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0612-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 12 Jun 16, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Finn Vigeland
THEME: Attending Physicians
Today’s themed answers are well-known phrases, but with the letter “DR” inserted, meaning “doctor”.
113A. Sign on Lucy's "Peanuts" booth ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : THE DOCTOR IS IN

23A. Result of shaking a soda too hard before opening? : DR PEPPER SPRAY (Dr. + “pepper spray”)
34A. Noted sexologist, in her infancy? : BABY DR RUTH (Dr. + “Baby Ruth”)
48A. "The paternity results are in ... it's the protagonist of a long-running BBC sci-fi show!"? : DR WHO’S YOUR DADDY (Dr. + “who’s your daddy?”)
64A. 1970s-'80s Sixers star and friends? : DR J CREW (Dr. + “J.Crew”)
85A. Controversial TV personality's magical sidekick? : THE WIZARD OF DR OZ (Dr. + “The Wizard of Oz”)
98A. Hurt a Bond villain? : DO DR NO HARM (Dr. + “do no harm”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME:27m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

20. It may be waved from the top of a pyramid : POMPOM
The French call a ball made of tufted wool a “pompon”, a word that we imported into English directly as “pompon”. We use “pompon” to describe perhaps bobbles on some hats, or the tufted balls that are shaken by cheerleaders at sports events. Over time, the spelling “pompom” has become common in English, probably due to mishearing. To confuse matters a little, we also use the word “pom-pom”, which is a nickname for a British autocannon used mainly as an anti-aircraft weapon, particularly during WWII.

23. Result of shaking a soda too hard before opening? : DR PEPPER SPRAY (Dr. + “pepper spray”)
Dr Pepper was introduced in 1885 in Waco, Texas, one year before the competing Coca-Cola was released to the market. I spent an entertaining few hours at the Dr Pepper Museum in Waco a while back.

25. Parts of many modern addresses : AT-SIGNS
The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of all email addresses.

28. Herbert of the Pink Panther films : LOM
Herbert Lom is a Czech film actor, best known for playing Chief Inspector Charles Dreyfus in the series of "Pink Panther" movies. He was born in Prague in 1917, and had his first film role in a Czech film. He moved to England in 1939, and made many appearances in British movies. He also worked for many years in Hollywood, and played the King of Siam in the original London production of "The King and I".

32. Busy Apr. workers : CPAS
Certified public accountant (CPA)

April 15th wasn’t always Tax Day in the US. The deadline for returns was March 1st from 1913-18, when it was moved to March 15th. Tax Day has been April 15th since 1955.

34. Noted sexologist, in her infancy? : BABY DR RUTH (Dr. + “Baby Ruth”)
Dr. Ruth Westheimer is a German sex therapist who made a name for herself as a media personality. Westheimer is the daughter of Orthodox Jews and was sent away from Germany by her family just before WWII. She ended up in Palestine and participated in the 1948 Palestine War serving as a scout and sniper. Westheimer was seriously wounded, and spent several months unable to walk. She moved to France in 1950, and soon after arrived in the US. It was in the US where she did her training as a sex therapist.

One might be forgiven for thinking that the candy bar called a Baby Ruth was named after baseball legend Babe Ruth. However, the Curtiss Candy Company that introduced the confection in 1921 has stated that it was in fact named for Ruth Cleveland, the daughter of President Grover Cleveland. That said, there seems to be some debate …

40. "Is That All There Is" singer Peggy : LEE
Peggy Lee was a jazz and popular music singer from Jamestown, North Dakota. “Peggy Lee” was a stage name, and she was born Norma Egstrom. She was a successful songwriter as well as singer, and supplied several numbers for the Disney movie “Lady and the Tramp”. Lee also sang in the film and voiced four of the characters.

43. Daniel ___ National Forest : BOONE
Daniel Boone National Forest is located in Kentucky, as one might expect from the name.

Daniel Boone was a pioneer and folk hero. For frontiersman Boone, the frontier was what we now call the state of Kentucky. He led the building of the Wilderness Road through the famous Cumberland Gap in the Appalachians, a route subsequently taken by hundreds of thousands of migrants into Kentucky. Boone fought in the Revolutionary War with distinction, and after the war returned to Kentucky and got himself into land speculation. He became mired in debt, forcing him to emigrate to Missouri to settle down on land that was at that time owned by the French. It was there that he spent the last decades of his life.

44. Stocking stuffer : COAL
Apparently, the tradition of putting coal in the Christmas stocking of a poorly-behaved child comes simply from the proximity of the stocking (hanging on the fireplace) to a source of coal!

45. Heroine of "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" : JANET
"The Rocky Horror Picture Show" has to have the most devout cult-following of any movie ever made. Famously, fans attending a midnight show of the film will dress up in the outrageous costumes used in the film, and bring props with them. The props bear little relation to the storyline, but a tradition of using certain props in a particular way has been established. For example, at one point a character proposes a toast, and the audience throws toast around the theater. Go figure ...

48. "The paternity results are in ... it's the protagonist of a long-running BBC sci-fi show!"? : DR WHO’S YOUR DADDY (Dr. + “who’s your daddy?”)
The iconic science-fiction television show “Doctor Who” first aired in 1963, and relaunched in 2005 by the BBC. The relaunched series is produced in-house by the BBC in Cardiff in Wales, the location that is the setting of the successful "Doctor Who" spin-off called “Torchwood”. The new show is about the Cardiff branch of the Torchwood Institute which investigates incidents involving extraterrestrials.

54. Messages you don't want to send to your parents accidentally : SEXTS
“Sexting” (a portmanteau of “sex” and “texting”) is the sending of explicit dialog and images between cell phones. The term “sexting” was first coined by the UK’s “Sunday Telegraph Magazine” in a 2005 article. Apparently the practice is “rampant” among teens and young adults. Whatever happened to dinner and a movie …?

57. Watson's creator : IBM
Watson is a program still in development at IBM. Watson is designed to answer questions that are posed in natural language, so that it should be able to interpret questions just as you and I would, no matter how the question is phrased. The program is named after the founder of IBM, Thomas J. Watson. Today’s Watson competed in a few memorable episodes of “Jeopardy!” in 2011 taking out two of the best players of the quiz show. That made for fun television …

59. Go to ___ : POT
The phrase “go to pot”, meaning fall into ruin, has been around since the 1500s when it really meant “go to (the) pot”, to be chopped up and boiled for food.

62. Maiden name of Harry Potter's mother : EVANS
In the world of “Harry Potter”, Harry’s mother was Lily Potter nee Evans. Lily Evans was born a Muggle. a person who has no magical ability. Lily married someone who did have that magical ability, namely James Potter, Harry’s father.

64. 1970s-'80s Sixers star and friends? : DR J CREW (Dr. + “J.Crew”)
Julius Erving is a retired professional basketball player who was known as “Dr. J”, a nickname he picked up in high school. Dr. J was a trailblazer in many ways, being the first player associated with slam dunking and other moves above the rim.

J.Crew is a clothing and accessory retailer. Never been there, but I’ve seen the name turn up on credit card statements somehow …

72. Disorder that the Ice Bucket Challenge benefited, for short : ALS
The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a viral phenomenon in which participants are challenged to be filmed having a bucket of ice water poured over their heads. Each participant then gets to nominate up to three other people to do the same. Usually the nominees are given a day or two to comply, but can make a charitable donation is they want to avoid the icy shower. Happily, many participants opt to take the challenge, and also make a donation.

77. One of Spain's Balearic Islands : MINORCA
The Balearic Islands (“Baleares” in Spanish) form an archipelago in the western Mediterranean of the east coast of Spain. The Balearics are made up up four main islands: Ibiza and Formentera (aka “the Pine Islands”), Majorca and Minorca.

79. Ones fully agreeing with you, metaphorically : CHOIR
The idiomatic phrase “preaching to the choir” means trying to convince someone to accept an opinion that is already held by that person, which is just a waste of time. Surprisingly (to me), the phrase only dates back to the early 1970s.

85. Controversial TV personality's magical sidekick? : THE WIZARD OF DR OZ (Dr. + “The Wizard of Oz”)
Mehmet Oz is a cardiothoracic surgeon, and a TV personality known simply as “Dr. Oz”. Oz appeared as a health expert for several seasons on “The Oprah Winfrey Show”. Now he has his own “The Dr. Oz Show” on radio and television that is backed by Winfrey’s Harpo Productions.

“The Wizard of Oz” scares me, as the flying monkeys creep me out. There, I’ve admitted it in public …

91. Ironically, small Starbucks size : TALL
Starbucks introduced us to coffee drinks in a whole range of volumes:
- Demi ... 3 fl oz
- Short ... 8 fl oz
- Tall ... 12 fl oz
- Grande ... 16 fl oz (Italian for “large”)
- Venti ... 20 fl oz (Italian for “twenty”)
- Trenta ... 30 fl oz (Italian for “thirty”)

95. QB's try: Abbr. : ATT
Attempt (att.)

96. "Primal Fear" star, 1996 : GERE
“Primal Fear" is a very enjoyable crime-thriller film released in 1996, starring Richard Gere. The most acclaimed performance in the movie came from Edward Norton in his film debut.

97. Rimes of country : LEANN
LeAnn Rimes has been a country music star since she was 13 years old. In 2008 she disclosed publicly that she suffered from the autoimmune disease psoriasis. She has been active since then in raising money to fight the disease and helping fund cancer research as well. So, not only did Rimes win three Grammy Awards in 1997, she also won a 2009 Humanitarian Award from the Academy of Country Music.

98. Hurt a Bond villain? : DO DR NO HARM (Dr. + “do no harm”)
"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. No and Fu Manchu.

106. Inits. at Grand Central Terminal : MTA
The MTA is the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which has public transportation responsibility in the state of New York (as well as part of Connecticut). MTA might also refer to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which is known as the Metro and sometimes the MTA.

Grand Central Terminal in New York City is the largest railroad station in the world in terms of the number of platforms (44). Those platforms are all underground, in two levels. The official name for the facility is “Grand Central Terminal”. The name “Grand Central Station” is very common, and is actually the name of the facility that the terminal replaced in 1913.

109. Fanny ___, Barbra Streisand role : BRICE
The movie "Funny Girl" stars Barbra Streisand in the title role of Fanny Brice. The real Fanny Brice was a theater and film actress, and "Funny Girl" is very loosely based on her life story. Fanny Brice was born into a Hungarian Jewish family in New York City, with the real name of Fania Borach.

113. Sign on Lucy's "Peanuts" booth ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : THE DOCTOR IS IN
In Charles Schulz’s fabulous comic strip “Peanuts”, Charlie Brown is friends with at least three members of the van Pelt family. Most famously there is Lucy van Pelt, who bosses everyone around, particularly Charlie. Then there is Linus, Lucy’s younger brother, the character who always has his security blanket at hand. Lastly there is an even younger brother, Rerun van Pelt. Rerun is constantly hiding under his bed, trying to avoid going to school.

117. Four Corners tribe : NAVAJO
The Four Corners region of the US surrounds the meeting point of the four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. The Four Corners is the only point in the US that is shared by four states.

119. Mid-Long Island community : SYOSSET
Syosset is a hamlet located on Oyster Bay, an inlet of Long Island Sound on the north shore of Long Island in New York.

120. Rahm Emanuel's post-White House title : MAYOR
The Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, was an Illinois representative in the US House before resigning to take up President Obama’s offer to become the White House Chief of Staff.

Down
4. Alternative to a cab : UBER
Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft. Personally, I love the service and have only had good experiences ...

5. Resort area in northeast Pa. : MT POCONO
Mount Pocono is a borough in the Pocono Mountains region of northeastern Pennsylvania.

7. "___ moi le déluge" : APRES
“Après moi, le déluge” is a French phrase that was supposedly used by Louis XV. The king was referring to the impending demise of the French monarchy and predicting the French Revolution. The phrase translates as “After me, the deluge”.

8. Big name in audio equipment : BOSE
Bose Corporation was founded in 1964 by Amar G. Bose, and is a company that specializes in manufacture of audio equipment.

9. Audio equipment : AMPS
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

10. Jump-start of sorts, in brief : CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

11. Eucalyptus lovers : KOALAS
The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. Male koalas are called “bucks”, females are “does”, and young koalas are “joeys”. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day ...

14. The P.L.O.'s Arafat : YASIR
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father’s funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat’s explanation was that he wanted to “study the mentality” of the Jewish people.

21. "Butt out!," briefly : MYOB
Mind your own business (MYOB)

38. Moue : POUT
The term “moue” comes from French, and means a small grimace or a pout.

42. "Ask Me Another" airer : NPR
“Ask Me Another” is a National Public Radio show that features word games, puzzles and trivia. The show is recorded live in front of an audience In New York City, and is hosted by comedian Ophira Eisenberg.

44. Directed the rowers : COXED
The coxswain of a boat is one in charge, particularly of its steering and navigation. The name is shortened to "cox" particularly when used for the person steering and calling out the stroke in a competition rowing boat.

45. Matchmaking site that asks "Do you keep kosher?" : JDATE
Spark Networks is company that owns several special-interest dating sites online. The most famous is probably ChristianMingle.com, but there is also BlackSingles.com, LDSSingles.com, JDate.com and CatholicMingle.com.

49. Strong appetite : YEN
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

52. Bird so named because of its call : NENE
The bird called a nene is a native of Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name "nene" is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful.

56. Frequent James Franco collaborator : SETH ROGEN
James Franco and Seth Rogen have appeared together in several films, including “The Interview”, “The 40 Year Old Virgin”, “Knocked Up” and “Pineapple Express”. The pair also worked together on the short-run TV comedy “Freaks and Geeks”.

58. Rock whose name sounds good? : GNEISS
Gneiss is a metamorphic rock containing bands of different colors and compositions.

61. Where "The Princess Diaries" is set : SAN FRANCISCO
“The Princess Diaries” is a series of novels for young adults by Meg Cabot. There have been two Disney adaptations of the books, starring Anne Hathaway and Julie Andrews.

66. "The Hunger Games" star, in tabloids : JLAW
Jennifer Lawrence (sometimes “J.Law” in the press) is an actress from Louisville, Kentucky who really hit the big time when she was cast as Katniss Everdeen, the protagonist in the “Hunger Games” series of films.

67. Pattern for a forensic scientist : WHORL
There are three basic fingerprint patterns:
- loops
- whorls
- arches

69. Future dealings? : TAROT
Tarot cards have been around since the mid-1400s, and for centuries were simply used for entertainment as a game. It has only been since the late 1800s that the cards have been used by fortune tellers to predict the future. The list of tarot cards includes the Wheel of Fortune, the Hanged Man and the Lovers.

76. Dickens nom de plume : BOZ
The English author Charles Dickens used the pen-name “Boz” early in his career. He had already established himself as the most famous novelist of the Victorian Era when he came to visit America in 1842. He was honored by 3,000 of New York’s elite at a “Boz Ball” in the Park Theater.

81. Yemeni seaport : ADEN
Aden is a seaport in Yemen, located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

86. Tabloid twosome : ITEM
An unmarried couple known to be involved with each other might appear in the gossip columns. This appearance as "an item" in the papers, led to the use of "item" to refer to such a couple, but only since the very early seventies.

"Tabloid" is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

90. 1961 Michelangelo Antonioni drama : LA NOTTE
Michelangelo Antonioni was a film director from Italy. Antonioni’s most famous movies are the trilogy “L’Avventura” (1960), “La Notte” (1961) and “Eclipse” (1962). He died in 2007, coincidentally on the same day that famed director Ingmar Bergman also passed away.

94. Awards won by Stephen King and Agatha Christie : EDGARS
The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (the Edgars) are presented annually by the Mystery Writers of America.

96. Successor to South Carolina's Thurmond in the Senate : GRAHAM
Lindsey Graham has been US Senator for South Carolina since 2003, when he took over from long-serving Senator Strom Thurmond. Graham sought the Republican Party’s nomination for US president in 2015, but dropped out of the race after six months on the campaign trail. Graham served in the US Air Force for 33 years.

97. Time to give up? : LENT
In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed "quadragesima" (meaning "fortieth"), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term "Lent" was introduced. "Lent" comes from "lenz", the German word for "spring".

99. Kentucky Derby winner's wreath : ROSES
The first Kentucky Derby was run in 1875, and is a race modelled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, The Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses.

105. Loopy little films? : GIFS
A bitmap is an image file format used to store digital images. Basically, each pixel in a bitmap file is stored as a “bit” of information, hence the name “bitmap”. In 1987, CompuServe introduced a new type of image file called the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). A GIF image takes the same information as a bitmap and then compresses it, resulting in a smaller file size. However, during compression the image may lose some resolution. The GIF format also handles short video clips, usually animations.

108. Bad thing to lose : MOJO
The word “mojo”, meaning magical charm or magnetism, is probably of Creole origin.

114. Longoria of "Telenovela" : EVA
Eva Longoria is a fashion model and an actress who had a regular role on TV’s “Desperate Housewives”, playing Gabrielle Solis.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Jump to conclusions : ASSUME
7. Off-guard : ABACK
12. Medium : PSYCHIC
19. Has reservations : DOUBTS
20. It may be waved from the top of a pyramid : POMPOM
22. Olympic group in red, white and blue : TEAM USA
23. Result of shaking a soda too hard before opening? : DR PEPPER SPRAY (Dr. + “pepper spray”)
25. Parts of many modern addresses : AT-SIGNS
26. In ___ (gestating) : UTERO
27. Homecoming giveaways : TEES
28. Herbert of the Pink Panther films : LOM
30. Limited : FINITE
31. 5 is a high one : PAR
32. Busy Apr. workers : CPAS
34. Noted sexologist, in her infancy? : BABY DR RUTH (Dr. + “Baby Ruth”)
36. Yahoos : BOORS
38. Common tidbits in fried rice : PEAS
40. "Is That All There Is" singer Peggy : LEE
41. Any day now : SOON
43. Daniel ___ National Forest : BOONE
44. Stocking stuffer : COAL
45. Heroine of "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" : JANET
47. Strike caller : UMP
48. "The paternity results are in ... it's the protagonist of a long-running BBC sci-fi show!"? : DR WHO’S YOUR DADDY (Dr. + “who’s your daddy?”)
51. Bury : INTER
53. Masseuse's stock : OILS
54. Messages you don't want to send to your parents accidentally : SEXTS
55. Nosy person's request : MAY I SEE?
57. Watson's creator : IBM
58. Element of one's inheritance : GENE
59. Go to ___ : POT
60. Cousins of gulls : TERNS
62. Maiden name of Harry Potter's mother : EVANS
64. 1970s-'80s Sixers star and friends? : DR J CREW (Dr. + “J.Crew”)
68. Take out to dinner : TREAT
70. Area with R.N.s : PRE-OP
72. Disorder that the Ice Bucket Challenge benefited, for short : ALS
73. Certain Facebook reaction button : HAHA
75. Collar : NAB
77. One of Spain's Balearic Islands : MINORCA
79. Ones fully agreeing with you, metaphorically : CHOIR
81. Kind of pick : AFRO
82. "P.U.!" : GROSS!
85. Controversial TV personality's magical sidekick? : THE WIZARD OF DR OZ (Dr. + “The Wizard of Oz”)
88. "I'm not overwhelmed" : MEH
89. Overwhelms, as with humor : SLAYS
91. Ironically, small Starbucks size : TALL
92. "Two thumbs up!" : GREAT
93. "Quién ___?" ("Who knows?": Sp.) : SABE
95. QB's try: Abbr. : ATT
96. "Primal Fear" star, 1996 : GERE
97. Rimes of country : LEANN
98. Hurt a Bond villain? : DO DR NO HARM (Dr. + “do no harm”)
101. A little progress, idiomatically : DENT
102. Quick smoke? : CIG
105. Loving, as eyes : GOO-GOO
106. Inits. at Grand Central Terminal : MTA
107. Feds : G-MEN
109. Fanny ___, Barbra Streisand role : BRICE
111. Quickly : IN HASTE
113. Sign on Lucy's "Peanuts" booth ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : THE DOCTOR IS IN
116. Broccoli pieces : FLORETS
117. Four Corners tribe : NAVAJO
118. What's played mainly for kicks? : SOCCER
119. Mid-Long Island community : SYOSSET
120. Rahm Emanuel's post-White House title : MAYOR
121. Not on board, say : ASHORE

Down
1. Make sense : ADD UP
2. "Ish" : SORTA
3. Sports bigwig every February : SUPER BOWL MVP
4. Alternative to a cab : UBER
5. Resort area in northeast Pa. : MT POCONO
6. 12-Across's skill : ESP
7. "___ moi le déluge" : APRES
8. Big name in audio equipment : BOSE
9. Audio equipment : AMPS
10. Jump-start of sorts, in brief : CPR
11. Eucalyptus lovers : KOALAS
12. Our Children magazine org. : PTA
13. Release : SET FREE
14. The P.L.O.'s Arafat : YASIR
15. Just below average : C-MINUS
16. Resolve a dispute in a modern way : HUG IT OUT
17. Has the lights off, perhaps : ISN'T HOME
18. Detective's assignment : CASE
21. "Butt out!," briefly : MYOB
24. Certain airline alerts, for short : ETAS
29. Knight's greeting : MY LADY
33. Continues forward : PRESSES ON
34. Topless? : BALD
35. Plead not guilty : DENY IT
37. ___ and aahs : OOHS
38. Moue : POUT
39. Good listeners : EARS
42. "Ask Me Another" airer : NPR
43. Suborn : BRIBE
44. Directed the rowers : COXED
45. Matchmaking site that asks "Do you keep kosher?" : JDATE
46. Land in South America : TIERRA
48. "You sure got me pegged!" : DO I!
49. Strong appetite : YEN
50. Latin love : AMOR
52. Bird so named because of its call : NENE
56. Frequent James Franco collaborator : SETH ROGEN
58. Rock whose name sounds good? : GNEISS
59. Certain notebooks : PCS
61. Where "The Princess Diaries" is set : SAN FRANCISCO
63. With 65-Down, technological escalations : ARMS
65. See 63-Down : RACES
66. "The Hunger Games" star, in tabloids : JLAW
67. Pattern for a forensic scientist : WHORL
69. Future dealings? : TAROT
71. Chip material : POTATO
74. Financial ___ : AID
76. Dickens nom de plume : BOZ
78. Beat : RHYTHM
79. Department head : CZAR
80. In fine shape : HALE
81. Yemeni seaport : ADEN
82. Baseball V.I.P.s : GMS
83. Like many uneditable files : READ-ONLY
84. "Cry me a river!" : OH BOOHOO!
86. Tabloid twosome : ITEM
87. Stereotypically rowdy dudes : FRAT BROS
90. 1961 Michelangelo Antonioni drama : LA NOTTE
94. Awards won by Stephen King and Agatha Christie : EDGARS
96. Successor to South Carolina's Thurmond in the Senate : GRAHAM
97. Time to give up? : LENT
99. Kentucky Derby winner's wreath : ROSES
100. Abbr. on a cover sheet : ATTN
101. Furnishings : DECOR
103. More dangerous in the winter, say : ICIER
104. Comedy, e.g. : GENRE
105. Loopy little films? : GIFS
107. Down Under greeting : G’DAY
108. Bad thing to lose : MOJO
110. Rolling in it : RICH
112. Superlative finish : -EST
114. Longoria of "Telenovela" : EVA
115. She-bear: Sp. : OSA


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8 comments :

Anonymous said...

57 Across: I recall watching the Jeopardy episodes with Watson as one of the three competitors. I believe the reason Watson won, is its electronic "finger" was much quicker on the buzzer, thus got to respond first.

Lou Sander said...

Cute theme.

Syndyland Solver in Texas said...

Lily Potter née Evans was born with magical powers but her parents and sister were muggles.

BruceB said...

31:56, 2 errors. 105D GIFN, 119 NYOSSET. It's been many moons since I have been on Long Island, my dusty memory recalls a NYOSSET, but it may have been Nesconset that I was remembering. Did not go back and check 105D, which would have corrected the error.

Dale Stewart said...

No errors. A rarity for me on a Sunday. I do indeed think that today was easier than the typical Sunday. But I do wish that Will Short would scale back the difficulty level of all Sundays. I believe many more people would join in as solvers if he would do so.

Anonymous said...

40 mins 28 sec, 5 errors, mostly by failure to understand the clue. Not too hard, and the clever theme helped (as well as being fairly readily apparent).

Glenn said...

16 letter DNF, mainly due to the fill in the lower left. Had the theme off the revealer on the first pass (and guessed it on 34A).

John Doak said...

Funny how the sayings of French royalty seem to have multiple interpretations. “Après moi, le déluge”. I always took as simply the king's rebuke to those who suggested he might curtail his lavish spending. Not sure he was really having the Pharoah's premonitions/dreams of lean years to come for royals.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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