Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

0301-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Mar 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Freddie Cheng
THEME: All About Eve … each of today’s themed answers includes one or two occurrences of the word EVE hidden inside:
19A. 2000-03 Disney Channel series with Shia LaBeouf : EVEN STEVENS
26A. Daredevil who survived more than 400 bone fractures : EVEL KNIEVEL
36A. Advil competitor : ALEVE
41A. Each and ___ : EVERY
44A. Place to buy a Slurpee : SEVEN-ELEVEN
56A. 1950 Bette Davis film hinting at something found 15 times in this puzzle : ALL ABOUT EVE
2D. Forty-niner's tool : SIEVE
10D. Things that are rising globally, according to scientists : SEA LEVELS
11D. Personal annoyances : PET PEEVES
32D. "Forget I said that" : NEVER MIND
33D. Stopped : PREVENTED
53D. High jump or 4 x 100-meter relay : EVENT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "Put a tiger in your tank" brand : ESSO
“Put a Tiger in Your Tank” was an advertising slogan and theme used by Esso gasoline in the 1960s.

9. Egyptian vipers : ASPS
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

14. Bread spread : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

15. Like the Parthenon : GREEK
The Parthenon is the ruined temple that sits on the Athenian Acropolis. Although the Parthenon was dedicated to the goddess Athena as a sacred building in the days of the Athenian Empire, it was actually used primarily as a treasury. In later centuries, the Parthenon was repurposed as a Christian Church dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and was also used as a mosque after Ottoman conquest.

18. Fine Cremona violin : AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo's son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

Cremona is a city in Lombardy in northern Italy that lies on the Po River. Cremona has a rich musical history and was the home to famous craftsmen who made stringed instruments, including Stradivari and several members of the Amati family.

19. 2000-03 Disney Channel series with Shia LaBeouf : EVEN STEVENS
Shia LaBeouf is an actor who started out in the Disney television series “Even Stevens”. Adult audiences might be more familiar with his leading role in the 2003 film “Holes”.

22. Pink Floyd's "The Dark Side of the Moon" and "The Wall" : LPS
Pink Floyd were an English rock band founded in 1965. The band's most famous albums are probably “The Dark Side of the Moon” and “The Wall”.

24. High-stress hosp. area : ICU
Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

25. Follower of wye : ZEE
In the (American) English alphabet, the letter Y (wye) is followed by the letter Z (zee).

26. Daredevil who survived more than 400 bone fractures : EVEL KNIEVEL
Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. Knievel eventually passed away in 2007.

31. Not socially acceptable : UN-PC
To be “un-PC” is to be politically incorrect, not be politically correct (PC).

35. Dawn goddess : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

36. Advil competitor : ALEVE
Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

Advil is Wyeth's brand of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug.

37. Oil-producing matter in shale : KEROGEN
The organic matter in oil shale that is insoluble in organic solvents is known as kerogen. Ultimately, kerogen turns into oil and natural gas.

42. Extension for the White House website : GOV
The .gov domain was one of the seven first generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:
- .com (commercial organizations, but unrestricted
- .info (informational sites, but unrestricted)
- .net (network infrastructures, but unrestricted)
- .mil (US military, restricted)
- .org (other organizations, but unrestricted)
- .gov (US government entities, restricted)
- .int (international organizations governed by treaty, restricted)

43. Number two: Abbr. : ASST
Assistant (asst.)

44. Place to buy a Slurpee : SEVEN-ELEVEN
The first precursor to the 7-Eleven store opened in Dallas, Texas in 1927. The stores were so named (much later, in 1946) because they were open longer than other stores, from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.

48. Like most Twizzlers : RED
Twizzlers candy has been produced since 1845, although back then the only flavor available was licorice. My wife is addicted to strawberry Twizzlers. Can’t stand the stuff myself …

55. Watergate monogram : RMN
President Richard Milhous Nixon (RMN) used “Milhous” in his name in honor of his mother Hannah Milhous. Richard was born in a house in Yorba Linda, California. You can visit that house today as it is on the grounds of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. It’s a really interesting way to spend a few hours if you ever get to Yorba Linda …

56. 1950 Bette Davis film hinting at something found 15 times in this puzzle : ALL ABOUT EVE
I must confess that I have a problem watching movies starring Bette Davis. I think I must have seen her play one of her more sinister roles when I was a kid and it gave me nightmares or something. So, I have never seen the 1950 classic "All About Eve", given that Bette Davis gets top billing. But, the title role of Eve Harrington was played by Anne Baxter, and Ms Baxter's movies I do enjoy. Coincidentally, on the epic television series "Hotel", when Bette Davis became ill, it was Anne Baxter who was chosen to take on her role.

61. Missing, militarily : AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

62. W.W. II British gun : STEN
The STEN gun is an iconic armament that was used by the British military. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun's designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

63. 56-Down opener : ENERO
(56D. Year, in Uruguay : ANO)
In Spanish, “el año” (the year) starts in “enero” (January) and ends in “diciembre” (December).

The official name of Uruguay is the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, reflecting the nation’s location on the eastern coast of South America. It is a relatively small country, the second-smallest on the continent, after Suriname. In 2009, Uruguay became the first country in the world to provide a free laptop and Internet access to every child. Now there's a thought ...

64. Some shortening : LARD
Fat, when extracted from the carcass of an animal, is called "suet". Untreated suet decomposes at room temperature quite easily so it has to be "rendered" or purified to make it stable. Rendered fat from pigs is what we call "lard". Rendered beef or mutton fat is known as "tallow".

Shortening is a fat used in baking. It is the term “shortening” that gives the words “shortbread” and “shortcake”.

65. ___ Health magazine : MEN’S
“Men’s Health” is most popular men’s magazine sold in the US today. “Men’s Health” started out in 1987 focused on health, but has broadened and is now described as a lifestyle magazine.

68. Art Deco designer of the 1920s and '30s : ERTE
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T."

Down
1. Merman of song and stage : ETHEL
Ethel Merman was an actress and singer, one noted for having a very powerful voice. Merman was married and divorced four times, the last time to the actor Ernest Borgnine albeit for only 32 days in 1964.

2. Forty-niner's tool : SIEVE
The California gold rush actually started in 1848, and not 1849. The first to exploit the find were those people already in California. By 1849 the word had spread and gold-seekers started to arrive from all over the world. The “out-of-towners” who arrived in 1849 became known as “forty-niners”.

4. Sumatran swinger, informally : ORANG
Orangutans (also “orangs”) are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word "orangutan" is Malay, meaning "man of the forest".

Sumatra is a very large island in western Indonesia, the sixth largest island in the world and home to 22% of the country’s population.

5. Chris Rock, for the 2016 Oscars : HOST
Chris Rock is a great stand-up comedian. Interestingly, Rock cites his paternal grandfather as an influence on his performing style. Grandfather Allen Rock was a preacher.

6. Sailor's heading : ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

7. Plantation pests : WEEVILS
A weevil is a small beetle, known for the damage that it can do to crops. The boll weevil damages cotton plants by laying eggs inside cotton bolls. The young weevils then eat their way out. Some weevils have snouts that are as long as their body.

8. Fraction of a ruble : KOPECK
The ruble (also “rouble”) is the unit of currency in Russia, as well as several other countries of the former Soviet Union. One ruble is divided into one hundred kopecks.

9. Fjord vis-à-vis an ocean : ARM
A drowned valley might be called a ria or afjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

10. Things that are rising globally, according to scientists : SEA LEVELS
Sea levels have been rising at the rate of about 1/10 of an inch per year for the past 100 years. The main cause of this rise in sea levels is the thermal expansion of the seawater due to increasing temperatures. About a quarter of the increase in sea levels is due to water runoff from land caused by the melting of snow and ice.

11. Personal annoyances : PET PEEVES
The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

12. Super G needs : SKIS
Super Giant Slalom (Super G) is an alpine skiing event introduced in 1982. The Super G isn’t as fast as its sister event the Downhill, but is faster than the more technical Giant Slalom.

21. Certain rosary counter : NUN
The Rosary is a set of prayer beads used in the Roman Catholic tradition. The name "Rosary" comes from the Latin "rosarium", the word for a "rose garden" or a "garland of roses". The term is used figuratively, in the sense of a "garden of prayers".

25. Nintendo video game princess : ZELDA
“The Legend of Zelda” is a video game. Apparently it’s very successful ...

29. Sir ___ McKellen (Gandalf portrayer) : IAN
Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in "The Lord of Rings". In the UK Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

Gandalf is an important character in the J. R. R. Tolkien novels “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. He is a wizard known as Gandalf the Grey during his life, and as Gandalf the White after he returns from the dead.

31. Luau music makers, for short : UKES
The ukulele (“uke”) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

38. Ob-___ : GYN
Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN)

39. Kind of lane for car-poolers : HOV
In some parts of the country one sees high-occupancy vehicle lanes (HOV lanes). Out here in California we call them carpool lanes.

40. "___ Maria" : AVE
"Ave Maria" ("Hail Mary" in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the "Hail Mary" comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:
AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
The prayer has been adapted as a hymn. The two most famous musical versions of “Ave Maria” are by Charles Gounod (based on a piece by Bach) and by Franz Schubert.

45. Prey for a barracuda : EEL
The fish called a barracuda is large and dangerous-looking, with a fierce looking jaw filled with fang-like teeth. I was surrounded by a large school of barracuda once, many years ago while scuba diving. A scary experience …

47. Greenwich Village sch. : NYU
The main campus of the private New York University (NYU) is located right in Manhattan, in Washington Square in the heart of Greenwich Village. NYU has over 12,000 resident students, the largest number of residents in a private school in the whole country. NYU’s sports teams are known as the Violets, a reference to the violet and white colors that are worn in competition. Since the 1980s, the school’s mascot has been a bobcat. “Bobcat” had been the familiar name given to NYU’s Bobst Library computerized catalog.

52. Flying Pan : PETER
“Peter Pan” is a musical adaptation of J.M. Barrie’s 1904 play of the same name. The musical opened on Broadway in 1954, famously starring Mary Martin in the title role. NBC recorded three separate telecasts of the stage production with the original cast, in 1955, 1956 and 1960. NBC broadcast a revived version of the musical in 2014 called “Peter Pan Live!” with Allison Williams playing Peter, and Christopher Walken playing Captain Hook. Unlike the earlier recordings, the 2014 version was not well received.

55. Cousin of an ostrich : RHEA
The rhea is a flightless bird native to South America. The rhea takes its name from the Greek titan Rhea, an apt name for a flightless bird as “rhea” comes from the Greek word meaning “ground”.

58. Bygone G.M. car, appropriately enough : OLDS
Oldsmobile was an automobile brand founded by Ransom E. Olds (REO) in 1897. The brand was finally phased out by General Motors in 2004.

60. Surgery sites, briefly : ORS
Operating Room (OR)

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Put a tiger in your tank" brand : ESSO
5. One watching very, very closely : HAWK
9. Egyptian vipers : ASPS
13. Theater ticket price factor : TIER
14. Bread spread : OLEO
15. Like the Parthenon : GREEK
16. Tri and tri again? : HEXA
17. Ooze : SEEP
18. Fine Cremona violin : AMATI
19. 2000-03 Disney Channel series with Shia LaBeouf : EVEN STEVENS
22. Pink Floyd's "The Dark Side of the Moon" and "The Wall" : LPS
23. Pigeon's perch : LEDGE
24. High-stress hosp. area : ICU
25. Follower of wye : ZEE
26. Daredevil who survived more than 400 bone fractures : EVEL KNIEVEL
31. Not socially acceptable : UN-PC
35. Dawn goddess : EOS
36. Advil competitor : ALEVE
37. Oil-producing matter in shale : KEROGEN
39. User names on Twitter : HANDLES
41. Each and ___ : EVERY
42. Extension for the White House website : GOV
43. Number two: Abbr. : ASST
44. Place to buy a Slurpee : SEVEN-ELEVEN
48. Like most Twizzlers : RED
49. Accept, as losses : EAT
50. "Eek!" : YIPES!
55. Watergate monogram : RMN
56. 1950 Bette Davis film hinting at something found 15 times in this puzzle : ALL ABOUT EVE
59. Chat up at a bar, say : HIT ON
61. Missing, militarily : AWOL
62. W.W. II British gun : STEN
63. 56-Down opener : ENERO
64. Some shortening : LARD
65. ___ Health magazine : MEN’S
66. Throws in : ADDS
67. Affirmations to captains : AYES
68. Art Deco designer of the 1920s and '30s : ERTE

Down
1. Merman of song and stage : ETHEL
2. Forty-niner's tool : SIEVE
3. Birds-and-the-bees class : SEX ED
4. Sumatran swinger, informally : ORANG
5. Chris Rock, for the 2016 Oscars : HOST
6. Sailor's heading : ALEE
7. Plantation pests : WEEVILS
8. Fraction of a ruble : KOPECK
9. Fjord vis-à-vis an ocean : ARM
10. Things that are rising globally, according to scientists : SEA LEVELS
11. Personal annoyances : PET PEEVES
12. Super G needs : SKIS
15. "What a ___!" : GAS
20. "Get it?" : SEE?
21. Certain rosary counter : NUN
25. Nintendo video game princess : ZELDA
27. Shape of some shirt necks : VEE
28. It's been a long time : EON
29. Sir ___ McKellen (Gandalf portrayer) : IAN
30. For fear that : LEST
31. Luau music makers, for short : UKES
32. "Forget I said that" : NEVER MIND
33. Stopped : PREVENTED
34. Hollowed out, as an apple : CORED
38. Ob-___ : GYN
39. Kind of lane for car-poolers : HOV
40. "___ Maria" : AVE
42. Quick vacation : GETAWAY
45. Prey for a barracuda : EEL
46. Syllables delivered with fingers in the ears : LA LA LA!
47. Greenwich Village sch. : NYU
51. Response to "Who's there?" : IT’S ME
52. Flying Pan : PETER
53. High jump or 4 x 100-meter relay : EVENT
54. Brains : SENSE
55. Cousin of an ostrich : RHEA
56. Year, in Uruguay : ANO
57. Snoozer : BORE
58. Bygone G.M. car, appropriately enough : OLDS
60. Surgery sites, briefly : ORS


Return to top of page

0229-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Feb 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: Leap Day … the circled letters in today’s grid spell out the name of four named holidays. Each of those DAYS has to LEAP over a black square, from the end of one answer to the start of the next. The four holidays are:
MOTHER’S DAY
Note the official punctuation in “Mother’s Day”, even though one might think it should be “Mothers’ Day”. President Wilson, and Anna Jarvis who created the tradition, specifically wanted Mother's Day to honor the mothers within each family and not just "mothers" in general, so they went with the "Mother's Day" punctuation.

LABOR DAY
Labor Day is a federal holiday observed every year on the first Monday in September. The tradition of honoring workers with a holiday started in Boston in 1878, when a day of observance was organized by the Central Labor Union, the major trade union at the time. There was a bloody dispute in 1894 between labor unions and the railroads called the Pullman Strike, which led to the death of some workers when the US Military and US Marshals were instructed to maintain order. President Grover Cleveland submitted a "Labor Day" bill to Congress which was signed into law just six days after the end of the strike. The introduction of a federal holiday to honor the worker was a move designed to promote reconciliation between management and unions after the bitter conflict.

VETERANS DAY
Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

BOXING DAY
Boxing Day is a holiday observed in some parts of the world, for example in the UK, Ireland and Canada. Boxing Day is the day after Christmas, and is traditionally when servants and tradespeople would be given gifts known as “Christmas boxes”.
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Apelike : SIMIAN
“Simian” means “pertaining to monkeys or apes”, from the Latin word “simia” meaning “ape”.

11. 4.0 is a great one, in brief : GPA
Grade point average (GPA)

14. Frigid time, climatically speaking : ICE AGE
Ice ages are periods in the Earth’s history when there are extensive ice sheets present in the northern and southern hemispheres. One might argue that we are still in an ice age that began 2.6 million years ago, as evidenced by the presence of ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica.

17. Witty remark : BON MOT
“Bon mot” translates from French as "good word". We use "bon mot" (and sometimes just "mot") to mean a quip, a witticism.

18. The past, from a feminist standpoint : HER STORY
As opposed to "his story" (history) ...

21. Crafty Norse god : LOKI
Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. He is a “shape shifter”, a being who can appear in different forms. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki is bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then his wife must empty the venom onto Loki when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing results in what we poor mortals experience as earthquakes.

26. ___ Crunch (Quaker cereal) : CAP'N
The first Cap'n Crunch commercials aired in 1963, at the time the product line was launched. The Cap'n's full name is Captain Horatio Magellan Crunch, would you believe? Crunch's voice was provided for many years by Daws Butler, the same voice actor who gave us Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound. Cap’n Crunch is commander of the S.S. Guppy.

28. Milan opera house : LA SCALA
La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: "Teatro alla Scala" in Italian.

35. Finnish telecom giant : NOKIA
I do enjoy classical guitar music, but there isn’t a huge choice on CD. There is one very special piece called “Gran Vals” by Francisco Tárrega, written in 1902. This piece has a unique reputation as it contains a phrase that it is the most listened to piece of music in the whole world. Just a few bars into the work one can hear the once omnipresent Nokia ring tone!

37. Auto with the slogan "Zoom-zoom" : MAZDA
“Zoom-zoom” is a catchphrase use by the automaker Mazda. Mazda is based in the Hiroshima Prefecture in Japan. The ballpark where the Hiroshima baseball team play was for many years known as the MAZDA Zoom-Zoom Stadium.

38. ___ populi : VOX
The Latin phrase “vox populi” translates as “voice of the people”. The expression is used in the world of broadcasting to describe interviews with members of the public.

39. 2/29/16, e.g. ... or a hint to the circled squares in this puzzle : LEAP DAY
Leap day is February 29th in a leap year, which is usually a year that is divisible by 4. My baby brother was born on February 19th, in 1968. A woman in Utah gave birth on February 29th in 2004, on February 29th in 2008, and once more on February 29th, 2012. That's in the Guinness Book of World Records ...

41. German article : EIN
The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

42. Louvre pyramid architect : IM PEI
I. M. Pei (full name: Ieoh Ming Pei) is an exceptional American architect who was born in China. Of Pei's many wonderful works, my favorite is the renovation of the Louvre in Paris, especially the Glass Pyramid in the courtyard.

52. Tiny bit : IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

54. "Quickly!," in an order : ASAP
As soon as possible! (ASAP)

56. Helper: Abbr. : ASST
Assistant (asst.)

60. Once-ubiquitous red fixture seen along London streets : PHONE BOX
The payphone is an American invention, a development by George A. Long based on an 1889 idea from William Gray. The first of the iconic British telephone boxes was installed in London in 1903. The network of red telephone boxes was installed across the country starting in 1920.

65. Become less full, as the moon : WANE
(51D. Becomes fuller, as the moon : WAXES)
The verbs “to wax” and “to wane” come from Old English. To wax is to increase gradually in size, strength, intensity or number. To wane is to decrease gradually.

66. Quality of a diva : BIG EGO
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

67. ___ Equis (Mexican beer) : DOS
Dos Equis lager was originally brewed in 1897, and back then was called "Siglo XX" (20th century) to celebrate the arrival of the new century. The name was changed later to simply "Dos Equis" (two exes).

69. Call for help : MAYDAY
The term “Mayday” is an emergency codeword that is used internationally as a distress signal, especially when making a radio transmission. “Mayday” comes from the French phrase “venez m’aider” meaning “come to help me”. When used properly, the term is repeated three times in a row: “Mayday Mayday Mayday”.

Down
1. Kids in the fam : SIBS
Siblings (sibs.)

4. ___ pentameter : IAMBIC
I remember hearing my English teacher drone on about iambic pentameter, but I understood none of it. I would have paid attention if I had known I needed it for my crosswords forty years later! In English poetry, an iamb is a metrical foot in a verse, consisting of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable (sort of da-DUM). String five of them together and you have iambic pentameter (da-DUM, da-DUM, da-DUM, da-DUM, da-DUM). Iambic pentameter is very common in Shakespeare's work in particular:

6. Ping-Pong table divider : NET
Ping pong is called table tennis in the UK, where the sport originated in the 1880s. Table tennis started as an after-dinner activity among the elite, and was called "wiff-waff". To play the game, books were stacked in the center of a table as a "net", two more books served as ""rackets" and the ball used was actually a golf ball. The game evolved over time with the rackets being upgraded to the lids of cigar boxes and the ball becoming a champagne cork (how snooty is that?). Eventually the game was produced commercially, and the sound of the ball hitting the racket was deemed to be a "ping" and a "pong", giving the sport its alternative name.

9. Fermi of physics : ENRICO
Enrico Fermi was born in Rome, Italy. Fermi moved to the US just before WWII, largely to escape the anti-Semitic feelings that were developing in Italy under Mussolini. It was Fermi's work at the University of Chicago that led to the construction of the world's first nuclear reactor. Fermi died at 53 years of age from stomach cancer . Cancer was a prevalent cause of death among the team working on that first nuclear pile.

10. Newspaper staffers, in brief : EDS
Editors (eds.)

11. Where the 9/11 Memorial is : GROUND ZERO
The 9/11 Memorial is at the former location of the World Trade Center Twin Towers. It consists of two square pools located where the Twin Towers stood, surrounded by trees. The pools are continually filled by water cascading down the sides. I found that the noise of the water to some extent drowns out the sound of city noise, providing a respectful and peaceful haven for visitors.

12. The "P" of PRNDL : PARK
PRNDL … that would be Park, Reverse, Neutral, Drive and Low. The gear shift for an automatic transmission is sometimes known familiarly as the “prindle stick”, from the abbreviations PRNDL.

13. Schumer and Poehler : AMYS
Amy Schumer is a stand-up comedian, and an alumna of the reality TV show “Last Comic Standing”, in which she placed fourth. Schumer now has her own comedy series “Inside Amy Schumer”, which airs on Comedy Central. Amy is a first cousin once removed of Chuck Schumer, the senior US Senator from New York.

Amy Poehler was a cast member on "Saturday Night Live" from 2001 to 2008, notable for appearing in many great sketches, including those where she played Hillary Clinton opposite Tina Fey's Sarah Palin. Poehler also starred with Fey in the 2008 movie "Baby Mama". And, Poehler led the cast of the sitcom "Parks and Recreation" for its seven-season run.

19. Highly competitive, as a personality : TYPE A
The Type A and Type B personality theory originated in the fifties. Back then, individuals were labelled as Type A in order to emphasize a perceived increased risk of heart disease. Type A personality types are so called "stress junkies", whereas Type B types are relaxed and laid back. But there doesn't seem to be much scientific evidence to support the linkage between the Type A personality and heart problems.

24. More macho : MANLIER
A man described as “macho” shows pride in his masculinity. “Macho” is a Spanish word for “male animal”.

25. ___ gin fizz : SLOE
By definition, a cocktail known as a Fizz includes lemon or lime juice and carbonated water. The most popular of the genre is the Gin Fizz, made from 3 parts gin, 2 parts lemon juice, 1 part sugar syrup and 5 parts soda water. There is also a variant known as a Sloe Gin Fizz.

27. Tropical insect that "marches" : ARMY ANT
Army ants are a collection of over two hundred different species of ants. Each of the species is known for aggressively raiding a certain area en masse, foraging for food. Army ants also stay on the move, never building permanent nests.

28. "I'm ___ it" (McDonald's slogan) : LOVIN’
The original McDonald's restaurant was opened in 1940 by Richard and Maurice McDonald as a barbecue restaurant. The brothers then moved into fast food hamburgers, eventually selling out to one of their franchise agents, Ray Kroc. It was Ray Kroc who really led the company to its worldwide success.

30. Johnny Rotten's punk band, with "the" : SEX PISTOLS
Johnny Rotten is the former stage name of English punk rock singer John Lydon. Lydon was most famous as the lead singer for the Sex Pistols in the seventies. Apparently he was given the name “Rotten” as he had very poor oral hygiene as a teenage, which turned his teeth green. So, one of the Sex Pistols declared, “You’re rotten, you are!”

31. Scary experience for an LSD user : BAD TRIP
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn't until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man ...

32. Intense hatred : ODIUM
“Odium” is a strong dislike or aversion. The term is Latin in origin and relates to the Latin word “odi” meaning “I hate”.

36. Wall St. debut : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

43. Aquafina rival : EVIAN
Évian-les-Bains (or simply Évian) is in the very east of France, on the shores of Lake Geneva directly across the lake from Lausanne, Switzerland. As one might imagine, Évian is the home of Évian mineral water, the most successful business in town. I can't stand the taste of Évian water ...

Aquafina is a Pepsico brand of bottled water. Aquafina is just plain old municipal water that has been purified.

47. Lipton item attached to a string : TEA BAG
Sir Thomas Lipton was a grocer in Glasgow, Scotland. He founded a tea packing company in North America in 1893, in Hoboken, New Jersey. He was very successful as his blends of tea became popular in the US. Despite the Lipton roots in the UK, Lipton black tea isn’t available there, so I’ve always thought of it as an American brand.

49. Scooby-Doo's pal : SHAGGY
Not only was Casey Kasem so closely associated with the radio show "American Top 40", but he was also well known for playing the voice of Shaggy Rogers on the "Scooby-Doo" animated series.

53. Its postal abbreviation is also an exclamation : OHIO
Ohio (OH)

Today’s two-letter abbreviations for states were introduced by the Post Office in 1963, at the same time that ZIP codes were introduced. The list of state abbreviations has remained unchanged since then, except for Nebraska changing from “NB” to “NE”. That change was made in 1969 in order to avoid confusion with the Canadian province of New Brunswick (NB).

58. "Iliad," e.g. : SAGA
“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

59. "Iliad" locale : TROY
The ancient city of Troy was located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey. The Trojan War of Greek mythology was precipitated by the elopement of Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, with Paris of Troy. The war itself largely consisted of a nine-year siege of Troy by the Greeks. We know most about the final year of that siege, as it is described extensively in Homer’s “Iliad”. The city eventually fell when the Greeks hid soldiers inside the Trojan Horse, which the Trojans brought inside the city’s walls. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts …

62. Tech giant with a striped blue logo : IBM
The origin of the IBM nickname "Big Blue" seems to have been lost in the mists of time. That said, maybe it has something to do with the fact that the IBM logo is blue, and almost every mainframe they produced was painted blue. I remember visiting IBM on business a few times in my career, and back then we were encouraged to wear white shirts and blue suits to "fit in" with our client's culture.

63. Actress Vardalos : NIA
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie "My Big Fat Greek Wedding", she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn't make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn't a blockbuster but rather a so-called "sleeper hit", a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, "My Big Fat Greek Life". It ran for only 7 episodes. “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” will hit movie theaters in 2016.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Apelike : SIMIAN
7. "Ah, gotcha" : I SEE
11. 4.0 is a great one, in brief : GPA
14. Frigid time, climatically speaking : ICE AGE
15. Repair : MEND
16. Male sheep : RAM
17. Witty remark : BON MOT
18. The past, from a feminist standpoint : HER STORY
20. Social slight : SNUB
21. Crafty Norse god : LOKI
22. Loud laughs : YUKS
23. "No more for me, thanks" : I'M SET
26. ___ Crunch (Quaker cereal) : CAP'N
28. Milan opera house : LA SCALA
31. Reason to stare off into space : BOREDOM
34. Mine find : ORE
35. Finnish telecom giant : NOKIA
37. Auto with the slogan "Zoom-zoom" : MAZDA
38. ___ populi : VOX
39. 2/29/16, e.g. ... or a hint to the circled squares in this puzzle : LEAP DAY
41. German article : EIN
42. Louvre pyramid architect : IM PEI
44. "Well, I ___ hand it to you ..." : GOTTA
45. Regret : RUE
46. Gullibility : NAIVETE
48. Kidnappers' demands : RANSOMS
50. How to address a king : SIRE
51. Area of a rectangle = length x ___ : WIDTH
52. Tiny bit : IOTA
54. "Quickly!," in an order : ASAP
56. Helper: Abbr. : ASST
60. Once-ubiquitous red fixture seen along London streets : PHONE BOX
62. Out of neutral : IN GEAR
64. Feel sick : AIL
65. Become less full, as the moon : WANE
66. Quality of a diva : BIG EGO
67. ___ Equis (Mexican beer) : DOS
68. Things dyed for Easter : EGGS
69. Call for help : MAYDAY

Down
1. Kids in the fam : SIBS
2. Clickable image : ICON
3. Waiter's handout : MENU
4. ___ pentameter : IAMBIC
5. Long, long ___ : AGO
6. Ping-Pong table divider : NET
7. "Can we turn on the A/C in here?!" : I’M HOT!
8. Look for : SEEK
9. Fermi of physics : ENRICO
10. Newspaper staffers, in brief : EDS
11. Where the 9/11 Memorial is : GROUND ZERO
12. The "P" of PRNDL : PARK
13. Schumer and Poehler : AMYS
19. Highly competitive, as a personality : TYPE A
21. Possible result of a cracked pipe : LEAKAGE
24. More macho : MANLIER
25. ___ gin fizz : SLOE
27. Tropical insect that "marches" : ARMY ANT
28. "I'm ___ it" (McDonald's slogan) : LOVIN’
29. Scent : AROMA
30. Johnny Rotten's punk band, with "the" : SEX PISTOLS
31. Scary experience for an LSD user : BAD TRIP
32. Intense hatred : ODIUM
33. What male lions have that lionesses lack : MANES
36. Wall St. debut : IPO
40. Somewhat : A TAD
43. Aquafina rival : EVIAN
47. Lipton item attached to a string : TEA BAG
49. Scooby-Doo's pal : SHAGGY
51. Becomes fuller, as the moon : WAXES
52. Apple tablet : IPAD
53. Its postal abbreviation is also an exclamation : OHIO
55. Ballad, e.g. : SONG
57. Edible part of a sunflower : SEED
58. "Iliad," e.g. : SAGA
59. "Iliad" locale : TROY
61. Female sheep : EWE
62. Tech giant with a striped blue logo : IBM
63. Actress Vardalos : NIA


Return to top of page

0228-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Court Jesters … each of today’s themed answers is a phrase heard around the basketball COURT. However, our JESTER of a constructor has reinvented those phrases with some punny clues:
23A. Fly swatter? : BUZZER BEATER
34A. Drool from both sides of the mouth? : DOUBLE DRIBBLE
51A. Tip of an épée? : POINT GUARD
58A. Busted timer? : SHOT CLOCK
66A. Desi Arnaz? : BALL HANDLER
79A. Winning an Oscar for "Norma Rae"? : FIELD GOAL
88A. Acrophobe's term for a route through the mountains? : NO-LOOK PASS
101A. Lament from an unlucky shrimper? : NOTHING BUT NET
116A. Writing "30 and single" when it's really "50 and married," e.g.? : PERSONAL FOUL
16D. Violation of Yom Kippur? : FAST BREAK
79D. Rug dealer's special? : FREE THROW
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Sleep lab study : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

16. Small invention : FIB
To "fib" is to "to tell a lie". The term likely comes from "fibble-fable" meaning "nonsense", itself derived from "fable".

19. Eagle constellation : AQUILA
The name of the constellation Aquila is Latin for “eagle”. The brightest star in Aquila is Altair. The name “Altair” comes from the Arabic “al-nasr al-tair” meaning “the flying eagle”.

20. Signature Michael Jackson wear : GLOVE
Michael Jackson introduced his one-glove look that same day that he debuted his little dance move known as the Moonwalk. It all took place on an NBC TV special in 1983 called “Motown 25”.

23. Fly swatter? : BUZZER BEATER
In basketball, a “buzzer beater” is a shot taken just before the game ends, which successfully passes through the net after the buzzer has sounded.

26. Attack order : SIC!
“Sic 'em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with "sic" being a variation of "seek".

30. "The Good Wife" figures: Abbr. : ATTS
“The Good Wife” is a legal drama showing on CBS starring Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, a litigator who returns to practicing the law after spending 13 years as a stay-at-home mom. I like this show, and find it to be very well written, and with some great performances by some fine actors.

31. Confer : POWWOW
“Powwow” is a gathering, a term used by Native Americans. The term derives from the Algonquian Narragansett word “powwow” which means “spiritual leader”. The Narragansett also gave us such words as “moose”, “papoose” and “squash”.

34. Drool from both sides of the mouth? : DOUBLE DRIBBLE
In basketball, a “double dribble” is an infraction in which a player dribbles using both hands simultaneously.

42. Quaker of note? : ASPEN
The “quaking” aspen tree is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble, quake”.

47. Sound near a spittoon : PTUI!
"Ptui" is an exclamation of disgust.

50. Brooding music genre : EMO
The musical genre of "emo" originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from "emotional hardcore". “Emo” is also the name given to the associated subculture. Not my cup of tea …

51. Tip of an épée? : POINT GUARD
The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, both of which are also thrusting weapons. However, the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

53. Sci-fi film with a 2010 sequel : TRON
Released in 1982, Disney’s "Tron" was one of the first mainstream films to make extensive use of computer graphics. The main role in the movie is played by Jeff Bridges. The original spawned a 2010 sequel called “Tron: Legacy”, as well as a 2012 TV show called “Tron: Uprising”.

56. Palindromic girl : ANA
One of my favorite words is "Aibohphobia", although it doesn't appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. "Aibohphobia" is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix "-phobia".

57. " : DITTO
"Ditto" was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, "ditto" is just another wonderful import from that lovely land ...

58. Busted timer? : SHOT CLOCK
Basketball’s shot clock was first used in a scrimmage game by the Syracuse Nationals in 1954. Team owner Danny Biasone and general manager Leo Ferris convinced the NBA to use for the 1954-55 season. Coincidentally, the Syracuse Nationals emerged as NBA champions that season.

62. Anderson of "WKRP" : LONI
Loni Anderson's best-remembered role was Jennifer Marlowe on the sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati". Anderson has been married four times, most famously to actor Burt Reynolds from 1988 to 1993.

64. Historic siege site : ALAMO
The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna's camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry "Remember the Alamo!".

65. Legendary siege site : TROY
The ancient city of Troy was located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey. The Trojan War of Greek mythology was precipitated by the elopement of Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, with Paris of Troy. The war itself largely consisted of a nine-year siege of Troy by the Greeks. We know most about the final year of that siege, as it is described extensively in Homer’s “Iliad”. The city eventually fell when the Greeks hid soldiers inside the Trojan Horse, which the Trojans brought inside the city’s walls. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts …

66. Desi Arnaz? : BALL HANDLER
Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

76. Karaoke bar sight : MIKE
A microphone is sometimes referred to as a “mike” or “mic”.

"Karate", means "open hand", and the related word "karaoke" means "open orchestra".

77. Key of Brahms's Symphony No. 4 : E MINOR
Symphony No. 4 in E minor by Johannes Brahms was his last symphony.

Johannes Brahms was a leading German composer during the Romantic period. Brahms is one of the "Three Bs", often grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven.

79. Winning an Oscar for "Norma Rae"? : FIELD GOAL
"Norma Rae" is a 1979 movie starring Sally Field as Norma Rae Webster in a tale of union activities in a textile factory in Alabama. The film is based on the true story of Crystal Lee Sutton told in a 1975 book called "Crystal Lee, a Woman of Inheritance".

81. One of the Gabor sisters : MAGDA
Magda Gabor was the elder sister of Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor. Like her sisters, Magda was an actress and socialite. Magda married six times in all. Her most famous husband was probably the fifth, the English actor George Sanders, although that only lasted for 32 days. Sanders had been married to Magda's younger sister Zsa Zsa.

85. Actress Thomas : MARLO
The actress Marlo Thomas’s most famous role was playing the title character in the television sitcom “That Girl”. Thomas is also well known as a spokesperson for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

88. Acrophobe's term for a route through the mountains? : NO-LOOK PASS
A “no-look pass” in basketball is a play in which a pass is made in one direction while look in another.

Our prefix "acro-" comes from the Greek "akros" meaning "at the top". Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

94. One of the Furies : ALECTO
The Furies of Greek and Roman mythology were the female personification of vengeance. They were also known as the Dirae, "the terrible". There were at least three Furies:
- Alecto: the "unceasing"
- Megaera: the "grudging"
- Tisiphone: the "avenging murder"

97. Asian territory in Risk : SIAM
Siam was the official name of Thailand up to 1939 (and from 1945 to 1949).

Risk is a fabulous board game, first sold in France in 1957. Risk was invented by a very successful French director of short films called Albert Lamorisse. Lamorisse called his new game "La Conquête du Monde", which translates into English as "The Conquest of the World". A game of Risk is a must during the holidays in our house ...

101. Lament from an unlucky shrimper? : NOTHING BUT NET
“Nothing but net” is a phrase used in basketball to describe a “clean basket”. A clean basket is a score in which the ball doesn’t touch the backboard or even the ring, and touches only the net.

105. Devotee : VOTARY
A “votary” is a devotee. Back in the mid-1500s, a votary was someone consecrated by a vow, from the Latin “votum” meaning “promise to a god”.

108. Fallout from the 2000 election? : CHAD
We are familiar with "hanging chads" after the famous Florida election recounts of 2000. A chad is any piece of paper punched out from a larger sheet. So, those round bits of paper we've all dropped over the floor when emptying a hole punch, they're chads.

114. Nougaty treats : MARS BARS
Having lived on both sides of the Atlantic, I find the Mars Bar to be the most perplexing of candies! The original Mars Bar is a British confection (and delicious) first manufactured in 1932. The US version of the original Mars Bar is called a Milky Way. But there is candy bar called a Milky Way that is also produced in the UK, and it is completely different to its US cousin, being more like an American "3 Musketeers". And then there is an American confection called a Mars Bar, something different again. No wonder I gave up eating candy bars ...

120. Reduces to smithereens : ATOMIZES
"Smithereens" is such a lovely word and I am proud to say that it comes from Irish. The Irish word "smiodar" means fragment. We add the suffix "-in" (anglicized as "-een") to words to indicate the diminutive form. So, "little fragment" is "smidirin", anglicized as "smithereen".

122. Canadian smacker : LOONIE
The great northern loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and the state bird of Minnesota. The loon once appeared on Canadian $20 bills and also appears on the Canadian one-dollar coin, giving the coin the nickname "the Loonie".

“Smacker” is American slang for “money”, with “smackers” often being used to mean ”dollars”. It is suggested that the term might come from “smacking” a banknote into one’s hand.

124. Chichi : TONY
Something described as “tony” is elegant or exclusive. The term derives from “high-toned”.

Someone who is "chichi" is showily trendy and pretentious. “Chichi” is a French noun meaning “airs, fuss”.

125. Cantina appetizers : TAPAS
"Tapa" is the Spanish word for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

Down
3. World Heritage Site in the Andes : CUZCO
Cusco (also Cuzco) is a city in the southeast of Peru. Historically, Cusco was the historic capital of the Inca Empire, and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983.

4. Oft-married Taylor : LIZ
Actress Elizabeth Taylor married eight times, to seven husbands. Those marriages were to:
- Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, the young hotel heir
- Michael Wilding, the English actor
- Mike Todd, the film and stage producer
- Eddie Fisher, the singer
- Richard Burton (twice), the Welsh actor
- John Warner, who went on to become a US Senator for Virginia
- Larry Fortensky, a construction worker whom Taylor met at the Betty Ford Clinic

11. Oxygen-dependent bacterium : AEROBE
An aerobe is an organism that lives in an environment rich in oxygen. An anaerobe on the other hand does not require oxygen for survival.

12. Card table cloth : BAIZE
Baize is a coarse woellen, or sometimes cotton, cloth. These days, baize is most often used to cover the playing surface on snooker and billiard tables, as well as on gaming tables in casinos.

14. Piece corps, briefly? : NRA
National Rifle Association (NRA)

“Piece” is underworld slang for “gun”.

16. Violation of Yom Kippur? : FAST BREAK
Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people and is also known as the Day of Atonement.

17. Batting .200, maybe : IN A SLUMP
In baseball, a player's batting average is the number of hits divided by the the number of at bats.

18. Queen ___ (pop music nickname) : BEY
Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny's Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical "Dreamgirls". Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”.

35. Virtual address : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

36. Père d'un prince : ROI
In French, a “roi” (king) is the “père d'un prince” (father of a prince).

37. 1961 space chimp : ENOS
Enos was a chimpanzee that was launched into Earth orbit in 1961 by NASA on a Mercury Atlas 4 rocket. Enos’s flight was a rehearsal for the first orbital flight made by an American, astronaut John Glenn. Enos returned from his mission safely, but died the following year from dysentery.

39. Improvise, in a way : SCAT
Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren't any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

43. Echolocator : SONAR
The British developed the first underwater detection system that used sound waves. Research was driven by defence demands during WWI, leading to production of working units in 1922. This new sound detection system was described as using "supersonics", but for the purpose of secrecy the term was dropped in favor of an acronym. The work was done under the auspices of the Royal Navy's Anti-Submarine Division, so ASD was combined with the IC from "superson-ic-s" to create the name ASDIC. The navy even went as far as renaming the quartz material at the heart of the technology "ASDivite". By the time WWII came along, the Americans were producing their own systems and coined the term SONAR, playing off the related application, RADAR. And so the name ASDIC was deep-sixed ...

44. Softly : PIANO
The term “piano” on a musical score is direction to play “softly”.

46. "Three Billy Goats Gruff" villain : TROLL
“Troll” is a term that comes from Norse mythology. Trolls are less than helpful creatures that tend to live on isolated mountains, in caves and under bridges.

“Three Billy Goats Gruff” is a fairy tale from Norway.

49. "You win!" : UNCLE!
To "say uncle" is an American expression meaning to submit or yield. Its usage dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how "uncle!" came to mean "stop!"

52. Stabilizer of a ship's compass : GIMBAL
A “gimbal” is a pivoted support, usually in the shape of a ring. The supported item is located in the center of the ring. One gimbal allows the supported item to tilt freely around one axis. By using two gimbals, one inside the other, the item can tilt freely in two directions. A ship’s compass is often housed within three gimbals. The two gimbals tend to isolate the compass from the movement of the ship in all three axes.

54. CD-___ : ROM
CD-ROM stands for "compact disc read only memory". The name indicates that you can read information from the disc (like a standard music CD for example), but you cannot write to it. You can also buy a CD-RW, which stands for "compact disc - rewritable", with which you can read data and also write over it multiple times using a suitable CD drive.

55. Ground beef contaminant : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

59. Rio Grande city : LAREDO
Laredo is a border city in Texas, situated on the banks of the Rio Grande across the border from Nuevo Laredo in Mexico.

The Rio Grande (Spanish for “big river”) is a river forming part of the border between Mexico and the United States. Although we call the river the Rio Grande on this side of the border, in Mexico it is called the Río Bravo or Río Bravo del Norte (Spanish for “furious river of the north”).

61. "Downton Abbey" daughter : SYBIL
In the incredibly successful period drama “Downton Abbey", the patriarch of the family living at Downton is Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham or Lord Grantham. The character is played by Hugh Bonneville. Lord Grantham married American Cora Levinson (played by Elizabeth McGovern. Lord and Lady Grantham had three daughters, and no son. The lack of a male heir implied that the Grantham estate would pass to a male cousin, and out of the immediate family. The Grantham daughters are Lady Mary (played by Michelle Dockery), Lady Edith (played by Laura Carmichael) and Lady Sybil (played by Jessica Brown Findlay). Lady Sybil had the audacity to marry the family chauffeur, an Irish nationalist. The shame of it all …

68. De jure : LEGAL
Conceptually, "de jure" and "de facto" are related terms, one meaning "concerning, according to law", and the other meaning "concerning, according to fact". There is an example of the use of the two terms together from my homeland of Ireland. According to our constitution, Irish is the first language of the country, and yet almost everyone in the country uses English as his or her first language. One might say that Irish is the de jure first language, but English is the first language de facto.

72. Trackpad alternative : MOUSE
A touchpad (also “trackpad”) is a pointing device found mainly on laptop computers. It serves as a fairly decent alternative to a mouse.

75. Astral lion : LEO
The constellation called Leo can be said to resemble a lion. Others say that it resembles a bent coat hanger. “Leo” is the Latin for “lion”, but I’m not sure what the Latin is for “coat hanger” …

80. Prepares for a Mr. Universe competition, say : OILS UP
There are several bodybuilding competitions that have used or continue to use the title “Mr. Universe”. I think that the original dates back to 1953.

82. "___ the day!" (cry repeated in Shakespeare) : ALAS
“Alas the day”, and variants thereof, is a phrase used a few times by William Shakespeare. For example, Iago says “Alas the day!” in “Othello”, as does Viola in “Twelfth Night”. Also in “Othello”, Desdemona says “Alas the heavy day!”.

88. Say "When I met the Dalai Lama last year," say : NAME-DROP
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

89. "Qué ___?" : PASA
In Spanish, “que pasa?” translates literally as “what's happening?” but is used to mean “how are things going with you?”

92. Goth-looking, in a way : WAN
The goth subculture developed from the gothic rock scene in the early eighties, and is a derivative of the punk music movement. It started in England and spread to many countries around the globe. The term "goth" of course comes from the Eastern Germanic tribe called the Goths. Frankly, I don't understand the whole goth thing ...

96. Morsel : TIDBIT
A “morsel” is a small bite, a mouthful of food. The term comes from the Latin “morsus” meaning “a bite”.

98. 1994 bomb based on an "S.N.L." character : IT’S PAT
The androgynous character known as “Pat” on “Saturday Night Live” was played by the comedienne Julia Sweeney. Pat appeared in a 1994 movie called “It’s Pat”, which is one of the worst films of all time, or so I am told ...

102. Bridge whiz : GOREN
Charles Goren was a world champion bridge player from Philadelphia. Goren published many books on the subject, and had a daily bridge column that appeared in almost 200 newspapers. He even had a weekly column in “Sports Illustrated”. Goren introduced several techniques and systems that eventually became part of the modern Standard American bidding system that is used by many bridge players today (including me!).

104. Actress Thompson of "Creed" : TESSA
Tessa Thompson is an actress from Los Angeles who is known for playing the supporting role of Jackie Cook on the TV show “Veronica Mars”, and for playing student leader Diane Nash in the 2014 film “Selma”.

106. River along Avignon : RHONE
Avignon is a city in the southeast of France on the Rhône river. Avignon is sometimes called the “City of Popes” as it was home to seven popes during the Catholic schism from 1309 to 1423.

115. Kind of dye : AZO
Azo compounds have very vivid colors and so are used to make dyes, especially dyes with the colors red, orange and yellow. The term “azo” comes from the French word “azote” meaning “nitrogen”. French chemist Lavoisier coined the term “azote” from the Greek word “azotos” meaning “lifeless”. He used this name as in pure nitrogen/azote animals die and flames are snuffed out (due to a lack of oxygen).

117. The Depression, for one : ERA
The Wall Street Crash of 1929 that signalled the start of the Great Depression did not happen on just one day. The first big drop in the market took place on October 24 (Black Thursday). Things stabilized on Friday, and then the slide continued on the 28th (Black Monday) and the 29th (Black Tuesday).

118. Smoked deli purchase : LOX
Lox is a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

119. Popinjay : FOP
Back in the 12th century a “popinjay” was a colorful parrot. By the 14th century the word was being applied to people who were considered beautiful, but by the mid-16th century the term applied to people who were vain and talkative.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Make less dangerous, in a way : DECLAW
7. Sleep lab study : APNEA
12. Some school edicts : BANS
16. Small invention : FIB
19. Eagle constellation : AQUILA
20. Signature Michael Jackson wear : GLOVE
21. Runway model? : AIRPLANE
23. Fly swatter? : BUZZER BEATER
25. "It seems to me ..." : I DARE SAY ...
26. Attack order : SIC!
27. Rationale : BASIS
28. Trickle : OOZE
30. "The Good Wife" figures: Abbr. : ATTS
31. Confer : POWWOW
34. Drool from both sides of the mouth? : DOUBLE DRIBBLE
38. Screams bloody murder : HOWLS
40. Brought up : BRED
41. Narrow lead in baseball : ONE RUN
42. Quaker of note? : ASPEN
45. In base 8 : OCTAL
47. Sound near a spittoon : PTUI!
50. Brooding music genre : EMO
51. Tip of an épée? : POINT GUARD
53. Sci-fi film with a 2010 sequel : TRON
54. Brings in : REAPS
56. Palindromic girl : ANA
57. " : DITTO
58. Busted timer? : SHOT CLOCK
60. Illicit sum : RANSOM
62. Anderson of "WKRP" : LONI
64. Historic siege site : ALAMO
65. Legendary siege site : TROY
66. Desi Arnaz? : BALL HANDLER
70. Unsteady gait : LIMP
74. Cutting edge : BLADE
76. Karaoke bar sight : MIKE
77. Key of Brahms's Symphony No. 4 : E MINOR
79. Winning an Oscar for "Norma Rae"? : FIELD GOAL
81. One of the Gabor sisters : MAGDA
84. Prompt : CUE
85. Actress Thomas : MARLO
87. Reclined : LAIN
88. Acrophobe's term for a route through the mountains? : NO-LOOK PASS
90. Encouraging word : OLE!
91. Fire place? : HELL
92. Attended : WAS AT
93. Soothes : EASES
94. One of the Furies : ALECTO
97. Asian territory in Risk : SIAM
99. Round after the quarters : SEMIS
101. Lament from an unlucky shrimper? : NOTHING BUT NET
105. Devotee : VOTARY
108. Fallout from the 2000 election? : CHAD
109. "My bad!" : OOPS!
110. Put off : DEFER
112. Short flight : HOP
114. Nougaty treats : MARS BARS
116. Writing "30 and single" when it's really "50 and married," e.g.? : PERSONAL FOUL
120. Reduces to smithereens : ATOMIZES
121. Cropped up : AROSE
122. Canadian smacker : LOONIE
123. Morning condensate : DEW
124. Chichi : TONY
125. Cantina appetizers : TAPAS
126. Go through : EXPEND

Down
1. Applies gingerly : DABS
2. Outfit : EQUIP
3. World Heritage Site in the Andes : CUZCO
4. Oft-married Taylor : LIZ
5. Keg contents : ALE
6. Archer's battle weapon : WAR BOW
7. Forever : AGES
8. Like lumberjack jackets : PLAID
9. O.K. : NOT SO BAD
10. Time for last-minute planning : EVE
11. Oxygen-dependent bacterium : AEROBE
12. Card table cloth : BAIZE
13. Not fully independent : AIDED
14. Piece corps, briefly? : NRA
15. Almost dislocate : SPRAIN
16. Violation of Yom Kippur? : FAST BREAK
17. Batting .200, maybe : IN A SLUMP
18. Queen ___ (pop music nickname) : BEY
22. Don't bother : LET BE
24. Give a tongue-lashing : BAWL OUT
29. Veteran : OLD PRO
32. A question of time : WHEN?
33. Is unacceptable : WON'T DO
35. Virtual address : URL
36. Père d'un prince : ROI
37. 1961 space chimp : ENOS
39. Improvise, in a way : SCAT
42. Isolated : APART
43. Echolocator : SONAR
44. Softly : PIANO
46. "Three Billy Goats Gruff" villain : TROLL
48. Smash up : TOTAL
49. "You win!" : UNCLE!
52. Stabilizer of a ship's compass : GIMBAL
53. "Use your head!" : THINK!
54. CD-___ : ROM
55. Ground beef contaminant : E COLI
58. Mobile home resident? : SNAIL
59. Rio Grande city : LAREDO
61. "Downton Abbey" daughter : SYBIL
63. "Jeez!" : OH MAN!
67. Flummox : ADDLE
68. De jure : LEGAL
69. Showroom models : DEMOS
71. Residents of 3-Down : INCAS
72. Trackpad alternative : MOUSE
73. Lean on : PRESS
75. Astral lion : LEO
78. Achieve success : MAKE IT
79. Rug dealer's special? : FREE THROW
80. Prepares for a Mr. Universe competition, say : OILS UP
82. "___ the day!" (cry repeated in Shakespeare) : ALAS
83. Settled the score : GOT EVEN
85. Ghostly sound : MOAN
86. Apportion : ALLOCATE
88. Say "When I met the Dalai Lama last year," say : NAME-DROP
89. "Qué ___?" : PASA
91. Sugar : HON
92. Goth-looking, in a way : WAN
95. It's hard to get across : CHASM
96. Morsel : TIDBIT
98. 1994 bomb based on an "S.N.L." character : IT’S PAT
100. Something to boost : MORALE
102. Bridge whiz : GOREN
103. Domineering : BOSSY
104. Actress Thompson of "Creed" : TESSA
106. River along Avignon : RHONE
107. "Wanna play?" : YOU IN?
111. Anti bodies? : FOES
113. Petitioned : PLED
114. Whacked : MAD
115. Kind of dye : AZO
117. The Depression, for one : ERA
118. Smoked deli purchase : LOX
119. Popinjay : FOP


Return to top of page

0227-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 16, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 24s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. Dinner serving in the Prodigal Son parable : CALF
The Parable of the Prodigal Son is related in the Gospel of Luke. Someone who is "prodigal" is wasteful or extravagant. The parable tells of a man with two sons. The youngest asks for and receives his share of the family estate, and then spends it all unwisely. The "prodigal" son returns, to an unwelcoming older brother. The father, however, declares happily that his son "was lost and now is found".

16. Stick in the refrigerator : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. A French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something he called oleomargarine in 1869, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

19. Hunger : YEN
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

22. Dwarf planet discovered in 2005 : ERIS
Eris is the largest known dwarf planet in our solar system. It is also the ninth largest body orbiting the sun, a fact that helped relegate Pluto (the tenth largest body) from its status of planet in 2006. Eris was discovered in 2005.

24. Bit of vaquero gear : REATA
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”. We tend to use the spelling “riata” in English, but sometimes can use the original Spanish word.

"Vaquero" is the Spanish word for "cowboy".

27. Gets back (to) : RSVPS
RSVP stands for "répondez s'il vous plaît", which is French for "please, answer".

29. Will with parts : SMITH
In the late eighties Will Smith was a successful rapper, but he ran foul of the IRS. When he was faced with an IRS-imposed penalty of $2.8 million he was close to becoming bankrupt. Fortunately, along came NBC with a proposal to build a sitcom around him, and “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” was born.

32. Aural "OMG!" : EEK!
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

36. Concoct : DREAM UP
“To decoct” is to extract the flavor of a liquid by boiling down and increasing the concentration. A related term is "to concoct", meaning "to boil together". We use the verb “to concoct” in figurative sense to mean to contrive, devise.

41. Many a Rolling Stone cover subject : ROCK IDOL
The iconic magazine “Rolling Stone” was founded in San Francisco in 1967. Jann Wenner was a cofounder, and is still the magazine’s chief editor. The name for the publication is taken from the 1950 song “Rollin’ Stone” recorded by Muddy Waters.

43. Senate greeting : AVE
“Ave” is a Latin word meaning “hail” as in “Ave Maria”, which translates as “Hail Mary”. “Ave” can also be used to mean “goodbye”.

44. Online qualification : IMO
In my opinion (IMO)

51. Servings with tandoori chicken : NANS
Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

53. Did a farrier's work on : SHOED
Traditionally there has been a distinction between a farrier and a blacksmith. A blacksmith is someone who forges and shapes iron, perhaps to make horseshoes. A farrier is someone who fits horseshoes onto the hooves of horses. The term “blacksmith” is sometimes used for one who shoes horses, especially as many blacksmiths make horseshoes and fit them as well.

55. ___ wave : SINE
A sine wave is a mathematical function that describes a simple, smooth, repetitive oscillation. The sine wave is found right throughout the natural world. Ocean waves, light waves and sound waves all have a sine wave pattern.

57. It "hath put a spirit of youth in every thing," per Shakespeare : APRIL
Here is the full text of William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 98” …
From you have I been absent in the spring,
When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him.
Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odour and in hue,
Could make me any summer’s story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew:
Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of delight
Drawn after you, – you pattern of all those.
  Yet seem’d it winter still, and, you away,
  As with your shadow I with these did play.

59. Something a U.P.S. driver has: Abbr. : RTE
Route (rte.)

United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky.

60. ___ Valley, Calif. : SIMI
Nowadays Simi Valley, California is perhaps best known as being home to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. If you ever get the chance to do so, the library is a great place to visit. There you can tour one of the retired Air Force One planes.

64. Coco Chanel, par exemple : PARISIENNE
Coco Chanel was a French fashion designer. Perhaps because I am a man, clothes design is not my forte. However, if I had to pick a designer whose clothes I really liked, it would be Chanel. She had a way of creating simpler designs that looked so elegant on a woman.

Down
1. "Casey at the Bat" writer : THAYER
"Casey at the Bat" is a poem written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer, first published in the San Francisco Examiner. The poem became very popular due to repeated live performances in vaudeville by DeWolf Hopper. Casey played for the Mudville Nine, and the last line of the poem is "But there is no joy in Mudville - mighty Casey has struck out."

3. Czar known for his mental instability : IVAN IV
The Grand Prince of Moscow Ivan IV became known as Ivan the Terrible. The name "terrible" is a translation from Russian, and perhaps creates the wrong impression about the man. The Russian word is "Grozny", which is more akin to "strict" and "powerful" rather than "cruel" or "abominable".

4. Frites seasoning : SEL
In French, one might put “sel” (salt) on “pommes frites” (French fries).

5. Hill climber of note : JILL
The "Jack and Jill" nursery rhyme dates back at least to the 1700s:
Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

7. Does in : SMITES
“To smite” is to strike with a firm blow.

8. Florida community with a portmanteau name : TAMIAMI
The Florida community of Tamiami takes its name from the Tamiami Trail on which it lies. In turn, the trail’s name is a portmanteau of Tampa and Miami, the two cities that it connects. That said, the accepted pronunciation of of Tamiami is “tammee-ammy”, and not “tam-my-ammy”.

10. Bomberman console, briefly : NES
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)

“Bomberman” is a series of video games for which the first version was released in 1983. They are strategy games that use mazes.

11. ___ Brava (Spanish resort area) : COSTA
The Costa Brava is a section of coast in northeastern Catalonia, Spain stretching from north of Barcelona to the border with France. “Costa Brava” means “rugged coast” and was a term first coined in a local newspaper article in 1908.

12. "Ocean's Thirteen" co-star : AL PACINO
Al Pacino seems to be best known for playing characters on both sides of the law. Pacino’s big break in movies came when he played Michael Corleone in “The Godfather”, a role that grew for him as the series of films progressed. But his Oscar-winning role was that of a blind ex-military officer in “Scent of a Woman”.

“Ocean’s 11” is a great film from 1960, starring Frank Sinatra as Danny Ocean. The original storyline is updated for the excellent 2001 remake, with George Clooney playing the lead. In the 1960 movie, the love interest is a character called Beatrice Ocean, played by Angie Dickinson. In the 2001 version, the love interest gets a new name, Tess Ocean, and is played by Julia Roberts. The 2001 remake (Called “Ocean’s Eleven”, note the spelling) spawned two sequels: “Ocean’s Twelve” in 2004 and “Ocean’s Thirteen” in 2007.

28. Rigs : SEMIS
A “semi” is a “semi-trailer truck”. The vehicle is so called because it consists of a tractor and a half-trailer. The half-trailer is so called because it only has wheels on the back end, with the front supported by the tractor.

30. Crumbly Mideastern dessert : HALVA
Halvas are sweet confections found in many parts of the world. Halvas are generally flour-based or based on nut-butter like sesame paste. Sounds delicious ...

33. "Mad props!" : KUDOS!
Our word "kudos" means acclaim given for an exceptional achievement. "Kudos" is not a plural, despite a common misapprehension. It is a singular noun derived from the Greek "kyddos" meaning "glory, fame".

35. A host : SLEWS
Ahh ... here's an Irish word! Our usage of "slew" to mean "large number" has nothing to do with the verb "to slew". The noun "slew" come into English in the early 1800s from the Irish word "sluagh" meaning "host, crowd, multitude".

37. Language in which "hello" is "buna ziua" : ROMANIAN
Romania sits just east of Hungary and north of Bulgaria in Europe. Romania was formed from the union of two principalities in 1859, Moldavia and Wallachia. The Kingdom of Romania grew larger in size after WWI with the addition of three new regions, including the "vampirish" Transylvania.

39. Virginia tribe : POWHATAN
The Powhatan are a Native American people who mainly live in modern-day Virginia. The Powhatan were greatly impacted by the settling of the English in Jamestown in 1607. The resulting physical conflict paled in comparison to the devastation caused by the introduction of measles and smallpox from Europe.

42. One spotted in tall grass : LEOPARD
The four “big cats” are the tiger, lion, jaguar and leopard. The smallest of these is the leopard.

46. Base of a follicle : DERMIS
There are several types of follicle in the human body, the best known being the sockets in the skin from which hairs grow.

48. Website for budget travelers : AIRBNB
Airbnb is a website-based service that matches people wanting to rent out short-term living quarters to people seeking accommodation.

52. Metro entrance : STILE
A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping. The derivative term “turnstile” describes a revolving structure in a wall or fence that allows the controlled passage of people.

54. Sponge : DIPSO
"Dipsomania" is a craving for alcohol to the point of damaging one's health. "Dipsa" is the Greek for "thirst", hence dipsomania is a "manic thirst".

58. Product from une vache : LAIT
In French, “une vache” (a cow) produces “lait” (milk).

61. Beautician employer : SPA
The word "spa" migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name "Spa" comes from the Walloon word "espa" meaning "spring, fountain".

62. "The Wolf of Wall Street" star, familiarly : LEO
Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio is from Los Angeles, California. DiCaprio’s mother was visiting a museum in Italy when she was pregnant and felt the first kick of her unborn child. At the moment of that first kick, Mama DiCaprio was looking at a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, and so named her son Leonardo.

“The Wolf of Wall Street" is an entertaining 2013 biographical film about a corrupt New York City stockbroker. The movie is based on a memoir of the same name by Jordan Belfort. Directed by Martin Scorsese, it is his highest-grossing movie to date.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Anchor line : THIS JUST IN
11. Dinner serving in the Prodigal Son parable : CALF
15. Be set : HAVE IT MADE
16. Stick in the refrigerator : OLEO
17. Without stopping : AT ALL TIMES
18. Trade rights, say : SPAR
19. Hunger : YEN
20. Granted access : LET IN
21. Up to the ___ : TASK
22. Dwarf planet discovered in 2005 : ERIS
24. Bit of vaquero gear : REATA
26. Hunger : ACHE
27. Gets back (to) : RSVPS
29. Will with parts : SMITH
31. Infant's attachment? : -ILE
32. Aural "OMG!" : EEK!
34. "Child's play!" : IT'S A SNAP!
36. Concoct : DREAM UP
40. Shows aging, in a way : YELLOWS
41. Many a Rolling Stone cover subject : ROCK IDOL
43. Senate greeting : AVE
44. Online qualification : IMO
45. Set in motion : SOWED
47. Expect : AWAIT
51. Servings with tandoori chicken : NANS
53. Did a farrier's work on : SHOED
55. ___ wave : SINE
56. Tough problem : KNOT
57. It "hath put a spirit of youth in every thing," per Shakespeare : APRIL
59. Something a U.P.S. driver has: Abbr. : RTE
60. ___ Valley, Calif. : SIMI
61. Book with profiles of many famous people? : STAMP ALBUM
63. Shadow : TAIL
64. Coco Chanel, par exemple : PARISIENNE
65. Historically : ONCE
66. Words before crashing? : AND SO TO BED

Down
1. "Casey at the Bat" writer : THAYER
2. No fans : HATERS
3. Czar known for his mental instability : IVAN IV
4. Frites seasoning : SEL
5. Hill climber of note : JILL
6. Say : UTTER
7. Does in : SMITES
8. Florida community with a portmanteau name : TAMIAMI
9. What makes you you : IDENTITY
10. Bomberman console, briefly : NES
11. ___ Brava (Spanish resort area) : COSTA
12. "Ocean's Thirteen" co-star : AL PACINO
13. Dog checker? : LEASH LAW
14. Permanently : FOR KEEPS
23. Dog command : SPEAK!
25. Confounded : AT SEA
28. Rigs : SEMIS
30. Crumbly Mideastern dessert : HALVA
33. "Mad props!" : KUDOS!
35. A host : SLEWS
36. Toasts : DRINKS TO
37. Language in which "hello" is "buna ziua" : ROMANIAN
38. Like some forecasts : ECONOMIC
39. Virginia tribe : POWHATAN
42. One spotted in tall grass : LEOPARD
46. Base of a follicle : DERMIS
48. Website for budget travelers : AIRBNB
49. Connected (with) : IN TUNE
50. Crawled (with) : TEEMED
52. Metro entrance : STILE
54. Sponge : DIPSO
58. Product from une vache : LAIT
61. Beautician employer : SPA
62. "The Wolf of Wall Street" star, familiarly : LEO


Return to top of page

0226-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Feb 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Paula Gamache
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: Did not finish (after 60 mins)
ANSWERS I MISSED: Too many to mention, all in the center of the grid

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. 1991 Scorsese/De Niro collaboration : CAPE FEAR
The 1991 film called “Cape Fear” is a Martin Scorsese remake of a 1962 movie of the same name. The 1991 version stars Robert De Niro and Nick Nolte, and there are also cameo appearances by Robert Mitchum and Gregory Peck who starred in the 1962 original.

15. Fragile fabric made from certain plant fibers : ALOE LACE
Aloe lace is quite unique. It is made from thread collected from the aloe leaves of agave plants growing on the Croatian island of Hvar in the Adriatic Sea.

17. Amscrayed : VAMOOSED
"To vamoose" is to "to leave", and comes from the Spanish "vamos" meaning "let’s go".

Pig Latin is in effect a game. One takes the first consonant or consonant cluster of an English word and moves it to the end of the word, and then adds the letters "ay". So the Pig Latin for the word "nix" is "ix-n-ay" ... ixnay, and for "scram" is "am-scr-ay"

19. Edward VII or VIII, in India: Abbr. : EMP
Emperor (emp.)

20. ___ nullius (no one's property) : RES
The Latin term “res nullius” translates as “nobody’s property”. In law, it describes something that has no owner, and is often used when ownership has subsequently been claimed. An example is a wild animal, which is nobody’s property. However, if a hunter kills that animal, the body becomes the hunter’s property.

21. Pioneering labor leader Samuel : GOMPERS
Samuel Gompers was an influential labor union leader who founded and served as president of the American Federation of Labor (AFL).

24. Nullius ___ (of no legal force) : JURIS
The Latin term “nullius juris” was used in old English law to mean “of no legal force”.

25. Like NSFW links : ADULT
The abbreviation “NSFW” stands for “not safe/suitable for work”. It’s Internet slang used to describe online content that is best not viewed at work.

26. Kennedy and Bush 41, but no other U.S. presidents : GEMINIS
“Gemini” is the Latin word for “twins”.

29. "Mum's the word" : BETWEEN US
The phrase “mum’s the word” has been around since the early 1700s. “Mum” has been used to mean “silent” for centuries, the idea being that “mum” is the sound made when the lips are tightly sealed.

31. Little, in Lockerbie : SMA
The Scots dialect word sma' means "small". The word famously appears in the Robert Burns poem, "To a Mouse". The pertinent lines read:
A daimen icker in a thrave
’S a sma’ request;
I’ll get a blessin wi’ the lave,
An’ never miss’t!
which "translates" to:
An occasional ear of corn out of twenty-four sheaves
Is a small request;
I'll be blest with the rest of the corn,
And never miss the ear you took!

32. Cross collections, e.g. : PEN SETS
A. T. Cross is a company that claims to be the oldest manufacturer of fine pens. Cross was founded in 1846 in Providence, Rhode Island by one Richard Cross. Richard passed the company on to his son Alonzo T. Cross, who gave it the current name.

33. Roughneck's workplace : RIG
A roughneck is a crew member on an oil rig.

35. It's in the far northwest : ESCAPE KEY
The Escape (ESC) key on a PC keyboard is usually located in the top-left corner. The Escape key was introduced in 1960 by IBM programmer Bob Berner, originally to switch from one type of code to another. Nowadays, the Escape key is mainly used as “stop, quit, cancel, abort”.

37. Product of Greek culture? : FETA
Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep's milk, or a mixture of sheep's and goat's milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

40. Splitting words : TATAS
An Englishman might say "tata" or "cheerio" instead of "goodbye". Well, supposedly so!

41. "Mr. ___" (Styx hit) : ROBOTO
"Mr Roboto" is a song on the 1983 album "Kilroy Was Here" by the Chicago band Styx. The first lines of the song are:
Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto,
Mata ah-oo hima de
Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto,
Himitsu wo shiri tai
which translates as:
Thank you very much, Mr. Robot
Until the day (we) meet again
Thank you very much, Mr. Robot
I want to know your secret

45. Winner's prize on "RuPaul's Drag U" : BOA
RuPaul is a famous drag queen who has developed a diverse career beyond performing on stage. He works as an actor, model, author and a recording artist. Famously, RuPaul doesn’t mind whether one addresses him as “he” or as “she” …
"You can call me he. You can call me she. You can call me Regis and Kathie Lee; I don't care! Just as long as you call me."
He currently hosts his own reality TV show called “RuPaul’s Drag Race”, which is billed as a search for “America’s next drag superstar”.

48. "Grey's Anatomy" actress with five straight Emmy nominations : SANDRA OH
The Canadian actress Sandra Oh is very much associated these days with the role of Dr. Cristina Yang on “Grey’s Anatomy”. However, my favorite of Oh’s performances are in the movies “Under the Tuscan Sun” and “Sideways”.

Down
1. They might spook spelunkers : CAVE BATS
Spelunking is an American term for caving, although the word has Latin roots ("spelunca" is the Latin for "cave"). The term originated in the 1940s in New England when it was adopted by a group of men who explored caves in the area.

2. Where the San Antonio Spurs used to play : ALAMODOME
The Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas opened for business in 1993. The Alamodome was home to the San Antonio Spurs basketball from 1993 to 2002. Today the facility hosts many sporting events, including football and ice hockey games. It is also used as a convention center.

The Spurs are the professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. The team was founded as the Dallas Chaparrals of the American Basketball Association (ABA) in 1967.

4. Job ad inits. : EEO
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was set up by the Civil Rights Act. Title VII of the Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin or religion.

12. Makeshift coaster, maybe : TILE
A "coaster" is a small mat or plate that goes under a glass or cup. Back in the late 1800s, the original coaster was a small drink stand that sat on a table. As the drink stand "coasted" around from guest-to-guest, it earned the name "coaster".

14. Gen ___ (millennials) : YERS
“Generation Y” (Gen-Y) is alternative name for the Millennial Generation. Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

21. Yellow-flowered plant producing a sticky resin : GUMWEED
Gumweed is the common name for the genus of plants Grindelia. One of the most common species is curlycup gumweed, a coastal scrub brush found in the western US.

23. Chicago Fire's sports org. : MLS
Major League Soccer (MLS)

The Chicago Fire is the name of the city’s professional soccer team. The Fire were founded in 1997, and are named for the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

24. Noisy recreation vehicles : JET SKIS
"Jet Ski" is actually a brand name, owned by Kawasaki Heavy Industries of Japan. The generic term, not often used, is "personal watercraft". Most people use the term "Jet Ski" generically, although "WaveRunner" is also popular. But that's another brand name, owned by Yamaha.

32. His wife and sons were Depression-era criminals : PA BARKER
“Pa Barker” was George Barker, husband of the more famous “Ma Barker”. Ma Barker was the mother of several children who became notorious criminals in the early thirties. Collectively they ran what was known as the Barker Gang and plied their trade in the US Midwest.

36. 2/2, to Toscanini : CUT TIME
The musical term “alla breve”, meaning “at the breve (i.e. the note)”, denotes a meter equivalent to 2/2. This implies quite a fast tempo, often found in military marches. 2/2 is also known as “cut time”.

37. Key-ring ornament : FOB
A fob is attached to another object to make access to it easier. And so a key fob is a chain attached to a key so that it can be retrieved easily. There are also watch fobs, and the pocket in a vest in which a watch can be placed is called a fob. In fact, the original use of the term “fob” was for a small pocket in which one could carry valuables.

41. ___ Barber, five-time Pro Bowler from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers : RONDE
Ronde Barber is a retired footballer who played with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for 16 years. Barber holds the record for the most consecutive starts by a defensive back (215). Ronde’s twin brother Tiki Barber also played for the NFL.

42. Like some legal decrees : NISI
A decree nisi is a court order, one that only comes into force when certain specified conditions are met. At the point where the conditions are met, it becomes a decree absolute and is binding. “Nisi” is Latin for “unless”.

44. Pomeranian, e.g. : SLAV
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:
- the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
- the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
- the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)

Pomerania is a region on the south shore of the Baltic Sea in Europe, divided between Germany and Poland.

48. Trifle : SOU
A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

49. Org. in the gulf war's Operation Granby : RAF
The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF's "finest hour" has to be the Battle of Britain when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter the memorable words:
Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

During the 1991 Gulf War, the British military operations were given the codename Operation Granby. Granby encompassed operations involving the Royal Air Force, the British Army and the Royal Navy.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 1991 Scorsese/De Niro collaboration : CAPE FEAR
9. Something exciting to play with : NEW TOY
15. Fragile fabric made from certain plant fibers : ALOE LACE
16. Tough leather : OXHIDE
17. Amscrayed : VAMOOSED
18. One getting lots of take-out orders? : TAILOR
19. Edward VII or VIII, in India: Abbr. : EMP
20. ___ nullius (no one's property) : RES
21. Pioneering labor leader Samuel : GOMPERS
22. Was suddenly successful : BOOMED
24. Nullius ___ (of no legal force) : JURIS
25. Like NSFW links : ADULT
26. Kennedy and Bush 41, but no other U.S. presidents : GEMINIS
28. Chuck : TOSS
29. "Mum's the word" : BETWEEN US
31. Little, in Lockerbie : SMA
32. Cross collections, e.g. : PEN SETS
33. Roughneck's workplace : RIG
35. It's in the far northwest : ESCAPE KEY
37. Product of Greek culture? : FETA
38. Moderately dry : SUBARID
39. True : LOYAL
40. Splitting words : TATAS
41. "Mr. ___" (Styx hit) : ROBOTO
42. Blow hole? : NOSTRIL
45. Winner's prize on "RuPaul's Drag U" : BOA
46. Gap fillers, of sorts : UHS
47. "My response was ...," informally : I'M LIKE ...
48. "Grey's Anatomy" actress with five straight Emmy nominations : SANDRA OH
50. Hands on deck : SEAMEN
51. Hand wringer's cry : OH DEAR ME!
52. Flip : INVERT
53. Bridge tolls, e.g. : USER FEES

Down
1. They might spook spelunkers : CAVE BATS
2. Where the San Antonio Spurs used to play : ALAMODOME
3. Blowhard : POMPOUS ASS
4. Job ad inits. : EEO
5. Broccoli bit : FLORET
6. Like pain after treatment, often : EASED
7. Nails : ACES
8. Stop sign? : RED
9. Unwanted attention : NOTORIETY
10. Checks out : EXAMINES
11. Adds with a whisk : WHIPS IN
12. Makeshift coaster, maybe : TILE
13. Reason to hold your nose : ODOR
14. Gen ___ (millennials) : YERS
21. Yellow-flowered plant producing a sticky resin : GUMWEED
23. Chicago Fire's sports org. : MLS
24. Noisy recreation vehicles : JET SKIS
26. Blanket : GENERAL
27. "Uh-huh, I believe THAT" : SURE YOU ARE
29. "Hold your horses" : BE PATIENT
30. Forgo a night out : SIT AT HOME
32. His wife and sons were Depression-era criminals : PA BARKER
34. Couple taken out on a rainy day : GALOSHES
36. 2/2, to Toscanini : CUT TIME
37. Key-ring ornament : FOB
39. Demolition cleanup machine : LOADER
41. ___ Barber, five-time Pro Bowler from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers : RONDE
42. Like some legal decrees : NISI
43. Owl's hoot, to some : OMEN
44. Pomeranian, e.g. : SLAV
45. Cross words : BAHS
48. Trifle : SOU
49. Org. in the gulf war's Operation Granby : RAF


Return to top of page

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive