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0731-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 16, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ruth Bloomfield Margolin
THEME: Make that a Double
We have a rebus puzzle today. The letters IT appear twice in each of the themed answers. For every occurrence of the letters IT we KEEP them TOGETHER, writing the letters in the same square:
118A. Stay cool ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : KEEP IT TOGETHER

22A. Flip-flop : SWITCH POSITIONS
31A. Question asked at the cash register : CREDIT OR DEBIT
59A. Occasion to learn a secret handshake : INITIATION RITE
80A. Fib : LITTLE WHITE LIE
107A. Way to get to know a father in law? : PATERNITY SUIT
16D. Landlord's request : SECURITY DEPOSIT
20D. Activity-tracking devices : FITBITS
58D. Climber in a children's rhyme : ITSY BITSY SPIDER
103D. Dummies : NITWITS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Person in handcuffs, for short : PERP
Perpetrator (perp.)

12. The Fonz, for one : GREASER
Fonzie is a character in the sitcom “Happy Days” that was originally aired from 1974 to 1984. The Fonz was written as a secondary character, but eventually took over the show. Fonzie is of course played by Henry Winkler.

25. Times for many Tours tours : ETES
In French, “été” (summer) is “la saison chaude” (the warm season).

Tours is the largest city in the Centre region of France. It is said that the people of Tours speak the "purest" form of French in the whole country, and when spoken by a local it is also said to be free of any accent.

29. Mentalist Geller : URI
Uri Geller's most famous performance is perhaps his uncomfortable failure on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson in 1973. Carson "hijacked" Geller on live television by providing him with spoons to bend and watches to start, none of which had been available to Geller before the show aired. Clever!

30. ___ Tamid (synagogue lamp) : NER
“Ner tamid” is the Hebrew term for a sanctuary lamp, although it is often referred to in English as “eternal flame”.

39. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
"Up" is the tenth movie released by Pixar studios, featuring wonderful animation as we have come to expect from Pixar. The film earned itself two Academy Awards. The main voice actor is Ed Asner, whose animated persona as Carl Fredricksen was created to resemble Spencer Tracy, as Tracy appeared in his last film, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”.

44. It may require a password : WI-FI
“Wi-Fi” is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with “Wi-Fi” has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

53. Some email attachments : PDFS
Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

56. Travis who sang "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" : TRITT
Travis Tritt is a country singer from Marietta, Georgia.

64. Man of morals : AESOP
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

68. Spot for vaccinations, for short? : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA)

69. Chest organs : THYMUSES
The thymus is an organ located behind the breastbone. It is within the thymus that T cells mature. T cells are a group of white blood cells that are essential components of the body’s immune system. T cells are so called because they mature in the thymus. Animal thymic tissue can be offered on a restaurant's menu, where it is described as “sweetbread”.

71. Q neighbors : RST
The letters RST follow the letter Q in the alphabet.

74. Q neighbor : TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

75. Apartment ad abbr. : RMS
Room (rms.)

78. Q preceder, in song : SUSIE
The song “Susie Q” was written by, and originally released by, Dale Hawkins in 1957. It was covered By Creedence Clearwater Revival (as “Suzie Q”) in 1968.

79. Passing note? : OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

83. Romance writers' awards : RITAS
The RITA Awards are presented by Romance Writers of America (RWA) to authors exhibiting excellence in the genre of romantic fiction. The RITA is named for the RWA’s first president, Rita Clay Estrada.

84. ___ buco : OSSO
“Osso” is the Italian word for bone as in the name of the dish Osso Buco: braised veal shanks.

86. "Amazing Grace" verse ender : … I SEE
“Amazing Grace” is a very, very famous hymn, with words written by John Newton in 1779. The words have been set to a number of different melodies, and what we are used to hearing today is music from a tune called “New Britain”.

87. Bush campaigns? : SAFARIS
“Safari” is a Swahili word, meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

91. Pet cause, in brief : SPCA
Unlike in most developed countries, there is no "umbrella" organization in the US with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

94. French city known for its porcelain : LIMOGES
Limoges is a city in west-central France that is the capital of the Limousin region. Limoges is famous for its production of vitreous enamel, hard-paste porcelain and oak barrels used in making Cognac and Bordeaux wines.

101. Powerhouse in women's b-ball : UCONN
The University of Connecticut (UConn) was founded in 1881 as the Storrs Agricultural School, taking its name from the Storrs brothers who donated the land and provided initial funding.

106. Trophies for Tiger Woods and LeBron James : ESPYS
Awards ceremony since 1993 : ESPYS. The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

110. Home of the N.C.A.A.'s Cyclones : ISU
Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable events, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

111. King of Portugal : REI
“Rei” is the Portuguese word for “king”.

113. Actor Bremner of "Black Hawk Down" : EWEN
Scottish actor Ewen Bremner played the character “Spud” Murphy in the 1996 film “Trainspotting”, and SPC Shawn Nelson in “Black Hawk Down”.

114. One side of the Bosporus strait : ASIA
The Dardanelles and Bosphorus (also “Bosporus”) are two straits in Turkey. The Bosphorus and the Dardanelles lie either side of the Sea of Marmara, allowing continuous navigation from the Aegean Sea to the Black Sea. The Turkish Straits also form the boundary between Europe and Asia.

115. Lead-up to mating : ENDGAME
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be "in check". If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in "checkmate" and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce "check!") so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn't occur.

123. It might land you in a trap : TEE SHOT
That would be in the sport of golf.

124. Singer with an eponymous 1956 #1 album : ELVIS
Elvis Aron Presley (aka “the King”) was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So, although born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

125. Persona non grata : OUTCAST
A “persona non grata” (plural “personae non gratae”) is someone who is not welcome. The phrase is Latin for “an unacceptable person”.

127. Fossey who was "in the mist" : DIAN
Dian Fossey carried out her famous study of gorilla populations in the mountain forests of Rwanda (NB: it was Jane Goodall that worked with chimpanzees). Sadly, Fossey was found dead in her cabin in Rwanda in 1986, murdered in her bedroom, her skull split open by a machete. The crime was never solved.

Down
1. What gets As in chemistry? : ARSENIC
Arsenic is element #33 in the periodic table, and has the chemical symbol “As”. Because of arsenic’s toxicity, it was very commonly used in pesticides. These compounds are getting banned over time, but it seems there is a long way to go. Arsenic in aquifers continues to be a problem around the world, including here in the US. China has introduced limits to the amounts of arsenic permitted in food as well as water, mainly as the Chinese staple rice is particularly good at accumulating arsenic from groundwater.

4. Ozone destroyers, for short : CFCS
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are the propellants that were once used in aerosols. CFCs make their way up into the ozone layer and trigger a chain reaction that converts ozone (O3) into regular oxygen (O2). That conversion creates “holes” in the ozone layer. Regular O2 is good stuff, but we need O3 to absorb harmful UV radiation raining down on us. CFC is not good stuff ...

7. Reproduction unit : SPORE
Spores are produced by many bacteria, fungi and non-flowering plants. A spore is a reproductive body encased in a protective shell that is highly resistant to damage, and resistant to heat in particular.

8. Cause of Romeo's death : POISON
William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” doesn’t end well for the title characters. Juliet takes a potion as a ruse to fool her parents, to trick them into thinking she is dead. The potion puts her in a death-like coma for 24 hours, after which Juliet plans to awaken and run off with Romeo. Juliet’s sends a message to Romeo apprising him of the plan, but the message fails to arrive. Romeo hears of Juliet’s “death”, and grief-stricken he takes his own life by drinking poison. Juliet awakens from the coma, only to find her lover dead beside her. She picks up a dagger and commits suicide. And nobody lives happily ever after …

9. "Xanadu" group, for short : ELO
The title song of the 1980 movie “Xanadu” was performed by the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) and Olivia Newton-John (who starred in the film). Despite the popularity of ELO around the world, the song “Xanadu” was the band’s only number one hit back in their homeland of the UK.

10. ___ Tin Tin : RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

11. Group surrounding a star : POSSE
A rap star’s entourage is usually called his or her “posse”.

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

12. Curling stone stone : GRANITE
I think curling is such a cool game (pun!). It’s somewhat like bowls, but played on a sheet of ice. The sport was supposedly invented in medieval Scotland, and is called curling because of the action of the granite stone is it moves across the ice. A player can make the stone take a curved path (“curl”) by causing it to slowly rotate as it slides.

14. Keebler baker : ELF
The famous Keebler Elves have been appearing in ads for Keebler since 1968. The original head of the elves was J. J. Keebler, but he was toppled from power by Ernest J. Keebler in 1970.

17. Something with two sides? : ENTREE
"Entrée" means "entry" in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in", an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the "entry" to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

20. Activity-tracking devices : FITBITS
Fitbits are wearable activity trackers that are mainly used to track the number of steps walked. Fitbit Inc. was founded in 2007 in San Francisco.

28. Newswoman Soledad : O'BRIEN
Broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien is most famous for her work with CNN, but also appears on HBO and Al Jazeera America.

31. End of geologic time? : -CENE
For example, the Pleistocene, Holocene and Pliocene epochs.

32. "The Evil Dead" director : RAIMI
Sam Raimi is a very successful director and producer, responsible for the "Spider-Man" series of films among others, and TV series' such as "Xena: Warrior Princess".

“The Evil Dead” is a horror movie franchise that includes video games and comic books, all derived from a series of three films: “The Evil Dead” (1981), “Evil Dead II” (1987) and “Army of Darkness” (1992). I don’t “do” horror, so I can’t tell you anything about them ...

35. Flight board abbr. : ARR
Arrival (arr.)

36. Oscar-winning Hanks role : GUMP
The epic 1994 movie “Forrest Gump” is based on a 1986 novel of the same name by Winston Groom. Groom said that he had envisioned John Goodman playing the title role, and not Tom Hanks.

38. Beat it : TOM-TOM
A tom-tom is a drum with no snares. The name “tom-tom” came from the Hindi name “tam-tam”, which in turn was likely imitative of the sound made by the instrument.

41. What a star may denote : CAPITAL
A capital city on map is often denoted with a star to distinguish it from other cities.

48. Hummus holders : PITAS
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a "pocket" in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools.

The lovely dip/spread called hummus usually contains mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic. The name “hummus” is an Arabic word for “chickpeas”.

50. Lawyer who defended Leopold and Loeb : DARROW
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were two well-heeled students at the University of Chicago who famously murdered a 14-year-old boy, apparently just on a whim, to show that they could commit the perfect crime. The crime turned out to be not quite so perfect and the pair were caught and put on trial for the murder in 1924. The trial was big news, especially after the defendants engaged high-profile attorney Clarence Darrow to represent them. In fact, the court proceedings were dubbed “The Trial of the Century”. The crime itself was the inspiration for the 1929 play called “Rope” by Patrick Hamilton, which in turn was the inspiration for the 1948 Hitchcock film of the same name.

54. Tissue surrounding a muscle : FASCIA
If you’ve seen pieces of meat that are cut relatively roughly, you’ll have noticed thin sheets of whitish, fibrous connective tissue that surrounds muscles, blood vessels etc., basically holding everything in place in the body. That connective tissue is called fascia.

56. Something hard to get off your chest? : TATTOO
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo". Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

58. Climber in a children's rhyme : ITSY BITSY SPIDER
The Itsy Bitsy Spider crawled up the water spout.
Down came the rain, and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun, and dried up all the rain,
And the Itsy Bitsy Spider went up the spout again.

60. N.Y.U.'s ___ School of the Arts : TISCH
New York University (NYU) is comprised of fifteen schools, one of which it the Tisch School of the Arts. The Tisch is famous for its acting program, with notable alumni such as Debra Messing, Christopher Guest and Josh Radnor.

61. Senses : INTUITS
“To intuit” is a verb, formed from the noun "intuition", meaning "to know intuitively".

62. Terminal info, for short : ETDS
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

65. It's a stitch : PURL
As all of us knitters know, the purl stitch and knit stitch are very similar, one being sort of the inverse of the other. Yes, I’ve knitted a few sweaters in my day …

70. Striking down : SMITING
“To smite” is to strike with a firm blow. The term can also mean to strike down and slay.

72. Baby whale : CALF
Male whales are referred to as “bulls”, females are “cows”, and the young are “calves”.

76. Private transportation? : JEEP
The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

81. Anne Rice antihero : LESTAT
Anne Rice is an American author of erotic and Gothic novels. Rice was born Howard Allen O’Brien (no wonder she changed her name!). Her famous series of novels “The Vampire Chronicles” centers on her character Lestat de Lioncourt, a French nobleman who was turned into a vampire in the 18th century. One of the stories, “Interview with the Vampire”, was adapted for the big screen in 1994 and features Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt and others in a star-studded cast. Not my kind of movie though, as I don’t do vampires …

82. "It was you," à la Verdi : ERI TU
Every crossword constructors’ favorite aria "Eri tu" is from Verdi's opera "Un ballo in maschera" (A Masked Ball). The opera tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball.

85. Like Cheerios : OATY
Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, “Cheerios” were known as CheeriOats.

88. Paintball cry : I'M HIT!
The “paint” in paintball isn’t actually paint, but rather a mix of gelatin and food coloring.

90. "I wish I ___ [sic] homeward bound": Paul Simon : WAS
I guess the lyric would have to be “I wish I were homeward bound”, to be grammatically correct.

“Homeward Bound” is a song recorded in 1965 by Simon & Garfunkel. It was written by Simon while he was away from his American girlfriend and working in London.

93. Horizontal: Abbr. : ACR
Across (acr.)

95. Kimono-clad hostesses : GEISHAS
The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

The lovely Japanese kimono is a garment worn by men, women and children. The word “kimono” translates simply as “thing to wear”, with “ki” meaning “wear” and “mono” meaning “thing”.

96. Like Monday crosswords : EASIEST
Personally, I’m a fan of the non-themed Saturday crosswords.

97. English royal family : STUARTS
The Royal House of Stewart (also Stuart) came to power in Scotland in the late 14th century, starting with Robert II of Scotland. The Stewarts extended their power to England and Ireland when the Tudor line became extinct as Queen Elizabeth I died without issue. James VI of Scotland became James I of England at that time. The last Stuart monarch was Anne, Queen of Great Britain who also died without issue, despite going through seventeen pregnancies. Assuming Prince William, Duke of Cambridge becomes the British Monarch one day, then there will be a Stewart descendant on the throne again. William is the son of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Diana was descended from the Stewart monarchs.

99. Early online forum : USENET
Remember the good old days, when you read messages online in “newsgroups”? Well, that system of aggregating public messages is known as Usenet, and it’s still around today. Usenet started operating in 1980, some ten years before the World Wide Web was introduced (which system has displaced Usenet in terms of popularity). Usenet definitely played a significant part in the history of the Internet. For instance, the terms “FAQ” and “spam” were both born on Usenet.

102. The first to go on a strike, usually : ONE-PIN
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

104. Duma dissent : NYET
“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

A Duma is a representative assembly in Russia. The word “dumat” in Russian means “to think, consider”.

108. Took a hit : TOKED
“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette or on a pipe containing the drug.

109. Hoity-toity sort : SNOOT
"Snoot" is a variant of "snout" and is a word that originated in Scotland. The idea is that someone who is “snooty”, or snouty, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

112. Patron god of ancient Thebes : AMON
Amun (also Amon, Amen and "Amun-Ra") was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word "ammonia". This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, "sal ammoniacus" (salt of Amun).

114. Record label for Cream and Sonny & Cher : ATCO
Atco Records is an American record label founded in 1955, taking its name from the parent company Atlantic Corporation.

Cream were a “supergroup” from Britain, meaning the band was comprised of musicians from other successful groups. The band’s members were Eric Clapton (from the Yardbirds), and Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker (both from the Graham Bond Organisation).

The famous duo Sonny & Cher started out in the mid-1960s as backing singer working with Phil Spector. The couple married in 1964, and the next year released their breakthrough numbers “Baby Don’t Go” and “I Got You Babe”. Sonny and Cher divorced in 1975, and dissolved their act that same year. Cher moved onto a successful solo career that continues to this day. Sonny Bono was elected as a US Congressman for California in 1995. Sadly, he didn’t finish his term in the House as he died from injuries sustained in a skiing accident in 1998.

116. Federal management org. : GSA
The US Government’s General Services Administration (GSA), as the name suggests, provides general services to other federal agencies. So for example, the GSA manages office space for the other agencies, and transportation.

117. Tuna type : AHI
Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as "ahi", the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

119. Giant Manning : ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback.

120. Señora Perón : EVA
Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. "Evita" was also the follow-up musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and was based on the life of Eva Perón.

121. Statehouse resident, informally : GUV
“Guv” is an informal word replacing “governor”, used in the UK. It is usually a friendly address to a man, sort of like our “Mac” or “Dad”.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. What an urgent message may be in : ALL CAPS
8. Person in handcuffs, for short : PERP
12. The Fonz, for one : GREASER
19. Dish site, maybe : ROOFTOP
20. Leaf : FOLIO
21. Stuffed, in Mexican cuisine : RELLENO
22. Flip-flop : SWITCH POSITIONS
24. Puts on : AFFECTS
25. Times for many Tours tours : ETES
26. Holds up : ROBS
27. Juniors : SONS
29. Mentalist Geller : URI
30. ___ Tamid (synagogue lamp) : NER
31. Question asked at the cash register : CREDIT OR DEBIT?
35. Match : AGREE
37. Drink with mint or lemon : ICE TEA
39. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
40. See 46-Across : RECRUITER
42. Persistent : CHRONIC
44. It may require a password : WI-FI
46. With 40-Across, visitor on high-school career day : ARMY
47. Spot for a shopping list : MEMO PAD
51. Collect : REAP
53. Some email attachments : PDFS
56. Travis who sang "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" : TRITT
59. Occasion to learn a secret handshake : INITIATION RITE
63. Opposite of fast : EAT
64. Man of morals : AESOP
66. Blackening : TARRING
67. Tangle of hair : MAT
68. Spot for vaccinations, for short? : PSA
69. Chest organs : THYMUSES
71. Q neighbors : RST
72. Knock unconscious : COLD-COCK
74. Q neighbor : TAB
75. Apartment ad abbr. : RMS
76. Playful : JOCULAR
78. Q preceder, in song : SUSIE
79. Passing note? : OBIT
80. Fib : LITTLE WHITE LIE
83. Romance writers' awards : RITAS
84. ___ buco : OSSO
86. "Amazing Grace" verse ender : … I SEE
87. Bush campaigns? : SAFARIS
89. Ho-hum response : YAWN
91. Pet cause, in brief : SPCA
94. French city known for its porcelain : LIMOGES
98. Laugh uproariously : BUST A GUT
101. Powerhouse in women's b-ball : UCONN
105. "... or I quit!," e.g. : THREAT
106. Trophies for Tiger Woods and LeBron James : ESPYS
107. Way to get to know a father in law? : PATERNITY SUIT
110. Home of the N.C.A.A.'s Cyclones : ISU
111. King of Portugal : REI
112. Regarding : AS TO
113. Actor Bremner of "Black Hawk Down" : EWEN
114. One side of the Bosporus strait : ASIA
115. Lead-up to mating : ENDGAME
118. Stay cool ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : KEEP IT TOGETHER
123. It might land you in a trap : TEE SHOT
124. Singer with an eponymous 1956 #1 album : ELVIS
125. Persona non grata : OUTCAST
126. Melodic passages : STRAINS
127. Fossey who was "in the mist" : DIAN
128. Ones who say "We'll be right back" : TV HOSTS

Down
1. What gets As in chemistry? : ARSENIC
2. Hardly electronic wizardry : LOW-TECH
3. One who's outstanding? : LOITERER
4. Ozone destroyers, for short : CFCS
5. Phys ed dept. : ATH
6. Carbonated drink : POP
7. Reproduction unit : SPORE
8. Cause of Romeo's death : POISON
9. "Xanadu" group, for short : ELO
10. ___ Tin Tin : RIN
11. Group surrounding a star : POSSE
12. Curling stone stone : GRANITE
13. Makes the calls : REFS
14. Keebler baker : ELF
15. Carbonated drink : ALE
16. Landlord's request : SECURITY DEPOSIT
17. Something with two sides? : ENTREE
18. More promising : ROSIER
20. Activity-tracking devices : FITBITS
23. Carbonated drink : SODA
28. Newswoman Soledad : O'BRIEN
31. End of geologic time? : -CENE
32. "The Evil Dead" director : RAIMI
34. Wash'n ___ (towelette brand) : DRI
35. Flight board abbr. : ARR
36. Oscar-winning Hanks role : GUMP
38. Beat it : TOM-TOM
41. What a star may denote : CAPITAL
43. Doesn't accept, say : CONTESTS
45. Throat problem : FROG
48. Hummus holders : PITAS
49. Cause of inflation? : AIR
50. Lawyer who defended Leopold and Loeb : DARROW
52. Relating to heraldry : ARMORIAL
54. Tissue surrounding a muscle : FASCIA
55. What's at risk : STAKES
56. Something hard to get off your chest? : TATTOO
57. Places to get clean : REHABS
58. Climber in a children's rhyme : ITSY BITSY SPIDER
60. N.Y.U.'s ___ School of the Arts : TISCH
61. Senses : INTUITS
62. Terminal info, for short : ETDS
65. It's a stitch : PURL
70. Striking down : SMITING
72. Baby whale : CALF
73. Arrow on a screen : CURSOR
76. Private transportation? : JEEP
77. Shepherd's place : LEA
81. Anne Rice antihero : LESTAT
82. "It was you," à la Verdi : ERI TU
85. Like Cheerios : OATY
88. Paintball cry : I'M HIT!
90. "I wish I ___ [sic] homeward bound": Paul Simon : WAS
92. Signal : CUE
93. Horizontal: Abbr. : ACR
95. Kimono-clad hostesses : GEISHAS
96. Like Monday crosswords : EASIEST
97. English royal family : STUARTS
98. Hats for artistes : BERETS
99. Early online forum : USENET
100. Overturns : UPSETS
102. The first to go on a strike, usually : ONE-PIN
103. Dummies : NITWITS
104. Duma dissent : NYET
108. Took a hit : TOKED
109. Hoity-toity sort : SNOOT
112. Patron god of ancient Thebes : AMON
114. Record label for Cream and Sonny & Cher : ATCO
116. Federal management org. : GSA
117. Tuna type : AHI
119. Giant Manning : ELI
120. Señora Perón : EVA
121. Statehouse resident, informally : GUV
122. Archaic verb ending : -ETH


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12 comments :

Anonymous said...

What about 33 down?

Anonymous said...

33 down is REW for "REWind button.

Dave Kennison said...

On iPad: 48:25, no errors, BUT ... what's the deal with 33D? REW does indeed stand for "REWind", but why is the clue for it totally missing? And why is the clue for it in the IPad app given as just a double quote (")? I spent a long time trying to figure out how to justify that particular entry. When I finally gave up on trying to make sense out of it, I then got the "Almost there" notice and had to spend more time looking at it before I finally went looking elsewhere for a typo (which I finally found). So was this puzzle published with an error or is there some gimmick that I'm missing?

Bill Butler said...

The clue for 33-down reads

"<<" button: abbr.

The answer is REW, which is short for REWIND.

This combination of symbols really messes with the html code used to write webpages, and so I was forced to leave it out. My guess is that there were similar formatting issues with the puzzle in other electronic forms.

ibbill said...

Okay and now I know also.

Its the old Html code trick. and so it goes

Dave Kennison said...

Aha! Thank you, Bill! This issue was threatening to torment me all week ... :-)

It's a little odd that the folks who made this puzzle available via the NYT crossword puzzle app would have allowed such an error to slip through, but hey, I've been known to screw up now and then, too, so I guess I can cut them some slack. It'll be interesting to see what happens next week in my Denver Post ...

Thanks again ...

Lou Sander said...

Well, the REW business is just ONE of the horrible errors in this puzzle. EVERYBODY knows that it's EENSY WEENSY spider. Only children who were poorly raised say ITSY BITSY. So there! ;-)

Dave Kennison said...

Oh, dear ... my ex and I ruined our kids! I must call them and apologize. Perhaps it's not too late to rescue the youngest grandchild ... :-)

ibbill said...

@Lou Sanders and my dad said I was raised right. Oh the humanity of it all.

It is to bad here in Hamilton Ontario, we are 1 week behind of the originally posted puzzle. I must say it is hard not to peek at the answers.



Anonymous said...

The REWind clue came through fine in the Detroit Free Press.

Anonymous said...

Can someone explain to me the reason for those misleading, "terse command" clues, like 38 Down: "Beat It" for TOM-TOM?? I got that one right, but many times I "misread" these clues, and, using this example, scramble around looking for words like "SCRAM" or "SHOO" or "LAM" to fit. Something like, "Part of a drum kit" would be a much more straight forward clue.

Anyway..... 42:47, and 8 errors. Could not see "CONTESTS" for all of the re-written ink entries I'd made, and STRAINS would not come to mind down in the bottom left....

As always, rebus gags make me want to puke, so this puzzle automatically gets no higher than a C- in my books. I did enjoy the Q-related clues and answers and the repeated Carbonated Drink clues. Those were more creative than stuffing ITs into squares.

JaJaJoe said...

17. "Something with two sides? : ENTREE
'Entrée' means 'entry' in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get 'a way in', an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the 'entry' to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!"

To this retar'd accountant raised in double-entry bookkeeping, i.e., two balancing sides (debits = credits), I had to get past this 2-sided sense "ENTRY"-)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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