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1204-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 4 Dec 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Bruce Haight
THEME: Action Stars
Today’s themed answers are movie STARS whose family names have been turned into an ACTION word, a verb:
23A. ___ into a major film star : ORLANDO BLOOMED ...
34A. ___ for just the right film role : HELEN HUNTED …
52A. ___ several filmmaking awards : JAMES GARNERED ...
66A. ___ a new film adaptation : SEAN PENNED …
69A. ___ two film studios against each other : BRAD PITTED ...
83A. ___ for meatier film roles : SHELLEY LONGED ...
96A. ___ the film deal : GLENN CLOSED …
111A. ___ himself as a big-screen film star : RUSSELL BRANDED ...
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 38s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Auto-sharing company : ZIPCAR
Zipcar is a carsharing company. Carsharing differs from car rental in that cars are available only to members, but 24 hours a day as opposed to office hours. There are other differences, including the fact that members are usually responsible for leaving cars gassed up and clean for the next user.

22. Earning a Purple Heart, say : HEROIC
The Purple Heart is a military decoration awarded by the President to members of the US military forces who have been wounded or killed while serving. Today’s Purple Heart was originally called the Badge of Military Merit, an award that was established by George Washington 1782 while he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. The Purple Heart is a heart-shaped medal with a gold border bearing a profile of President Washington, and a purple ribbon.

23. ___ into a major film star : ORLANDO BLOOMED …
English actor Orlando Bloom’s breakthrough on the big screen came when he was chosen to play the Sindarin Elf Legolas in “The Lord of the Rings” series of films.

25. 7Up, in old ads, with "the" : UNCOLA
7UP was introduced to the world as “Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda”, and was a patent medicine that contained lithium citrate, a mood-stabilizing drug. Paradoxically, it came on the market in 1929 just two weeks before the Wall Street Crash. 7UP’s “Uncola” advertising campaign dates back to 1967.

28. Sibling of Helios and Selene, in myth : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

Selene was the Greek goddess of the moon, the equivalent of the Roman deity Luna. Selene gave her name to the word “selenology”, the study of the geology of the moon, and also gave her name to the chemical element “selenium”. According to mythology, Selene fell in love with the handsome hunter/shepherd Endymion, a mere mortal.

30. Something to shoot with, briefly : SLR
SLR stands for "single lens reflex". Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

34. ___ for just the right film role : HELEN HUNTED …
Helen Hunt is a very talented actress who first came to national attention playing opposite Paul Reiser in TV’s hit sitcom “Mad About You”. Hunt then starred in some major films including “As Good as It Gets” (for which she won the Best Actress Oscar), “Twister, “Cast Away”, What Women Want” and more recently “The Sessions”. Offscreen, Hunt was married for a while to Hank Azaria, a favorite actor of mine.

44. Bio word : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

45. Radius, for one : ARM BONE
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

47. ___ Doggie of old cartoons : AUGIE
Augie Doggie and his father, Doggie Daddy, appeared in the Hanna-Barbera cartoon classic series, "The Quick Draw McGraw Show". Doggy Daddy was famous for his regular line referring to Augie, "Dat's my boy who said dat".

48. Psychedelic experience : LSD TRIP
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

52. ___ several filmmaking awards : JAMES GARNERED …
Actor James Garner was best known for playing the lead in two long-running TV shows: “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files”. Garner also played key roles in some very successful films, such as 1963’s “The Great Escape” and 2004’s “The Notebook”.

54. Maker of business jets : CESSNA
The Cessna Aircraft manufacturing company was founded in 1911 by Clyde Cessna, a farmer from Kansas. Cessna is headquartered in Wichita and today has over 8,000 employees.

56. Hybrid citrus fruits : UGLIS
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

57. "The Lion King" villain : SCAR
Among the group of lions at the center of “The Lion King” story, young Simba is the heir apparent, the lion cub destined to take over as leader of the pride. His uncle is jealous of Simba, and plots with a trio of hyenas to kill Simba, so that he can take his position. The uncle was originally named Taka (according to books) but he was given the name Scar after being injured by a buffalo. The trio of hyenas are called Shenzi, Banzai and Ed.

66. ___ a new film adaptation : SEAN PENNED …
Actor Sean Penn is a two-time Oscar winner, for his roles in “Mystic River” released in 2003 and “Milk” released in 2008. Penn’s celebrity on screen is only matched with his fame off the screen. Apart from his “big name” marriages to singer Madonna and actress Robin Wright, Penn is also well known for political and social activism. He perhaps inherited some of his political views from his father, actor and director Leo Penn. As an actor, Leo refused to “name names” in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee and so was blacklisted in Hollywood and had to move into directing to put bread on the table. In later years as a director he gave his son Sean his first acting role, in a 1974 episode of “Little House on the Prairie”.

69. ___ two film studios against each other : BRAD PITTED …
Brad Pitt’s first major role was the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston and then to Angelina Jolie.

71. ___ nova (musical style of the late Middle Ages) : ARS
“Ars antiqua” is a term used to describe European music of the Middle Ages between c.1170 and 1310. The term “ars nova” applies to the music that followed, between the years c.1310 and 1377.

72. Like businesses on Yelp : RATED
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

74. Org. with the magazine America's 1st Freedom : NRA
National Rifle Association (NRA)

76. Leader who was Time's 2007 Person of the Year : PUTIN
Vladimir Putin became acting President of Russia at the very end of 1999 when Boris Yeltsin resigned. Putin was elected in his own right in 2000, re-elected in 2004, and then ran up against a term limit in 2008. In 2008 Putin was appointed by his successor, President Dmitry Medvedev, to the position of Prime Minister. Putin is a controversial figure, inside and outside Russia. On the one hand he led the country out of an economic crisis into a period of stability and relative prosperity. On the other hand he has been associated with government corruption and accused of allowing private concerns to have undue influence on government actions.

77. Italy's Isola d'___ : ELBA
I had a lovely two-week vacation in Tuscany once, including what was supposed to be a two-night stay on the island of Elba. I had envisioned Elba as a place full of history, and maybe it is, but it is also overrun with tourists who use it as a beach getaway. We left after one day and we won't be going back again …

83. ___ for meatier film roles : SHELLEY LONGED …
Actress Shelley Long is best known for playing Diane Chambers on the sitcom “Cheers”. There are lots of stories out there about tension on the set of “Cheers”, particularly between Long and her costar Ted Danson. Long decided to leave the show after the fifth season, but “Cheers” kept running, for eleven seasons in all.

89. Cads : ROUES
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

91. "Despicable Me" supervillain : GRU
The main protagonist in the “Despicable Me” movies is the supervillain Felonius Gru, usually referred to simply as “Gru”.

“Despicable Me” is a 2010 animated comedy film. The main voice actor in the movie is the very funny Steve Carell. “Despicable Me” is a Universal Pictures production, although all of the animation was done in France. The 2010 film was followed by a sequel “Despicable Me 2” released in 2013, with a prequel/spinoff film called “Minions” released in 2015.

94. Baylor's home : WACO
Remember Ken Starr of Whitewater fame? He is now the President of Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

96. ___ the film deal : GLENN CLOSED …
Glenn Close a wonderful actress who has played many varied roles, but is well known for her portrayals of less than wholesome characters. She play the crazy Alex Forrest in “Fatal Attraction”, and Cruella de Vil in “101 Dalmatians”. More recently, Close had a regular role on a TV show called “Damages”. Glenn Close is an avid fan of the New York Mets and regularly sings the national anthem before games.

102. Milne character : ROO
Like most of the characters in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie the Pooh”, the kangaroo named Roo was inspired by on a stuffed toy belonging to Milne’s son Christopher Robin.

103. Java neighbor : BALI
Bali is the most important tourist destination in Indonesia and is an island lying east of Java. In recent years, Bali’s tourist industry has been badly hit in the aftermath of two terrorist bombings. The first one, in 2002, killed 202 people, mainly foreign tourists in a nightclub.

111. ___ himself as a big-screen film star : RUSSELL BRANDED …
English comedian and actor Russell Brand is perhaps best known on this side of the Atlantic for his movie appearances, notably in 2008’s “Forgetting Sarah Marshall”, 2010’s “Get Him to the Greek” and 2011’s remake of “Arthur”. Famously, Brand was married to American singer Katy Perry from 2010 to 2012.

120. Stacking game : TETRIS
Tetris is a very addictive video game that was developed in the Soviet Union in 1984. The name Tetris comes from a melding of the prefix “tetra-” (as all the game pieces have four segments) and “tennis” (a favorite sport played by the developer). Since 2005 there have been more than 100 million copies of the game installed on cell phones alone.

Down
2. Lady's man : EARL
In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquis. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquis and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known as a countess.

3. Country singer Lovett : LYLE
As well as being famous in his own right as a successful country singer, Lyle Lovett is known for his marriage to the actress Julia Roberts in 1993. The pair had a whirlwind romance lasting just three weeks before they eloped and were wed. The marriage was also relatively whirlwind, lasting less than two years.

4. First African-American Disney princess : TIANA
“The Princess and the Frog" is an animated feature released in 2009 by Walt Disney Studios. The film is set in New Orleans in the twenties. A waitress called Tiana kisses a prince who had been turned into a frog, and hen she herself turns into a frog.

5. Spike TV's former name : TNN
Spike TV was a 2003 relaunch of The Nashville Network (TNN) and was marketed as the first television channel for men. The station owners ran into trouble though as the director Spike Lee sued, claiming that viewers would assume he was associated with the channel because of the use of "Spike". The suit was settled when Lee concluded that there was no intention to trade on his name.

8. Jewelry chain : ZALES
The first Zales jewelry store was opened by Morris and William Zale and Ben Lipshy in Wichita Falls, Texas, in 1924. Zales became successful largely by offering credit to their customers, a revolutionary concept at the time.

9. Borodin's prince : IGOR
“Prince Igor” is an opera by the Russian composer, Alexander Borodin. Borodin died before he had finished “Prince Igor”, so it was completed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Alexander Glazunov. Music from “Prince Igor” and other Borodin works was used in the American musical “Kismet”.

10. 1993 accord grp. : PLO
The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

12. Middle word in a mall map phrase : ARE
You are here …

15. Half a score : TEN
Our verb “to score” meaning “to tally”, comes from the Old Norse “skor”, which is a “mark, notch”. It is likely that items such a livestock were counted by placing a notch in a stick for each set of twenty, hence our use of the noun “score” to mean “twenty”.

16. Story ___ : ARC
A story arc is a continuing storyline in say a television show that has a number of episodes. Story arcs are also found in comics, books, video games, and other forms of media.

18. French city near the Belgian border : LILLE
Lille is a large city in the very north of France sitting right on the border with Belgium. The name “Lille” is a derivation of the term “l’isle” meaning “the island”. The name “L’Isle” dates back to 1066, and is a reference to a castle that once stood on an island in the Deûle river that runs through the city. The city grew around the island and the castle.

24. ___ noire : BETE
“Bête noire” translates from French as “black beast” and is used in English to describe something or someone that is disliked.

29. Student taking Contracts, maybe : ONE L
“One L” is a name used in general for first year law students, especially those attending Harvard..

32. Villagers the Grinch stole from in Dr. Seuss : WHOS
Whoville is where the Whos live in Dr. Seuss’ children’s book “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!”

35. Native New Yorkers : ERIES
The Erie people lived on lands south of Lake Erie. The Erie were sometimes referred to as the Cat Nation, a reference to the mountain lions that were ever-present in the area that they lived. The name “Erie” is a shortened form of “Erielhonan” meaning “long tail”, possibly a further reference to the mountain lion or cat, which was possibly used as a totem. The Erie people gave their name to the Great Lake.

36. Eco-friendly building certification, for short : LEED
LEED is a green building certification program. The acronym stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

38. New York team : NETS
The NBA’s Brooklyn Nets until relatively recently were the New Jersey Nets, based in Newark. Prior to 1977, the team was known as the New York Nets and played in various locations on Long Island. Ten years earlier, the Nets were called the New Jersey Americans and were headquartered in Teaneck, New Jersey.

39. Goya subject : MAJA
María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th Duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

49. Seafood order : SCAMPI
The Italian dish known as “scampi” is a serving of shrimp in garlic butter and dry white wine.

58. Things to chew on : CUDS
Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work. We also use the verb “to ruminate” in a figurative sense, to mean “to muse, ponder, chew over”.

67. Morris who directed "The Fog of War" : ERROL
Errol Morris is a film director, best known for his excellent 2003 documentary “The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara”. Morris also directed “The Unknown Known: The Life and Times of Donald Rumsfeld” in 2013.

69. Gable part : BUTLER
The actor Clark Gable was the leading man in so many great movies, the most famous of which is probably 1939’s “Gone with the Wind” portraying Rhett Butler. My personal favorite of his films is 1934’s “It Happened One Night”, for which he won the Best Actor Oscar. Gable enlisted in the US Army Air Corps in 1942 and flew five combat missions from England, for which he was awarded the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross.

70. Singer Marie : TEENA
Teena Marie was a very successful R&B singer, born Mary Christine Brockert in Santa Monica, California.

78. Pride parade letters : LGBT
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

The first gay pride parades were held all on the same weekend in 1970, in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

79. Actor Lugosi : BELA
Bela Lugosi was a Hungarian stage and screen actor, best known for playing the title role in the 1931 film “Dracula” and for playing the same role on Broadway. Lugosi found himself typecast for the rest of his career and almost always played the role of the villain, often in horror movies. When he passed away in 1956, his wife had him buried in the costume he wore playing Count Dracula on Broadway.

80. Yemen seaport : ADEN
Aden is a seaport in Yemen, located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

82. Laura of "Blue Velvet" : DERN
The actress Laura Dern is the daughter of the actors Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd. Among her many notable roles, Laura played the Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris in the 2008 movie “Recount”, and Dr. Ellie Sattler in the 1993 blockbuster “Jurassic Park”.

96. "Roger that" : GOT IT
The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included "Roger" to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

99. "The Twilight Zone" episodes, e.g. : TALES
The iconic television series called “The Twilight Zone” first aired in 1959 and then ran for 156 episodes before being pulled in 1964. “The Twilight Zone” was revived for four years in the late eighties, and was also spun-off into a movie by Steven Spielberg in 1983.

100. Poet who wrote "In the middle of the journey of our life I came to myself within a dark wood where the straight way was lost" : DANTE
Dante Alighieri (usually just “Dante”) was an Italian poet of the Middle Ages. Dante’s “Divine Comedy” is widely considered to be the greatest literary work ever written in the Italian language.

103. Capital NW of Jungfrau : BERN
Bern (sometimes “Berne”, especially in French) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

The Jungfrau is a peak in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. “Jungfrau” translates from German as “maiden” or “virgin”.

105. Some info holders : PDAS
Personal digital assistant (PDA)

106. ___ lily : SEGO
The Sego Lily is the state flower of Utah, and is a perennial plant found throughout the Western United States.

107. Depiction in Bosch's "The Garden of Earthly Delights" : EDEN
Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter who worked late 15th and early 16th centuries. Perhaps his most recognized work is his triptych titled "The Garden of Earthly Delights".

109. ___ se : PER
"Per se" is a Latin phrase that translates as "by itself". We use "per se" pretty literally, meaning "in itself, intrinsically".

110. Tire measure: Abbr. : PSI
Pounds Per Square Inch (PSI) is a measure of pressure.

116. Swell : A-OK
Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose in the sixties during the Space Program.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Kind of marker : FELT-TIP
8. Auto-sharing company : ZIPCAR
14. Solid : STABLE
20. Attack : LAY INTO
21. Harshly bright : AGLARE
22. Earning a Purple Heart, say : HEROIC
23. ___ into a major film star : ORLANDO BLOOMED ...
25. 7Up, in old ads, with "the" : UNCOLA
26. Vale : GLEN
27. Salacious look : LEER
28. Sibling of Helios and Selene, in myth : EOS
30. Something to shoot with, briefly : SLR
31. "Phooey!" : AW RATS!
34. ___ for just the right film role : HELEN HUNTED …
39. Many a suit has one, for short : MBA
42. New employee : HIRE
43. "You think I won't!" : DARE ME!
44. Bio word : NEE
45. Radius, for one : ARM BONE
47. ___ Doggie of old cartoons : AUGIE
48. Psychedelic experience : LSD TRIP
52. ___ several filmmaking awards : JAMES GARNERED ...
54. Maker of business jets : CESSNA
55. Spellbound : AGOG
56. Hybrid citrus fruits : UGLIS
57. "The Lion King" villain : SCAR
59. Stick close to : HUG
60. Went after : ASSAILED
64. Something that turns up when you snap your fingers? : THUMB
65. Pay dirt : ORE
66. ___ a new film adaptation : SEAN PENNED …
69. ___ two film studios against each other : BRAD PITTED ...
71. ___ nova (musical style of the late Middle Ages) : ARS
72. Like businesses on Yelp : RATED
73. Land near a wharf : QUAYSIDE
74. Org. with the magazine America's 1st Freedom : NRA
75. Spellbound : AWED
76. Leader who was Time's 2007 Person of the Year : PUTIN
77. Italy's Isola d'___ : ELBA
81. "Ha! I was right!" : TOLD YA!
83. ___ for meatier film roles : SHELLEY LONGED ...
87. Brisk tempo : ALLEGRO
89. Cads : ROUES
90. Like food : EATABLE
91. "Despicable Me" supervillain : GRU
92. Evidence of a brawl : SHINER
94. Baylor's home : WACO
95. Salon offering : TAN
96. ___ the film deal : GLENN CLOSED …
99. Giggled : TEHEED
101. Honey ___ Clusters (breakfast cereal) : OAT
102. Milne character : ROO
103. Java neighbor : BALI
104. Church recess : APSE
108. Too much, in music : TROPPO
111. ___ himself as a big-screen film star : RUSSELL BRANDED ...
117. "If you say so" : I GUESS
118. Strive : ASPIRE
119. Actions of environmental extremists : ECOTAGE
120. Stacking game : TETRIS
121. Pines : YEARNS
122. Confronts : TAKES ON

Down
1. Lash : FLOG
2. Lady's man : EARL
3. Country singer Lovett : LYLE
4. First African-American Disney princess : TIANA
5. Spike TV's former name : TNN
6. "___ be my honor" : IT’D
7. Sunbathing locale : POOL AREA
8. Jewelry chain : ZALES
9. Borodin's prince : IGOR
10. 1993 accord grp. : PLO
11. Surveillance device : CAM
12. Middle word in a mall map phrase : ARE
13. Cash in : REDEEM
14. "Quiet down!" : SHUSH!
15. Half a score : TEN
16. Story ___ : ARC
17. Immunity enhancer : BOOSTER SHOT
18. French city near the Belgian border : LILLE
19. Modern greeting : E-CARD
24. ___ noire : BETE
29. Student taking Contracts, maybe : ONE L
32. Villagers the Grinch stole from in Dr. Seuss : WHOS
33. Surround : RING
34. Hogwarts groundskeeper : HAGRID
35. Native New Yorkers : ERIES
36. Eco-friendly building certification, for short : LEED
37. Runner-up's amount in an auction : UNDERBID
38. New York team : NETS
39. Goya subject : MAJA
40. Speak for oneself? : BRAG
41. Some rounds : AMMO
43. Settled a score old-style : DUELED
46. Got going : BEGAN
47. Aslant : ANGLED
49. Seafood order : SCAMPI
50. Temper : INURE
51. Summoned, in a way : PAGED
53. In bankruptcy : RUINED
57. Michael ___, Brett Halliday detective : SHAYNE
58. Things to chew on : CUDS
61. Aid for a big painting project : SPRAY GUN
62. Naval conflict : SEA WAR
63. Put up : ANTE
64. Straggles : TRAILS
66. December temp : SANTA
67. Morris who directed "The Fog of War" : ERROL
68. Like you wouldn't believe : AS ALL GET-OUT
69. Gable part : BUTLER
70. Singer Marie : TEENA
73. In line : QUEUED
76. Buzz, so to speak : PHONE
78. Pride parade letters : LGBT
79. Actor Lugosi : BELA
80. Yemen seaport : ADEN
82. Laura of "Blue Velvet" : DERN
83. Hindu honorifics : SRIS
84. "A likely story!" : YEAH, I BET!
85. Tie (up) : LACE
86. Western tribe : OTOE
88. 1993 accord city : OSLO
93. "Yippee!" : HOORAY!
94. "I'm waiting ...?" : WELL …?
96. "Roger that" : GOT IT
97. Vast : LARGE
98. Betray : CROSS
99. "The Twilight Zone" episodes, e.g. : TALES
100. Poet who wrote "In the middle of the journey of our life I came to myself within a dark wood where the straight way was lost" : DANTE
103. Capital NW of Jungfrau : BERN
105. Some info holders : PDAS
106. ___ lily : SEGO
107. Depiction in Bosch's "The Garden of Earthly Delights" : EDEN
109. ___ se : PER
110. Tire measure: Abbr. : PSI
112. Benefit : USE
113. Unwinding spot : SPA
114. Word before and after "yes," in the Army : SIR
115. Home appliance giant : RCA
116. Swell : A-OK


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7 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

28:50, no errors, iPad. Good theme. Toward the end, I had RUSSELL... in the lower right and was all set to get up on a self-righteous high horse over the fact that CROWNED didn't' properly follow the pattern of the other theme entries ... and then it turned out to be BRANDED. Oh. Silly me ... :-)

Lou Sander said...

We finished without looking anything up (this is not uncommon, of course, and we admit it when we have to cheat). Kind of a clever theme. We are NOT knowledgeable on current film stars, but we knew enough to get them.

BruceB said...

43:37, no errors. Unfortunately, the first two theme answers I entered were BRAD PITTED and HELEN HUNTED, so I expected all of theme entries to end with TED. Wasted a lot of time trying to fit the 'T" where it didn't belong.

Had particular difficulty with the bottom right corner. First thought was Russell Crowe; not familiar with SEGO lily; the quote for 100D sounded far too modern for DANTE; and ECOTAGE is a new word construction to me. I have heard of the term ecocide before, but not ecotage.

As always, I enjoyed the challenge and Bill's wiki-est explanations.

Steve C. said...

Nailed it. I did not have Bill's time, but I got them all, so at least today I consider myself partially in Bill's league. Fun puzzle.

Tom M. said...

I got 90+% if it, but I was sucked into it, and I didn't like it. Took too much time. I applaud those of you who got it all.

Anonymous said...

31:15, no errors, no issues. Enjoyable Sunday challenge.

Grumpy Greg said...

I don't believe any of you banana heads. It would take that long just to read the clues and write down the answers. Based on a completion time of 30 minutes (1,800 seconds) and 140 clues, you'd have to read, solve and write in each answer in approximately 13 seconds. Yeah, right! If you can do that, you'd be fools not to go on Jeopardy! and line your pockets with gold.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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