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1127-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Nov 16, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt Ginsberg
THEME: Mixology
Today’s themed answers comprise two shorter answers MIXED together to arrive at a phrase (C). One of the answers (A) used for the MIX is outlined with circled letters, and the non-circled letters spell out the second answer (B). Each clue is in the format A + B = C.
23A. Infant + straying = noted coach : BEAR BRYANT = BABY + ERRANT
25A. Less polite + wildly unconventional = epicenter : GROUND ZERO = RUDER + GONZO
34A. Urban woe + squirms = pool accessory : SWIM GOGGLES = SMOG + WIGGLES
43A. Delay + dodos = some compromises : PLEA BARGAINS = LAG + PEABRAINS
60A. Remain + "Hmm ..." = R&B great : BO DIDDLEY = BIDE + ODDLY
70A. Bill producers + Western wear = info for events : STARTING TIMES = ATMS + STRING TIES
80A. Show, informally + African capital = Adonis : DREAMBOAT = DEMO + RABAT
97A. Pasty + vacation expense, maybe = hospital specialty : PRENATAL CARE = PALE + RENTAL CAR
103A. See + umbrella alternative = warming option : RADIANT HEAT = DATE + RAIN HAT
119A. Regarding + undercoat = network with 303 stations : PARIS METRO = AS TO + PRIMER
122A. Day of the month + succeed = some recital pieces : PIANO DUETS = IDES + PAN OUT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. "Back to the Future" antagonist : BIFF
Biff Tannen (and variants) was the bully character in the "Back to Future" trilogy. He was played by Thomas F. Wilson.

18. Stars-and-stripes land, informally : US OF A
Legend has it that Betsy Ross made the first American flag for General George Washington. However, this story only surfaced during the centennial celebrations of 1876, and although Betsy Ross was indeed one of several flag makers in Philadelphia in the days of George Washington, sadly there’s no definitive evidence that Ross provided that first stars and stripes.

19. Some Great Plains residents : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

20. Possible destination for un inmigrante, with "el" : NORTE
“El Norte” is the term many people in Central America use for the United States and Canada, “the North” in Spanish.

23. Infant + straying = noted coach : BEAR BRYANT = BABY + ERRANT
Bear Bryant was head coach for the University of Alabama (“Bama”) for almost 25 years, from 1958 to 1983. Sadly, Bryant passed away unexpectedly just a few weeks after he retired as Alabama coach.

25. Less polite + wildly unconventional = epicenter : GROUND ZERO = RUDER + GONZO
Something “gonzo” is bizarre or unconventional. The term might perhaps come from the Italian “gonzo” meaning “rude, sottish”.

27. Eye part : SCLERA
The sclera is the white part of the eye. Usually the sclera is white, but in horses for example, it is black. Really, go check!

28. New pop of 1924 : NEHI
Nehi Corporation was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company's flagship product, so the "Nehi Corporation" became the "Royal Crown Company". In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

32. In Tahitian it means "good" : MAI TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum. "Maita'i" is the Tahitian word for "good".

34. Urban woe + squirms = pool accessory : SWIM GOGGLES = SMOG + WIGGLES
“Smog” is a portmanteau word formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s. Several cities around the world have a reputation of being particularly smoggy. For example, the most smog-plagued city in Latin America is Mexico City, which is located in a highland “bowl” that traps industrial and vehicle pollution.

42. Big Ten sch. : MSU
Michigan State University’s sports teams used be called the Aggies, as the school was founded as the State Agricultural College of Michigan. The team name was changed to the Spartans in 1925, reflecting the school’s shift in focus beyond agriculture-centered education. The school mascot Sparty hit the scene in 1989.

46. Adorn brilliantly : EMBLAZON
Our terms “blazon” and “emblazon” both mean to decorate in a showy way. “To blazon” can also mean to adorn with a coat of arms. In the world of heraldry, a “blazon” is in fact a coat of arms, probably coming from the old French word “blason” meaning “shield”.

52. Pandora release : ILLS
According to Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman. She was created by the gods, with each god bestowing on her a gift. Her name can be translated from Greek as “all-gifted”. Pandora is famous for the story of “Pandora’s Box”. In actual fact, the story should be about Pandora’s “Jar” as a 16th-century error in translation created a “box” out of the “jar”. In the story of Pandora’s Box, curiosity got the better of her and she opened up a box she was meant to leave alone. As a result she released all the evils of mankind, just closing it in time to trap hope inside.

53. Del ___ (fast-food chain) : TACO
The Del Taco chain of fast food restaurants opened for business in 1964, with the first restaurant called “Casa Del Taco” located in Yermo, California. Del Taco serves American-style Mexican cuisine as well as the typical collection of hamburgers, fries and shakes.

55. Poetic Muse : ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry and is often depicted playing a lyre.

58. Nevada gold-mining town : ELKO
The city of Elko, Nevada came into being in 1868 as a settlement built around the eastern end of a railway line that was constructed from California and that was destined for Utah. When that section of the line was completed, the construction crews moved on towards the Nevada/Utah border, and the settlement was left behind to eventually form the city of Elko

60. Remain + "Hmm ..." = R&B great : BO DIDDLEY = BIDE + ODDLY
Bo Diddley was the stage name of Ellas Otha Bates, the celebrated R&B artist.

67. Letter at the end of three other letters : ETA
The three letters in the Greek letter “eta” serve as the endings to three other Greek letters: beta, zeta and theta.

74. Lisa, to Bart : SIS
Lisa Simpson is Bart’s brainy younger sister on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Lisa is voiced by actress Yeardley Smith.

75. Big name in root beer : DAD’S
Dad’s root beer was developed by Ely Klapman and Barney Berns in 1937, and was given the name “Dad’s” in honor of Klapman’s father who used to make root beer for his family at home.

78. Sushi go-with : SAKE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

80. Show, informally + African capital = Adonis : DREAMBOAT = DEMO + RABAT
Rabat is the capital city of the Kingdom of Morocco. After WWII, the United States maintained a major Air Force Base in Rabat, part of Strategic Air Command (SAC). Responding to pressure from the Moroccan government of King Mohammed V, the USAF pulled out in 1963.

89. Someone never seen in "Peanuts" : ADULT
Charles M. Schulz was a cartoonist best known for his comic strip “Peanuts” that featured the much-loved characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy. “Peanuts” was so successful, running daily in over 70 countries and 21 languages, that it earned Schulz an estimated 30-40 million dollars annually.

90. ___ Minor : URSA
Ursa Minor (Latin for “Smaller Bear”) sits right beside the constellation Draco (Latin for “dragon”). Ursa Minor used to be considered the wing of Draco, and so was once called “Dragon’s Wing”.

94. Feudal lord : LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. "Liege" was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

101. Radial alternative : BIAS TIRE
A bias tire is also known as a “cross ply”.

108. Minimal diamond margin : ONE RUN
That would be a baseball diamond.

112. Santa ___ : MARIA
When Columbus made his famous voyage of discovery, the largest of his three ships was the Santa Maria. The Santa Maria ran aground on the coast of Hispaniola on Christmas Day in 1492 and was lost. 39 of Columbus’s men were left behind with the permission of the locals. These men stripped the timbers from the Santa Maria and used them to build a settlement they called La Navidad (Spanish for “Christmas”). La Navidad is now the modern town of Môle-Saint-Nicolas in the Republic of Haiti.

115. "My Cup Runneth Over" crooner : ED AMES
“My Cup Runneth Over” is a song from the 1966 Broadway musical “I Do! I Do!”. A very popular recording of the song was made by Ed Ames in 1967. The title of the song is a quotation from the Bible, from the Book of Psalms.

119. Regarding + undercoat = network with 303 stations : PARIS METRO = AS TO + PRIMER
The Paris Métro is the busiest underground transportation system in western Europe, carrying about 4.5 million passengers a day, about the same as the New York City Subway. The system took its name from the company that originally operated it, namely “La Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris”, which was shorted to “Métro”. The term “Metro” was then adopted for similar systems in cities all over the world.

122. Day of the month + succeed = some recital pieces : PIANO DUETS = IDES + PAN OUT
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually "fixed" by law. "Kalendae" were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. "Nonae" were originally the days of the half moon. And "idus" (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

124. Epps of "House" : OMAR
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Forman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

125. Kind of chair : EAMES
Charles and Ray Eames were a husband-wife team of furniture designers. One of the more famous of their designs is the Eames lounge chair that comes with an ottoman. This trendy piece of furniture featured in a late episode of the television show “Frasier”. In the show, Frasier’s Dad remarks that the Eames chair is so comfortable that he might have gotten rid of his tatty old recliner a long time ago.

130. The time of Nick? : NITE
“Nick at Nite” is the name given to the late-night programming aired on the Nickelodeon channel space. Nick at Nite started broadcasting in 1985 and was conceived as television’s first “oldies” television network.

131. ___ Chris Steak House : RUTH’S
Ruth’s Chris Steak House is a huge chain of fine-dining restaurants, with well over 100 establishments. The company was started by a single mother of two called Ruth Fertel. In 1965 Fertel bought the Chris Steak House in New Orleans, and under the agreement governing the purchase, she had to retain the name “Chris”. So Fertel added her own name in front of the existing name, and Ruth’s Chris Steak Houses were born.

Down
1. "Jinx" breakers of 2016 : CUBS
The Chicago Cubs is one of only two charter members of the baseball’s National League who are still playing, the other being the Atlanta Braves. The Cubs won the World Series in 2016 for the first time since 1908, which is a long time ago. In fact, the Cubs had the longest championship drought of any professional sports team in North America.

4. Violinist Zimbalist : EFREM
Efrem Zimbalist was a prominent concert violinist from Russia. Zimbalist was married to the famous American soprano Alma Gluck. The couple had a son called Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. who became a well-known actor (co-star on “77 Sunset Strip”). Zimbalist, Sr. was therefore also the grandfather of actress Stephanie Zimbalist (co-star on “Remington Steele”).

5. Negev native : SABRA
Jewish people born in the State of Israel, or the historical region of israel, are known as Sabras. “Sabra” is actually the name of the prickly pear, the thorny desert cactus. Apparently the name “Sabra” is used because someone born in the region is said to be tough on the outside and sweet on the inside, just like a prickly pear.

The Negev is a desert region in southern Israel. The largest city in the Negev is Beersheba.

9. Green of "The Italian Job" : SETH
Seth Green is an actor and comedian best-known by many as creator and voice actor on the animated television series “Robot Chicken”. I know him best for playing “Napster” in the 2005 film “The Italian Job”.

10. Director Lee : ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".

16. The "F" in F = ma : FORCE
Newton’s second law of motion tells us that a body accelerates when a force is applied to it, and the greater the mass of the object, the greater the force required to cause that acceleration. Mathematically, the law can be written as Force = mass x acceleration (F=ma).

24. Mrs. Gorbachev : RAISA
Raisa Gorbachova was the wife of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. There’s no doubt that Raisa’s charm and personality helped her husband as he worked to change the image of the Soviet Union.

33. Actress Hatcher : TERI
Teri Hatcher’s most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in “Desperate Housewives”. I’ve never seen more than a few minutes of “Housewives” but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in “Tomorrow Never Dies”. More recently, she has been portraying Lois Lane on the show “Lois & Clark”.

46. Recall cause, maybe : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

47. Computer hookups : MODEMS
A modem is a device that is used to facilitate the transmission of a digital signal over an analog line. At one end of the line a modem is used to “modulate” an analog carrier signal to encode the the digital information, and at the other end a modem is used to “demodulate” the analog carrier signal and so reproduce the original digital information. This modulation-demodulation gives the device its name: a MOdulator-DEModulator, or “modem”.

48. Chain that sells chains : ZALES
The first Zales jewelry store was opened by Morris and William Zale and Ben Lipshy in Wichita Falls, Texas, in 1924. Zales became successful largely by offering credit to their customers, a revolutionary concept at the time.

49. Cheri formerly of "S.N.L." : OTERI
Cheri Oteri was the SNL cast member who regularly appeared with Will Ferrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

50. "The Highwayman" poet : NOYES
Alfred Noyes was an English poet best known for his narrative poem “The Highwayman”, published in 1906. The highwayman in the poem is in love with an innkeeper’s daughter named Bess. Bess dies trying to warn her lover about an ambush, and then the highwayman dies when trying to exact revenge for her death. The highwayman and Bess meet up as ghosts on winter nights.

65. Relatives on the father's side : AGNATES
Something that is enate is growing outward, and "enate" is used to describe ancestors related on the mother's side. Something that is agnate comes from a common source, and "agnate" is used to describe relatives on the father's side of the family tree.

67. Classic Icelandic literary works : EDDAS
The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century, in Iceland.

68. Time for una siesta : TARDE
In Spanish, the “tarda” (afternoon) might be a good time for “una siesta” (a nap).

We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, taking the word from the Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at “the sixth hour” after dawn.

69. For two : A DEUX
We use the French term “à deux” to describe something involving two people, usually in a private arrangement (like maybe a dinner together).

71. Cabooses : REARS
The word “caboose” originally came from Middle Dutch and was the word for a ship’s galley. When the last car in a train in North America was given a stove for the comfort of the crew, it took on the name “caboose”. The term has also become slang for a person’s backside.

72. Some needlework, informally? : TATS
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo". Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

76. Carter/Brezhnev agreement : SALT II
There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970, with the resulting treaty signed by President Richard Nixon and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev in 1972. Brezhnev also signed the SALT II treaty, with President Jimmy Carter in 1979.

81. After Rainier, highest peak in the Pacific Northwest : MT ADAMS
Mount Adams is a volcanic peak in the state of Washington, in the Cascade Range. There was an unsuccessful attempt in the 1930s to have the Cascade Range renamed to the President’s Range, with each of the major peaks named for a US president. The plan was to rename Mount Hood as Mount Adams, after President John Adams. Due to a cartographer’s error, the relatively unknown peak that we now call Mount Adams was given the name, instead of Mount Hood. The plans for “the President’s Range” came to nought, but the Mount Adams name stuck.

83. Island whose volcanic eruption is rumored to have destroyed Atlantis : SANTORINI
The legendary city of Atlantis was first referred to in writing by the Greek philosopher Plato. The story is that a navy from Atlantis attempted to invade Athens but failed, and as a result the city of Atlantis sank into the ocean.

91. Capital where Robert Louis Stevenson died : APIA
Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely. Apia is also known as the home of writer Robert Louis Stevenson, for the last four years of his life.

93. Verb from which "suis" and "sommes" are conjugated : ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”.

98. Heavy metal band with 1980s hits : RATT
Ratt is a rock band based in Los Angeles. Ratt was formed out of a San Diego group called Mickey Ratt.

99. Correo ___ (foreign mail stamp) : AEREO
The words “Correo Aereo” can be found on some stamps. The phrase translates from Spanish as “Air Mail”.

104. Old World lizard : AGAMA
Agama is a genus of lizards that are native to Africa.

105. Hulk Hogan trademark : DO-RAG
Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags today, but they have been around for centuries. If you recall the famous image of Rosie the Riveter, she was wearing a do-rag. The etymology is pretty evident, a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place

Hulk Hogan is the stage name (well, “ring” name) for wrestler Terry Gene Bollea. Hogan was big in the eighties and nineties. He fell out of public favor in 2015 when tapes of him making repeated racist remarks were published.

106. October option : TREAT
Trick or treat!

107. Counterpart of "stand" : HIT ME
“Stand” and “hit me” are instructions to the dealer in the card game Blackjack.

110. Remote land in the Pacific : NAURU
Nauru is the world’s smallest island nation, located in the South Pacific 300 km to the east of Kiribati. The island was taken as a colony by Germany in the late 1800s, and came under the administration of Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom after WWI. The Japanese invaded during WWII, but Nauru was one of the islands that was bypassed in the US advance across the Pacific towards Japan. Nauru achieved independence in 1968.

116. Rendezvous : MEET
A rendezvous is a meeting, from the French “rendez vous” meaning “present yourselves”.

118. Bygone boomers, for short : SSTS
Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot “get out of the way”. When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

120. Org. authorized by the 16th Amendment : IRS
The Sixteenth Amendment to the US Constitution gives the US Congress the right to levy a personal income tax without the need to reapportion the funds collected to the States proportionally based on Census results. Prior to the amendment, taxes collected had to be returned to the States based on population.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. They often have small tables : CAFES
6. Base men? : CADS
10. Jazzes (up) : AMPS
14. "Back to the Future" antagonist : BIFF
18. Stars-and-stripes land, informally : US OF A
19. Some Great Plains residents : OTOE
20. Possible destination for un inmigrante, with "el" : NORTE
22. Hero : IDOL
23. Infant + straying = noted coach : BEAR BRYANT = BABY + ERRANT
25. Less polite + wildly unconventional = epicenter : GROUND ZERO = RUDER + GONZO
27. Eye part : SCLERA
28. New pop of 1924 : NEHI
30. Approached apace : RAN TO
31. Pro : ACE
32. In Tahitian it means "good" : MAI TAI
34. Urban woe + squirms = pool accessory : SWIM GOGGLES = SMOG + WIGGLES
37. Untuned, say : OFF
40. Halters? : SENTRIES
42. Big Ten sch. : MSU
43. Delay + dodos = some compromises : PLEA BARGAINS = LAG + PEABRAINS
46. Adorn brilliantly : EMBLAZON
51. Birthday girl's wear : TIARA
52. Pandora release : ILLS
53. Del ___ (fast-food chain) : TACO
55. Poetic Muse : ERATO
56. Spa, e.g. : SPRING
58. Nevada gold-mining town : ELKO
60. Remain + "Hmm ..." = R&B great : BO DIDDLEY = BIDE + ODDLY
62. ___ season : DEER
64. Moved at a crawl : SNAILED
66. Saharan : SERE
67. Letter at the end of three other letters : ETA
70. Bill producers + Western wear = info for events : STARTING TIMES = ATMS + STRING TIES
74. Lisa, to Bart : SIS
75. Big name in root beer : DAD’S
77. Overindulged : ATE A TON
78. Sushi go-with : SAKE
80. Show, informally + African capital = Adonis : DREAMBOAT = DEMO + RABAT
82. Social worker? : WASP
85. Suck it up? : SIPHON
89. Someone never seen in "Peanuts" : ADULT
90. ___ Minor : URSA
92. Yarn : TALE
94. Feudal lord : LIEGE
95. Mariners' aids : SEXTANTS
97. Pasty + vacation expense, maybe = hospital specialty : PRENATAL CARE = PALE + RENTAL CAR
100. Court affirmation : I DO
101. Radial alternative : BIAS TIRE
102. Was ahead : LED
103. See + umbrella alternative = warming option : RADIANT HEAT = DATE + RAIN HAT
108. Minimal diamond margin : ONE RUN
111. Lead-in to maniac : EGO-
112. Santa ___ : MARIA
113. Area to defend : TURF
115. "My Cup Runneth Over" crooner : ED AMES
119. Regarding + undercoat = network with 303 stations : PARIS METRO = AS TO + PRIMER
122. Day of the month + succeed = some recital pieces : PIANO DUETS = IDES + PAN OUT
124. Epps of "House" : OMAR
125. Kind of chair : EAMES
126. In years past : ONCE
127. Vertical : ERECT
128. Makes it? : TAGS
129. Prefix with byte : TERA-
130. The time of Nick? : NITE
131. ___ Chris Steak House : RUTH’S

Down
1. "Jinx" breakers of 2016 : CUBS
2. "Hold on ___!" : A SEC
3. Stable arrival : FOAL
4. Violinist Zimbalist : EFREM
5. Negev native : SABRA
6. Evasive : COY
7. Crooked : AT AN ANGLE
8. Accomplished everything : DONE IT ALL
9. Green of "The Italian Job" : SETH
10. Director Lee : ANG
11. Cat that epitomizes finickiness : MORRIS
12. Many a charity tournament : PRO-AM
13. Deeply offended : STUNG
14. Hollywood, with "the" : BIZ
15. Unimprovable : IDEAL
16. The "F" in F = ma : FORCE
17. Results of icy breakups? : FLOES
21. Finally put an end to? : ENTOMB
24. Mrs. Gorbachev : RAISA
26. Follower of an Alaskan team : DOGSLED
29. "The doctor ___" : IS IN
33. Actress Hatcher : TERI
35. Last part of the country to report election results : WEST
36. Keeps safe : GUARDS
37. Pulls (out of) : OPTS
38. Resell quickly : FLIP
39. "___ not!" : FEAR
41. Takes a chance : RISKS IT
44. Saharan : ARID
45. Curses : BANES
46. Recall cause, maybe : E COLI
47. Computer hookups : MODEMS
48. Chain that sells chains : ZALES
49. Cheri formerly of "S.N.L." : OTERI
50. "The Highwayman" poet : NOYES
54. Some : A BIT
57. Do pretty well gradewise : GET A B
59. Currently airing : ON NOW
61. What germs may turn into : IDEAS
63. Squeal on : RAT OUT
65. Relatives on the father's side : AGNATES
67. Classic Icelandic literary works : EDDAS
68. Time for una siesta : TARDE
69. For two : A DEUX
71. Cabooses : REARS
72. Some needlework, informally? : TATS
73. Art : SKILL
76. Carter/Brezhnev agreement : SALT II
79. Absolutely awesome : EPIC
81. After Rainier, highest peak in the Pacific Northwest : MT ADAMS
83. Island whose volcanic eruption is rumored to have destroyed Atlantis : SANTORINI
84. Simple truth : PLAIN FACT
86. Mend : HEAL
87. Nasty sort : OGRE
88. Attention, for some : NEED
91. Capital where Robert Louis Stevenson died : APIA
93. Verb from which "suis" and "sommes" are conjugated : ETRE
96. Anonymous : NO-NAME
98. Heavy metal band with 1980s hits : RATT
99. Correo ___ (foreign mail stamp) : AEREO
101. Carrier : BEARER
103. Move, as a plant : REPOT
104. Old World lizard : AGAMA
105. Hulk Hogan trademark : DO-RAG
106. October option : TREAT
107. Counterpart of "stand" : HIT ME
109. Milk container : UDDER
110. Remote land in the Pacific : NAURU
114. Familiar with : UP ON
116. Rendezvous : MEET
117. Impress deeply : ETCH
118. Bygone boomers, for short : SSTS
120. Org. authorized by the 16th Amendment : IRS
121. Spanish she-bear : OSA
123. Maiden name preceder : NEE


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7 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

31:11, no errors, iPad. Very clever theme. I suppose the setter spent a bunch of hours witn an online anagramming tool to come up with the theme entries. In the old (pre-computer) days, this puzzle would have been a real tour de force.

BruceB said...

55:39, 2 errors, EFREN, NAITAI. Had a tough time getting into this setters head. Clever theme and enjoyed the challenge, but clues seemed a bit of a stretch, at times. Have never seen SNAIL used as a verb before.

119A 'network with 303 stations' was a diabolical misdirect.

Anonymous said...

44:58, and 8 errors. This one was full of poorly-worded clues, making it difficult to finish. I liked the theme answers, though. This was a decent idea ruined by cynical editing.

Steve C. said...

Guessed Efrem and Neuru. Got the rest of them. I thought it was pretty fun.

Steve C. said...

*Efram

Dale Stewart said...

No errors. Couldn't have done it without the theme. Each theme line had essentially three clues. I got to where I was simply working the shorter answers independently of the longer answers.

Anonymous said...

Re PEANUTS -- actually, Schultz did show adults in a single early Sunday strip, set on a golf course. He never repeated the experiment, though, and did not choose to reprint that strip in any collections published when he was alive (it was eventually reprinted a few years ago in the complete PEANUTS series published in hc by Fantagraphics Books.) / Denny Lien

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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