walk” or “enclosed shopping space”, comes from the Italian for “mallet”. All of our shopping-style malls are named for “The Mall” in St. James’s Park in London. This tree-lined promenade was so called as it used to a famous spot to play the croquet-like game called “pall-mall”. The game derived its name from the Italian for ball (palla) and mallet “maglio”. The London thoroughfare called the Mall still exists, at one end of which is Buckingham Palace. Indeed, parallel to the Mall is a street called Pall Mall.

116. Wild and woolly? : OVINE
The Latin word for "sheep" is "ovis", giving us the adjective "ovine", meaning "like a sheep".

117. Ligurian Sea feeder : ARNO
The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, passing through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

The Ligurian Sea is part of the Mediterranean, located off the Italian coast and north of the French island of Corsica.

119. GameCube successor : WI
The Nintendo GameCube video game console was the successor to the Nintendo 64, and the predecessor to the Nintendo Wii.

Down
3. Substitute anchor during Walter Cronkite's tenure at CBS : ROGER MUDD
After a career with CBS and NBC, Roger Mudd was more recently an anchor for the History Channel. Mudd is perhaps best known for his 1979 interview with Senator Edward Kennedy. Ted Kennedy's lackluster responses to some of Mudd's questions were cited as the reason support plummeted for the senator’s 1980 Presidential nomination.

The broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite was the anchor of the “CBS Evening News” for 19 years, from 1962 to 1981. Cronkite’s famous sign-off line was “And that’s the way it is …” Cronkite made many famous broadcasts, including coverage of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the Moon landings. Cronkite was so closely associated with the Apollo space missions that he was presented with a Moon rock, making him the only non-NASA person to be so honored.

4. ___ Island (home of Wagner College) : STATEN
Staten Island is part of New York City and is the least populous of the city's five boroughs. The island was originally called Staaten Eylandt by Henry Hudson and was named after the Dutch parliament, the Staaten Generaal.

Wagner College is a private school on Staten Island in New York that was established in 1883 in Rochester, New York. Wagner moved to its present location in 1918.

5. Cleveland team, informally : CAVS
The Cleveland Cavaliers are the professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Cavs joined the NBA as an expansion team in 1970. The team plays at the Quicken Loans Arena in downtown Cleveland, a facility that the locals refer to as “the Q”.

6. "Ex Machina" robot : AVA
“Ex Machina" is an intriguing science fiction movie released in 2015 about a computer programmer who is chosen to test a humanoid robot named Ava. I found this movie to be an engrossing thriller that was beautifully shot, especially the scenes filmed in Norway …

11. Poet who wrote "I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am" : PLATH
Sylvia Plath was a poet from Boston, Massachusetts who lived much of her life in the UK where she married fellow poet Ted Hughes. The couple had a tumultuous relationship, and Plath had a long battle with depression. She lost that battle in 1963, committing suicide at the age of 30 years.

12. Kate's partner of old TV : ALLIE
"Kate & Allie" ran from 1984 to 1989, starring Susan Saint James as Kate, and Jane Curtin as Allie. Jane Curtin won two Emmy awards for her work on the series, while Susan Saint James ... did not.

13. Hartford-based Fortune 100 company : AETNA
When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

Hartford is the capital of the state of Connecticut. The city is home to the headquarters of many insurance companies. As such Hartford is nicknamed the “Insurance Capital of the World”.

38. Contributes to a GoFundMe campaign : DONATES
GoFundMe is what is known as “crowdfunding” website, based in San Diego.

“Crowdsourcing” is mainly an online phenomenon, and is the solicitation of perhaps services, ideas or content from a large group of people. “Crowdsourcing” is a portmanteau of “crowd” and “outsourcing”. One example of crowdsourcing is “crowdfunding”, where an individual solicits many small contributions from a large number of people to fund a project.

39. Stumper? : ORATOR
“To stump” can mean to go on a speaking tour during a political campaign. This peculiarly American term dates back to the 19th century. Back then a “stump speech” was an address given by someone standing on a large tree stump that provided a convenient perch to help the speaker get his or her message across to the crowd.

40. Food sometimes sold with a flavor packet : RAMEN
Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed.

43. Codon carrier : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

Proteins are synthesised in the body from amino acids, which are linked together in specific sequences that are determined by the genetic code. The language of the code is sequence of nucleotides. The nucleotides are arranged in groups of three called “codons”, with each codon determining a specific amino acid.

45. "Lord of the Flies" protagonist : RALPH
What a story "Lord of the Flies" is! William Golding wrote the novel as an allegory of society. The most famous screen adaptation was made in 1963, directed by Peter Brook.

47. Hoppy drink : ALE
The foodstuff that we call “hops” are actually the female flower of the hop plant. The main use of hops is to add flavor to beer. The town in which I live here in California used to be home to the largest hop farm in the whole world. Most of the harvested hops were exported all the way to the breweries of London where they could fetch the best price.

48. Actress Carrere : TIA
Tia Carrere is an actress from Honolulu who got her break in the soap opera “General Hospital”. Carrere is perhaps best known for playing Cassandra Wong in the “Wayne’s World” movies.

49. Kevin who played Hercules on TV : SORBO
The actor Kevin Sboro is best known for playing the leads in the TV show “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys” and “Andromeda”.

53. Author of the 1984 memoir "Mayor" : KOCH
Ed Koch was a Democratic Representative in the US Congress from 1969-73, and then Mayor of New York City from 1978-89. From 1997 to 1999 Koch was a “judge” on the TV show “The People’s Court”. And in 2004, he collaborated with his sister Pat Koch, and wrote a children's book called "Eddie, Harold's Little Brother", a tale about Ed's own childhood experiences.

59. Owner of Fisher-Price : MATTEL
Mattel is the world’s largest toy manufacturer. Mattel was founded by Harold “Matt” Matson and Elliot Handler in 1945, and they chose the company name by combining “Matt” with “El-liot” giving “Matt-el”.

The toy company Fisher-Price was founded in 1930 by Herman Fisher and Irving Price, along with Margaret Evans Price and Helen Schelle. The company’s first toy was introduced the following year, a pull-along duck named Dr. Doodle.

60. Lacking creature comforts : SPARTAN
Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece, famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe someone who is self-disciplined or or something that is austere since the 1600s.

64. It often contains "lies" : EPITAPH
Our word “epitaph” ultimately comes from the Greek “epitaphion”, the word for a funeral oration.

65. Ireland : Erin :: Britain : ___ : ALBION
“Albion” is an old name for the island of Great Britain, in fact it’s the island’s oldest known name.

66. Dalmatian, e.g. : CROAT
Dalmatia is a historical region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, with most of its area falling in modern-day Croatia.

67. Kedrova of "Torn Curtain" : LILA
Lila Kedrova was a Russian-born French actress best-known for playing Mme. Hortense in the 1964 film "Zorba the Greek". Kedrova won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for that performance.

“Torn Curtain” is a marvelous Alfred Hitchcock thriller from 1966 starring Paul Newman and Julie Andrews. It’s a political/spy story set against the backdrop of the Cold War. This was Hitchcock’s fiftieth film, and apparently was fraught will all sorts of difficulties. Newman and Andrews were big stars at the time of shooting and were cast on the insistence of the studio, despite the director’s misgivings. Method actor Paul Newman clashed with Hitchcock when he was trying to establish his character’s motivation. Hitch informed his leading man that the “motivation is your salary”.

68. ___ Novello Award (songwriter's honor) : IVOR
Ivor Novello was one of the most popular entertainers in Britain in the early 20th century. Novello was a Welsh composer, singer and actor. On top of his success on the stage and in front of the camera, he even wrote the dialogue for the 1932 movie "Tarzan the Ape Man" starring Johnny Weissmuller.

69. Rhodes of Rhodes scholar fame : CECIL
Cecil Rhodes (famous in America as the founder of the Rhodes Scholarship), was a very successful English businessman and South African politician. He founded the De Beers diamond mining company, and also founded the state of Rhodesia which was named after him. The British colony gained its independence over time in the latter half of the 20th century, and is known today as the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe. The Rhodesian capital of Salisbury was renamed in 1982 to Harare, the current capital of Zimbabwe.

75. Browser bar text : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

76. Jamaican genre : SKA
Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term "ska", but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

84. Break down : PARSE
The verb "to parse" means "to state the parts of speech in a sentence". "Parse" comes from the Latin word "pars" meaning "part".

86. Take heat from? : DISARM
“Packing” and “packing heat” are underworld slang for “carrying a gun”.

101. Start of several Hawaiian place names : MAUNA
“Mauna” is a Hawaiian word meaning “mountain”, as in Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea.

103. City near Lake Nasser : ASWAN
The Egyptian city of Aswan lies in the south of the country, on the River Nile. Aswan is famous for its stone quarries, going back to ancient times. The most celebrated granite rock from the area is called syenite. Stone from Aswan was shipped northwards along the Nile and used in the construction of the pyramids. From ancient times right up to 1970, the annual flooding of the Nile was a significant event in Egypt. The flooding allowed the deposition of fertile silt far beyond the banks of the river, helping the region’s agriculture. However, the flooding was unpredictable. So the Aswan Dam was built in the sixties and from 1970 the flooding was brought under control.

105. Screenwriter Ephron : DELIA
Delia Ephron is the sister of the more famous Nora Ephron, and is a screenwriter and producer in her own right. Among Delia's writing credits is the 2005 movie “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants”.

106. Baseball commissioner after Giamatti and Vincent : SELIG
Bud Selig was the Commissioner of Baseball for Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2015. Selig became acting commissioner in 1992 after the resignation of Fay Vincent. The team owners searched for a new commissioner for six years, and finally gave the permanent job to Selig in 1998.

Bart Giamatti was the President of Yale University from 1978 to 1986. He was also the Commissioner of Major League Baseball for a few months in 1989 after having served as National League President from 1986 to 1989.

Fay Vincent served as the Commissioner of Baseball from 1989 until 1992. Prior to his career in baseball, Vincent was the chairman of Columbia Pictures and vice chairman of Coca-Cola.

107. Shoe with holes : CROC
Crocs are foam clogs that were originally designed as shoes to be worn at health spas.

109. Stomach stuff : ACID
Gastric acid is produced by cells lining the stomach, and is composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium chloride (NaCl). Other cells lining the stomach produce bicarbonate to ensure the contents of the stomach do not become too acidic. Those same cell also produce mucus that lines the stomach wall to protect it from the acid.

111. Rodent control brand : D-CON
“d-Con” is a line of rodent control products that has been around for over 50 years.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Tired runner? : CAR
4. Hard to find : SCARCE
10. Production Code org. : MPAA
14. Prayer ___ : SHAWL
19. Singer with a palindromic name : ONO
20. Taphouse : TAVERN
21. Magazine with a palindromic name : ELLE
22. Out of bounds : TABOO
23. Repeatedly cried "Land ho!" with no land in sight, maybe? : AGGRAVATED A SALT (sounds like “aggravated assault”)
26. Inflames : RILES
27. Rains pellets : SLEETS
28. Fighting off drowsiness? : RESISTING A REST (sounds like “resisting arrest”)
30. Like tweets : TERSE
31. One of the "cities of the plain" : SODOM
32. Internal pump : HEART
33. Belarussian capital : MINSK
35. Lose it : SNAP
37. "Peanuts" girl : EUDORA
42. 2016 campaigner : CRUZ
44. Jack ___ (member of the Royal Navy) : TAR
46. "Conger eel? Au contraire!" : THAT'S A MORAY (sounds like “That’s Amore”)
50. Stuck to the corkboard? : UNDER A TACK (sounds like “under attack”)
54. "Not with a bang but a whimper" poet : ELIOT
55. Tag line? : NAME
56. Inedible : BAD
57. La Scala premiere of 1887 : OTELLO
58. Show signs of age : WEAR
59. Associates : MATES
60. Erwin of 1950s TV : STU
61. Bring along : PACK
63. Pound : BEAT ON
65. Whirlybird whose paint job is flaking off? : A PATCHY HELICOPTER (sounds like “Apache helicopter”)
70. Christian in Hollywood : SLATER
71. Supply : GIVE
72. "___ All Too Much" (Beatles song) : IT'S
73. Cuba ___ : LIBRE
74. Dethrone : OUST
78. Track down : LOCATE
80. "Something just occurred to me ..." : SAY ...
83. Correct copy : EDIT
84. Down-filled garment : PARKA
85. Adversary who shows up at romantic dinners? : A RIVAL DATE (sounds like “arrival date”)
87. "Finally, I can buy that house!" : A LOAN AT LAST! (sounds like “alone at last”)
90. Cut (off) : LOP
91. Scoffing reply : I BET!
92. Company that sold Spirographs : KENNER
93. "Santa Baby" singer : KITT
96. "___ Body?" (first Peter Wimsey novel) : WHOSE
98. Its symbol is a star and crescent : ISLAM
102. Quarters : AREAS
104. Hand makeup : CARDS
107. What Carrie needed after the prom? : CHANGE OF A DRESS (sounds like “change of address”)
112. 1980s-'90s Olympian Jackie Joyner-___ : KERSEE
113. Maker of Caplio cameras : RICOH
114. "Major shopping centers aren't among the prizes!" : YOU CAN'T WIN A MALL (sounds like “you can’t win ‘em all”)
116. Wild and woolly? : OVINE
117. Ligurian Sea feeder : ARNO
118. Stun with sound : DEAFEN
119. GameCube successor : WII
120. Signed over : CEDED
121. Lacking excess : LEAN
122. Divines : SENSES
123. Lose rigidity : SAG

Down
1. Land line? : COAST
2. Trig term : ANGLE
3. Substitute anchor during Walter Cronkite's tenure at CBS : ROGER MUDD
4. ___ Island (home of Wagner College) : STATEN
5. Cleveland team, informally : CAVS
6. "Ex Machina" robot : AVA
7. Evocative of yesteryear : RETRO
8. Belief systems : CREEDS
9. Finishes with : ENDS ON
10. Predicament : MESS
11. Poet who wrote "I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am" : PLATH
12. Kate's partner of old TV : ALLIE
13. Hartford-based Fortune 100 company : AETNA
14. Layer : STRATUM
15. Head locks : HAIR
16. Good at one's job : ABLE
17. Reasons to despair : WOES
18. In need of a steer : LOST
24. Shrink or enlarge : RESIZE
25. Target : AIM AT
29. Highly regarded : GREAT
31. Glide effortlessly : SKATE
34. Act : STATUTE
36. "That was sure close!" : PHEW!
38. Contributes to a GoFundMe campaign : DONATES
39. Stumper? : ORATOR
40. Food sometimes sold with a flavor packet : RAMEN
41. Those in favor : AYES
42. Predator-to-be : CUB
43. Codon carrier : RNA
45. "Lord of the Flies" protagonist : RALPH
47. Hoppy drink : ALE
48. Actress Carrere : TIA
49. Kevin who played Hercules on TV : SORBO
51. Exchange cyclically : ROTATE
52. Body, metaphorically : CLAY
53. Author of the 1984 memoir "Mayor" : KOCH
59. Owner of Fisher-Price : MATTEL
60. Lacking creature comforts : SPARTAN
62. Party purchase : KEG
64. It often contains "lies" : EPITAPH
65. Ireland : Erin :: Britain : ___ : ALBION
66. Dalmatian, e.g. : CROAT
67. Kedrova of "Torn Curtain" : LILA
68. ___ Novello Award (songwriter's honor) : IVOR
69. Rhodes of Rhodes scholar fame : CECIL
70. Move through a crowd, maybe : SIDLE
73. Ceiling stain's cause : LEAK
75. Browser bar text : URL
76. Jamaican genre : SKA
77. Undertaking : TASK
79. Affirms : AVOWS
80. Tools used for cutting curves : SABER SAWS
81. Put away : ATE
82. Even so : YET
84. Break down : PARSE
86. Take heat from? : DISARM
88. Spoke horsely? : NEIGHED
89. Something fit for a queen : TIARA
94. Fashion editor's predictions : TRENDS
95. Experiment subject : TESTEE
97. Continental divides? : OCEANS
99. Unswerving : LOYAL
100. Ere : AFORE
101. Start of several Hawaiian place names : MAUNA
103. City near Lake Nasser : ASWAN
105. Screenwriter Ephron : DELIA
106. Baseball commissioner after Giamatti and Vincent : SELIG
107. Shoe with holes : CROC
108. Colonial home, you might say : HIVE
109. Stomach stuff : ACID
110. Lowest possible turnout : NONE
111. Rodent control brand : D-CON
112. Housemaid's ___ (bursitis) : KNEE
115. Hypotheticals : IFS


Return to top of page

3 comments :

Lou Sander said...

Challenging and fun, and no rebus! It doesn't get any better than this! We were a bit misled by "Exhibit A" and that the first instances of the theme were legalities: aggravated assault and resisting arrest. We expected to find a bunch of courthouse phrases (courthouses, where "Exhibit A" is often presented.) We got 'em all, but we didn't figure out how "Exhibit A" related to them until we came here.

Anonymous said...

36:28, no errors. Couldn't truly figure out "A" theme here, since it's pretty forced, but as Lou says, at least it wasn't a rebus.

BruceB said...

40:06, 2 errors. 112A KERSIE, 105D DILIA. Todays puzzle definitely played to my weaknesses. Literary authors, awards, etc.

Although I loved reading Peanuts as a child, in both newspaper and book form; and although it continues to be one of my favorite comics; I must have missed an entire decade of the strip where EUDORA was a character of any significance.

Challenging, enjoyed the theme.

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive