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0401-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter Gordon
THEME: All Good Things Must Come To an End … today’s themed answers string together to make an announcement, a very sad announcement:
17A. With 34-, 40- and 60-Across, a somber message for our loyal fans : DUE TO BUDGET CUTS ...
34A. See 17-Across : … THE NEW YORK TIMES ...
40A. See 17-Across : … CROSSWORD PUZZLE ...
60A. See 17-Across : … WILL END TOMORROW
One might breathe a sigh of relief if one checks the date of today’s puzzle ...
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Sister brand of Scope : ORAL-B
Those would be brands of mouthwash.

6. Like blackjack hands with an ace counted as 11 : SOFT
In the card game called Blackjack, an ace has the point value of one or eleven. When one of the two cards dealt to a player is an ace, the hand is called “soft”. This means that the player cannot go bust by taking another card, as the ace can be revalued at “one” if necessary in order to stay under 21.

10. Feature of a modern zoo : MOAT
A “moat” is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say, or a an exhibit in a zoo. A moat may or may not be filled with water.

14. Athlete who uses steroids : DOPER
Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “roids” or simply "steroids") are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed "anabolic" as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “roid rage”.

15. Decorative enamelware : CLOISONNE
“Cloisonné” is an ancient technique that uses vitreous enamel to decorate metalwork. The technique involves the addition of metal compartments to the surface of the piece, made by soldering silver or gold wires that form the edges of each compartment. Vitreous enamels of various colors are then added to each compartment and the whole piece fired. “Cloison” is a French word meaning “compartment, partition”.

17. With 34-, 40- and 60-Across, a somber message for our loyal fans : DUE TO BUDGET CUTS …
34. See 17-Across : … THE NEW YORK TIMES ...
40. See 17-Across : … CROSSWORD PUZZLE ...
60. See 17-Across : … WILL END TOMORROW
April Fool's Day is celebrated on April 1st in the western world. In the US (and Ireland) one can make practical jokes all day long if one wants. But in the UK there is a noon deadline. Anyone pranking after midday is called an "April Fool".

23. Letters before Kitty Hawk : USS
The USS Kitty Hawk is an aircraft carrier launched in 1960 that is aptly named for the town of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, where the Wright brothers made the world’s first powered airplane flight. The Kitty Hawk was decommissioned in 2009 after nearly 49 years of service. The original USS Kitty Hawk was an aircraft transport ship that the US Navy acquired in 1941, and which was decommissioned in 1946.

26. Feet, in slang : DOGS
“Dogs” is a slang term for “feet”, as in “my dogs are killing me”.

29. Fruit with yellow skin : CASABA
A casaba is type of honeydew melon. The casaba takes its name from the Turkish city of Kasaba, from where the fruit was imported into America in the late 1800s.

37. The Gaels of collegiate sports : IONA
Iona College is a Roman Catholic school run by Christian Brothers in New Rochelle, New York. The school’s sports teams are called the Iona Gaels, and the team mascot goes by the name Killian.

38. Actress Issa ___ of "The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl" : RAE
Issa Rae is Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”.

39. Shield from the elements : TARP
Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word "tarpaulin" comes from "tar" and "palling", with "pall" meaning "heavy cloth covering".

47. Gloaming, to a sonneteer : E’EN
“Gloaming” is an alternative word for twilight or dusk, and is often used poetically. The word is particularly associated with Scottish poetry, and notably the work of Robert Burns.

A sonnet is a short poem with varying rhyming schemes but always with 14 lines. The sonnet form has been around at least since the 13th century. The Shakespearean sonnet is composed of three quatrains (4 lines) and a final couplet (2 lines).

48. 2 letters : ABC
The letters ABC appear on the 2-button of a telephone’s keypad.

50. Pennsylvania and others: Abbr. : RRS
The Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) was a large rail network in the northeast that was founded in 1846. Even though the “Pennsy” (as it was called) was the busiest railroad in the first half of the twentieth century, it went out of business in 1968. The PRR was also the largest public company in the world at one point, and it still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history, having paid out an annual dividend for over one hundred years in a row.

56. Vigorous reprimand : RIOT ACT
The Riot Act was a British law that was in force from 1715 to 1967. According to the Riot Act, government entities could declare any gathering of twelve or more people “unlawful”. Our expression “read the Riot Act” is derived from the requirement for the authorities to read out the Riot Act proclamation to an unlawful assembly before the Act could be enforced.

63. Cardio option : TAE BO
Tae Bo isn't an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of "taekwondo" and "boxing".

64. "___ Darkness Fall" (L. Sprague de Camp novel) : LEST
L. Sprague de Camp was a prolific writer, mainly of science fiction and fantasy. His 1939 novel “Lest Darkness Fall” is an alternate history work, and helped define the genre.

65. Chew (out) : REAM
I must admit that I find the slang term "to ream out", with its meaning "to scold harshly", to be quite distasteful. The usage of the word as a reprimand dates back to about 1950.

66. Collects a DNA sample from, say : SWABS
I've always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

Down
1. Parimutuel calculation : ODDS
Parimutuel betting is a system in which the bookmaker is guaranteed a pre-determined profit. In the system, all bets are pooled, taxes and house profit are removed, and the payoff is made with the resulting pool.

2. Marquis de Sade, e.g. : ROUE
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On an off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

5. Fancy fabric : BROCADE
Brocade is a very decorative fabric usually made from silk and often incorporating gold and silver thread. The name "brocade" comes from the Italian word "broccato" meaning "embossed cloth".

6. Long-range guided missile : SCUD
Scud missiles were developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The Soviets called them R-11 missiles at first, with later versions known as R-17 and R-300 Elbrus. The name "Scud" was actually the name NATO used for the missile, a name created by Western intelligence officers. Ballistic missiles haven't been used a lot in actual warfare, the exception being the German V-2 rocket attacks on England during WWII. After the V-2, the second most-used ballistic missile in warfare is the Scud, which featured in a number of conflicts:
- used by Egypt against Israel in the Yom Kippur War of 1973
- used by the USSR in Afghanistan
- used by Libya against a US Coast Guard station in the Mediterranean in 1986
- used by Iranians and Iraqis in the Iran-Iraq War of 1980-88
- used by Iraq in the Gulf War of 1990-91

7. "___ New Hampshire" (state song) : OLD
“Old New Hampshire” is a song that has been declared the state’s sole official song twice. It was first so designated in 1949, but was then relegated to “one of the state songs” with the addition of “New Hampshire, New Hampshire” as the second state song in 1963. These two songs were joined by “New Hampshire Hills” in 1973, and by “Autumn in New Hampshire” in 1977. Later in 1977, a further four state songs were added to the roster. But by the end of 1977, the decision was made to clear out the closet and leave just one state song, and that honor went once again to “Old New Hampshire”.

10. Comfy footwear : MOCS
"Moc" is short for “moccasin” shoe.

13. 1980 Oscar nominee directed by Roman Polanski : TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy's 1891 novel is "Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented". When it was originally published, "Tess ..." received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society's attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski's "Tess" released in 1979. Polanski apparently made "Tess" because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy's novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads "To Sharon".

23. Capital of the Roman province of Africa : UTICA
The ancient city of Utica was perhaps the first colony founded by the Phoenicians in North Africa. Located in modern-day Tunisia, Utica surrendered to Rome shortly before the Third Punic War after which it became the capital of the Roman province of Africa.

27. Sandwich topped with tzatziki sauce : GYRO
A gyro is a traditional Greek sandwich made with pita bread and containing meat, tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce). The meat for gyros is usually roasted on a tall vertical spit and is sliced from the spit as required.

30. ___ bath : SITZ
A “sitz bath” is one in which the water comes up to the hips. It is usually a therapeutic bath used to treat discomfort in the lower part of the body. The term comes from the German “Sitzbad” meaning a bath (bad) in which one sits. “Sitzen” is German for “to sit”.

32. Comedian who married Joyce Mathews in 1941, divorced her in 1947 and married her again in 1949 "because she reminded me of my first wife" : BERLE
Comedian Milton Berle was known as "Uncle Miltie" and "Mr. Television", and was arguably the first real star of American television as he was hosting "Texaco Star Theater" starting in 1948.

33. Winter X Games host city : ASPEN
Aspen, Colorado used to be known as Ute City, with the name change taking place in 1880. Like many communities in the area, Aspen was a mining town, and in 1891 and 1892 it was at the center of the highest production of silver in the US. Nowadays of course, it's all about skiing and movie stars.

The X Games are annual events, with a Summer X Games held every year as well as a Winter X Games. It's very much a commercial venture, with all aspects controlled by the TV station ESPN. The games focus on extreme action sports, like skateboarding and freestyle motocross in the summer and various extreme snowboarding events in the winter.

35. Curiosity org. : NASA
NASA’s Curiosity rover is the fourth in a series of unmanned surface rovers that NASA has sent to Mars. Previous rovers are the Sojourner rover (1997), Spirit rover (2004-2010) and Opportunity rover (2004-present). Curiosity rover was launched in November of 2011, and landed on Mars in August 2012 after having traveled 350 million miles. After that long journey, Curiosity landed just 1½ miles from its targeted touchdown spot.

41. Thing with a filament : STAMEN
The stamen is the male reproductive organ of a flower. The part of the stamen known as the anther sits on a stalk called the filament, and carried carries the pollen. The pollen is picked up by insects, especially bees, who then transfer pollen from flower to flower. The pistil is the female reproductive organ, and it accepts the pollen.

42. Online course : WEBINAR
Webinar is short for “Web-based seminar”, a presentation, lecture or similar event held online. In a Webinar there is two-way interaction, with the audience able to ask questions of the presenter.

43. Holiday a month before Passover : PURIM
Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther. During the celebration of Purim, the Book of Esther (or Megillah) is read aloud, once in the evening and once the following morning. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Old Testament that doesn't mention the word "God".

49. Military group : CADRE
A "cadre" is most commonly a group of experienced personnel at the core of a larger organization that the small group trains or heavily influences. "Cadre" is a French word meaning a "frame". We use it in the sense that a cadre is a group that provides a "framework" for the larger organization.

52. Taking unauthorized R&R : AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

Rest and relaxation/recuperation (R&R)

58. His .366 lifetime batting average is the best ever : COBB
Ty Cobb was one of the richest baseball players of all times. When he retired, Cobb was a major stockholder of the Coca-Cola Corporation. By the time he passed away in 1961, Cobb had an even bigger investment in General Electric. He left an estate after his death worth about $86m (in 2008 dollars).

59. Yahtzee category : TWOS
The dice game of Yahtzee was introduced in 1956, a variant of earlier dice games, especially the game "Yacht" (which even has a similar name). Yahtzee is required playing in our house at holidays. The game involves the rolling of five dice, with the intent of getting certain combinations. A lot of those combinations resemble poker hands, such as “three of a kind”, “four of a kind” and “full house”.

61. Quinceañera invitee : TIA
In Spanish, a “tia” (aunt) is a member of “la familia” (the family).

Quinceañera is a celebration of a girl's fifteenth birthday, an event common in many parts of Latin America.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sister brand of Scope : ORAL-B
6. Like blackjack hands with an ace counted as 11 : SOFT
10. Feature of a modern zoo : MOAT
14. Athlete who uses steroids : DOPER
15. Decorative enamelware : CLOISONNE
17. With 34-, 40- and 60-Across, a somber message for our loyal fans : DUE TO BUDGET CUTS ...
19. Led astray : SEDUCED
20. Agrostologists' study : GRASSES
21. Bud : PAL
22. "Whoopee!" : YAY!
23. Letters before Kitty Hawk : USS
26. Feet, in slang : DOGS
29. Fruit with yellow skin : CASABA
34. See 17-Across : … THE NEW YORK TIMES ...
37. The Gaels of collegiate sports : IONA
38. Actress Issa ___ of "The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl" : RAE
39. Shield from the elements : TARP
40. See 17-Across : … CROSSWORD PUZZLE ...
45. Make less flat : AERATE
46. You might put stock in it : SOUP
47. Gloaming, to a sonneteer : E’EN
48. 2 letters : ABC
50. Pennsylvania and others: Abbr. : RRS
52. Inability to sense smells : ANOSMIA
56. Vigorous reprimand : RIOT ACT
60. See 17-Across : … WILL END TOMORROW
62. Large marine fish tanks : OCEANARIA
63. Cardio option : TAE BO
64. "___ Darkness Fall" (L. Sprague de Camp novel) : LEST
65. Chew (out) : REAM
66. Collects a DNA sample from, say : SWABS

Down
1. Parimutuel calculation : ODDS
2. Marquis de Sade, e.g. : ROUE
3. Made like : APED
4. Pause : LET UP
5. Fancy fabric : BROCADE
6. Long-range guided missile : SCUD
7. "___ New Hampshire" (state song) : OLD
8. Not clear : FOGGY
9. Closet organizer : TIE RACK
10. Comfy footwear : MOCS
11. Responsibility : ONUS
12. Play money? : ANTE
13. 1980 Oscar nominee directed by Roman Polanski : TESS
16. Patronize, as a hotel : STAY AT
18. Later in the text : BELOW
23. Capital of the Roman province of Africa : UTICA
24. Coast : SHORE
25. "Sí" man? : SENOR
27. Sandwich topped with tzatziki sauce : GYRO
28. Goes up, up, up : SOARS
30. ___ bath : SITZ
31. Blow away : AMAZE
32. Comedian who married Joyce Mathews in 1941, divorced her in 1947 and married her again in 1949 "because she reminded me of my first wife" : BERLE
33. Winter X Games host city : ASPEN
35. Curiosity org. : NASA
36. Overhaul : REDO
41. Thing with a filament : STAMEN
42. Online course : WEBINAR
43. Holiday a month before Passover : PURIM
44. Pulls out : UPROOTS
49. Military group : CADRE
51. Drinker's bender? : STRAW
52. Taking unauthorized R&R : AWOL
53. "Good going!" : NICE!
54. Shouts of support : OLES
55. Crib part : SLAT
56. Go here and there : ROAM
57. Bay or gray follower : AREA
58. His .366 lifetime batting average is the best ever : COBB
59. Yahtzee category : TWOS
61. Quinceañera invitee : TIA


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0331-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 16, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ellen Leuschner & Jeff Chen
THEME: Doubles … each of today’s clues is a common phrase in the form “Double x?” The corresponding answers is another common phrase, one that includes two words with the same meaning as x:
17A. Double solitaire? : ONE AND ONLY
21A. Double space? : NULL AND VOID
33A. Double take? : SNATCH AND GRAB
50A. Double life? : VIM AND VIGOR
55A. Double back? : AID AND ABET
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 48s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Big online source for film info : IMDB
The website called the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) was launched in 1990, and is now owned by Amazon.com. It's a great site for answering question one has about movies and actors.

15. ___ Valley (Utah ski resort) : DEER
Deer Valley is a ski resort in Park City, Utah, one of the sites used in the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics held in 2002. Deer Valley is one of the very few ski resorts in the US that still prohibits snowboarding.

16. Fallon predecessor : LENO
Jay Leno was born James Leno in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson college and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website: www.jaylenosgarage.com.

Jimmy Fallon was a cast member for a number of years on “Saturday Night Live” before getting his own talk show in 2009, “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon”. Fallon took over “The Tonight Show” from Jay Leno in 2014.

17. Double solitaire? : ONE AND ONLY
Double Solitaire is a card game for two players. It is basically two opponents playing the game of solitaire (also called “Klondike”).

19. ___ buco : OSSO
“Osso” is the Italian word for bone as in the name of the dish Osso Buco: braised veal shanks.

24. "And what ___ rare as a day in June?": Lowell : IS SO
James Russell Lowell was a Romantic poet from Massachusetts. Lowell was also known as one of the Fireside Poets, a group of New England poets who used a simpler style to make their work accessible to the general populace. One his more famous works is the poem that starts, “And what is so rare as a day in June?”

25. Volkswagen model : JETTA
The name Jetta is one in a series of names related to winds that has been used by Volkswagen. Jetta comes from the German for "jet stream"", and the model name Passat comes from the German for "trade wind".

31. Jet for a jet-setter : CESSNA
The Cessna Aircraft manufacturing company was founded in 1911 by Clyde Cessna, a farmer from Kansas. Cessna is headquartered in Wichita and today has over 8,000 employees.

38. Mass distribution? : WAFERS
The Communion rite is the part of the Mass in the Roman Catholic tradition. The rite involves distribution of the Communion bread (the host, a wafer) to the faithful.

39. Supermodel who married David Bowie : IMAN
Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a supermodel from Somalia who goes simply by the name "Iman" these days. “Iman” is an Arabic word for “faith”. Iman is smart cookie. Imam has a degree in Political Science and is fluent in five languages: Somali, Arabic, Italian, French and English. Iman was married to English rock star David Bowie from 1992 until his death in 2016.

46. Supreme Court justice nominated by Bush : ALITO
Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

49. Zika virus tracker, for short : CDC
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days ...

The Zika virus causes the disease known as Zika fever, and is mainly spread by the yellow fever mosquito. While the majority of cases of infection result in minor symptoms or even no symptoms at all, Zika virus infections of pregnant women may be linked to newborn microcephaly. Microcephaly is a birth defect in which a baby’s head is smaller than normal.

53. Noah's escape : ARK
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah's life-preserver during the flood.

57. One of its sources is Lake Tana : NILE
Lake Tana is the largest lake in Ethiopia, and is the source of the Blue Nile. The lake has a number of islands of significant size, many of which are home to ancient monasteries.

58. Champagne name : MOET
Moët & Chandon is a French winery, one of the world's largest producers of champagne. The company was founded by wine trader Claude Moët in 1743. The name was changed to Moët & Chandon in the 1830s when Pierre-Gabriel Chandon, an in-law to the Moët family, was given co-ownership. Moët & Chandon owns the famous Dom Pérignon brand name, honoring the Benedictine monk who did so much to improve the quality of champagne.

59. 1890s vice president Stevenson : ADLAI
Adlai Stevenson I served as Vice President of the US from 1893 to 1897 under Grover Cleveland. Stevenson was the grandfather of Adlai Stevenson II, the Democratic candidate for president in 1952 and 1956.

Down
1. Like London's City Hall : OVOIDAL
London’s City Hall is home to the Mayor of London and an elected 25-member London Assembly, known collectively as the Greater London Authority. The City Hall building opened for business in 2002 and has an unusual and controversial ovoidal shape. It has been compared to Darth Vader’s helmet, and some less complimentary comparisons have also been made.

2. Robert Galbraith and J. K. Rowling : PEN NAMES
Joanne Rowling changed her name to J. K. Rowling at the request of her publisher, who believed that young boys might have shied away from reading the first "Harry Potter" book if they believed the story was written by a woman (this was 1997!). "Jo" Rowling chose J for Joanne, and K for Kathleen after her grandmother (Jo has no middle name to use). Rowling also writes books for adults, using the pen name Robert Galbraith.

3. "Excellent, mon ami" : TRES BIEN
“Very good” is written as “Sehr gut” in German, and as “très bien” in French.

4. "Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg" heroine : EVA
Eva is the heroine in Richard Wagner's (long!) opera titled “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg” (The Mastersingers of Nuremberg).

5. Comics troublemaker : DENNIS
"Dennis the Menace" is a comic strip that first appeared in 1951, originally drawn by Hank Ketcham. The strip made the jump over the years from the newspaper to television and the silver screen. Dennis's full name is Dennis Mitchell, and his parents are Henry and Alice (Johnson) Mitchell. Dennis's nemesis is his neighbor, Mister George Everett Wilson. Hank Ketcham drew his inspiration for the story from his real life. When he introduced the strip, he had a 4-year-old son called Dennis and a wife named Alice.

6. No-nos in Leviticus 26:1 : IDOLS
Ye shall make you no idols nor graven image, neither rear you up a standing image, neither shall ye set up any image of stone in your land, to bow down unto it: for I am the LORD your God.

7. Bay Area's ___ College : MENLO
Menlo College is a private school located in Atherton, California, one of the wealthiest and most expensive cities in the country. Menlo was founded in 1927 as when the existing Menlo School for Boys grew to include a junior college. Today the school specializes in providing four-year business degrees. One of Menlo’s more famous alumni is newspaper heiress and kidnap victim Patty Hearst.

8. Crème-crème filler : DE LA
The “crème de la crème” is the elite, the best of the best. The term is French and translates as “cream of the cream”.

9. Welsh word that starts a noted college name : BRYN
I used to live not far from Bryn-mawr (also "Brynmwar") in Wales, the town with the highest elevation in the country. Appropriately enough, "bryn mawr" is Welsh for "big hill". There is also a Bryn Mawr in Pennsylvania (note the different capitalization) that is named after its Welsh counterpart. At the Pennsylvania location there's a Bryn Mawr college, a private women's school that was the first American university to offer graduate degrees to women.

10. Cole Porter tune sung by Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier : I LOVE PARIS
“I Love Paris” is a song from the Cole Porter musical “Can-Can”.

The Cole Porter musical "Can-Can" was first produced on Broadway, in 1953, where it ran for two years. There was a very successful film adaptation (which I saw recently ... it's good stuff) released in 1960, starring Shirley MacLaine, Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier. During filming, the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev visited the set as part of a tour of 20th Century Fox studios. He made a big splash in the media at the time describing what he saw as "depraved" and "pornographic".

11. Spaniard granted the right to conquer Florida by Charles V : DE SOTO
Hernando de Soto was a Spanish conquistador who led expeditions throughout the southeastern US. De Soto’s travels were unsuccessful in that he failed to bring gold or silver back to Spain, and nor did he found any colonies. What de Soto did achieve was the exposure of local populations to devastating Eurasian diseases. De Soto was the first European to cross the Mississippi River, in 1541. The first European to see the Mississippi (but not cross it) was Alonso Álvarez de Pineda, in 1519.

12. As found : IN SITU
“In situ” is a Latin phrase meaning "in the place", and we use the term to mean “in the original position”.

28. Govt. IDs : SSNS
The main purpose of a Social Security Number (SSN) is to track individuals for the purposes of taxation, although given its ubiquitous use, it is looking more and more like an "identity number" to me. The social security number system was introduced in 1936. Prior to 1986, an SSN was required only for persons with substantial income so many children under 14 had no number assigned. For some years the IRS had a concern that a lot of people were claiming children on their tax returns who did not actually exist. So, from 1986 onward, it is a requirement to get an SSN for any dependents over the age of 5. Sure enough, in 1987 seven million dependents "disappeared".

29. It might be taken before a trip : LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn't until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man ...

31. Jazzman Baker : CHET
The famous jazz trumpeter Chet Baker was noted for his heroin addiction, a problem that nearly put an end to his performing career. He managed a comeback in the late seventies, mainly appearing and recording in Europe. But he never kicked the drug habit and was found dead one day after falling from his hotel room window in Amsterdam.

32. What an otoscope examines : EAR
An otoscope is that instrument that an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT) uses to look into the interior of your ears.

35. Co. money manager : CFO
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

40. Bit of Blues Brothers attire : NECKTIE
The Blues Brothers is a blues band created in 1978 for a Saturday Night Live sketch. The original Blues Brothers were Dan Aykroyd (Elwood Blues) and John Belushi ("Joliet" Jake Blues).

41. Asylums : HAVENS
"Asylum" is a Latin word, meaning "sanctuary".

42. Pig featured in a series of children's books : OLIVIA
Olivia is a pig featured in a series of children’s books that is written and illustrated by Ian Falconer. The character was inspired by Falconer’s niece, also named Olivia.

47. Current events? : TIDES
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

48. 5.5-point type : AGATE
In the world of typography, “agate” is a unit of measure. One agate is is equal to 5.5 points, or about one quarter of an inch. Agate is generally the smallest type size used in newspapers, and is generally restricted to advertisements and market reports in financial publications.

51. One appointed to the Royal Victorian Order : DAME
The Royal Victorian Order was established by Queen Victoria in 1896. Admission to the order is the personal gift of the ruling British monarch.

52. Ancestor of a cello : VIOL
Viols are a family of stringed instruments that resemble the violin family. However, viols have fretted fingerboards like guitars, and have six strings instead of four.

56. Oklahoma city : ADA
Back in 1889, Jeff Reed was hired to carry the mail between the two communities of Stonewall and Center in what was then called the Indian Territory. Reed had moved to the area from Texas and he bought some land in between the two limits of his mail route and built himself a log cabin. Pretty soon other settlers built homes nearby and in 1891 the settlement got its own post office. As postman, Reed got to name the new post office and he called it Ada, after his oldest daughter. Ada is now a county seat in Oklahoma and has over 17,000 residents. One of the sons of the city of Ada was the televangelist Oral Roberts.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Elected : OPTED
6. Big online source for film info : IMDB
10. "Gotcha, dude" : I DIG
14. Pep : VERVE
15. ___ Valley (Utah ski resort) : DEER
16. Fallon predecessor : LENO
17. Double solitaire? : ONE AND ONLY
19. ___ buco : OSSO
20. Entry points : INS
21. Double space? : NULL AND VOID
23. Light touch : DAB
24. "And what ___ rare as a day in June?": Lowell : IS SO
25. Volkswagen model : JETTA
26. Surrounded by : AMIDST
28. Leave early, say : SLIP OUT
30. Give the stink eye : LEER
31. Jet for a jet-setter : CESSNA
33. Double take? : SNATCH AND GRAB
38. Mass distribution? : WAFERS
39. Supermodel who married David Bowie : IMAN
41. War zone, e.g. : HOTSPOT
44. Benefit : UPSIDE
46. Supreme Court justice nominated by Bush : ALITO
47. Stick with it : TAPE
49. Zika virus tracker, for short : CDC
50. Double life? : VIM AND VIGOR
53. Noah's escape : ARK
54. "Do I ___!" : EVER
55. Double back? : AID AND ABET
57. One of its sources is Lake Tana : NILE
58. Champagne name : MOET
59. 1890s vice president Stevenson : ADLAI
60. "Who ___?" : SAYS
61. "Who ___?" : ELSE
62. Self-congratulatory words : YAY ME!

Down
1. Like London's City Hall : OVOIDAL
2. Robert Galbraith and J. K. Rowling : PEN NAMES
3. "Excellent, mon ami" : TRES BIEN
4. "Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg" heroine : EVA
5. Comics troublemaker : DENNIS
6. No-nos in Leviticus 26:1 : IDOLS
7. Bay Area's ___ College : MENLO
8. Crème-crème filler : DE LA
9. Welsh word that starts a noted college name : BRYN
10. Cole Porter tune sung by Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier : I LOVE PARIS
11. Spaniard granted the right to conquer Florida by Charles V : DE SOTO
12. As found : IN SITU
13. Proficient with : GOOD AT
18. Attic buildup : DUST
22. Activity for some wedding hires : DJING
27. Make a scene, say : DRAW STARES
28. Govt. IDs : SSNS
29. It might be taken before a trip : LSD
31. Jazzman Baker : CHET
32. What an otoscope examines : EAR
34. Lightly touch, as a shoulder : TAP ON
35. Co. money manager : CFO
36. How conflicts are best resolved : AMICABLY
37. Nightmare : BAD DREAM
40. Bit of Blues Brothers attire : NECKTIE
41. Asylums : HAVENS
42. Pig featured in a series of children's books : OLIVIA
43. On-schedule : TIMELY
44. Knowing all about : UP ON
45. Like some parking garage rates : PER DAY
47. Current events? : TIDES
48. 5.5-point type : AGATE
51. One appointed to the Royal Victorian Order : DAME
52. Ancestor of a cello : VIOL
56. Oklahoma city : ADA


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0330-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew Reynolds
THEME: Climate Change … each of today’s themed answers includes a sequence of circled letters. Each sequence is a CHANGED version of the word CLIMATE:
34A. Environmentalist's concern ... or a hint to the circled letters : CLIMATE CHANGE

17A. Some lab work : CHEMICAL TESTING
23A. Source of income : MEAL TICKET
49A. Like some ad campaigns : DIRECT-MAIL
56A. School branch : SATELLITE CAMPUS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. So last year : PASSE
“Passé” is a French word, meaning "past, faded".

10. One of the A's in A.M.A.: Abbr. : ASSN
American Medical Association (AMA)

14. Flopper in basketball, e.g. : FAKER
In basketball, a “flop” is a fall in which a player is acting as though fouled, with the intent of getting a personal foul called on an opponent.

19. Home of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
EPCOT Center (now just called Epcot) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym standing for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away before that vision could be realized.

Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

21. "Hamlet" soliloquy starter : TO BE …
To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous fortune;
Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles ...
There has been centuries of debate about how one interprets Hamlet's soliloquy that begins "To be or not to be ...". My favorite opinion is that Hamlet is weighing up the pros and cons of suicide ("to not be").

27. Fab Four surname : STARR
Ringo Starr's real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles (replacing drummer Pete Best), Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name "Ringo Starr", because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded "cowboyish". Back then his drum solos were billed as "Starr Time".

The Beatles were described on the sleeve notes of their 1963 album “With the Beatles” as the “fabulous foursome”. The press picked up on the phrase and morphed it into “the Fab Four”.

31. Filch : PILFER
“Filch” is a slang term for steal, especially in a sly way.

33. Musician's booking : GIG
Musicians use “gig” to describe a job, a performance. The term originated in the early 1900s in the world of jazz.

41. Part of an insect's body that holds the legs : THORAX
By definition, an insect has a body made up of three parts: head, thorax and abdomen.

52. "Calvin and Hobbes" conveyance : SLED
The comic strip "Calvin and Hobbes" is still widely syndicated, but hasn't been written since 1995. The cartoonist Bill Watterson named the character Calvin after John Calvin, the 16th century theologian. Hobbes was named for Thomas Hobbes a 17th century English political philosopher.

53. Emmy classification : DRAMA
The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars in the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of "Emmy" is a softened version of the word "immy", the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

54. "W" is one in Welsh : VOWEL
The Welsh language is a Celtic tongue that is known as “Cymraeg” by its native speakers. The country of Wales is known as “Cymru” in Welsh.

66. Sharpshooter Oakley : ANNIE
Many regard Annie Oakley as the first American female superstar, given her celebrity as a sharpshooter in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. She toured with the show all over Europe, and performed her act for the likes of Queen Victoria of England and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. Supposedly, using a .22 caliber rifle from 90 feet away, Oakley could split a playing card edge-on, and shoot five or six holes in the card before it hit the ground!

Down
1. U.S.M.C. one-striper : PFC
Private First Class (PFC)

US Marine Corps (USMC)

3. Arcade game played on an incline : SKEE BALL
Skee Ball is that arcade game where you roll balls up a ramp trying to "bounce" it into rings for varying numbers of points. The game was first introduced in Philadelphia, in 1909.

4. Motto for a 1-Down, informally : SEMPER FI
(1D. U.S.M.C. one-striper : PFC)
"Semper Fidelis" is the motto of the United States Marine Corps (USMC). The phrase is Latin and means "Always Faithful". The US Marine Corps isn't the only military unit using "Semper Fidelis" as a motto . It's also used by the Portuguese Marine Corps, the Republic of China Marine Corps and the Swiss Grenadiers.

5. ___ the Red : ERIC
According to Icelandic tradition, Erik the Red was the man responsible for founding the first Nordic settlement in Greenland. Erik had a famous son, the explorer Leif Ericson.

6. Shooting marbles : AGATES
A playing marble made from agate is called just that, an agate. Steelies on the other hand, are made from solid steel.

7. ___-de-sac : CUL
Even though "cul-de-sac" can indeed mean "bottom of the bag" in French, the term cul-de-sac is of English origin (the use of "cul" in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are "voie sans issue", meaning "way without exit".

9. Rap's Dr. ___ : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

21. Kitchen meas. : TSP
Teaspoon (tsp.)

24. Largest country in Africa : ALGERIA
Algeria is a huge country, the largest in Africa and the largest country on the Mediterranean. The capital of Algeria is Algiers, and the country takes its name from the city.

25. Of the flock : LAIC
Anything described is laic (or “laical, lay”) is related to the laity, those members of the church who are not clergy. The term "laic" ultimately comes from the Greek "laikos" meaning "of the people".

28. Dream state : REM
REM is an acronym standing for Rapid Eye Movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one's most vivid dreams.

32. "Nick of Time" singer Bonnie : RAITT
Bonnie Raitt is a blues singer, originally from Burbank, California. Raitt has won nine Grammys for her work, but she is perhaps as well known for her political activism as she is for her music. She was no fan of President George W. Bush while he was in office, and she sure did show it.

35. Reds or Blues : TEAM
The Red Scare (i.e. anti-communist sentiment) following WWII had such an effect on the populace that it even caused the Cincinnati baseball team to change its name from the Reds. The team was called the Cincinnati Redlegs from 1953-1958, as the management was fearful of losing money due to public distrust of any association with "Reds".

The St. Louis Blues hockey team takes its name from the song "St. Louis Blues", a jazz and popular music classic.

42. Marked, as a ballot : XED
Today a “ballot” is a piece of paper used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

44. Capital of Albania : TIRANA
Tirana is the capital of Albania, and the nation’s largest city.

45. "Friends, Romans, countrymen ..." sort of speaker : ORATOR
“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears …” is the start of a famous speech by Mark Antony from William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”.

46. Teatro alla ___ : SCALA
La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: "Teatro alla Scala" in Italian.

50. Mani-pedi tool : EMERY
Emery is a very hard type of rock that is crushed for use as an abrasive. Emery paper is made by gluing small particles of emery to paper. Emery boards are just emery paper with a cardboard backing. And emery boards are primarily used for filing nails.

Manicure & pedicure (mani-pedi)

51. Position: Abbr. : LOC
Location (loc.)

57. War on Poverty prez : LBJ
President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) is one of only four people to have held all four elected federal offices, namely US Representative, US Senator, US Vice-President and US President. As President he is perhaps best remembered for escalating involvement in the Vietnam War, and for his “Great Society” legislation.

60. College, in Down Under slang : UNI
In Australia (Down Under) and in the British Isles the term “Uni” is routinely used for “university”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. So last year : PASSE
6. Got one's serve past : ACED
10. One of the A's in A.M.A.: Abbr. : ASSN
14. Flopper in basketball, e.g. : FAKER
15. Buyer's protection : GUARANTEE
17. Some lab work : CHEMICAL TESTING
19. Home of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
20. Rather, informally : KINDA
21. "Hamlet" soliloquy starter : TO BE ...
23. Source of income : MEAL TICKET
27. Fab Four surname : STARR
29. Whacked, so to speak : SLAIN
30. Vein find : ORE
31. Filch : PILFER
33. Musician's booking : GIG
34. Environmentalist's concern ... or a hint to the circled letters : CLIMATE CHANGE
40. Front end? : -IER
41. Part of an insect's body that holds the legs : THORAX
43. ___ Z (the works) : A TO
46. Way up or down : STAIR
48. Crop up : ARISE
49. Like some ad campaigns : DIRECT-MAIL
52. "Calvin and Hobbes" conveyance : SLED
53. Emmy classification : DRAMA
54. "W" is one in Welsh : VOWEL
56. School branch : SATELLITE CAMPUS
62. Approximately : ON OR ABOUT
63. Starts on baby food, say : WEANS
64. ___ a one (zero) : NARY
65. Moonshine holders : JUGS
66. Sharpshooter Oakley : ANNIE

Down
1. U.S.M.C. one-striper : PFC
2. What a doctor may have you say : AAH
3. Arcade game played on an incline : SKEE BALL
4. Motto for a 1-Down, informally : SEMPER FI
5. ___ the Red : ERIC
6. Shooting marbles : AGATES
7. ___-de-sac : CUL
8. Have one's fill : EAT
9. Rap's Dr. ___ : DRE
10. Bit of funny business : ANTIC
11. Pie-eyed : STINKO
12. Return addressee : SENDER
13. Prove false : NEGATE
16. Invite for coffee, say : ASK IN
18. .net alternative : .COM
21. Kitchen meas. : TSP
22. Ear-related : OTIC
24. Largest country in Africa : ALGERIA
25. Of the flock : LAIC
26. Like skinny jeans : TIGHT
28. Dream state : REM
32. "Nick of Time" singer Bonnie : RAITT
35. Reds or Blues : TEAM
36. "Got it!" : AHA!
37. 5-Down and cohorts : NORSEMEN
38. Cast-iron cooker : GRILL PAN
39. Maneuver with care : EASE
42. Marked, as a ballot : XED
43. Builds a new room, say : ADDS ON
44. Capital of Albania : TIRANA
45. "Friends, Romans, countrymen ..." sort of speaker : ORATOR
46. Teatro alla ___ : SCALA
47. Fixes firmly : RIVETS
50. Mani-pedi tool : EMERY
51. Position: Abbr. : LOC
55. Trumpet or guitar effect : WAWA
57. War on Poverty prez : LBJ
58. Note in a pot : IOU
59. Yank's cousin : TUG
60. College, in Down Under slang : UNI
61. Minn.-to-Ala. direction : SSE


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0329-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Mar 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Doglegs … the circled letters in today’s grids spell out breeds of DOGS. Those letters also make a change of direction, like a DOGLEG on a golf course. We also have several golfing references in the puzzle as well:
17A. What red markers may indicate on 59-Acrosses : LADIES TEES
38A. Some links holes ... with a hint to the circled letters : DOGLEGS
55A. Scored, as on a 59-Across : CARDED
59A. 18 holes, often : GOLF COURSE
The dog breeds are:
- SETTER
- BEAGLE
- POODLE
- COLLIE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Volleyball actions between bumps and spikes : SETS
In volleyball, each team can only touch the ball a maximum of three times before it returns to the other side of the net. The three contacts are often a “bump” (a preliminary pass) and a “set” (setting up the attacking shot) followed by a “spike” (a shot into the opposing court).

5. Name on an orange-and-white truck : U-HAUL
The U-Haul company was started by married couple Leonard Shoen and Anna Mary Carty in Ridgefield, Washington in 1945. The Shoens used $5,000 of seed money to build trailers in their garage, and then cleverly recruited gas station owners as franchisees with whom they would split the rental revenue. There are now about 15,000 U-Haul dealers across the country.

14. "What ___" (1996 Sublime hit) : I GOT
Sublime was a band from Long Beach, California that was active from 1988 until 1996. Sublime played “American ska punk”, whatever that is …

15. Some chip dip : SALSA
“Salsa” is simply the Spanish for “sauce”.

17. What red markers may indicate on 59-Acrosses : LADIES TEES
Most golf courses have three sets of tee markers, each with different yardages. In casual play of the game, anyone can play from any set of tees. That said, there is a common designation that describes the group of players who often tee off from each tee markers, but these designations are somewhat outdated:
- The back tees, blue tees, championship tees
- The middle tees, white tees, mens’ tees
- The forward tees, red tees, women’s tees

21. Cat in a record store : STEVENS
The singer-songwriter that I mainly know as Cat Stevens has been through a few names in his life. He was born in London as Steven Georgiou and adopted the stage name “Steve Adams” in the mid-sixties. A year later he changed his stage name to “Cat Stevens”, with which he had most of success. During this time he had hits with classic songs like “Wild World”, “Moonshadow” and “Morning Has Broken”. He also wrote the song “The First Cut Is the Deepest”, which became a hit for four different artists. In 1977, Stevens converted to Islam and took the name Yusuf Islam in 1978.

24. Musician Reed or Rawls : LOU
Lou Reed was best known as a rock musician and songwriter, and was especially associated with the fabulous 1973 hit "Walk on the Wildside". Reed is less well known as a photographer, but he published two collections of his work. The first was released in 2003 under the title "Emotions in Action", and the second in 2006 called "Lou Reed's New York". Reed passed away in 2013.

Lou Rawls was an American soul and blues singer known for his smooth vocal style. With his singing career well on the way, Rawls was asked to sing "The Star Spangled Banner" in 1977 at a Muhammad Ali fight in Madison Square Garden. This performance led to him being asked to sing the anthem many, many times in the coming years with his last rendition being at a World Series game in 2005. Rawls passed away in January of the following year.

26. Tripoli's land : LIBYA
Tripoli is the capital city of Libya and sits on the Mediterranean Coast. The city was founded by the Phoenicians in the 7th century BC and was originally called Oea.

27. Musical name after Tori or before Lee : AMOS
Tori Amos is an American pianist and singer. Amos started playing the piano at two years old, and was composing piano pieces by age five. She was playing in piano bars (chaperoned by her father) when she was 14. I'm going to have to find some of her music (I lead such a sheltered life ...)!

Amos Lee is a singer-songwriter from Philadelphia who performs in the genres of soul and folk.

29. Ancestor of the harmonica : PANPIPE
The pan flutes (also “panpipes”) are folk instruments that have been around along time, and are believed to be the first mouth organs. The pan flute is named for the Greek god Pan, who was often depicted playing the instrument.

The harmonica is a reed instrument. A harmonica contains a number of reeds that are usually made from metal, all arranged on a reed plate.

33. 1960s Egyptian president : NASSER
Gamal Abdel Nasser was the second president of Egypt, from 1956 until he died in 1970. He stood alongside Muhammad Naguib, Egypt's first president, during the Egyptian Revolution of 1952 that overthrew the ruling monarchy of Egypt and Sudan. Nasser was an advocate of Pan-Arabism, an ideology promoting unification of Arab peoples and countries. President Nasser went so far as forming the United Arab Republic (UAR), a union between Egypt and Syria that started in 1958 but fell apart in 1961 when Syria withdrew.

37. "___ My Children" : ALL
“All My Children” was the first daytime soap opera to debut in the seventies. Star of the show was Susan Lucci who played Erica Kane. The show was cancelled in 2011 after having being on the air for 41 years.

38. Some links holes ... with a hint to the circled letters : DOGLEGS
A dogleg on a golf course is a hole that bends to the left or right. The name comes from the shape of a dog’s hind leg.

The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. "Hlinc" was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

40. ___-Magnon : CRO
Remains of early man, dating back to 35,000 years ago, were found in Abri de Cro-Magnon in southwest France, giving the name to those early humans. Cro-Magnon remains are the oldest human relics that have been discovered in Europe.

41. Capital of Saudi Arabia : RIYADH
Riyadh is the capital of Saudi Arabia, and is located near the center of the country. The name “Riyadh” translates from Arabic as ‘the gardens”.

43. Capital of Norway : OSLO
Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiana. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city's name to "Kristiana", and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiana.

44. Big export of Saudi Arabia and Norway : OIL
As of 2012, Saudi Arabia was the country with the largest oil exports in the world. Norway was tenth on the same list.

45. Lithe : LISSOME
“Lissome” is such a lovely word, meaning easily bent and supple. The term is a variation of “lithesome”.

51. Luau instrument, informally : UKE
The ukulele (“uke”) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

53. Like some lights : HALOGEN
A halogen lamp is a specific type of incandescent light that has a small amount of halogen in the atmosphere surrounding the tungsten filament. In a regular incandescent lamps, tungsten evaporates from the filament and deposits on the inner surface of the glass bulb causing it to blacken and dim over time. The halogen, such as iodine or bromine, reacts with the evaporating tungsten keeping the bulb of the glass clean hence maintaining the light output level.

58. "Out of Africa" author Dinesen : ISAK
Isak Dinesen was the pen name of the Danish author Baroness Karen Blixen. Blixen's most famous title by far is “Out of Africa”, her account of the time she spent living in Kenya.

59. 18 holes, often : GOLF COURSE
There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

67. Nobel winner Wiesel : ELIE
Elie Wiesel is a holocaust survivor, best known for his book "Night" that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

Down
2. Op-ed columnist Timothy : EGAN
Timothy Egan the Pacific Northwest correspondent for “The New York Times”. Egan was born in and lives in Seattle.

4. Supporting stalks : STIPES
A stipe is stalk or stem-like structure that supports a fern frond or the cap of a mushroom.

5. Country in a classic Beatles title : USSR
By the time the Beatles recorded "Back in the U.S.S.R", they were having a lot of problems working with each other. The song was recorded in 1968, with the band formally dissolving in 1970. Tensions were so great during the recording of "Back in the U.S.S.R" that Ringo Starr actually stormed out saying that he had quit, and the remaining three Beatles made the record without Ringo. Drums were played mainly by Paul McCartney, but there are also drum tracks on the final cut by both George Harrison and John Lennon. Interesting, huh?

9. Z's position : LAST
The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

13. Girl's name that's a benefit in reverse? : TESSA
The girls’ name “Tessa” makes the word “asset’ when reversed.

22. Texas home of the Sun Bowl : EL PASO
The Sun Bowl is an annual college football game played in El Paso. The Rose Bowl is the oldest of the bowl games, but the Sun Bowl, Sugar Bowl and Orange Bowl come in second. The first Sun Bowl was played on New Year's Day 1935. To be fair to the sponsors, the full name today is the Hyundai Sun Bowl ...

24. Early filmmaker Fritz : LANG
Fritz Lang was an Austrian-born American filmmaker. His masterpiece "Metropolis" was produced in Germany in 1927, a work of science-fiction that explored the struggle between workers and owners in a capitalist society. "Metropolis" was the most expensive silent movie ever made. One of Lang’s more famous sound films is “M”, which stars Peter Lorre and was released in 1931.

25. It just took this before "I fell so hard in love with you," in a 1960s hit : ONE LOOK
“Just One Look” was a hit in 1963 for Doris Troy, who co-wrote the song with Gregory Carroll. It was a song with great legs, with cover versions being hits for the Hollies (1964), Anne Murray (1974) and Linda Ronstadt (1978).

28. Burkina Faso neighbor : MALI
The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa, south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, the nation’s most famous city is Timbuktu. Mali is the third-largest producer of gold on the continent, after South Africa and Ghana.

Burkina Faso is an inland country in western Africa. The country used to be called the Republic of Upper Volta and was renamed in 1984 to Burkina Faso meaning “the land of upright people”.

29. Some stuffed bears : POOHS
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful "Winnie-the-Pooh" series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin's real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

30. Hearth : INGLE
An ingle is a name for a hearth or fireplace. The word "ingle" probably comes from the Scottish word "aingeal" meaning "fire".

35. "___ go bragh!" : ERIN
“Erin go bragh!” is an anglicization of an Irish phrase “Éirinn go Brách!”, which translates as “Ireland Forever!”

39. Salinger title girl : ESME
J. D. Salinger wrote a short story called "For Esmé - with Love and Squalor", originally published in "The New Yorker" in 1950. It is a story about a young English girl called Esme and an American soldier, and is set in WWII.

42. Morning TV weatherman : AL ROKER
Al Roker is best known as the meteorologist on the “Today” show on NBC. He has successfully branched out from that platform though, and even co-wrote a novel called “The Morning Show Murders”, about a celebrity chef and TV host who get entangled in mystery. Topical stuff …

46. Gas brand with an arrow in its logo : SUNOCO
Back in the late 1800s, Sunoco was known as the Sun Oil Company.

47. "Always on Time" rapper : JA RULE
Ja Rule is the stage name of rapper Jeffrey Atkins. Apparently Ja Rule is noted not only for his music, but for his “feuds” with the likes of 50 Cent and Eminem.

52. World leader with a distinctive jacket : MAO
What we call the Mao suit in the west is known as the Zhongshan suit in China. The style was introduced by Sun Yat-sen (also known as Sun Zhongshan) as the form of national dress after the founding of the Republic of China in 1912.

54. Divas have big ones : EGOS
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

55. Sch. overlooking Harlem : CCNY
The City College of New York (CCNY) is a college of the City University of New York. The City College was founded as the Free Academy of the City of New York in 1847, and was the first free public institution of higher education in the whole country.

The Manhattan district of Harlem is sometimes divided into Central Harlem, West Harlem and East Harlem. East Harlem is also known as Spanish Harlem.

56. Morales of "La Bamba" : ESAI
The actor Esai Morales is best known for his role in the 1987 movie "La Bamba", which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai).

57. Hockey feint : DEKE
A deke, also known as a dangle, is a technique used to get past an opponent in ice hockey. "Deke" is a colloquial shortening of the word "decoy".

60. Many an August birth : LEO
Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Volleyball actions between bumps and spikes : SETS
5. Name on an orange-and-white truck : U-HAUL
10. "Hey, buddy!" : PSST!
14. "What ___" (1996 Sublime hit) : I GOT
15. Some chip dip : SALSA
16. Ceremony : RITE
17. What red markers may indicate on 59-Acrosses : LADIES TEES
19. Altar exchange : I DOS
20. Even (with) : ON A PAR
21. Cat in a record store : STEVENS
23. To date : YET
24. Musician Reed or Rawls : LOU
26. Tripoli's land : LIBYA
27. Musical name after Tori or before Lee : AMOS
29. Ancestor of the harmonica : PANPIPE
31. Supporter : FAN
32. Top-shelf : A-ONE
33. 1960s Egyptian president : NASSER
37. "___ My Children" : ALL
38. Some links holes ... with a hint to the circled letters : DOGLEGS
40. ___-Magnon : CRO
41. Capital of Saudi Arabia : RIYADH
43. Capital of Norway : OSLO
44. Big export of Saudi Arabia and Norway : OIL
45. Lithe : LISSOME
47. When summer officially starts : JUNE
48. Like a disciplinarian's talk : STERN
51. Luau instrument, informally : UKE
52. Symbol of power, with "the" : MAN
53. Like some lights : HALOGEN
55. Scored, as on a 59-Across : CARDED
58. "Out of Africa" author Dinesen : ISAK
59. 18 holes, often : GOLF COURSE
62. Suffix with disk : -ETTE
63. Indian ___ : OCEAN
64. Pipeline problem : LEAK
65. Animal that's sometimes frozen in the headlights : DEER
66. Like a chimney sweep : SOOTY
67. Nobel winner Wiesel : ELIE

Down
1. Missile ___ : SILO
2. Op-ed columnist Timothy : EGAN
3. "Act quickly! This offer will end very soon!" : TODAY ONLY!
4. Supporting stalks : STIPES
5. Country in a classic Beatles title : USSR
6. Overhead expense? : HAT
7. Pub order : ALE
8. Exhausts : USES UP
9. Z's position : LAST
10. Outhouses : PRIVIES
11. Obsolescent designation in the music business : SIDE B
12. Expressionless : STONY
13. Girl's name that's a benefit in reverse? : TESSA
18. Sup : EAT
22. Texas home of the Sun Bowl : EL PASO
24. Early filmmaker Fritz : LANG
25. It just took this before "I fell so hard in love with you," in a 1960s hit : ONE LOOK
27. Way off : AFAR
28. Burkina Faso neighbor : MALI
29. Some stuffed bears : POOHS
30. Hearth : INGLE
32. Doing sums : ADDING
34. Rascal : SCOUNDREL
35. "___ go bragh!" : ERIN
36. Something cast : ROLE
39. Salinger title girl : ESME
42. Morning TV weatherman : AL ROKER
46. Gas brand with an arrow in its logo : SUNOCO
47. "Always on Time" rapper : JA RULE
48. Recoiled (from) : SHIED
49. Flavor : TASTE
50. Thrill : ELATE
52. World leader with a distinctive jacket : MAO
54. Divas have big ones : EGOS
55. Sch. overlooking Harlem : CCNY
56. Morales of "La Bamba" : ESAI
57. Hockey feint : DEKE
60. Many an August birth : LEO
61. What beef marbling is : FAT


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0328-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Mar 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: Appealing … each of today’s themed answers ends with something that is peeled:
35A. Winsome ... or like the ends of 17-, 24-, 51- and 58-Across, to a punster? : APPEALING

17A. Bump on the neck : ADAM'S APPLE
24A. Issue that's too dangerous to touch : HOT POTATO
51A. Grand pooh-bah : TOP BANANA
58A. Hand-blown wine bottle that's also the title of a 1968 Beatles song : GLASS ONION
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Bills and coins : CASH
Our word “cash” comes from the Middle French “caisse” meaning “money box”.

10. Sumptuously furnished : POSH
No one really knows the etymology of the word "posh". The popular myth that POSH stands for "Port Out, Starboard Home" is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang". The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

14. Pear-shaped stringed instrument : LUTE
A lute player is a “lutenist”. A nice bit of trivia ...

15. Hebrew school reading : TORAH
The word "Torah" best translates as "teaching", I am told.

17. Bump on the neck : ADAM'S APPLE
The voice box or larynx is where pitch and volume of sound are manipulated when we talk. The structure called the Adam’s apple that protrudes from the human neck is formed by the thyroid cartilage that surrounds the larynx. The Adam’s apple of males tends to increase in size during puberty, so the feature tended to be associated more with males in days gone by, perhaps leading to the name “Adam’s” apple.

20. Like monkeys and 59-Downs : SIMIAN
“Simian” means “pertaining to monkeys or apes”, from the Latin word “simia” meaning “ape”.

23. What angry bees do : STING
A queen bee has a stinger, just like worker bees. When a worker bee stings, it leaves it stinger in its victim. The worker bee dies after losing its stinger as the loss rips out part of its insides. However, a queen bee can sting with impunity as the stinger’s anatomy is different.

34. Tennis champ Agassi : ANDRE
Renowned tennis professional Andre Agassi was nicknamed “the Punisher”, because of the efficiency with which he ran most of his opponents around the court. He wrote an autobiography called "Open", published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi's famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

42. Sloe ___ fizz : GIN
By definition, a cocktail known as a Fizz includes lemon or lime juice and carbonated water. The most popular of the genre is the Gin Fizz, made from 3 parts gin, 2 parts lemon juice, 1 part sugar syrup and 5 parts soda water. There is also a variant known as a sloe gin fizz.

43. Completely gratify : SATE
"Sate" is a variant of the older word "satiate". Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

51. Grand pooh-bah : TOP BANANA
The expression “top banana” is used to mean “the main guy” or “Mr. Big”. The first person to use “top banana” was supposedly Vaudeville performer Harry Steppe in 1927, who applied it to the top comic on the bill. The phrase comes from a comedy routine in which three comics struggle to share two bananas.

The term "pooh-bah" (also “poobah”), meaning an ostentatious official, comes from the world of opera. Pooh-Bah is a character in the wonderful Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera "The Mikado". Famously, the Pooh-Bah in “The Mikado” holds many, many offices, including that of "Lord High Everything Else".

53. 100-meter dash or shot put : EVENT
Shot put, or events like shot put, have been around for millennia, but the first events that truly resemble today's track and field event had to come with the invention of the cannonball. Soldiers would "putt" (throw) cannonballs as far as possible in attempts to outperform each other. Shot put has been in the modern Olympic Games since day-one, with an American winning the gold in the first games in 1896, one Robert Garrett.

55. Itzhak Perlman's instrument : VIOLIN
Itzhak Perlman is an Israeli-American violinist from Tel Aviv, and a virtuosi who I had the pleasure of hearing perform not too long ago. Little known fact: Perlman is a distant cousin of comedian Howie Mandel.

57. Huckleberry ___ : FINN
"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain was first published in 1884, not here in the US but rather in England. The original launch planned for the US had to be delayed until 1885, because some rascal had defaced the plate for one of the illustrations, making an obscene joke. Once the problem was spotted a new plate had to be made, and 30,000 copies already printed had to be reworked to cover up the obscenity.

58. Hand-blown wine bottle that's also the title of a 1968 Beatles song : GLASS ONION
“Glass Onion” is a 1968 Beatles song that is sort of self-referential in that there are mentions in the lyrics to earlier Beatles songs, including "Strawberry Fields Forever", "I Am the Walrus", "Lady Madonna" and "The Fool on the Hill".

65. Many a middle schooler : TWEEN
The term "tween" is now used to describe preadolescence, the years between 8 and 12 years of age.

Down
5. ___ Lee of Marvel Comics : STAN
Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he has a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

7. Painter/poet Jean ___ : ARP
Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

9. Curly's replacement in the Three Stooges : SHEMP
If you've seen a few of the films starring "The Three Stooges" you'll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as "Moe, Larry and Shemp". Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, "Moe, Larry And Curly". Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then "Curly-Joe" DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

10. "Sunflowers" and "Water Lilies" : PAINTINGS
“Sunflowers” is the name of two series of paintings by Vincent van Gogh. In the first series, the flowers are lying on the ground and in the second, more famous series painted in Arles, the flowers are in a vase. Famously, a Japanese insurance magnate purchased “Still Life: Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers” in 1987 in an auction, paying just under $40 million. This price outstripped the previous record price paid for a work of art by a wide, wide margin, one that stood at $12 million.

“Water Lilies” by French Impressionist Claude Monet is actually a whole series of paintings, numbering about 250 in total. The subjects of the works were the water lilies in Monet’s flower garden at Giverny in northern France.

22. Early caucusgoer : IOWAN
The Iowa caucuses have been the first major electoral event in the nominating process for President since 1972.

A “caucus” is a meeting of supporters of a particular political group. It is believed that the term was first used in the original North American colonies.

24. Aesop character who lost a race : HARE
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

25. Shape of a stop sign : OCTAGON
In the US, a stop sign is red, and octagonal.

29. Easy-to-chew food : PAP
One meaning of "pap" is soft or semi-liquid food for babies and small children. "Pap" comes into English via French, from the Latin word used by children for "food". In the 1500s, "pap" also came to mean "an oversimplified" idea. This gives us a usage that's common today, describing literature or perhaps TV programming that lacks real value or substance. Hands up those who think there's a lot of pap out there, especially on television ...

37. Capital of Peru : LIMA
Lima is the capital city of Peru. Lima was founded in 1535 by the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro, who named it “la Ciudad de los Reyes” (the City of Kings). He chose this name because the decision to found the city was made on January 6th, the feast of the Epiphany that commemorates the visit of the three kings to Jesus in Bethlehem.

44. "Sweet land of liberty," in song : AMERICA
The patriotic song “America” is also known by its first line, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”. The song was written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1831, and was the de facto national anthem of the country until “The Star-Spangled Banner” was declared the official anthem in 1931. The melody of “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee” is identical with the British national anthem, “God Save the Queen”.

45. Did a stylized ballroom dance : TANGOED
The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay.

49. "Finding ___" (2003 Pixar film) : NEMO
"Finding Nemo" is a 2003 animated blockbuster from Pixar. The film was the winner of the Oscar that year for Best Animated Feature. Believe it or not, "Finding Nemo" is the best-selling DVD of all time and, until 2010's "Toy Story 3", it was the highest-grossing, G-rated movie at the box office.

54. Open to bribery : VENAL
Someone described as “venal” is open to bribery. The term ultimately derives from the Latin word “venus” meaning “for sale”.

56. Channel that describes itself as "The worldwide leader in sports" : ESPN
ESPN is the Entertainment Sports Programming Network, a cable network that broadcasts sports programming 24 hours a day. ESPN was launched back in 1979.

57. Hat with a tassel : FEZ
"Fez" is the name given to the red cylindrical hat worn mainly in North Africa, and by Shriners here in the US. The fez used to be a very popular hat across the Ottoman Empire. The etymology of "fez" is unclear, although it might have something to do with the Moroccan city named Fez.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bills and coins : CASH
5. Light punishment on wrists : SLAPS
10. Sumptuously furnished : POSH
14. Pear-shaped stringed instrument : LUTE
15. Hebrew school reading : TORAH
16. Throw a chip in the pot : ANTE
17. Bump on the neck : ADAM'S APPLE
19. Letter-shaped girder : I-BAR
20. Like monkeys and 59-Downs : SIMIAN
21. Key with no sharps or flats : A MINOR
23. What angry bees do : STING
24. Issue that's too dangerous to touch : HOT POTATO
27. Charged particle : ION
28. Quickly : APACE
30. Connected to the Internet : WIRED
31. Constant complainer : CRAB
33. State-of-the-___ : ART
34. Tennis champ Agassi : ANDRE
35. Winsome ... or like the ends of 17-, 24-, 51- and 58-Across, to a punster? : APPEALING
39. Steeple : SPIRE
42. Sloe ___ fizz : GIN
43. Completely gratify : SATE
47. Having a gun : ARMED
48. Like the numerals I, V, X and L : ROMAN
50. Highest setting, informally : MAX
51. Grand pooh-bah : TOP BANANA
53. 100-meter dash or shot put : EVENT
55. Itzhak Perlman's instrument : VIOLIN
56. Come out : EMERGE
57. Huckleberry ___ : FINN
58. Hand-blown wine bottle that's also the title of a 1968 Beatles song : GLASS ONION
61. Favorable margin : EDGE
62. Increase the energy of : HOP UP
63. Scored 100 on : ACED
64. Sleep indicators in the comics : ZEES
65. Many a middle schooler : TWEEN
66. Young fellows : LADS

Down
1. Like rock music from the 1950s-'70s, now : CLASSIC
2. Tax fraud investigator : AUDITOR
3. Something a long-distance runner needs : STAMINA
4. Encircle : HEM IN
5. ___ Lee of Marvel Comics : STAN
6. Cut (off) : LOP
7. Painter/poet Jean ___ : ARP
8. Gourmet's heightened sense : PALATE
9. Curly's replacement in the Three Stooges : SHEMP
10. "Sunflowers" and "Water Lilies" : PAINTINGS
11. In a plane or train : ON BOARD
12. Opposite of a bench player : STARTER
13. His counterpart : HER
18. Multigenerational tale : SAGA
22. Early caucusgoer : IOWAN
24. Aesop character who lost a race : HARE
25. Shape of a stop sign : OCTAGON
26. Appreciative poem : ODE
29. Easy-to-chew food : PAP
32. Nitty-gritty : BARE BONES
36. One of two on a bike : PEDAL
37. Capital of Peru : LIMA
38. Any port ___ storm : IN A
39. Used a bench : SAT
40. Bring home the bacon, so to speak : PROVIDE
41. Encroach (on) : IMPINGE
44. "Sweet land of liberty," in song : AMERICA
45. Did a stylized ballroom dance : TANGOED
46. Widens : EXTENDS
48. Was almost out of supplies : RAN LOW
49. "Finding ___" (2003 Pixar film) : NEMO
52. When one sees stars : NIGHT
54. Open to bribery : VENAL
56. Channel that describes itself as "The worldwide leader in sports" : ESPN
57. Hat with a tassel : FEZ
59. Jungle swinger : APE
60. Begin litigation : SUE


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0327-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Mar 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Blindauer
THEME: Pitch Imperfect … today’s themed answers are advertising slogans with the letters in one word rearranged:
23A. Warren Buffett's rule about hugging? : DON’T SQUEEZE THE RICH MAN (Charmin)
39A. Encouraging words from slug enthusiasts? : WE LOVE TO SEE YOU SLIME (smile)
64A. Shout to one about to be knighted? : THIS DUB’S (Bud’s) FOR YOU
73A. Take a clothing slogan too seriously? : OBEY YOUR T-SHIRT (thirst)
100A. Tulle, to brides? : THE FABRIC OF OUR VEILS (lives)
118A. "After all that hard work, I'll order some cake"? : YOU DESERVE A BAKER (break) TODAY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

16. When Hamlet says "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio" : ACT V
In Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, there is a scene when Prince Hamlet holds in his hand the skull of the deceased court jester Yorick. Hamlet starts into a famous monologue at this point:
Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is …
The opening line is often misquoted as “Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well.”

20. Sponsor of classic radio's "Little Orphan Annie" : OVALTINE
Ovaltine is a milk-flavoring product that was developed in Berne, Switzerland in the early 1900s. It is still called by its original name in its native Switzerland, namely “Ovomaltine”. The “ovo-maltine” name reflects the main ingredients back then: eggs and malt.

21. Lindbergh, e.g. : AVIATOR
The renowned aviator Charles Lindbergh was dubbed “Lucky Lindy” by the press, which was perhaps a reference to his narrow escape in four airplane crashes, including two incidents when he had to deploy his parachute.

22. Japanese noodle : SOBA
Soba is a thin Japanese noodle made from buckwheat flour. In Japan, the word soba tends to be used to describe any thin noodle, in contrast with the thicker noodles that are called udon.

23. Warren Buffett's rule about hugging? : DON’T SQUEEZE THE RICH MAN (Charmin)
Charmin is a brand of toilet paper made by Procter & Gamble.

Warren Buffett is one of my heroes, a man with the nickname “Wizard of Omaha”. Despite being one of the wealthiest men in the world, he lives a relatively frugal and modest life. Buffett also has a very Jeffersonian attitude towards the role his wealth plays within his family. He has set up his estate so that his children get enough money to be independent, but the vast majority of his assets are going to charity, both before and after he dies.

26. Toymaker Rubik : ERNO
What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik's Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

27. Cone head? : SNO-
A sno-cone (also "snow cone") is just a paper cone filled with crushed ice and topped with flavored water. Italian ice is similar, but different. Whereas the flavoring is added on top of the ice to make a sno-cone, Italian ice is made with water that is flavored before it is frozen.

28. Actor Stephen : REA
Stephen Rea is an Irish actor from Belfast. Rea’s most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

29. Like some prose : PURPLE
“Purple prose” is prose that is overly ornate and flowery, so much so that it draws attention to itself, detracting from the narrative.

30. You are, in español : ERES
“Español” is Spanish for “Spanish”.

33. Math ordinal : NTH
Ordinal numbers express a position in a series, i.e. first, second, third etc.

35. Tiger Stadium sch. : LSU
The LSU Tigers are the sports teams of Louisiana State University (LSU). They are officially known as the Fightin' Tigers, and the school mascot is "Mike the Tiger". The name comes from the days of the Civil War, when two Louisiana brigades earned the nickname the "Louisiana Tigers". Given the French/Cajun history of Louisiana, the LSU fans use the cheer “Geaux Tigers” instead of “Go Tigers”.

39. Encouraging words from slug enthusiasts? : WE LOVE TO SEE YOU SLIME (smile)
“We love to see you smile” is a slogan used by McDonald’s.

47. Grp. that gets the lead out? : NRA
National Rifle Association (NRA)

51. Fifth-to-last word in the Lord's Prayer : GLORY
The Lord's Prayer is a central prayer in Christian religions, and is found in two places in the New Testament. In the version in the Gospel of Matthew, the last line of the prayer is "deliver us from evil". In the Gospel of Luke, the last line is "lead us not into temptation". The last words of the prayer as it most often said today are:
For thine is the kingdom,
The power, and the glory,
For ever and ever,
Amen

56. Creature on the Australian coat of arms : EMU
The official symbol of Australia is a coat of arms that features a kangaroo and an emu.

57. Mozart's "___ kleine Nachtmusik" : EINE
Mozart's Serenade No. 13 for strings in G major, is better known as "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik", which translates into "a little serenade", but the more literal English translation of "a little night music" is often used. It is a delightful piece in four, very recognizable movements, although there is much debate about a "lost" fifth movement.

59. Rap's Dr. ___ : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

60. Hayek of "Frida" : SALMA
Salma Hayek is a Mexican actress. Hayek was the first Mexican national to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar, for her portrayal of artist Frida Kahlo in the 2002 movie "Frida".

62. Longtime soap actress Hall : DEIDRE
Deidre Hall is the actress who has played Dr. Marlena Evans on the soap opera “Days of Our Lives” since 1976.

64. Shout to one about to be knighted? : THIS DUB’S (Bud’s) FOR YOU
Kneel, and the Queen might "dub thee a knight". "Dub" is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean "make a knight". As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, "dub" has come to mean "give someone a name".

The American beer named Budweiser (often shortened to “Bud”) is named for the Czech town of Budweis (“České Budějovice” in Czech). The name is the subject of a dispute as here is an original Czech beer with a similar name, Budweiser Budvar. American Budweiser is sold in most European countries as “Bud”.

71. Milo of stage and screen : O’SHEA
Milo O'Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from "Romeo and Juliet" to "The West Wing". Sadly, O’Shea passed away in 2013, in New York City.

72. Voice from a phone : SIRI
Siri is software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri not that long ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. Also, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

73. Take a clothing slogan too seriously? : OBEY YOUR T-SHIRT (thirst)
“Obey Your Thirst” is a slogan used to promote Sprite.

Sprite is Coca-Cola’s answer to the very successful soft drink called 7 Up. Sprite was introduced in 1961, and Coca-Cola used its muscle to topple 7 Up from its dominant position in the market. Sprite has been the number-one selling lemon soda since 1978.

78. Like Loyola and Xavier universities : JESUIT
Saint Ignatius of Loyola (also known as Inigo Lopez de Loyola) was a Spanish knight from a noble family in the Basque region of Spain. He left behind his easy life to become a hermit and a priest, and eventually founded the Society of Jesus (The Jesuit order of the Roman Catholic church).

84. 1 + 2, in Germany : DREI
The German for “one, two, three” is "eins, zwei, drei".

86. Prefix with -scope : ENDO-
An endoscope is an instrument used to make a visual examination of the inside of an organ or cavity of the body.

87. Investment sometimes pronounced as a name : IRA
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

96. ___ Day (Hawaiian holiday) : LEI
What’s known as May Day around the world is also called Lei Day in Hawaii. Lei Day started in the twenties and is a celebration of native Hawaiian culture.

97. SEAL Team 6 mission : RAID
The US Special Forces unit that is popularly referred to as SEAL Team Six, is more correctly known as the US Naval Warfare Development Group (NSWDG). “SEAL Team Six” was actually the name of the unit’s predecessor, which was disbanded in 1987. The original group was created soon after the Iran hostage crisis of 1979. Two SEAL teams were deployed, and the name SEAL Team Six was used as a ruse in order to confuse the Russian intelligence services about the actual number of teams in existence.

99. Chinese calendar animal : RAT
The 12-year cycle in the Chinese calendar uses the following animals in order:
- Rat
- Ox
- Tiger
- Rabbit
- Dragon
- Snake
- Horse
- Goat
- Monkey
- Rooster
- Dog
- Pig

100. Tulle, to brides? : THE FABRIC OF OUR VEILS (lives)
“The Fabric of Our Lives” is a slogan used by the cotton industry.

Tulle is a lightweight net fabric often used in veils, wedding gowns and ballet tutus.

104. Carriage : MIEN
One's “mien” is one's bearing or manner. "Mien" shares the same etymological root as our word "demeanor".

105. Dundee turndown : NAE
The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name "Dundee" are a little obscure, although the omnipresent "dùn" in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for "fort".

106. Messenger of biochemistry : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

107. French film director Clair : RENE
René Clair was a film director from Paris who made movies in France, the UK and in the US. I must admit, the only René Clair film that I’ve seen is 1945’s “And Then There Were None”, an adaptation of the Agatha Christie mystery novel that stars Barry Fitzgerald and Walter Huston.

108. Gray matter? : BOTANY
Asa Gray was an important American botanist in the nineteenth century. He was a lifelong friend of Charles Darwin, albeit mainly through correspondence. Darwin's book "Forms of Flowers", was dedicated to Gray.

112. ___-d'Oise (French department) : VAL
Val-d’Oise is a French department located just to the north of Paris. Part of the Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport is located in Val-d’Oise.

115. "American Greed" channel : CNBC
“American Greed” is documentary series in the “true crime” genre that is aired weekly on CNBC. The crimes explored are corporate and white collar crimes.

118. "After all that hard work, I'll order some cake"? : YOU DESERVE A BAKER (break) TODAY
“You Deserve a Break Today” is a slogan that was used by McDonald’s for decades.

124. Latin word on the back of a dollar bill : ORDO
The Latin phrase “novus ordo seclorum” means "new order of the ages”. These words appear on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, a device used to authenticate some US federal documents. “Novus ordo seclorum” also appears on the back of one-dollar bills. The phrase itself is lifted from one of the works of the ancient Roman poet Virgil.

125. Compact : ENTENTE
An “entente cordiale” (sometimes just “entente”) is a friendly understanding, usually between two nations. The term, which translates from French as “cordial agreement”, was first used to describe a set of agreements between the UK and France that were put in place 1904.

128. Antarctic waters : ROSS SEA
The Ross Sea is a bay in the Southern Ocean of Antarctica. It was discovered by one James Ross in 1841. A more recent discovery, in the waters of the Ross Sea, was a 33 feet long giant squid that was captured in 2007.

Down
2. Composer Novello : IVOR
Ivor Novello was one of the most popular entertainers in Britain in the early 20th century. Novello was a Welsh composer, singer and actor. On top of his success on the stage and in front of the camera, he even wrote the dialogue for the 1932 movie "Tarzan the Ape Man" starring Johnny Weissmuller.

3. Cylindrical pasta : CANNELLONI
Cannelloni differs from manicotti, even though both are essentially tubes of pasta. Manicotti (Italian for "sleeves") are pre-shaped tubes. Cannelloni (Italian for "large reeds") are rectangular sheets of pasta that are rolled into tubes after having been stuffed with some filling.

4. The matador's foe : EL TORO
“Matador” is a Spanish word used in English for a bullfighter, although the term isn't used in the same way in Spanish. The equivalent in Spanish is "torero". "Matador" translates aptly enough as “killer”.

8. Member of Generation Z : TEEN
Definitions vary, but it seems that Generation Z is reserved for the children of Generation X.

The term Generation X originated in the UK, the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of her study of British youth in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. However, Canadian author Douglas Coupland was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen Xers were born from 1961 to 1981.

9. Looney Tunes devil, for short : TAZ
The “Looney Tunes” character known as the Tasmanian Devil, or “Taz”, first appeared on screens in 1964 but gained real popularity in the 1990s.

The carnivorous marsupial known as the Tasmanian devil is aptly named, in the sense that the only place the animal is found in the wild is on the island of Tasmania. The “little devils” are about the size of a small dog, and they have the strongest bite for their size of any known mammal.

12. Thanks, in Hawaii : MAHALO
In Hawaiian, “mahalo” means “thank you” and “mahalo nui loa” translates as “thank you very much”.

13. Juillet et août : ETE
“Août” is the French for August, and “juillet” is French for July (note that the name of months aren't capitalized in French). Both are months in the season of “été” (summer).

14. Ibsen's homeland: Abbr. : NOR
Henrik Ibsen was a Norwegian playwright, considered by many to be the greatest playwright since William Shakespeare. Ibsen was famous for shocking his audiences by exploring subjects that offended the sensibilities of the day (the late 1800s).

16. Indian retreats : ASHRAMS
“Ashram” is a Hindu term that traditionally describes a place of spiritual retreat, one that is typically located in a remote location conducive to spiritual instruction and meditation.

31. "Climb ___ Mountain" : EV’RY
"Climb Ev'ry Mountain" is a famous show tune from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "The Sound of Music". The song is performed by the Mother Abbess, and is an inspirational number. She is encouraging people to take whatever steps are necessary in pursuing one's dream.

32. Sicilian six : SEI
In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

40. Kemper of "The Office" : ELLIE
When Pam gave up her spot at the reception desk in the US version of the hit sitcom "The Office", it was taken over by Kelly Erin Hannon. Erin, as she is known, is played by Ellie Kemper. Kemper had auditioned for the sitcom "Parks and Recreation". She did get a call she did get a callback, but was offered a part on “The Office” instead of “Parks and Recreation”. I think it's a great show, and the addition of the character called Erin adds a lot ...

42. Stoned : ON POT
“Potiguaya” is the Mexican-Spanish word for “marijuana leaves”. The slang name “pot” comes from “potiguaya”.

44. Mormons, for short : LDS
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, often abbreviated to "LDS", is known colloquially as the Mormon Church.

49. What a bandoleer holds : AMMO
A “bandolier” (also “bandoleer”) is a belt with small pockets that hold ammunition. A bandolier is usually worn over the shoulders, rather than around the waist. The term derives from the Spanish “banda” meaning “scarf, sash”.

50. Party with pu pu platters : LUAU
In Hawaiian, “pu-pu” is a word originally meaning “snail”. Nowadays “pu-pu” denotes many different types of food that are usually served as an hors d’oeuvres. A “pupu platter” then is a selection of such foods served in a Hawaiian restaurant. The term “pupu platter” somehow became absorbed into American Chinese cuisine in the fifties, so one can order the same dish in a Chinese restaurant and get a plate of Chinese morsels.

52. Cotton candy additive : RED DYE
What we call “cotton candy” here in the US has some interesting names in the rest of the world. Back in Ireland it's candyfloss, and in France it "barbe à papa" (Dad's beard). In Australia it is called fairy floss, which is actually the original name for cotton candy, first used when it was introduced at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904.

54. Mummy in "The Mummy" : IMHOTEP
Imhotep was early Egyptian polymath who was a noted architect, engineer and physician. He designed and supervised the construction of the Step Pyramid of Djoser, which held the remains of Imhotep’s Pharaoh Djoser. Imhotep also constructed his own tomb, the existence of which is well documented, although it has never been located. It is believed that Imhotep constructed his tomb in such a way that it would remain hidden.

“The Mummy” is a 1999 horror film, a remake of the 1932 film of the same name starring Boris Karloff in the title role. Arnold Vosloo plays Karloff’s role in the 1999 version.

55. Saverin who co-founded Facebook : EDUARDO
If you’ve seen the 2010 movie “The Social Network”, you’ll know about the turmoil that surrounded the launch of the website Facebook. The company's co-founders are Mark Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg) and Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield). The way things are portrayed in the movie, Saverin was poorly treated by Zuckerberg after the “sharks” moved in, i.e. the professional investors. Supposedly Saverin’s stock position in the company was diluted “without his knowledge” from 34% to about 5%, to the benefit of the remaining investors.

58. Musical lead-in to -smith : AERO-
Aerosmith is a hard rock band from Boston that formed in 1970. Aerosmith is the best-selling American rock band of all time, and holds the record for most gold albums by any American group.

63. Rogers, Orbison and Yamaguchi : ROYS
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers' real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was "King of the Cowboys". Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans' nickname was "Queen of the West".

Roy Orbison had to be one the sickliest looking performers I've ever seen. Orbison had a very sallow complexion, pock-marked from teenage acne. The yellowish skin tone came from a severe bout of jaundice as a child. Perhaps poor nutrition affected him and his siblings, because all of them had very poor eyesight, with Roy almost blind and wearing very thick lenses from a very young age. He was also very ashamed of his head of hair, which was almost a ghostly white, and so he dyed it jet black even when he was young. Despite all this, he was immensely popular in his heyday with teenage girls, particularly in Canada and Ireland for some reason. On a tour of Ireland in 1963, the Irish police had to stop one of his performances in order to pull a bevy of local lasses off poor Mr. Orbison ...

Roy Yamaguchi is celebrity chef and founder of Roy’s Restaurants, a chain of Hawaii-inspired eating establishments.

65. Magazine edition: Abbr. : ISS
Issue (Iss.)

67. Roman gods : DEI
“Deus” (plural “dei”) is Latin for “god”.

68. Country whose name is one letter different from a mountain : FIJI
The island nation of Fiji is an archipelago in the South Pacific made up of over 330 islands, 110 of which are inhabited. Fiji was occupied by the British for over a century and finally gained its independence in 1970.

Mount Fuji is Japan's highest and most famous mountain. It is an active volcano, situated just west of Tokyo.

70. Gheorghe ___, former 7'7" N.B.A. player : MURESAN
Gheorghe Mureșan is a retired NBA basketball player from Romania. Standing at 7 foot 7 inches tall, Mureșan is the tallest man in his native land, and the second tallest man in the European Union.

74. 1-5 on a cellphone screen : BARS
The strength of cell phone reception is usually illustrated by a series of five bars.

76. iRobot vacuum : ROOMBA
The Roomba vacuum cleaner is a cool-looking device that navigates its way around a room by itself, picking up dirt as it goes. Like I said, it's cool-looking but I am not sure how effective it is ...

77. Cape Cod town : TRURO
Truro is a town in the Outer Cape, close to the northern tip of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. The area was settled in the late 1600s by English colonists who named it for the city of Truro in Cornwall, England. Truro is home to the Highland Light (also called “the Cape Cod Light”), which was the first lighthouse to be built on Cape Cod. The first Highland Lighthouse was built in 1797, and the current structure was erected in 1857. The whole structure had to be moved a tenth of a mile inland in 1996, as it had become endangered by coastal erosion.

79. Cut ties with, in a way : UNFRIENDED
That would be on Facebook, I assume …

81. Law school class : TORTS
The word "tort" is a French word meaning "mischief, injury or wrong". Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

85. Whom "I saw" on a seesaw, in a tongue twister : ESAU
I saw Esau, he saw me.
I saw Esau, sitting on a see-saw,
I saw Esau, he saw me.
I saw Esau, he saw me, and she saw I saw Esau.
How many S’s in that?

88. Peter Pan rival : JIF
Jif is the leading brand of peanut butter in the US, and has been since 1981. Introduced in 1958, it is now produced by Smuckers.

The Peter Pan brand of peanut butter is named for the character in the J. M. Barrie play.

89. Ring master : ALI
Muhammad Ali won 56 professional fights, 37 of which were knockouts. He lost 5 fights, 4 being decisions and one being a technical knockout (TKO). The TKO-loss was Ali’s second-last fight, against Larry Holmes. By the time Ali took on Holmes, he was already showing signs of Parkinson’s Syndrome, although the diagnosis would not come until four years later. Ali turned out for his last two fights largely because he needed the money. A sad end to a career, I’d say …

91. One-named hitmaker of the 1950s-'60s : DION
Dion and the Belmonts were a vocal group from the fifties who had success in the late fifties. The four singers were from the Bronx in New York, with two living on Belmont Avenue, hence the name that was chosen. Perhaps the biggest hits for Dion and the Belmonts were “A Teenager in Love” and "Where or When".

92. Word with two apostrophes : I’D’VE
I would have can be abbreviated to “I’d’ve”.

95. Pasta whose name is Italian for "feathers" : PENNE
Cylindrical pasta is known in general as “penne”, and there are many variants. For example, ziti is a particularly large and long tube with square-cut ends. "Penne" is the plural of "penna", the Italian for "feather, quill".

98. Sale tag abbr. : IRR
Irregular (irr.)

101. "Speed" star : REEVES
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" (1989), a cop in "Speed" (1994) and the main antagonist Neo in "The Matrix" series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name "Keanu" is Hawaiian for "the coldness".

"Speed" is a 1994 action film, starring Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock, as well as the late Dennis Hopper as the bad guy.

104. "Where to Invade Next" filmmaker : MOORE
“Where to Invade Next" is a 2015 documentary from Michael Moore. Moore travels the world highlighting ways that various countries deal with the social and economic pressures experienced back home in the US.

108. Letters of invitation? : BYOB
Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB)

109. 1914 battle site : YSER
The Yser river originates in northern France and flows through Belgium into the North Sea. The Yser is often associated with WWI as it figured in a major battle early in the conflict. In the first three months of the war, the German Army pushed almost completely through Belgium, inflicting heavy losses on the Belgian Army as the defenders were forced to fight a fast-moving rearguard action. The Germans were intent on pushing right through Belgium and across France in a "race to the sea". But the Belgians, with the help of their Allies, decided to make a final stand at the Yser Canal in an effort to prevent the Germans reaching the French ports of Calais and Dunkirk. The 22-mile long defensive line was chosen at the Yser because the river and canal system could be flooded to create a barrier that might be defended. The plan was successful and the front was "stabilized". As we now know, millions of lives were lost over the coming years with very little movement of that battle line.

111. Desires : YENS
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

114. Golf's Champagne Tony : LEMA
Tony Lema was a golfer, a native of Oakland, California. In 1962-1966 he had an impressive run of PGA victories, including a famous 1962 win at the Orange County Open. As a joke, he promised that should he win he would serve champagne to the press corps, who quickly gave him the nickname "Champagne Tony", a name that stuck. In 1966, Lema and his wife were flying in a small, chartered plane to an exhibition tournament in Illinois, when the aircraft ran out of fuel. Ironically, it crashed into a water hazard near the seventh green of a country club in Lansing, Illinois, killing all four people on board. Lema was 32-years-old.

116. City and province of southern Italy : BARI
Bari is a major port city on the Adriatic coast of Italy. Bari has the unfortunate distinction of being the only city in Europe to experience chemical warfare during WWII. Allied stores of mustard gas were released during a German bombing raid on Bari in 1943. Fatalities caused by the chemical agent were reported as 69, although other reports list the number as maybe a thousand military personnel and a thousand civilians.

119. Composer of the Windows 95 start-up sound : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:
I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

120. Some offensive linemen: Abbr. : RTS
In American football, linemen specialize in playing in the line of scrimmage. RT stands for Right Tackle. That's about all I know, and even that I am unsure about ...

122. New York engineering sch. : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

123. ___ Aviv : TEL
The full name of Israel's second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into "Spring Mound", a name chosen in 1910.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Comment after a bull's-eye : NICE SHOT
9. Distress : TORMENT
16. When Hamlet says "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio" : ACT V
20. Sponsor of classic radio's "Little Orphan Annie" : OVALTINE
21. Lindbergh, e.g. : AVIATOR
22. Japanese noodle : SOBA
23. Warren Buffett's rule about hugging? : DON’T SQUEEZE THE RICH MAN (Charmin)
26. Toymaker Rubik : ERNO
27. Cone head? : SNO-
28. Actor Stephen : REA
29. Like some prose : PURPLE
30. You are, in español : ERES
33. Math ordinal : NTH
35. Tiger Stadium sch. : LSU
38. Skyscraping : TALL
39. Encouraging words from slug enthusiasts? : WE LOVE TO SEE YOU SLIME (smile)
45. Word said with right or rise : ALL
46. Nothing: Fr. : RIEN
47. Grp. that gets the lead out? : NRA
48. Bust supporter : PEDESTAL
51. Fifth-to-last word in the Lord's Prayer : GLORY
53. "Sharp" fashion : SPIKE HEELS
56. Creature on the Australian coat of arms : EMU
57. Mozart's "___ kleine Nachtmusik" : EINE
58. Tiny powerhouse : ATOM
59. Rap's Dr. ___ : DRE
60. Hayek of "Frida" : SALMA
62. Longtime soap actress Hall : DEIDRE
64. Shout to one about to be knighted? : THIS DUB’S (Bud’s) FOR YOU
69. One side of a quad, say : DORM
71. Milo of stage and screen : O’SHEA
72. Voice from a phone : SIRI
73. Take a clothing slogan too seriously? : OBEY YOUR T-SHIRT (thirst)
78. Like Loyola and Xavier universities : JESUIT
82. Clobbers : WAXES
83. Fish eggs : ROE
84. 1 + 2, in Germany : DREI
86. Prefix with -scope : ENDO-
87. Investment sometimes pronounced as a name : IRA
88. Risky : JEOPARDOUS
92. Surmise : INFER
93. Video game playing, e.g. : ESCAPISM
96. ___ Day (Hawaiian holiday) : LEI
97. SEAL Team 6 mission : RAID
99. Chinese calendar animal : RAT
100. Tulle, to brides? : THE FABRIC OF OUR VEILS (lives)
104. Carriage : MIEN
105. Dundee turndown : NAE
106. Messenger of biochemistry : RNA
107. French film director Clair : RENE
108. Gray matter? : BOTANY
110. Have in view : EYE
112. ___-d'Oise (French department) : VAL
115. "American Greed" channel : CNBC
118. "After all that hard work, I'll order some cake"? : YOU DESERVE A BAKER (break) TODAY
124. Latin word on the back of a dollar bill : ORDO
125. Compact : ENTENTE
126. People holding things up : IMPEDERS
127. Bellyache : BEEF
128. Antarctic waters : ROSS SEA
129. "Perfecto!" : NAILED IT!

Down
1. Terminal in a computer network : NODE
2. Composer Novello : IVOR
3. Cylindrical pasta : CANNELLONI
4. The matador's foe : EL TORO
5. Peter and Francis: Abbr. : STS
6. Peg solitaire puzzle brand : HI-Q
7. Burden : ONUS
8. Member of Generation Z : TEEN
9. Looney Tunes devil, for short : TAZ
10. Possible reply to "Where are you?" : OVER HERE
11. Confirmation, e.g. : RITE
12. Thanks, in Hawaii : MAHALO
13. Juillet et août : ETE
14. Ibsen's homeland: Abbr. : NOR
15. Hit the ground running? : TRIP
16. Indian retreats : ASHRAMS
17. Hook, line and sinker : COMPLETELY
18. Game for little sluggers : T-BALL
19. Fan part : VANE
24. Huge spans : EONS
25. Little darling : CUTIE
31. "Climb ___ Mountain" : EV’RY
32. Sicilian six : SEI
34. Long race, in brief : TEN-K
36. Top-notch : SUPERB
37. Like most trivia, in the real world : USELESS
39. Carried on : WAGED
40. Kemper of "The Office" : ELLIE
41. Try : TEST
42. Stoned : ON POT
43. Derisive cry : YAH!
44. Mormons, for short : LDS
49. What a bandoleer holds : AMMO
50. Party with pu pu platters : LUAU
52. Cotton candy additive : RED DYE
54. Mummy in "The Mummy" : IMHOTEP
55. Saverin who co-founded Facebook : EDUARDO
58. Musical lead-in to -smith : AERO-
60. Like some losers : SORE
61. Up : ARISEN
63. Rogers, Orbison and Yamaguchi : ROYS
65. Magazine edition: Abbr. : ISS
66. "Hey, I want to listen here!" : SHH!
67. Roman gods : DEI
68. Country whose name is one letter different from a mountain : FIJI
70. Gheorghe ___, former 7'7" N.B.A. player : MURESAN
73. "Ooh, dat hurt!" : OWIE!
74. 1-5 on a cellphone screen : BARS
75. Precision : EXACTITUDE
76. iRobot vacuum : ROOMBA
77. Cape Cod town : TRURO
79. Cut ties with, in a way : UNFRIENDED
80. Best : IDEAL
81. Law school class : TORTS
85. Whom "I saw" on a seesaw, in a tongue twister : ESAU
88. Peter Pan rival : JIF
89. Ring master : ALI
90. Play : RECREATE
91. One-named hitmaker of the 1950s-'60s : DION
92. Word with two apostrophes : I’D’VE
94. Leading : AHEAD OF
95. Pasta whose name is Italian for "feathers" : PENNE
98. Sale tag abbr. : IRR
101. "Speed" star : REEVES
102. ___ bean : FAVA
103. Make secret : ENCODE
104. "Where to Invade Next" filmmaker : MOORE
108. Letters of invitation? : BYOB
109. 1914 battle site : YSER
111. Desires : YENS
113. Comparable (to) : AKIN
114. Golf's Champagne Tony : LEMA
116. City and province of southern Italy : BARI
117. Anatomical sac : CYST
119. Composer of the Windows 95 start-up sound : ENO
120. Some offensive linemen: Abbr. : RTS
121. "___ sport!" : BE A
122. New York engineering sch. : RPI
123. ___ Aviv : TEL


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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