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0918-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Sep 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeremy Newton
THEME: Make a Dash for It
Today’s themed answers in the down-direction are common words or phrases that include a DASH. That dash then breaks up a common phrase in the across-direction, giving it a new meaning that suits the clue:
24A. Actor Joaquin's complete bio? : PHOENIX A-Z (from “Phoenix, AZ”)
32A. Troupe of lesser-known actors? : B-LISTER PACK (from “blister pack”)
44A. Schmaltz in kids' films? : G-RATED CHEESE (from “grated cheese”)
65A. An airline now serves a Minute Maid beverage? : AMERICAN GOT HI-C (from “American Gothic”)
87A. Some apartments for scaredy-cats? : CHICKEN CO-OPS (from “chicken coops”)
100A. Record half that stirs emotions? : MOVING A-SIDE (from “moving aside”)
109A. Sandwich for a dieter? : LO-CAL HERO (from “Local Hero”)

2D. Curve-enhancing undergarment : PUSH-UP BRA
14D. "That is ... not looking good" : UH-OH
18D. Cops, in slang : THE PO-PO
37D. Modern airport amenity : FREE WI-FI
85D. Guy into hip-hop : B-BOY
90D. Kerfuffles : TO-DOS
97D. "So funny!" : HA-HA!
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Pranks with a roll, briefly : TPS
TP’ing (toilet papering) is a prank involving the covering of some object or location with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. If you live in Texas or Minnesota, that little “prank” is legal, but if you live here in California it is classed as mischief or vandalism.

4. Casualties of streaming services : CDS
Compact discs (CDs) are become rarer, displaced by content available for streaming online.

7. Updated one's blog : POSTED
Many folks who visit this website regard it as just that, a website. That is true, but more correctly it is referred to as a blog, as I make regular posts (actually daily posts) which then occupy the "front page" of the site. The blog entries are in reverse chronological order, and one can just look back day-by-day, reading older and older posts. “Blog” is a contraction of the term "web log".

16. Navajo hogan, e.g. : HUT
The traditional dwellings built by the Navajo people are known as hogans. “Hogan” is the anglicization of a Navajo word meaning “the home place”.

17. Part of NATO : TREATY
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down."

20. Forgo : ESCHEW
"To eschew", meaning “to avoid, shun” comes from the Old French word "eschiver" that means the same thing.

21. Question from an owl? : WHO?
“Who” might be a sound made by an “owl”.

23. Chief : HONCHO
“Honcho” is a slang term for a leader or manager. The term comes to us from Japanese, in which language a “hancho” is a squad (han) leader (cho).

24. Actor Joaquin's complete bio? : PHOENIX A-Z (from “Phoenix, AZ”)
The actor Joaquin Phoenix is the brother of actress Summer Phoenix and of the late River Phoenix.

30. "___ Wiedersehen!" : AUF
“Auf Wiedersehen” is German for “goodbye”, literally translating as “till we see each other again”.

31. Hughes poem that mentions "the darker brother" : I, TOO
Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as “jazz poetry”. His poem “I, Too, Sing America” was published in 1925.
I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed–

I, too, am America.

35. Reef-dwelling snapper : REDFISH
Here in the US, “redfish” is a common name sometimes used for several species of fish including “red snapper”.

38. Unattractive fruit : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

39. 2016 Olympics site : RIO
Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as “January River”. The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Year’s Day in 1502.

40. What swish shots miss : RIM
That would be in basketball.

42. Word repeated in the postal creed : NOR
There is no official creed or motto for the US Postal Service. However, there is the oft-quoted inscription that is posted (pun!) over the entrance to the James Farley Post Office in New York City:
Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

43. W.W. I battle locale : YPRES
Ypres is a Belgian city located close to the French border. In WWI, Ypres was the scene of three devastating battles that resulted in almost a million casualties, including many who suffered in gas attacks.

44. Schmaltz in kids' films? : G-RATED CHEESE (from “grated cheese”)
“Schmaltz” is an informal term used to describe things that are excessively sentimental. The word comes from the Yiddish “shmalts”, which means “melted fat”. Indeed, the modern German word for fat or grease is Schmaltz, and it can be used in the same figurative way in that language.

50. "The meaning of life" once sold on it for $3.26 : EBAY
There have been some notable things sold on eBay over the years. For example:
  • Ad space on a guy’s forehead, in the form of a temporary tattoo - $37,375
  • William Shatner’s kidney stone - $25,000
  • A cornflake shaped like Illinois - $1,350
  • A single corn flake - $1.63
  • A box of 10 Twinkies - $59.99
  • The original Hollywood sign - $450,400
  • The meaning of life - $3.26

59. Muhammad had 13 : WIVES
In the Islamic tradition, the prophet Muhammad had thirteen wives, referred to by the faithful as “Mothers of the Believers”.

60. Birthplace of multiple saints : ASSISI
The Italian town of Assisi is in Umbria. Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

65. An airline now serves a Minute Maid beverage? : AMERICAN GOT HI-C (from “American Gothic”)
American Airlines was founded in 1930 through the acquisition of 82 existing small airlines, and initially operated as American Airways. The company name was changed to “American Air Lines” in 1934. Back then, airlines made their profits by carrying the US mail, and American became the first airline to turn a profit on a route that could solely carry passengers. It did so by working with Donald Douglas to develop the DC-3 passenger plane. At that time, American started calling its aircraft “Flagships” and introduced its more wealthy passengers to the first Admirals Club.

Hi-C orange drink was created in 1946, and introduced to the market in 1948, initially in the south of the country. The name Hi-C was chosen to emphasize the high vitamin C content in the drink, as it contained added ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

The iconic Grant Wood work called “American Gothic” was painted in 1930. It depicts a farmer holding a pitchfork standing beside his spinster daughter. Grant used his sister as a model for the daughter, and his dentist as a model for the farmer. You can see “American Gothic” on display at the Art Institute of Chicago. You can also visit the house depicted in the painting, in the city of Eldon, Iowa. Perhaps predictably, the house is located on American Gothic Street.

76. Popular sans-serif font : ARIAL
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif, using the French word "sans" meaning "without" and “serif” from the Dutch “schreef” meaning “line”. Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I'm not so sure though ...

83. U.S. detainment site in Cuba, informally : GITMO
The Guantánamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba is often referred to by using abbreviation “GTMO” or simply “Gitmo”. Gitmo is the oldest overseas base operated by the navy and dates back to the Cuban-American Treaty of 1903, at which time the US leased the facility as a fueling station. A perpetual lease was offered by Tomas Estrada Palma, the first President of Cuba, after the US took over control of Cuba from Spain following the Spanish-American War of 1898.

86. Joint action : TOKE
“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette, or on a pipe containing the drug.

90. Drank to excess : TOPED
“To tope” is to drink alcohol excessively and habitually.

91. R.V. camper's org. : KOA
Kampgrounds of America (KOA) was founded in 1962 by Montana businessman Dave Drum, who opened up his first property along the Yellowstone River. His strategy was to offer a rich package of services including hot showers, restrooms and a store, which he hoped would attract people used to camping in the rough. The original campground was an immediate hit and Drum took on two partners and sold franchises all over the country. There are about 500 KOA sites today.

93. Deli supply : LOX
Lox is a brine-cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

95. Marauding group in Tolkien's "The Two Towers" : ORCS
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

107. Dark force : YIN
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

108. European country slightly larger than Malta : ANDORRA
Andorra is a small principality nestled in the Pyrenees between France and Spain. Andorra is a very prosperous country, mainly due to its status as a tax haven and thriving tourist industry. We used help out the tourist industry there in the winters, enjoying a couple of skiing holidays there. Happy memories …

The island state of Malta is relatively small, but its large number of inhabitants makes it one of the most densely populated countries in Europe. Malta’s strategic location has made it a prized possession for the conquering empires of the world. Most recently it was part of the British Empire and was an important fleet headquarters. Malta played a crucial role for the Allies during WWII as it was located very close to the Axis shipping lanes in the Mediterranean. The Siege of Malta lasted from 1940 to 1942, a prolonged attack by the Italians and Germans on the RAF and Royal Navy, and the people of Malta. When the siege was lifted, King George VI awarded the George Cross to the people of Malta collectively in recognition of their heroism and devotion to the Allied cause. The George Cross can still be seen on the Maltese flag, even though Britain granted Malta independence in 1964.

109. Sandwich for a dieter? : LO-CAL HERO (from “Local Hero”)
“Hero” is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name "hero" was coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the "New York Herald Tribune" when he wrote that "one had to be a hero" to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

“Local Hero” is a fabulous 1983 comedy-drama film starring Peter Riegert as a representative of a Houston oil company who is sent to Scotland to buy up a whole village to make for a refinery. The big name in the cast is Burt Lancaster, who plays the quirky executive running the oil company. Highly recommended …

116. Volcano output : ASH
Our word “volcano” comes from “Vulcano”, the name of a volcanic island off the coast of Italy. The island’s name comes from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire. The Romans believed that the island of Vulcano was the chimney of the forge belonging to the god Vulcan. The Romans also believed that the eruptions on Mount Etna in Sicily were caused by Vulcan getting angry and working his forge so hard that sparks and smoke flew out of the top of the volcano.

117. Slippery sort : WEASEL
To weasel out of something is to back away from a prior commitment. The association of “weasels” with the concept of not being trusted might have arisen from the behavior in which a weasel sucks out the contents of an egg while leaving the shell virtually intact.

119. Letters on some baggage to N.Y.C. : LGA
The three big airports serving New York City (NYC) are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

122. "Gangnam Style" singer : PSY
PSY is the stage name of South Korean rapper Park Jae-sang. PSY became an international star when his 2102 music video “Gangnam Style” went viral on YouTube. That video had over 1 billion views on YouTube in about six months, making it the most viewed YouTube video clip of all time. I am not one of that billion ...

Down
1. Channel that aired "Felicity" and "Smallville" : THE WB
The WB Television Network was launched in 1995 as a joint venture between Warner Bros. Entertainment and Tribune Broadcasting. The WB (for “Warner Bros.”) was shut down in 2006 and replaced by the CW (for “CBS” and “Warner Bros.”).

4. Certain Balkanite : CROAT
The Republic of Croatia is a Balkan country. The Croats declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Croatia became a member of NATO in 2009, and a member of the European Union in 2013.

The Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe is usually referred to as “the Balkans”. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains located in present-day Bulgaria and Serbia. “Balkan” is Bulgarian for “mountain”.

6. ___ fly : SAC
A sac(rifice) fly, in baseball.

8. Factory watchdog grp. : OSHA
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

12. Something that gets MADD mad : DWI
In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offence than a DWI.

Candice Lightner lost her 13-year-old child to a drink driver in 1980. Soon after, Lightner formed the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

19. Sage swamp-dweller of film : YODA
Yoda is one of the most beloved characters of the "Star Wars" series of films. Yoda's voice was provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of "Muppets" fame.

25. The witching hour : XII
In common parlance, “the witching hour” is midnight. In the world of the occult, the witching hour last from 3 to 4 in the morning, and is the time at which witches and demons appear and are at their most powerful. This particular hour is chosen as there are no Catholic church services nor prayers called out for that time in the canonical hours.

27. Pat ___, three-time N.B.A. Coach of the Year : RILEY
Pat Riley is a former professional basketball player and NBA head coach. Off the court, Riley is quite the celebrity and is noted as a snappy dresser. He is friend of Giorgio Armani and wears Armani suits at all his games. Riley even modeled suits at an Armani fashion show.

36. Play-___ : DOH
Back in the 1930s, a manufacturer in Cincinnati produced a doughy compound that was used to clean wallpaper. Twenty years later, school-kids started using the cleaning material as a modelling compound, so the manufacturer reworked the formula, and sold it to local schools. It was given the name Play-Doh.

41. Soft wool source : MERINO
The Merino breed of sheep is prized for the soft quality of its wool.

46. Actress Kirsten : DUNST
Kirsten Dunst is a Hollywood actress from Point Pleasant, New Jersey. Dunst is perhaps best known for playing the love interest and female lead in the “Spider-Man” series of movies opposite Tobey Maguire. Personally, my favorite Dunst films are “Wimbledon” and “Marie Antoinette”. Dunst is a dual citizen of the US and Germany, as her father is from Hamburg.

49. Locale painted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling : EDEN
The Sistine Chapel, in the Pope's residence in Rome, takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV who was responsible for restoring the old Capella Magna in the 15th century. It was about a century later (1508-1512) that Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel under the patronage of Pope Julius II.

55. Something starting something? : ESS
The letter S (ess) starts the word “something”.

58. Image on the Arizona license plate : SAGUARO
The saguaro is a beautiful cactus, native to the Sonoran Desert in Arizona and in Sonora, Mexico. Arizona is proud of its saguaros, featuring them prominently on its licence plates. If you ever get a chance to visit the Saguaro National Park in southern Arizona, I thoroughly recommend it.

61. Deli supply : SALAMI
Salame (note the "e" at the end) is an Italian sausage that is traditionally associated with the peasant classes. The meat in the sausage is preserved with salt, and it can be hung and stored for as long as ten years. The name "salame" comes from "sale", the Italian word for salt, and "-ame", a suffix indicating a collective noun. Our English word "salami" is actually the Italian plural for "salame".

63. Brian of ambient music : ENO
Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the “ambient” genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks somewhat inventively: 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

69. E.W. or S.I. : MAG
“Entertainment Weekly” (EW) is a magazine focused on entertainment media news and reviews of movies, television, books, etc. “EW” was launched in 1990.

"Sports Illustrated" is read by 23 million people every week, including a whopping 19% of adult males in the US. And that's every week, not just the swimsuit issue …

70. One of the Trumps : ERIC
Eric Trump is the second son of Donald Trump and his first wife Ivana Zelníčková. Eric works for his father, and in particular manages Donald’s golf courses and the Trump Winery in Charlottesville, Virginia. Eric also appears in the boardroom alongside his Dad on the reality show “The Apprentice”.

71. "I'm ___ Her," 2016 political slogan : WITH
“I’m With Her” is a campaign slogan used by the 2016 campaign to elect Hillary Clinton as US president.

74. Work of extraterrestrials? - not! : CROP CIRCLE
Don't believe what you hear. Crop circles are hoaxes …

80. Actor Williams of "Happy Days" : ANSON
Anson Williams plays the lovable Warren “Potsie” Weber character on “Happy Days”. After “Happy Days” finished its run, Williams moved into directing and has directed episodes of “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine”, “Xena: Warrior Princess”, “Sabrina the Teenage Witch”, “Melrose Place”, “Beverly Hills 90210” and other shows. But Williams’ true claim to fame has to be that he is the second cousin of Dr. Henry Heimlich, who invented the Heimlich Maneuver!

85. Guy into hip-hop : B-BOY
A “b-boy” is a male fan of rap-music and breakdancing. Apparently the term comes from either “Bronx boy” or “break boy”.

86. Where the heart is : TORSO
“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

88. Colorful pond swimmer : KOI
Koi are also called Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

90. Kerfuffles : TO-DOS
“Kerfuffle” comes from the Scottish “curfuffle”, with both words meaning “disruption”.

94. Event for snocrossers : X GAMES
The X Games are annual events, with a Summer X Games held every year as well as a Winter X Games. It's very much a commercial venture, with all aspects controlled by the TV station ESPN. The games focus on extreme action sports, like skateboarding and freestyle motocross in the summer and various extreme snowboarding events in the winter.

Snocross is a racing event between riders on snowmobiles. The tracks used for the race contain major obstacles including tight turns and steep jumps. The term “snocross” is a portmanteau of “snowmobile” and “motocross”.

98. "World News Tonight" airer : ABC
“ABC World News Tonight” is the station’s daily evening news program, which has been anchored on weekdays by David Muir since 2014.

101. Aid for one going places? : VISA
A visa is a usually a stamp in one's passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter (and less often “to exit”) a particular country. The word "visa" comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression "charta visa" meaning "paper that has been seen", or "verified paper".

111. Actor ___ J. Cobb of "12 Angry Men" : LEE
The powerful 1957 movie “12 Angry Men” was directed by Sidney Lumet, and has a stellar cast of “jury members” including Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Jack Klugman and Ed Begley. If ever there is a movie that clearly was based on a play, it’s this one. Practically the whole film takes place on one set, the jury room.

Lee J. Cobb’s most famous film roles were in “12 Angry Men” released in 1957, and “On the Waterfront” released in 1954. Cobb found himself caught up in the net cast by the dreadful House Un-American Activities Committee and was blacklisted for two years as he refused to testify. Finding himself penniless and with five children to support, he eventually did appear in front of the committee and named twenty former members of the Communist Party USA, just to survive.

114. You thinking what I'm thinking? : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pranks with a roll, briefly : TPS
4. Casualties of streaming services : CDS
7. Updated one's blog : POSTED
13. Swap (out) : SUB
16. Navajo hogan, e.g. : HUT
17. Part of NATO : TREATY
20. Forgo : ESCHEW
21. Question from an owl? : WHO?
22. Austin-to-Houston dir. : ESE
23. Chief : HONCHO
24. Actor Joaquin's complete bio? : PHOENIX A-Z (from “Phoenix, AZ”)
26. Start of a legalese paragraph : WHEREAS
28. Figs. in an author's acknowledgments section : EDS
30. "___ Wiedersehen!" : AUF
31. Hughes poem that mentions "the darker brother" : I, TOO
32. Troupe of lesser-known actors? : B-LISTER PACK (from “blister pack”)
35. Reef-dwelling snapper : REDFISH
38. Unattractive fruit : UGLI
39. 2016 Olympics site : RIO
40. What swish shots miss : RIM
42. Word repeated in the postal creed : NOR
43. W.W. I battle locale : YPRES
44. Schmaltz in kids' films? : G-RATED CHEESE (from “grated cheese”)
50. "The meaning of life" once sold on it for $3.26 : EBAY
51. Throw together : WHIP UP
53. Certainly not wish to repeat : RUE
54. Get by : EVADE
56. "I don't mean to ___ ..." : PRY
57. Like bibs and aprons : TIED ON
58. Sermon topics : SINS
59. Muhammad had 13 : WIVES
60. Birthplace of multiple saints : ASSISI
62. Slowly disengages (from) : WEANS
64. Department store department : LINENS
65. An airline now serves a Minute Maid beverage? : AMERICAN GOT HI-C (from “American Gothic”)
69. Whined like a baby : MEWLED
72. End of many a toast : … TO YOU
73. Touch : AFFECT
76. Popular sans-serif font : ARIAL
77. Schools of thought : ISMS
78. "Onward!," in Italy : AVANTI!
81. Unfiltered : RAW
83. U.S. detainment site in Cuba, informally : GITMO
84. Question posed with feigned shock : MOI?!
85. Ushers in : BRINGS
86. Joint action : TOKE
87. Some apartments for scaredy-cats? : CHICKEN CO-OPS (from “chicken coops”)
90. Drank to excess : TOPED
91. R.V. camper's org. : KOA
92. [I'm devastated!] : SOB!
93. Deli supply : LOX
95. Marauding group in Tolkien's "The Two Towers" : ORCS
96. Game of tag, basically : CHASING
100. Record half that stirs emotions? : MOVING A-SIDE (from “moving aside”)
104. Exerciser's target : FLAB
105. "Shame on you!" : TUT!
107. Dark force : YIN
108. European country slightly larger than Malta : ANDORRA
109. Sandwich for a dieter? : LO-CAL HERO (from “Local Hero”)
113. Appear that way : SEEM TO
115. Share : CUT
116. Volcano output : ASH
117. Slippery sort : WEASEL
118. Size up : ASSESS
119. Letters on some baggage to N.Y.C. : LGA
120. Word with sweet or sugar : PEA
121. Made damp : WETTED
122. "Gangnam Style" singer : PSY
123. Winter D.C. hrs. : EST

Down
1. Channel that aired "Felicity" and "Smallville" : THE WB
2. Curve-enhancing undergarment : PUSH-UP BRA
3. Metallic shades : STEEL GRAYS
4. Certain Balkanite : CROAT
5. Not as bright : DENSER
6. ___ fly : SAC
7. Oomph : PEP
8. Factory watchdog grp. : OSHA
9. Search far and wide : SCOUR
10. Home run territory, in lingo : THE FENCES
11. Dark time, in poetry : E’EN
12. Something that gets MADD mad : DWI
13. Smacks hard : SWATS
14. "That is ... not looking good" : UH-OH
15. Numbskull : BOZO
17. Argument you may start in school : THESIS
18. Cops, in slang : THE PO-PO
19. Sage swamp-dweller of film : YODA
25. The witching hour : XII
27. Pat ___, three-time N.B.A. Coach of the Year : RILEY
29. Discard : SCRAP
33. Inflexible : RIGID
34. Handy take-along : KIT
36. Play-___ : DOH
37. Modern airport amenity : FREE WI-FI
41. Soft wool source : MERINO
43. "Sure thing" : YEP
45. Parts of airports and fashion shows : RUNWAYS
46. Actress Kirsten : DUNST
47. Display clearly : EVINCE
48. Goalie's goal : SAVE
49. Locale painted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling : EDEN
51. Caught on, with "up" : WISED
52. Junior, often : HEIR
55. Something starting something? : ESS
57. Devices preventing off-hour openings of vaults : TIME LOCKS
58. Image on the Arizona license plate : SAGUARO
61. Deli supply : SALAMI
63. Brian of ambient music : ENO
64. Offerings to hitchhikers : LIFTS
66. "Challenge accepted!" : IT’S ON!
67. Common newspaper feature not seen in The New York Times : COMICS
68. Chill, with "out" : HANG
69. E.W. or S.I. : MAG
70. One of the Trumps : ERIC
71. "I'm ___ Her," 2016 political slogan : WITH
74. Work of extraterrestrials? - not! : CROP CIRCLE
75. Pops some pills, say : TAKES DRUGS
77. "No joke!" : I MEAN THAT!
79. Shortcuts into clubs : VIP LINES
80. Actor Williams of "Happy Days" : ANSON
82. Put together : WED
85. Guy into hip-hop : B-BOY
86. Where the heart is : TORSO
88. Colorful pond swimmer : KOI
89. ___-pah : OOM
90. Kerfuffles : TO-DOS
94. Event for snocrossers : X GAMES
96. "You're almost there" : CLOSE
97. "So funny!" : HA-HA!
98. "World News Tonight" airer : ABC
99. Talk show interviewee : GUEST
101. Aid for one going places? : VISA
102. On edge : ANTSY
103. Worry : EAT AT
104. Kerfuffle : FLAP
106. Olive or avocado : TREE
110. "How precious is that!" : AWW!
111. Actor ___ J. Cobb of "12 Angry Men" : LEE
112. So last month : OLD
114. You thinking what I'm thinking? : ESP


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6 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

37:49, no errors, iPad (Mini). Slow time (mostly due to a bad case of fumble fingers om my iPad). I'd heard of Warner Brothers, but not the WB Channel. B-BOY and SAC FLY were new to me, as was THE PO-PO as a term for the police (an unlovely phrase, if ever I heard one - it apparently originated in California in the 80's).. ESCHEW always amuses me: a fellow I used to work with didn't like the word much, so, when he encountered it in a paper he was reviewing, he simply circled it and wrote "Gesundheit!" in the margin.

@Bill ... A typo: In your comment about 55D, the letter "r" has gone missing, so the letter S "stats" the word "something". Also, you might consider explaining THE PO-PO as the answer for 18D (but I'd be okay with not contributing to the perpetuation of that particular phrase). Your call ... :-)

Bill Butler said...

Thanks, Dave.

All fixed now. I appreciate the help.

Anonymous said...

37:27 no errors. Semi-rebus aside, pretty easy.

BruceB said...

29:42, no errors. Several unfamiliar terms to me as well. THE PO-PO and B-BOY included.

Had to look up B-BOY (after the fact), it refers to a break dancer, which is typically performed to hip-hop. Break dance BOY is where the B-BOY comes from. I am surprised that it is not spelled B-BOI.

Dale Stewart said...

Only one stupid mistake today that prevented me from a perfect score.

@Dave Kennison, I had never heard of the PO-PO either. Looked it up in the Urban Dictionary. Comes from the 1980's beach scene in California. There were cops patrolling on bicycles and on their chests they had the large letters PO standing for Police Officer. Since they usually patrolled in pairs, two cops coming toward someone would look like PO-PO. So there is a logical explanation but, yeah, I agree that it is pretty disrespectful

cjpbrown said...

I'm so glad I found this blog while trying to check solutions to this puzzle. I got all answers right but didn't time myself (I check answers after I finish puzzles but had lost that page in the paper).
I love the explanations, as there are sometimes clues and/or answers that baffle me.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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