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1030-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 16, Sunday






QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers


CROSSWORD SETTER: Caleb Madison
THEME: Updates
Each of today’s themed answers starts with the name of a Mac operating system, and those operating systems are also named for big cats:
65A. Things found at the starts of the answers to the six starred clues : MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS

28A. *2000s group with three eponymous Disney Channel films, with "the" : CHEETAH GIRLS
34A. *Athletic footwear once promoted by Pelé : PUMA SNEAKERS
58A. *Enzo Ferrari called it "the most beautiful car ever made" : JAGUAR XKE
75A. *Showy orange bloom : TIGER LILY
96A. *Something spotted on a runway? : LEOPARD PRINT
103A. *1968 Peter O'Toole drama, with "The" : LION IN WINTER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. One talking on the phone, nowadays? : SIRI
Siri is software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri not that long ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. Also, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

13. Coronas, e.g. : CIGARS
The most common shape of cigar is the “parejo”, with such cigars usually referred to as “coronas”.

20. Whitman sampler? : POEM
Walt Whitman is considered to be one of the greatest American poets. He was born in 1819 on Long Island, and lived through the American Civil War. Whitman was a controversial character, even during his own lifetime. One view held by him was that the works attributed to William Shakespeare were not actually written by Shakespeare, but rather by someone else, or perhaps a group of people.

21. Like sardines : OILY
Sardines are oily fish related to herrings. Sardines are also known as pilchards, although in the UK “sardine” is a noun reserved for a young pilchard. Very confusing …

22. The princess in "The Princess Diaries" : AMELIA
“The Princess Diaries” is a series of novels for young adults by Meg Cabot. There have been two Disney adaptations of the books, both starring Anne Hathaway and Julie Andrews.

25. Banned pollutants : PCBS
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were banned with good reason. Apart from their link to cancer and other disorders in humans and animals, they are extremely persistent in the environment once contamination has occurred. Among other things, PCBs were used as coolants and insulating fluids in electrical gear such as transformers and large capacitors, as well as a transfer agent in carbonless copy paper.

28. *2000s group with three eponymous Disney Channel films, with "the" : CHEETAH GIRLS
The Cheetah Girls were a musical girl group active from 2003 until 2008. The trio was put together by Disney for a 2003 movie based on a series of young adult books titled “The Cheetah Girls”. There followed two film sequels: “The Cheetah Girls 2” and “The Cheetah Girls: One World”.

30. U.S.C.G. rank : CPO
A Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is a non-commissioned officer (NCO) in the Navy (USN) and Coast Guard (USCG). The “Petty” is derived from the French word “petit” meaning “small”.

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USCG was founded as the Revenue Cutter Service by Alexander Hamilton in 1790.

31. Woman of whom it's begged "Please don't take my man," in a 1973 hit : JOLENE
I must admit that I am not a big fan of country music, but I do like the 1974 hit “Jolene” written and performed by Dolly Parton. Dolly Parton tells the story that the song was inspired by a red-headed bank teller who was frequently flirting with her husband.

33. Place : LIEU
As one might perhaps imagine, "in lieu" comes into English from the Old French word "lieu" meaning "place", which in turn is derived from the Latin "locum", also meaning "place". So, "in lieu" means "in place of".

34. *Athletic footwear once promoted by Pelé : PUMA SNEAKERS
Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world's greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

39. Bo'sun for Captain Hook : SMEE
In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook’s pirates and is Hook’s right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being “Irish” and “a man who stabbed without offence”. Nice guy! Captain Hook and Smee sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

A boatswain works on the deck of a boat. A boatswain is unlicensed, and so is not involved in the navigation or handling of the vessel. He or she has charge of the other unlicensed workers on the deck. Boatswain is pronounced "bosun" and this phonetic spelling is often used interchangeably with "boatswain". The contraction "bo’s'n" is also very popular.

43. Soon enough : ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

44. Prefix with -pathy : SOCIO-
A sociopath is someone deemed to exhibit antisocial behavior. The term is often used interchangeably with “psychopath”.

45. School in Berkshire : ETON
The world-famous Eton College is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who took power in the last UK general election. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington, George Orwell, and the creator of James Bond, Ian Fleming (as well as 007 himself as described in the Fleming novels).

49. Result of Québec's vote to leave Canada : NON
Québec is the largest province in Canada, and the only one with French as its sole official language. The name “Québec” comes from an Algonquin word “kebec” meaning “where the river narrows”. This refers to the area around Quebec City where the St. Lawrence River narrows as it flows through a gap lined by steep cliffs. The province has voted twice in referenda asking whether or not Quebec should become an independent country, once in 1980, and again in 1995. The 1995 result was 49% in favor of sovereignty, up from 40% in 1980.

50. Event code-named Operation Neptune : D-DAY
The Allied Invasion of Normandy during WWII was given the codename “Operation Overlord”. The Normandy landings that kicked off the invasion on D-Day (6 June 1944) were given the codename “Operation Neptune”.

51. Endure, in an expression : BEAR IT
Grin and bear it.

58. *Enzo Ferrari called it "the most beautiful car ever made" : JAGUAR XKE
I have to agree with Enzo …

Auto manufacturer Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters “SS” in that era (i.e. the Nazi paramilitary organization).

Enzo Ferrari was an Italian race car driver, and founder of the Ferrari car manufacturing company. Ferrari died in 1988, and in 2003 the company named the Enzo model after its founder.

62. Lush : WINO
"Lush" is a slang term for a heavy drinker. Back in the 1700s, “lush” was slang for “liquor”.

64. Acronym for an outdoor fantasy game : LARP
Live action role-playing (LARP)

65. Things found at the starts of the answers to the six starred clues : MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS
Apple introduced the OS X Operating System in 2000. Each version of this operating system has had a code name, and that code name until recently has been a type of big cat. The versions and code names are:
  • 10.0: Cheetah
  • 10.1: Puma
  • 10.2: Jaguar
  • 10.3: Panther
  • 10.4: Tiger
  • 10.5: Leopard
  • 10.6: Snow Leopard
  • 10.7: Lion
  • 10.8: Mountain Lion
  • 10.9: Mavericks
  • 10.10: Yosemite
  • 10.11: El Capitan
  • 10.12: macOS Sierra

72. Prefix with -stat : HEMO-
A hemostat is that scissors-like clamp that is used in surgery to close off blood vessels temporarily until more permanent repairs can be made.

73. Not go home by curfew : STAY OUT
Our word “curfew” comes from an Old French word meaning “cover fire”. In medieval days a bell would be ring in the evenings as a signal to bank the hearths in preparation for sleeping. The intent was to prevent uncontrolled fires starting from fireplaces that were not tended during the night.

80. Artist Magritte : RENE
Belgian artist René Magritte was a surrealist. His most recognized work maybe is “The Son of Man”, a painting he created as a self-portrait. It is the work that shows a man in a bowler hat with his face covered by an apple. The image features prominently in the great movie, the 1999 remake of “The Thomas Crown Affair”.

82. Chest bones : STERNA
“Sternum” (plural “sterna”) is the Latin name for the breastbone. “Sternon” is a Greek for “chest, breastbone”.

83. Some acids : AMINOS
Amino acids are essential to life in many ways, not least of which is their use as the building blocks of proteins.

84. Fantasy creatures : ORCS
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

86. Band with the 1991 #1 hit "Unbelievable" : EMF
EMF is an alternative rock dance band from England. EMF’s biggest hit was 1990’s “Unbelievable” that made it to the number one spot here in the US. The initialism “EMF” supposedly stands for “Epsom Mad Funkers”.

88. Like nonprescription meds : OTC
Over-the-counter drugs (OTC) don't need a prescription (Rx).

89. Colt 45 brewer : PABST
Colt 45 is a brand of lager that first went on the market in 1963. It has a relatively high alcohol content (6.1%) and so is sometimes referred to as a malt liquor.

91. American ___ : SAMOA
The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. “Samoa” is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

93. Start of many congregation names : B’NAI
The Hebrew word “b'nai” means “sons”.

95. Woodrow Wilson was the only U.S. prez to have one : PHD
Woodrow Wilson was a professor at Princeton from 1890 to 1902 at which time he was promoted to president of the university. Professor Wilson had earned his PhD. at John Hopkins University in 1886, so that when he was elected 28th President of the United States in 1912, he became the only US President to hold a PhD.

99. Margarine : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. A French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something he called oleomargarine in 1869, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

101. Axis foe : ALLIES
Before WWII, Hungary's prime minister was lobbying for an alliance between Germany, Hungary and Italy and worked towards such a relationship that he called an "axis". The main Axis powers during the war were Germany, Italy and Japan. However, also included in the relationship were Romania, Bulgaria and the aforementioned Hungary.

102. When sung five times, a 1974 Rolling Stones hit : DOO
“Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)” is a 1973 song recorded by the Rolling Stones. It’s certainly no love song, as it relates the story of the shooting of a boy and the death of a ten-year-old girl from a drug overdose.

103. *1968 Peter O'Toole drama, with "The" : LION IN WINTER
“The Lion in Winter” is a play by James Goldman that was first staged in 1966 on Broadway. The two lead characters in the piece are King Henry II of England and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. The play was adapted into a very successful movie in 1968 starring Peter O’Toole and Katharine Hepburn. There was also a 2003 television movie adaption that I’d like to see, starring Patrick Stewart and Glenn Close.

Irish actor Peter O'Toole got his big break in movies when he played the title role in the 1962 epic film "Lawrence of Arabia". But my favorite of O'Toole's movies is much lighter fare, namely "How to Steal a Million" in which he stars opposite Audrey Hepburn.

107. 1998 Faith Hill hit that describes "perpetual bliss" : THIS KISS
Faith Hill is a country singer from Ridgeland, Mississippi. Hill is married to fellow country singer Tim McGraw.

112. Cold-weather conveyance : SNO-CAT
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four independently-mounted tracks.

113. Part of P.S.U.: Abbr. : UNIV
Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania. Penn State is listed as one of the “Public Ivies”, a public university that offers a quality of education comparable to that of the Ivy League.

114. Annual California music festival : COACHELLA
The first Coachella Valley Music Festival was held in 1999, and then annually from 2001 until the present day.

115. Symbol of wisdom : ATHENA
The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today's perception of the owl as being "wise". Athena's Roman counterpart was Minerva.

116. Small change : DIME
The term “dime”, used for a 10-cent coin, comes from the Old French word “disme” meaning “tenth part”.

Down
1. Kemo ___ : SABE
“Kemosabe” is a term used by the Tonto character in the iconic radio and television program “The Lone Ranger”. “Kemosabe” doesn't really mean anything outside of the show, and in fact was written as “ke-mo sah-bee” in the original radio show scripts. The term was created by longtime director of “The Lone Ranger”, Jim Jewell. To come up with the term, Jewell used the name of a boy’s camp that his father-in-law established called Kamp Kee-Mo Sah-Bee.

2. Corsica et d'autres : ILES
In French, “Corsica et d'autres” (Corsica and others) are “îles” (islands).

3. Recruiting org. : ROTC
The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

4. Odysseus, by birth : ITHACAN
Ithaca is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. The island features in Homer’s “Odyssey” as it was the home of the mythological hero Odysseus, who was Ithaca’s king.

7. Faction in "Twilight" fandom : TEAM JACOB
The reference is to a character in "The Twilight" series of books by Stephenie Meyer. "The Twilight Saga" is a series of films based on the books. “The Twilight” books feature vampires, and I don’t do vampires …

8. Funny Schumer : AMY
Amy Schumer is a stand-up comedian, and an alumna of the reality TV show “Last Comic Standing”, in which she placed fourth. Schumer now has her own comedy series “Inside Amy Schumer”, which airs on Comedy Central. Amy is a first cousin once removed of Chuck Schumer, the senior US Senator from New York.

9. Minnesota athlete : GOPHER
The University of Minnesota sports teams are known as the Golden Gophers. The team mascot is Goldy Gopher. The team name comes from Minnesota’s nickname, “The Gopher State”, a nickname that dates back to 1857.

11. Pulitzer-winning Edward : ALBEE
Playwright Edward Albee’s most famous play is “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Albee won three Pulitzer Prizes for Drama:
  • 1967: “A Delicate Balance”
  • 1975: “Seascape”
  • 1994: “Three Tall Women”
Albee also won three Tony Awards:
  • 1963: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (Best Play)
  • 2002: “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?”
  • 2005: Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement

12. Best-selling PC game before The Sims : MYST
In the days when I played the occasional video game, the best of the bunch was undoubtedly “Myst”. It is a game full of puzzles with the player wandering through a beautifully-designed (for its day) interactive world.

SimCity is a very clever computer game. Players build and grow cities and societies by creating the conditions necessary for people (the Sims) to move in and thrive. "SimCity" was launched in 1989, and to this day it is consistently ranked as one of the greatest computer games of all time.

14. X-ray, e.g. : IMAGE
X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also "Roentgen"), and it was he who gave the name "X-rays" to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen's native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as "Röntgen rays". In 1901 Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded, recognition for his work on X-rays.

15. Tech help station : GENIUS BAR
The technical support desk found in Apple Retail Stores is rather inventively called the Genius Bar. The certified support technicians are known as “Geniuses”. The trainees are called GYOs: Grow-Your-Own-Geniuses.

16. 'Stro, e.g. : ALER
The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros (sometimes “'Stros”) from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city’s long association with the US space program. The Astros moved from the National League to the American League starting in the 2013 season.

17. Streamlet : RILL
The word “rill”, meaning a small brook or rivulet, has German roots. It has the same roots as “Rhine”, the name of the major European river.

24. Tinder and others : APPS
Tinder is a matchmaking app that uses Facebook profiles. Users “swipe” photos of potential matches, either to the right (“like”) or to the left (“not interested”). Users who “match” each other can then chat within the app.

28. Miss ___ (late TV psychic) : CLEO
Miss Cleo was the stage name of psychic Youree Dell Harris. Miss Cleo was a spokesperson for the Psychic Readers Network, a pay-per-call service, for many years.

29. Astronaut Shepard : ALAN
Alan Shepard was the first American in space. Shepard's flight was originally scheduled for October 1960 but a series of delays pushed it out till May 5, 1961. Yuri Gagarin made his celebrated flight on April 12, 1961, just one one month earlier, winning that part of the Space Race for the Soviets. A decade later, Shepard went into space again at the age of 47, as commander of Apollo 14. He was the fifth man to walk on the moon, and indeed the oldest. Shepard was also the only one of the Mercury Seven team to make it to the moon. Famously, he drove two golf balls while on the lunar surface.

32. U.S. base site in the Pacific : OKINAWA
Okinawa is a large city located on the island of Okinawa in the very south of Japan. Okinawa is home to several US military facilities including Kadena Air Base and the Marine Corps’ Camp Foster.

34. Half of a 1960s pop group : PAPAS
The folk group called the Magic Circle renamed itself to the Mamas and the Papas in the early sixties. Sadly, the Mamas and the Papas weren’t a happy bunch, always fighting over who was getting credit for songs and whose voice was getting mixed out of recordings, so they split up, twice. While they were together though, they wrote and recorded some great songs, songs which really do epitomize the sound of the sixties. “Monday, Monday” was written by John Phillips, one of “the Papas”, and it was to become the only number one hit for the group. Here’s a shocker … when it hit number one in 1966, it was the first time that a group made up of both sexes topped the American charts!

35. Popular sleep aid : UNISOM
ZzzQuil, Benadryl, Unisom and Sominex are all brand names for the antihistamine diphenhydramine, which also has sedative properties.

36. Godzilla foe : MOTHRA
Mothra is a giant moth-like monster that made its big-screen debut in the 1961 film “Mothra”. Mothra turns up quite often in “Godzilla” movies.

Godzilla is a Japanese invention. The first in a very long series of films was released way back in 1954. The original name in Japanese was "Gojira", but this was changed to Godzilla for audiences outside of Japan. "Gojira" is a combination of "gorira" and "kujira", the Japanese words for gorilla and whale, apt because Godzilla is a big ape-like creature that came out of the deep.

40. Who said "Revolutions are the locomotives of history" : MARX
Karl Marx was a German philosopher and revolutionary who helped develop the principles of modern communism and socialism. Marx argued that feudal society created internal strife due to class inequalities which led to its destruction and replacement by capitalism. He further argued that the inequalities created in a capitalist society create tensions that will also lead to its self-destruction. His thesis was that the inevitable replacement of capitalism was a classless (and stateless) society, which he called pure communism.

41. Composer Satie : ERIK
Erik Satie was a French composer most famous for his beautiful composition, the three “Gymnopédies”. I have tried so hard to appreciate other works by Satie but I find them so very different from the minimalist simplicity of the lyrical “Gymnopédies”.

42. Dirección geográfica : ESTE
In Spanish, “este” (east) is a “dirección geográfica” (geographical direction).

46. ___ Boston (luxury hotel) : TAJ
The luxury hotel known today as the Taj Boston was opened in 1927 as the Ritz Carlton.

53. J.F.K. tower grp. : ATC
Air traffic control (ATC)

57. Familiar folks : KITH
The word “kith” describes friends and acquaintances, and is used used in the phrase “kith and kin” meaning “friends and family”. “Kith” comes from an Old English word meaning “native country, home”, as the expression “kith and kin” was used originally to mean “country and kinsmen”.

59. Target audience of Out magazine : GAYS
“Out” is a highest-circulation magazine aimed at the LGBT community.

61. Actress Polo : TERI
Teri Polo’s most prominent role on the big screen was Pam Focker in “Meet the Fockers” and its sequel. Pam is the wife of the character played by Ben Stiller. Polo also played the wife of Presidential candidate Matt Santos in “The West Wing”.

69. Angel who visited Joseph Smith : MORONI
According to the Mormon tradition, Angel Moroni visited founder Joseph Smith on several occasions. The Angel Moroni is the same person as the prophet-warrior Moroni who lived in the Americas in the fourth and fifth centuries.

76. Kind of theater : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

78. Settles snugly : ENSCONCES
To ensconce oneself, one settles securely or comfortably somewhere. Back in the late 1500s, “to ensconse” meant “to cover with a fort” as a “sconse” is a small defensive fort or earthwork.

81. Best Supporting Actress nominee for "Birdman" : EMMA STONE
The actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

“Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” is a 2014 film that was an incredible critical success. The title character was played by Michael Keaton. I know I am in the minority, but I hated “Birdman” …

90. Eats : CHOW
“Chow” is an American slang term for food that originated in California in the mid-1800s. “Chow” comes from the Chinese pidgin English “chow-chow” meaning “food”.

91. Setting for a sunset on the Seine : SOIR
“Soir” is the French word for “evening” and a “soirée” is an “evening party”. The French word “soirée” has an acute accent over the first “e”, but we tend to drop this when using the word in English.

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

95. The fingers of a hand, e.g. : PENTAD
A pentad is a group of five.

98. Fancy-schmancy : POSH
No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that POSH stands for “Port Out, Starboard Home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

100. Actress Balaban : LIANE
Liane Balaban is an actress from Ontario, Canada. Apparently, Balaban is often mistaken for fellow actress Natalie Portman.

101. Hit musical with the song "N.Y.C." : ANNIE
The Broadway musical “Annie” is produced in more than one version. There is an “Annie Jr.” that has been edited down to a shortened version more suitable for young performers and audiences. An even shorter version that lasts only 30 minutes is called “Annie KIDS”, and is meant for performers still in elementary school.

103. Exam with logic games, briefly : LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

106. Some contraceptive devices : IUDS
It seems that it isn’t fully understood how intrauterine devices (IUDs) work. The design that was most popular for decades was a T-shaped plastic frame on which was wound copper wire. It’s thought that the device is an irritant in the uterus causing the body to release chemicals that are hostile to sperm and eggs. This effect is enhanced by the presence of the copper.

109. "___, She Wolf of the SS" (1975 cult film) : ILSA
“Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS” is a 1975 cult film. Set in a WWII prison camp, it is classed as a Nazisploitation war film. It has very adult themes, and sounds very brutal.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One talking on the phone, nowadays? : SIRI
5. Numerical prefix : OCTA-
9. Glitz : GLAM
13. Coronas, e.g. : CIGARS
19. What sweet gestures may mean : A LOT
20. Whitman sampler? : POEM
21. Like sardines : OILY
22. The princess in "The Princess Diaries" : AMELIA
23. "Fine, see if I care!" : BE THAT WAY!
25. Banned pollutants : PCBS
26. With reason : SANELY
27. Reading comics, doing crosswords, etc. : ESCAPISM
28. *2000s group with three eponymous Disney Channel films, with "the" : CHEETAH GIRLS
30. U.S.C.G. rank : CPO
31. Woman of whom it's begged "Please don't take my man," in a 1973 hit : JOLENE
33. Place : LIEU
34. *Athletic footwear once promoted by Pelé : PUMA SNEAKERS
38. Bled : RAN
39. Bo'sun for Captain Hook : SMEE
43. Soon enough : ANON
44. Prefix with -pathy : SOCIO-
45. School in Berkshire : ETON
47. Shelf supports : L-BARS
48. Set (against) : PIT
49. Result of Québec's vote to leave Canada : NON
50. Event code-named Operation Neptune : D-DAY
51. Endure, in an expression : BEAR IT
52. B flat equivalent : A-SHARP
56. Lie on the beach : BAKE
58. *Enzo Ferrari called it "the most beautiful car ever made" : JAGUAR XKE
60. Make sense of : SORT OUT
62. Lush : WINO
64. Acronym for an outdoor fantasy game : LARP
65. Things found at the starts of the answers to the six starred clues : MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS
71. Get bored (of) : TIRE
72. Prefix with -stat : HEMO-
73. Not go home by curfew : STAY OUT
75. *Showy orange bloom : TIGER LILY
80. Artist Magritte : RENE
82. Chest bones : STERNA
83. Some acids : AMINOS
84. Fantasy creatures : ORCS
86. Band with the 1991 #1 hit "Unbelievable" : EMF
88. Like nonprescription meds : OTC
89. Colt 45 brewer : PABST
90. Home to Hernando : CASA
91. American ___ : SAMOA
93. Start of many congregation names : B’NAI
94. Suit : EXEC
95. Woodrow Wilson was the only U.S. prez to have one : PHD
96. *Something spotted on a runway? : LEOPARD PRINT
99. Margarine : OLEO
101. Axis foe : ALLIES
102. When sung five times, a 1974 Rolling Stones hit : DOO
103. *1968 Peter O'Toole drama, with "The" : LION IN WINTER
107. 1998 Faith Hill hit that describes "perpetual bliss" : THIS KISS
112. Cold-weather conveyance : SNO-CAT
113. Part of P.S.U.: Abbr. : UNIV
114. Annual California music festival : COACHELLA
115. Symbol of wisdom : ATHENA
116. Small change : DIME
117. "I'll take care of that" : ON IT
118. Employments : USES
119. Threw out : TOSSED
120. In view : SEEN
121. Comes together : GELS
122. Football gear : PADS


Down
1. Kemo ___ : SABE
2. Corsica et d'autres : ILES
3. Recruiting org. : ROTC
4. Odysseus, by birth : ITHACAN
5. Possible paths : OPTIONS
6. Intimidates : COWS
7. Faction in "Twilight" fandom : TEAM JACOB
8. Funny Schumer : AMY
9. Minnesota athlete : GOPHER
10. Able to practice, say : LICENSED
11. Pulitzer-winning Edward : ALBEE
12. Best-selling PC game before The Sims : MYST
13. Convert chips to money : CASH IN
14. X-ray, e.g. : IMAGE
15. Tech help station : GENIUS BAR
16. 'Stro, e.g. : ALER
17. Streamlet : RILL
18. "Goes" : SAYS
24. Tinder and others : APPS
28. Miss ___ (late TV psychic) : CLEO
29. Astronaut Shepard : ALAN
32. U.S. base site in the Pacific : OKINAWA
34. Half of a 1960s pop group : PAPAS
35. Popular sleep aid : UNISOM
36. Godzilla foe : MOTHRA
37. Ages and ages : EON
38. Prince and others : ROYALS
40. Who said "Revolutions are the locomotives of history" : MARX
41. Composer Satie : ERIK
42. Dirección geográfica : ESTE
46. ___ Boston (luxury hotel) : TAJ
47. Eagerly seized : LEAPT AT
50. One side of the climate change debate : DENIERS
51. Pops : BURSTS
53. J.F.K. tower grp. : ATC
54. Plant malady caused by overwatering : ROOT ROT
55. Teacher's head count : PUPILS
57. Familiar folks : KITH
59. Target audience of Out magazine : GAYS
61. Actress Polo : TERI
63. "Don't quit ___ now!" : ON ME
66. Browser button : RELOAD
67. Flipped : GONE APE
68. Assess : EYE
69. Angel who visited Joseph Smith : MORONI
70. Lie on the beach : SUNTAN
74. Implied : TACIT
75. Tailor's need : TAPE
76. Kind of theater : IMAX
77. Barb : GIBE
78. Settles snugly : ENSCONCES
79. 1000, 1500 and 2000: Abbr. : YRS
81. Best Supporting Actress nominee for "Birdman" : EMMA STONE
85. Make a "T" gesture in basketball : CALL TIME
87. Pro : FOR
90. Eats : CHOW
91. Setting for a sunset on the Seine : SOIR
92. Rehab attendees : ADDICTS
93. Split : BROKE UP
95. The fingers of a hand, e.g. : PENTAD
97. One plus one? : ELEVEN
98. Fancy-schmancy : POSH
100. Actress Balaban : LIANE
101. Hit musical with the song "N.Y.C." : ANNIE
103. Exam with logic games, briefly : LSAT
104. Digging : INTO
105. Sounds after a magic trick : OOHS
106. Some contraceptive devices : IUDS
108. Loudly acclaim : HAIL
109. "___, She Wolf of the SS" (1975 cult film) : ILSA
110. Cold-weather conveyance : SLED
111. Lip : SASS
114. Part of a wheel : COG



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5 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

34:31, no errors, iPad.

ibbill said...

EMF band say what. Okay looked it up. listen to their song and now I know why I never heard of them.

kith was a real stumper for me and my friend had to look it up also.

Had fun as usual doing the puzzle.

BruceB said...

38:53, no errors. Very 'Apple-centric' today; with SIRI, GENIUS BAR and all the MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS. I'm surprised that the setter missed the opportunity to plug Apple even further with 122A; could have been "i____".

I haven't seen KITH as a stand alone word; only in the expression 'kith and kin'; now I know the actual meaning of the word and the expression. Learn something new every day.

Dale Stewart said...

I had six errors. ERIC for ERIK. JOLEEN for JOLENE. ALLEN for ALBEE. Understandable mistakes. I am still pleased with my effort today. A few months ago I would not even attempt these Sundays.

Steve C. said...

ERIL for ERIK; ALPEE for ALBEE. I feel good about getting it done nonetheless.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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