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1218-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Dec 16, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Derrick Niederman
THEME: Mirror Reflection
We have symmetry in all the across-answers today. Each answer in the top of the grid has exactly the same clue as the corresponding answer in the bottom of the grid.
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. One of the blanks in the cereal slogan "___ are for ___" : TRIX
Trix is a corn-based breakfast cereal that has been around since 1954, produced by General Mills. Ads for the cereal featured Trix Rabbit, who would try hard to get hold of bowls of the cereal. He would always get caught though, and be admonished with, “Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!” With 46% sugar content, the rabbit probably wouldn’t have liked it anyway …

5. Tinker, for one, in olden days : SHORTSTOP
That would be baseball player Joe Tinker who played professional ball from 1902 until 1916.

21. Legendary Egyptian queen : NEFERTITI
Nefertiti was the Great Royal Wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nefertiti is relatively well-known in modern times largely due to a 3,300-year-old limestone bust that depicts her rather beautiful features. The painted bust was discovered by archaeologists in the sculptor’s workshop in 1912, and is on display in the Neues Museum in Berlin.

24. Liberal arts college in the Keystone State : LAFAYETTE
Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania was founded in 1826 and was named after the Revolutionary War officer, General Lafayette of France.

28. Caterpillar product : PUPA
The pupa is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

32. One of Frank's wives : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long-term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

36. Japanese auto make : NISSAN
Japanese automaker Nissan introduced the Datsun brand in 1931, and then retired it in 1986. The Datsun brand was reintroduced in 2013, applied to low-cost models sold in emerging markets.

40. One of five on a starfish : RAY
Starfish come in many shapes and sizes, but commonly have "pentaradial symmetry", meaning they have symmetric body-shapes with five points. Most starfish are predators, mainly living on a diet of mollusks such as clams and oysters.

44. These could amount to fortunes : READINGS
That could be reading of palms, or reading of tea leaves perhaps.

48. Dead follower : SEA
The Dead Sea is a salt lake that lies over 1,000 feet below sea level in the Middle East. It is one of the saltiest bodies of water in the world, with a salt content that is almost ten times that of most oceans.

53. Vingt-___ (multiple de trois) : SEPT
In French, “vingt-sept” (twenty-seven) is a “multiple de trois” (multiple of three).

54. This does not fly : TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the initialism “TWA”) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

63. Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar, e.g. : TRIO
“Magi” is the plural of the Latin word “magus”, a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the “wise men from the East” who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born. In Western Christianity, the three Biblical Magi are:
  • Melchior: a scholar from Persia
  • Caspar: a scholar from India
  • Balthazar: a scholar from Arabia

66. First name of an Oscar-nominated actress of 1957 : LANA
Lana Turner started work as a Hollywood actress at a very young age, signing up with MGM at only sixteen. Early in her career she earned the nickname “The Sweater Girl” after wearing a pretty tight sweater in the film “They Won’t Forget”, which was her film debut. She married eight times, to seven different husbands, the first of which was bandleader Artie Shaw. Shaw and Turner eloped and married on their very first date, when the young actress was just nineteen years old. After divorcing Shaw she married restaurateur Joseph Crane, but had the marriage annulled when she found out that Crane was still married to his first wife. The two had a daughter together, and so remarried when Crane’s divorce was finalized. Cheryl Crane was the daughter from the marriage to Joseph and she lived with Turner after her parents split up. When Cheryl was 14-years-old, her mother was romantically involved with a shady character named Johnny Stompanato. One evening Cheryl found her mother engaged in a violent argument with Stompanato, and Cheryl became so scared that she pulled out a gun and killed him in what was deemed to be justifiable homicide. Turner’s last marriage was to a nightclub hypnotist, Ronald Pellar, and that union lasted just six months as Pellar disappeared one day with a lot of Turner’s money and jewelry. Years later Turner said, “My goal was to have one husband and seven children, but it turned out to be the other way around.”

69. Animal in an Aesop fable : OWL
That would be the Aesop fable “The Owl and the Birds”.

72. White House sight : OVAL OFFICE
Although there have been several “oval offices” used by US presidents in the White House, the current Oval Office was designed and constructed at the bequest of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The room has four doors: one door opens onto the Rose Garden; a second door leads to a small study and dining room; a third opens onto the main corridor running through the West Wing; the fourth door opens to the office of the president’s secretary.

75. Animal in an Aesop fable : ASS
Aesop used the ass in at least four of his fables:
  • The Ass and his Masters
  • The Ass and the Pig
  • The Ass Carrying an Image
  • The Ass in the Lion’s Skin

78. First name of an Oscar-nominated actress of 1957 : ELSA
Elsa Lanchester was an English actress who made her life and career in Hollywood. Lanchester's husband was the actor Charles Laughton.

79. Something you can do with flies : SHAG
“To shag” (I am reliably informed, never having played a game of baseball in my life!) is to chase and catch a fly ball.

82. Instrument for an angel : LYRE
The lyre is a stringed instrument most closely associated with Ancient Greece, and with the gods Hermes and Apollo in particular. According to myth, Hermes slaughtered a cow from a sacred herd belonging to Apollo and offered it to the gods but kept the entrails. Hermes used the entrails to make strings that he stretched across the shell of a tortoise, creating the first lyre. Apollo liked the sound from the lyre and agreed to accept it as a trade for his herd of cattle.

86. This does not fly : EMU
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an “Emu War” in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the “invading force”. The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of “war”, the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

87. Vingt-___ (multiple de trois) : ET-UN
In French, “vingt-et-un” (twenty-one) is a “multiple de trois” (multiple of three).

110. Member of the cat family : OCELOT
The ocelot is found mainly in South and Central America, although there have been sightings as far north as Arkansas. An ocelot doesn't look too different from a domestic cat, and some have been kept as pets. Perhaps most famously, Salvador Dali had one that he carried around everywhere with him.

113. One of Frank's wives : MIA
Mia Farrow is an energetic, award-winning actress who really hasn't looked back in her career since her first leading role, in "Rosemary's Baby" back in 1968. Her on-screen celebrity is matched by the interest created by her personal life. Her first husband was Frank Sinatra, a wedding in 1966 that received a lot of attention partly due to the couple's age difference (she was 21, he was 50). Her second husband was almost as famous, the magnificent musician André Previn. Farrow then moved in with Woody Allen, a relationship that famously fell apart when Farrow discovered that Allen was having a sexual relationship with Soon-Yi, one of her adopted daughters from the marriage with André Previn.

117. Caterpillar product : PLOW
Back in the early 1900s, Benjamin Holt invented a steam tractor that was able to move over soggy land. The new vehicle crawled over the ground using wheels that drove tracks. Someone apparently noted that the tractor moved along like a caterpillar, and so the enterprise that was to be known as the Caterpillar Tractor Company was born.

118. Hood lead-in : RIDING
“Little Red Riding Hood” is a fairy tale that originated in Europe and was first published in France by Charles Perrault in 1697. The title translates into French as “Le Petit Chaperon Rouge”.

122. Liberal arts college in the Keystone State : DICKINSON
Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania was founded 1773 as Carlisle Grammar School by Benjamin Rush, one of the signatories on the US Declaration of Independence. Dickinson was chartered by the Pennsylvania legislature in 1783, just six days after signing of the Treaty of Paris that ended the American Revolution. That makes Dickinson the first college to be chartered in the United States.

127. Legendary Egyptian queen : CLEOPATRA
Cleopatra was the last pharaoh to rule Egypt. After she died, Egypt became a province in the Roman Empire.

Down
1. Harry or Bess in the White House : TRUMAN
Harry and Bess Truman met when they were very young children, at Sunday school. They were friends right through high school and became engaged in 1918 just before Harry went off to France during WWI, marrying the next year. Bess Truman never really took to the Washington scene when she became First Lady and stayed out of the limelight as much as she could. Perhaps that contributed to her longevity. Mrs. Truman lived to the age of 97, making her the longest living First Lady in US history.

5. 1975 TV debut, briefly : SNL
NBC first aired a form of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) in 1975 under the title “NBC’s Saturday Night”. The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from “The Tonight Show”. Back then “The Tonight Show” had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call “Saturday Night Live”.

8. Grim sort? : REAPER
The Grim Reaper is one of the personifications of death, along with the Hooded One and the Angel of Death. Death has been depicted since the 1400s as a skeleton in a hooded, black cloak and carrying a scythe. The name “Grim Reaper” only dates back to the mid-1800s.

9. "___ Little Tenderness" : TRY A
The love song "Try a Little Tenderness" was first released in 1932 by the Ray Noble Orchestra, and has since been covered countless times. The most famous version is probably by Otis Redding from 1966. My personal favorite performance is in the Irish movie "The Commitments". That movie is a must-see for anyone interested in contemporary Irish culture, in my humble opinion that is ...

10. Bus. card abbr. : STE
Suite (ste.)

13. Facefuls in slapstick : PIES
“Slapstick” is a physical comedy, horseplay. Back in the late 19th century, the term described a device made from two sticks loosely fastened together, which could be “slapped” together to create a sound effect offstage. The sound effect added to the laugh when a clown or actor was given a slap on stage.

15. Suffix with schnozz : -OLA
Jimmy Durante was a very talented entertainer, with that wonderful, gravelly voice, as well as that large nose that he used in so much of his humor (and earned him the nickname “Schnozzola”). Durante appeared in the Broadway stage musical "Jumbo" in 1935. In one scene, he leads a live elephant across the stage, and gets stopped by a police officer who asks, "What are you doing with that elephant?" Durante replies "What elephant?" and brings the house down every night.

16. Slithy ones : TOVES
Here are the first two verses of “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll, probably the one poem that we all just loved learning to recite at school
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

17. The Marx Brothers spent a night at one : OPERA
“A Night at the Opera” is a 1935 Marx Brothers film that was the first movie in which Chico, Harpo and Groucho appeared without their brother Zeppo. “A Night at the Opera” is really great entertainment!

18. V-shaped fortification : REDAN
A “redan” is a v-shaped projection in a fortified wall that juts out in the direction of an anticipated attack. “Redan” is a French word meaning “projection”.

30. Carbon compound : ENOL
An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, sort of part-alkene and part-alcohol. The term “enol” therefore, is a portmanteau of “alkene” and “alcohol”.

35. Ingredient in an old-fashioned : RYE
The cocktail called an Old Fashioned is usually made from whiskey or brandy that is muddled with sugar and bitters, and then a twist of citrus rind added.

37. Exams required for some prep schools : SSATS
Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT)

41. "Stat!" : ASAP!
The exact etymology of "stat", a term meaning "immediately" in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin "statim" meaning "to a standstill, immediately". A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for "short turn-around time".

47. One runs through the middle of Kansas City : STATE LINE
The Kansas City metropolitan area straddles the stateline between Kansas and Missouri. The metropolitan area includes several cities, with the largest being (in order):
  • Kansas City, Missouri
  • Overland Park, Kansas
  • Kansas City, Kansas
  • Independence, Missouri

49. Like Norton software : ANTIVIRUS
Norton Antivirus software is produced by Symantec. The Norton brand name originated with Peter Norton Computing, a company that Symantec acquired in 1990. Peter Norton’s most famous product was Norton Utilities, and he never produced an antivirus application. Symantec decided to use the respected Norton brand for the antivirus product that it developed and introduced in 1991.

52. Vehicle used for grooming ski trails : SNOWCAT
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four independently-mounted tracks.

55. Small songbird : WREN
A wren is a small songbird belonging to the family troglodytidae and the genus troglodytes. Wrens are known for making dome-shaped nests.

59. Florida State athlete, for short : ‘NOLE
Florida State University (FSU) is located in Tallahassee, the state capital of Florida. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Seminoles (sometimes “the ‘Noles”). The team name was chosen in 1947 by the students in a vote, and alludes to the Seminole people who originally lived in the state. Most of the Seminole now live in Oklahoma, after their forced relocation by the US government in the 1840s.

71. Nav. rank : ADM
Admiral (adm.)

72. Ending with syn- or ant- : -ONYM
An antonym is an “anti-synonym”. A synonym is word having the same sense as another, and an antonym the opposite. For example, “love” is an antonym of “hate”, and “stop” is an antonym of “go”.

73. Longest bone in the human body : FEMUR
The thigh bone, the femur, is the longest and the largest bone in the human body.

87. Month after Av : ELUL
Elul is the month in the Hebrew calendar that occurs in August-September.

90. City that, despite its name, is smaller than Little Rock : BOULDER
The Colorado city of Boulder is located in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains about 25 miles northwest of Denver. Boulder is a college town, and is home to the main campus of the University of Colorado.

The city of Little Rock is the capital of Arkansas, and is located in the center of the state. Early French travelers used a small rock formation on the Arkansas River as a landmark, a formation that they named “La Petite Roche” (The Little Rock) in 1722. “The Little Rock” actually lies across the river from a large bluff known as “Big Rock”, which was once the site of a rock quarry.

96. 19,101-foot volcano next to Peru's second-largest city : EL MISTI
El Misti is a volcano also known as Guagua-Putina that lies in Southern Peru near the city of Arequipa.

97. Like Joan of Arc : SAINTED
Joan of Arc (also “Jeanne d’Arc”, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. In fact, after the fire died down, the executioner raked the coals to display the charred body, proving Joan had died, and then burned the corpse again, twice, so that relics could not be collected. The remaining ashes were then cast into the Seine River. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

106. Marketplace of old : AGORA
In early Greece the “agora” was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

109. "___ saw a little bird ..." (Mother Goose rhyme) : ONCE I
“Mother Goose” is an imaginary author of nursery rhymes and fairy tales. Even though collections of “Mother Goose” tales have been published over the years, there is no specific writer who has been identified as her creator. “Mother Goose” is a very common pantomime that is staged in the British Isles in the Christmas season.

111. ___ Rica : COSTA
Costa Rica is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua in the north, and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

112. Plains dwelling: Var. : TIPI
A tepee (also written as "tipi" and "teepee") is a cone-shaped tent traditionally made from animal hides that is used by the Great Plains Native Americans. A wigwam is a completely different structure and is often a misnomer for a tepee. A wigwam is a domed structure built by Native Americans in the West and Southwest, intended to be a more permanent dwelling. The wigwam can also be covered with hides but more often was covered with grass, reeds, brush or cloth.

117. Sherlock Holmes accessory : PIPE
According to author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, his Sherlock Holmes character was based on a Dr. Joseph Bell for whom Doyle worked in Edinburgh. That said, Bell actually wrote a letter to Doyle in which he said “you are yourself Sherlock Holmes and well you know it”.

121. Tokyo, once : EDO
Edo is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today's Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

123. ___-Tiki : KON
The Kon-Tiki is a raft used by Thor Heyerdahl in 1947 to cross the Pacific Ocean from South America to the Polynesian islands. The original raft used in the voyage is on display in the Kon-Tiki Museum in Oslo, Norway (Heyerdahl was a native of Norway).

124. D.C. player : NAT
The Washington Nationals (“The Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One of the blanks in the cereal slogan "___ are for ___" : TRIX
5. Tinker, for one, in olden days : SHORTSTOP
14. Certain blade : ROTOR
19. Spread dirt, in a way : RUMOR
21. Legendary Egyptian queen : NEFERTITI
22. Run off : ELOPE
23. Stick together : UNITE
24. Liberal arts college in the Keystone State : LAFAYETTE
25. Like many a lot : PAVED
26. Hood lead-in : MOTHER-
28. Caterpillar product : PUPA
29. Dud : LOSER
31. Historical period : ERA
32. One of Frank's wives : AVA
33. Member of the cat family : FELINE
35. Father, familiarly : REV
36. Japanese auto make : NISSAN
38. Court concern : NET
39. Big Australian export : TIN
40. One of five on a starfish : RAY
42. Set of clubs in a bag : IRONS
44. These could amount to fortunes : READINGS
48. Dead follower : SEA
50. Where to find grooms : ALTARS
53. Vingt-___ (multiple de trois) : SEPT
54. This does not fly : TWA
56. Anagram of the letters O-N-D : NOD
58. State with part of I-81: Abbr. : TENN
60. What you might call a dog : SPOT
62. Instrument for an angel : HARP
63. Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar, e.g. : TRIO
65. Something you can do with flies : SHOO
66. First name of an Oscar-nominated actress of 1957 : LANA
67. Time in ads : DATE
68. Square ___ : INCH
69. Animal in an Aesop fable : OWL
70. White House sight : ROSE GARDEN
72. White House sight : OVAL OFFICE
75. Animal in an Aesop fable : ASS
76. Square ___ : DEAL
77. Time in ads : NITE
78. First name of an Oscar-nominated actress of 1957 : ELSA
79. Something you can do with flies : SHAG
81. Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar, e.g. : MAGI
82. Instrument for an angel : LYRE
83. What you might call a dog : MUTT
84. State with part of I-81: Abbr. : PENN
85. Anagram of the letters O-N-D : DON
86. This does not fly : EMU
87. Vingt-___ (multiple de trois) : ET-UN
89. Where to find grooms : STABLE
92. Dead follower : -EYE
94. These could amount to fortunes : SPLURGES
98. Set of clubs in a bag : WOODS
100. One of five on a starfish : ARM
102. Big Australian export : RUM
103. Court concern : LAW
105. Japanese auto make : DATSUN
108. Father, familiarly : POP
110. Member of the cat family : OCELOT
113. One of Frank's wives : MIA
114. Historical period : AGE
115. Dud : LEMON
117. Caterpillar product : PLOW
118. Hood lead-in : RIDING
120. Like many a lot : ZONED
122. Liberal arts college in the Keystone State : DICKINSON
125. Stick together : PASTE
126. Run off : ERODE
127. Legendary Egyptian queen : CLEOPATRA
128. Spread dirt, in a way : INTER
129. Certain blade : RAZOR
130. Tinker, for one, in olden days : ITINERANT
131. One of the blanks in the cereal slogan "___ are for ___" : KIDS

Down
1. Harry or Bess in the White House : TRUMAN
2. What many Oscar speeches do : RUN OVER
3. Ape : IMITATE
4. Home star of Cthulhu, in fantasy tales : XOTH
5. 1975 TV debut, briefly : SNL
6. Like a more-than-full spoonful : HEAPING
7. Barrels ___ : OF FUN
8. Grim sort? : REAPER
9. "___ Little Tenderness" : TRY A
10. Bus. card abbr. : STE
11. Boxer's reward : TITLE
12. Old German ruler nicknamed "the Short" : OTTO VI
13. Facefuls in slapstick : PIES
14. Publish anew : REPRINT
15. Suffix with schnozz : -OLA
16. Slithy ones : TOVES
17. The Marx Brothers spent a night at one : OPERA
18. V-shaped fortification : REDAN
20. Skin diving locale : REEF
27. Fix, as a pool cue : RETIP
30. Carbon compound : ENOL
34. Something to brush off a jacket : LINT
35. Ingredient in an old-fashioned : RYE
37. Exams required for some prep schools : SSATS
41. "Stat!" : ASAP!
43. Part of a plant embryo that develops into a root : RADICLE
45. Together : AS ONE
46. Remove a label from : DETAG
47. One runs through the middle of Kansas City : STATE LINE
49. Like Norton software : ANTIVIRUS
51. Raise again, as a flag : REHOIST
52. Vehicle used for grooming ski trails : SNOWCAT
55. Small songbird : WREN
57. Very busy : ORNATE
59. Florida State athlete, for short : ‘NOLE
60. Walks in rain boots, say : SLOSHES
61. En ___ (chess maneuver) : PASSANT
62. Tried : HAD A GO
64. "What's this?!" : OHO!
67. Feared : DREADED
70. Blacksmith's tool : RASP
71. Nav. rank : ADM
72. Ending with syn- or ant- : -ONYM
73. Longest bone in the human body : FEMUR
74. Thrown with force : FLUNG
80. Eats (at) : GNAWS
82. Lewd look : LEER
87. Month after Av : ELUL
88. Chemo target : TUMOR
90. City that, despite its name, is smaller than Little Rock : BOULDER
91. Sole : LONE
93. Prattle : YAP
95. Like hand-me-downs : PREWORN
96. 19,101-foot volcano next to Peru's second-largest city : EL MISTI
97. Like Joan of Arc : SAINTED
99. Gone bad, in Britain : SPOILT
101. "Liliom" playwright Ferenc ___ : MOLNAR
104. Bets : WAGERS
105. Something that stuns : DAZER
106. Marketplace of old : AGORA
107. Common strip steak weight: Abbr. : TEN OZ
109. "___ saw a little bird ..." (Mother Goose rhyme) : ONCE I
111. ___ Rica : COSTA
112. Plains dwelling: Var. : TIPI
116. The year 1601 : MDCI
117. Sherlock Holmes accessory : PIPE
119. Like dungeons : DANK
121. Tokyo, once : EDO
123. ___-Tiki : KON
124. D.C. player : NAT


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7 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

28:44, no errors, iPad. A wonderful puzzle! When I ran into the first duplicate clue, I thought, "Okay, that again." And then, it just got better and better. Loved it! Kudos to Derrick!

Lou Sander said...

More kudos to Derrick, a true crossword-setting genius. We definitely got the items with the duplicate clues. But we didn't see the mirror symmetry until we had solved the puzzle. Even before we saw it, we were praising the setter for finding such paired answers. When we saw the mirror symmetry, we were blown away! This must be the cleverest puzzle ever.

Jeff said...

Ditto- an impressive puzzle to say the least. I thought I was reading the wrong clues for a minute. I got the mirror image aspect from the name at the top of the grid.

I always thought love and hate were synonyms....perhaps only when it comes to the women in my life :)

I saw The Commitments when it first came out, but that was so long ago I should probably see it again.

Great way to spend time before I go have Christmas dinner with the relatives.

Best -

BruceB said...

33:34, no errors. I agree with the previous posters about the great construction of this puzzle. Again, my pet peeve is the use of foreign language terms that are not in English common use. 53A 'Vingt-SEPT' and 87A 'Vingt-ET-UN' are two instances. The connection of the word 'tinker' to 'ITINERANT' could also be included, since this connection seems to be common only in 'British-English'.

I wholeheartedly agree with Bill's assessment of the 'The Commitments', in fact I watched it again two days ago. Interesting story, good humor, excellent music sound track. One warning though, anyone watching this movie will have to tolerate an almost endless bombardment of 'F-bombs'.

Dale Stewart said...

4 errors centered around 25-Across "Like many a lot". I wrote in PAPER thinking it might be an amount like a REAM. But overall I continue to get better and better at these Sundays.
Ditto to the comments about the quality work done by the setter. Very nice.

Anonymous said...

Now *this* was a CLEVER puzzle. I can appreciate the hard work it must've took to construct it. No need for stupid tricks and cynical misdirections. 37:10, with 2 errors at the meeting of PAVED, TOVES and REDAN.

Very nice indeed. We need more like this.

michael atterton said...

Dear Bill
Wishing You a very happy Christmas and Challenging New Year Puzzles
I was intrigued by the answer to "Big Australian Export" 102 across "Rum"
I was under the impression that that title related more to Jamaica, Cuba etc
You did not elaborate in Your summary
Did You ever make it to the "Pelican Country Pub" Muir woods way for some Fine Irish Ale? Good Pints last time I visited
Best Wishes Michael in Vancouver

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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