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0501-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 May 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano & Byron Walden
THEME: Stellar Work … in each of today’s themed clues, we replace an asterisk with the word STAR:
22A. *Z, for one : CABLE CHANNEL (Starz, for one)
38A. *Board : RIGHT SIDE (Starboard)
42A. *Alliance member : UNITED AIRLINES (Star Alliance member)
60A. *Ted talks, say : BROKERED A SETTLEMENT (Started talks, say)
87A. *Crossed pair : ROMEO AND JULIET (Star-crossed pair)
89A. *Search party : ED MCMAHON (Star Search party)
110A. *Let's hope : ACTING CAREER (Starlet’s hope)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Grass and such : FORAGE
“Forage” is another word for “fodder”, food used for domestic animals.

7. Lifesavers, e.g. : TORI
A torus (plural “tori”) is a shape resembling a doughnut.

22. *Z, for one : CABLE CHANNEL (Starz, for one)
The Starz premium cable channel is owned by the same company that owns the Encore cable channel. Starz was launched in 1994 and mainly shows movies.

24. Behind : DERRIERE
“Derrière” is a French term meaning “back part, rear”.

25. "O grave, where is ___ victory?": I Corinthians : THY
The seventh and eighth books of the New Testament are the First and Second Epistles to the Corinthians.

26. Neither wizards nor witches, in Harry Potter books : MUGGLES
In the world of “Harry Potter”, a “muggle” is someone born without any magical ability, and who wasn’t born into the magical world. There is also a “Squib”, who is someone born to magical parents but who has no magical abilities.

28. Language descended from Old Norse : FAROESE
The Faroe Islands (also Faeroe Islands) are a group of islands lying halfway between Scotland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are part of the Kingdom of Denmark and were granted the power of self-governance in 1948.

31. Subject of the 1954 Nobel Prize in Medicine : POLIO
The 1954 Nobel Prize in Medicine was a awarded to John Franklin Enders, Frederick Chapman Robbins and Thomas Huckle Weller “for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue".

34. God whose name sounds like a word meaning "understated" : LOKI
“Loki” sounds like “low-key”.

Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki is bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then his wife must empty the venom onto Loki when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing results in what we poor mortals experience as earthquakes.

38. *Board : RIGHT SIDE (Starboard)
The “starboard” side of a ship is her right side, a term that comes from the Old English “steobord” meaning “side on which a vessel was steered”. Apparently, old Germanic peoples constructed boats that were habitually propelled and steered by a paddle on the right side.

42. *Alliance member : UNITED AIRLINES (Star Alliance member)
The Star Alliance was the airline industry's first code-sharing alliance, created in 1997. The American founding representative was United Airlines. The other four members of that first alliance were SAS, Thai Airways, Air Canada, and Lufthansa.

46. They may result in title changes, for short : TKOS
Technical knockout (TKO)

47. Dips made with olives, capers and anchovies : TAPENADES
The dish known as tapenade is traditionally made from olives, capers, anchovies and olive oil. The name comes from the Provençal word for capers, "tapenas".

48. Fragrant wood : CEDAR
Cedar is used for the manufacture of some wardrobes and chests as it has long been believed that the fragrant oil in the wood is a moth-repellent. However, whether or not cedar oil is actually effective at keeping moths away seems to be in doubt.

50. Grain to crush : GRIST
When grain has been separated from its chaff, to prepare it for grinding, it is called "grist". Indeed, the word "grist" is derived from the word "grind". Grist can be ground into a relatively coarse meal, or into a fine flour. The names can be confusing though. For example, the grist from maize when ground to a coarse consistency is called "grits", and when ground to a fine consistency is called "corn meal". There is an idiomatic phrase “grist for one’s mill”, meaning something used to one’s advantage.

52. Government org. in "Breaking Bad" : DEA
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973 while President Nixon was in office.

“Breaking Bad” is a crime drama series that originally aired on AMC from 2008 to 2013. The show was created by Vince Gilligan who had spent many years as producer and writer of “The X-Files”. There is a “Breaking Bad” spin-off show running on AMC called “Better Call Saul” that focuses on the life of lawyer Saul Goodman. I hear that it’s pretty good ...

56. Hundred, in Honduras : CIENTO
Honduras is a Central American country that used to be known as Spanish Honduras, in order to differentiate it from British Honduras that is now called Belize. “Honduras” is the Spanish word for “the depths”, which is probably a reference to deep coastal waters.

68. Reebok rival : PUMA
Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term "roe buck".

69. Texas city in the movie "Friday Night Lights" : ODESSA
The city of Odessa, Texas has as its symbol the jack rabbit. This is because from the thirties through the seventies the city hosted a rodeo for roping rabbits. The Humane Society applied pressure and the city did away with the tradition in 1977.

“Friday Night Lights” is a TV series about a high school football team in Texas. The television show was inspired by the book “Friday Night Lights: A Town, A Team, and a Dream”, as well as the 2004 movie based on the book.

70. Bonn one : EIN
After WWII, Bonn was chosen as the capital of West Germany, a choice promoted by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer who was from the area. After German reunification, the capital was moved to Berlin.

72. Pro-consumer ideology : NADERISM
Consumer and political activist Ralph Nader first came to the public’s attention with the publication of his 1965 book “Unsafe at Any Speed”, which criticized the safety record of American-made automobiles. Nader also ran five times as candidate for US President, starting as a write-in candidate in 1992.

77. Jet fuel, mainly : KEROSENE
Kerosene is a mixture of hydrocarbons that is used mainly as a fuel. Kerosene is volatile, but is less flammable than gasoline. Back in the British Isles, we call the same fuel “paraffin”.

82. Stave off : AVERT
The word "stave" was originally the plural of "staff", a wooden rod. To "stave off" originated with the concept of holding off with a staff. In the world of barrel-making, a stave is a narrow strip of wood that forms part of a barrel’s sides.

86. Red giant in the constellation Cetus : MIRA
Mira is a red giant star in the constellation Cetus. Red giants are very large stars with a relatively low mass. The atmosphere of a red giant is also very inflated and extends a long way into space so the surface of that atmosphere that we see is relatively cool, which gives it a red color. Stars are classified by their spectral characteristics, basically the color of the light they emit. As such, red giants are classified as M stars. Cool red giants are of a color beyond the usual range, and are classified as S stars.

87. *Crossed pair : ROMEO AND JULIET (Star-crossed pair)
Two lovers who are “star-crossed” are ill-fated, thwarted by the stars. The term was coined by William Shakespeare in the prologue to his play “Romeo and Juliet”.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes,
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life

89. *Search party : ED MCMAHON (Star Search party)
“Star Search” is a TV show hosted by Ed McMahon that ran from 1983 to 1995. It was a an audition show and an opportunity for performers in many genres of entertainment get themselves seen. Included in the list of “Star Search” competitors who later made it into the big time are:
- Adam Sandler
- Beyoncé
- Brad Garrett
- Christina Aguilera
- Drew Carey
- Justin Timberlake
- Rosie O’Donnell
- Sharon Stone
- Usher

93. Drainage pit : SUMP
A "sump" has been a "pit to collect water" since the middle of the 17th century. Prior to that, a sump was a marsh or a morass.

97. Browns and Blues : TEAMS
The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted nor sent a team to the Super Bowl.

The St. Louis Blues hockey team takes its name from the song "St. Louis Blues", a jazz and popular music classic.

99. "House Hunters" network : HGTV
HGTV first went on air in 1994, as the “Home, Lawn and Garden Channel”. The name was shortened (the lawn was dropped) soon after, but nowadays it’s just known as HGTV.

102. Bromine and fluorine compounds : HALIDES
A halide is a chemical compound in which one of the elements is a halogen.

The halogens are a group of elements in the periodic table consisting of fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine and astatine. The term “halogen” was the name that was originally proposed for chlorine when it was first discovered. When it was passed over in favor of chlorine, the name “halogen” was given to the group of elements to which chlorine belonged.

114. Group with the 1985 #1 hit "Broken Wings" : MR MISTER
Mr. Mister was a pop rock group that was big in the eighties. The band took its name from the record "Mr. Gone" by the Weather Report. The band used to make fun of the song calling it "Mister This", "Mister That" and eventually "Mr. Mister".

116. Eyelike opening, in architecture : OCULUS
Oculus (plural “oculi”) is the Latin word for "eye", and is used in architecture for a circular window.

119. "Great" Eurasian region : STEPPE
The Eurasian Steppe (also “Great Steppe”) is a huge grassland ecosystem stretching across Europe and Asia from Moldavia in the west to Manchuria in the east.

Down
2. Home of the daily World-Herald : OMAHA
Omaha is the largest city in the state of Nebraska. It is located on the Missouri River, about 10 miles north of the mouth of the Platte River When Nebraska was still a territory Omaha was its capital, but when Nebraska achieved statehood the capital was moved to the city of Lincoln.

3. Clicker for Dorothy : RUBY SLIPPER
In the 1939 movie “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy arrives in the Land of Oz after her farmhouse is swept up in a cyclone. The farmhouse comes to ground and kills the Wicked Witch of the East. The Wicked Witch of the West arrives to claim the magical ruby slippers worn by the Wicked Witch Witch of the East. The Good Witch of the North steps in and gives the ruby slippers to Dorothy instead.

6. Abbr. that can be written with an ampersand : ETC
Back in the day, when reciting the alphabet it was common to emphasize that some letters could be used as a word in itself. One would say “A per se A, B, C, D … I per se I, J, K, L … denoting that the letters A and I are also their own words. It was common to add the & symbol at the end of the recitation, as if it were a 27th letter. So the alphabet ended with “X, Y, Z, & (and) per se and”. This “and per se and” statement was slurred to “ampersand”, giving the name that we use today for the & symbol.

7. The casino in "Casino" : TANGIERS
“Casino” is a 1995 Martin Scorsese film. One of the movie’s stars is Robert De Niro, someone who collaborated with Scorsese in eight films in all, "Casino" being the last. The Tangiers Hotel in the movie was actually the Stardust Resort and Casino, which operated in Las Vegas from 1958 until 2006.

10. Goldbrick : IDLER
A goldbrick is someone, especially a soldier, who lies down on the job, someone who shirks his or her responsibilities. "Goldbrick" arose as slang during WWII, initially meaning “to swindle, cheat”. This was a play on the old confidence trick of selling fake gold bricks.

11. The Pentagon inits. : DOD
Department of Defense (DOD)

The incredible building known as the Pentagon was built during WWII, and dedicated on January 15, 1943. It is the largest office building in the world (by floor space) covering an area of about 6.5 million square feet. As it was built during the war years, a major requirement was that it use a minimum amount of steel. So the steel shortage dictated that the building be no more than four stories in height, covering an awful lot of real estate.

13. "___ of Heaven! too gentle to be human" (line from Shelley's "Epipsychidion") : SERAPH
“Epipsychidion” is an 1821 poetic work by Percy Bysshe Shelley, that had the subtitle “Verses addressed to the noble and unfortunate Lady, Emilia V--, now imprisoned in the convent of --.” In reality, the work is addressed to Countess Teresa Viviani, the 19-year-old daughter of the governor of Pisa who was placed in the Convent of Saint Anna by her father. Shelly had visited the young woman at the convent several times before writing the poem.

14. Unlofty loft : GARRET
A garret is a room on the top floor of a house, under a gabled roof. “Garret” can be another word for an attic.

16. Pirate's mate, in literature and film : SMEE
In J. M. Barrie's play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook's pirates and is Hook's right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being "Irish" and "a man who stabbed without offence". Nice guy! Captain Hook and Smee sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

18. German vice admiral killed in W.W. I's Battle of the Falklands : SPEE
The Battle of the Falkland Islands was an engagement in 1914 between the British Royal Navy and the Imperial German Navy. The battle started with an attempt to raid the British base at Stanley in the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic. The raiding squadron was under the command of Admiral Maximilian von Spee. The raid was repulsed by a large British force that had arrived in Stanley just the day before. By the end of the engagement, the British forces suffered relatively few casualties, whereas the German forces had been decimated. Included in the list of dead were Admiral Spee and his two sons.

20. Celtic who was the M.V.P. of the 2008 N.B.A. Finals : PAUL PIERCE
Professional basketball player Paul Pierce is from Oakland, California whose nickname is “the Truth”, a moniker given to him by Shaquille O’Neal in 2001.

23. Kaiser Permanente offering : HMO
Kaiser Permanente is a health maintenance organization (HMO) based in Oakland, California. Kaiser is the largest provider of managed care in the whole country.

30. W, for one : HOTEL
The W chain of hotels is luxury brand owned by Starwood. Aimed at a younger market, the W properties feature modern, minimalist decor. There’s also a “trendy” use of the letter W throughout the hotels. For example, the pool is called “the Wet”, the laundry bag in each is “the Wash” and the concierge goes by the name “Whatever Whenever”.

31. March 14, to math lovers : PI DAY
The first three digits of the mathematical constant “pi” are 3.14, so “Pi Day” is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) every year since 1988 when it was inaugurated at the San Francisco Exploratorium. In countries where the day is usually written before the month, Pi Day is July 22nd, reflecting the more accurate approximation of pi as 22/7. Interestingly, March 14th is also Albert Einstein's birthday.

33. Fibonacci or Galileo : PISAN
Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t "discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo's proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

35. Casino offering, derived from the Latin for "five each" : KENO
The name "Keno" has French or Latin roots, with the French "quine" being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin "quini" meaning "five each". The game originated in China and was introduced into the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

41. "Cómo ___ usted?" : ESTA
"¿Cómo está usted?" is the more formal way of asking, "How are you?" in Spanish.

42. Sch. whose mascot is Paydirt Pete : UTEP
The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) was founded in 1914, originally as the Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy. To this day there is a mine shaft on the campus, and the mascot of the school’s sports teams is Paydirt Pete, a prospector from the mining industry. The teams are also known as the UTEP Miners and Lady Miners.

43. Coastal desert of southern Africa : NAMIB
The Namib Desert is in Namibia, as one might expect, and and also stretches into part of Angola. It is thought to be the oldest desert in the world, having been arid for over 55 million years.

50. Wheat ___ : GERM
The germ of a cereal (like wheat and oat) is the reproductive part that germinates and grows into a new plant. A whole grain has three main parts:
- the germ, the source of the new plant
- the endosperm, the energy store of carbohydrate and protein for initial growth
- the bran, protective outer shell

62. Novelist Vonnegut : KURT
Kurt Vonnegut was an writer from Indianapolis whose most famous work is probably the novel “Slaughterhouse-Five” from 1969. The inspiration for the book was the time he spent in the US Army in WWII. After being captured during the Battle of the Bulge, Vonnegut was held as a prisoner of war in Dresden. Many of his fellow prisoners were killed during the 1945 firebombing of Dresden, but he and others survived by sheltering in an underground meat locker that had been converted to a detention facility. The Germans called the meat locker “Schlachthof Fünf”, which translates to “Slaughterhouse Five”.

63. Big Four record co. that broke up in 2012 : EMI
The Big Four recording labels were (until EMI was broken up in 2012 and absorbed by what became “the Big Three”):
1. Universal Music Group
2. Sony Music Entertainment
3. Warner Music Group
4. EMI

71. Classic hair removal brand : NEET
The hair removal product "Neet" was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as "Immac". Today it is sold under the name "Veet".

73. Gung-ho : AVID
"Kung ho" is a Chinese expression meaning "work together, cooperate". The anglicized version "gung ho" was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

78. Posting at JFK or DFW : ETD
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

The Idlewild Golf Course was taken over by the city of New York in 1943 and construction started on a new airport to serve the metropolis and relieve congestion at La Guardia. The Idlewild name still persists, even though the airport was named after Major General Alexander E. Anderson from the first days of the project. When the facility started operating in 1948 it was known as New York International Airport, Anderson Field. It was renamed to John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in 1963, one month after the President was assassinated.

Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (DFW) is the largest hub for American Airlines, and is also the third busiest airport in the world in terms of aircraft landings and takeoffs (Chicago O’Hare is the world’s busiest, followed by Atlanta).

79. Eastern royals : RAJAS
“Raja” (also “rajah”) is word derived from Sanskrit that is used particularly in India for a monarch or princely ruler. The female form is “rani” (also “ranee”) and is used for a raja’s wife.

81. Pause word in Psalms : SELAH
“Selah” is a word that appears commonly in the Book of Psalms in the Bible. Apparently the exact meaning of the word is unclear, but it is used as an instruction in reading or singing the text.

84. Scam with three cards : MONTE
Three-card Monte is a confidence trick in which someone is goaded into betting money on the assumption that he or she can find the “money card” (usually a queen) among three cards placed face down. The “mark” who is being duped has all sorts of ways to lose and there are usually several people in on the scam, including others playing who seem to be winning.

91. Latin carol word : ADESTE
The lovely hymn "Adeste Fideles" (translated from Latin as "O Come, All Ye Faithful") was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time.

92. Prynne of "The Scarlet Letter" : HESTER
Hester Prynne is the main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel "The Scarlet Letter". When Hester is convicted by her puritanical neighbors of the crime of adultery, she is forced to wear a scarlet "A" (for “adultery”) on her clothing for the rest of her life, hence the novel's title, "The Scarlet Letter".

98. "Charlie's Angels" director, 2000 : MCG
Film director Joseph McGinty Nichol is known simply as “McG”. The nickname “McG” was given to him by his mother, to avoid confusion with his uncle and grandfather who also were named Joseph. McG directed the 2000 film “Charlie’s Angels” and the 2003 sequel “Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle”.

101. One of 1,288 in the book of Numbers : VERSE
The Book of Numbers in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles relates much of the journey of Moses and the Israelites from Egypt to the promised land. The title comes from the numbering of the people that is described in the beginning of the book.

104. ___ Linda, Calif. : LOMA
Loma Linda is a city in California located not far from Los Angeles. The name Loma Linda translates from Spanish as “Beautiful Hill”.

106. ___-deucy : ACEY
Acey-deucy is a fast-played variant of backgammon. Apparently the game has been a favorite with members of the armed forces since the days of WWI.

109. Some 112-Down retakers: Abbr. : SRS
(112D. Exam with a Science Reasoning section : ACT)
Senior (sr.)

111. Tan neighbor, on calculators : COS
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent. For example, the arctangent can be read as “What angle is equivalent to the following ratio of opposite over adjacent?”

112. Exam with a Science Reasoning section : ACT
ACT is an abbreviation for American College Testing. The ACT is an entrance exam used by many universities. It has four sections, English, Reading, Math and Science, and an optional 30-minute essay.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Grass and such : FORAGE
7. Lifesavers, e.g. : TORI
11. Turns off : DISGUSTS
19. Source of good fortune : AMULET
20. Tried to open, as a pet door : PAWED
21. Seaman's aid : OCEAN MAP
22. *Z, for one : CABLE CHANNEL (Starz, for one)
24. Behind : DERRIERE
25. "O grave, where is ___ victory?": I Corinthians : THY
26. Neither wizards nor witches, in Harry Potter books : MUGGLES
28. Language descended from Old Norse : FAROESE
29. Tiara accompaniment : SASH
31. Subject of the 1954 Nobel Prize in Medicine : POLIO
32. Eagerly unwrap : RIP OPEN
34. God whose name sounds like a word meaning "understated" : LOKI
36. Take its toll? : PEAL
38. *Board : RIGHT SIDE (Starboard)
42. *Alliance member : UNITED AIRLINES (Star Alliance member)
46. They may result in title changes, for short : TKOS
47. Dips made with olives, capers and anchovies : TAPENADES
48. Fragrant wood : CEDAR
50. Grain to crush : GRIST
51. Background check runner, maybe : EMPLOYER
52. Government org. in "Breaking Bad" : DEA
53. "Oh, that's clever!" : NICE IDEA!
55. Something to be divvied up : PIE
56. Hundred, in Honduras : CIENTO
59. Stand in the shadows : LURK
60. *Ted talks, say : BROKERED A SETTLEMENT (Started talks, say)
68. Reebok rival : PUMA
69. Texas city in the movie "Friday Night Lights" : ODESSA
70. Bonn one : EIN
72. Pro-consumer ideology : NADERISM
76. In back : AFT
77. Jet fuel, mainly : KEROSENE
82. Stave off : AVERT
83. Good friend, informally : HOMIE
85. Find some advantage : GET AN EDGE
86. Red giant in the constellation Cetus : MIRA
87. *Crossed pair : ROMEO AND JULIET (Star-crossed pair)
89. *Search party : ED MCMAHON (Star Search party)
93. Drainage pit : SUMP
94. ___ example : AS AN
95. Owl's prey : RODENTS
97. Browns and Blues : TEAMS
99. "House Hunters" network : HGTV
102. Bromine and fluorine compounds : HALIDES
105. Kind of band : ELASTIC
107. Move it : HIE
108. Boastful types : EGOTISTS
110. *Let's hope : ACTING CAREER (Starlet’s hope)
114. Group with the 1985 #1 hit "Broken Wings" : MR MISTER
115. "___ about right" : SEEMS
116. Eyelike opening, in architecture : OCULUS
117. Ones breaking game rules? : POACHERS
118. Big buildup : HYPE
119. "Great" Eurasian region : STEPPE

Down
1. Almanac fodder : FACTS
2. Home of the daily World-Herald : OMAHA
3. Clicker for Dorothy : RUBY SLIPPER
4. Tie word : ALL
5. "Well, fancy that!" : GEE!
6. Abbr. that can be written with an ampersand : ETC
7. The casino in "Casino" : TANGIERS
8. Soccer goof : OWN GOAL
9. Kite adjunct : REEL
10. Goldbrick : IDLER
11. The Pentagon inits. : DOD
12. Crystalline weather phenomenon : ICE FOG
13. "___ of Heaven! too gentle to be human" (line from Shelley's "Epipsychidion") : SERAPH
14. Unlofty loft : GARRET
15. Labor pain : UNION STRIKE
16. Pirate's mate, in literature and film : SMEE
17. Besmirches : TARS
18. German vice admiral killed in W.W. I's Battle of the Falklands : SPEE
20. Celtic who was the M.V.P. of the 2008 N.B.A. Finals : PAUL PIERCE
23. Kaiser Permanente offering : HMO
27. Begat : SIRED
30. W, for one : HOTEL
31. March 14, to math lovers : PI DAY
33. Fibonacci or Galileo : PISAN
35. Casino offering, derived from the Latin for "five each" : KENO
37. Revenue source for Fish and Wildlife departments : LICENSE FEES
39. Jocular disclaimer : I KID
40. Spoonful, say : DOSE
41. "Cómo ___ usted?" : ESTA
42. Sch. whose mascot is Paydirt Pete : UTEP
43. Coastal desert of southern Africa : NAMIB
44. Fruity drink : ADE
45. Tops in handwriting, say : NEATEST
49. Small stream : RILL
50. Wheat ___ : GERM
52. What sharpshooters take : DEAD AIM
54. Prompt : CUE
57. Vow that's mostly vowels : I DO
58. When golden goals happen in the N.H.L. : OTS
61. Arts page contributor : OPERA CRITIC
62. Novelist Vonnegut : KURT
63. Big Four record co. that broke up in 2012 : EMI
64. Headlong or headstrong : RASH
65. Striven : TAKEN PAINS
66. What rugged individualists seldom admit to : NEEDING HELP
67. Light shade : TINGE
71. Classic hair removal brand : NEET
72. Reputation : NAME
73. Gung-ho : AVID
74. Skin: Suffix : -DERM
75. Numbskull : MORON
78. Posting at JFK or DFW : ETD
79. Eastern royals : RAJAS
80. Heavy load : ONUS
81. Pause word in Psalms : SELAH
84. Scam with three cards : MONTE
85. Information on a sports ticket : GAME TIME
88. Exceed : OUTSTEP
90. Fashionable : MODISH
91. Latin carol word : ADESTE
92. Prynne of "The Scarlet Letter" : HESTER
96. Question mark's key-mate : SLASH
98. "Charlie's Angels" director, 2000 : MCG
100. Keep occupied : TIE UP
101. One of 1,288 in the book of Numbers : VERSE
102. Biodiesel fuel source : HEMP
103. Prefix with ecology or chemical : AGRO-
104. ___ Linda, Calif. : LOMA
106. ___-deucy : ACEY
109. Some 112-Down retakers: Abbr. : SRS
111. Tan neighbor, on calculators : COS
112. Exam with a Science Reasoning section : ACT
113. Wish undone : RUE


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0430-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 16, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Mark Diehl
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 78m 45s!!!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Signs of life : ANKHS
The ankh was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character for "eternal life". The ankh wasn't just used in inscriptions but was often fashioned into amulets and as surrounds for mirrors (perhaps symbolizing a view into another world). The ankh is also known as “the key of the Nile” and “crux ansata” (Latin for “cross with a handle”).

15. Paper pusher? : STATIONER
“Stationery” is a noun describing writing materials and office supplies, items that are sold by a stationer. Centuries ago, a stationer was someone who sold goods from a shop or a “station”, from a fixed, stationary stall.

17. 1998 Spike Lee film : HE GOT GAME
“He Got Game” is a movie written and directed by Spike Lee, released in 1998. It is a sports drama about a high school basketball player, with a father in prison played by Denzel Washington.

18. Sunflowerlike flower : OXEYE
Oxeyes are in the daisy family of plants.

19. Royal name in ancient Egypt : AMENHOTEP
There were four pharaohs of Ancient Egypt with the name Amenhotep. The name “Amenhotep: translates as “Amun is satisfied”.

20. The Rosetta Stone, for one : STELE
Stelae (singular “stele” or “stela”) were used all over the world, sometimes as territorial markers and sometimes to commemorate military victories. In later times stelae were commonly erected as commemorative markers in graveyards or other religious sites.

Rosetta is a coastal city and port on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt. The Rosetta Stone is an Ancient Egyptian artifact of tremendous importance in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics. Carvings on the stone are actually three translations of the same passage of prose, one in Egyptian hieroglyphics, one in Egyptian Demotic language, and one in classical Greek. The stone was discovered by the French military during Napoleon's 1798 campaign in Egypt. Before the French could get it back to France, the stone somehow ended up in enemy hands (the British), so it is now on display in the British Museum. Ownership of the stone is very much in dispute. The French want it, and understandably, the Egyptians would like it back.

21. Engineer's home, for short : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

25. Caribbean port : PONCE
Ponce is the second largest city in Puerto Rico. The famous conquistador Juan Ponce de Leon first landed on the island in 1508, with Spanish settlers following soon after. Among the earliest settlers was Juan Ponce de Leon's great-grandson, Juan Ponce de León y Loayza. The great-grandson was politically savvy and was instrumental in getting a royal permit to establish the settlement that became today's Ponce. Ponce is named after Juan Ponce de Leon y Loayza rather than his more famous great-grandfather.

29. Pantheon member : JOVE
Jupiter, also known as Jove, was the king of the gods in the Roman tradition, as well as the god of sky and thunder. He was the Roman equivalent to the Greek god Zeus.

The Pantheon in Rome was built as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome. Even though the Pantheon was built almost two thousand years ago, the dome at its center remains the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome.

32. Key employer in England? : GAOLER
Both “jail” and “gaol” are pronounced the same way, mean the same thing and are rooted in the same Latin word for “cave”. The spelling “gaol” is seen quite often in the UK, although it is gradually being replaced with “jail”. The “gaol” spelling has Norman roots and tends to be used in Britain in more formal documentation.

37. Advance men? : MASHERS
"Masher" is a slang term for a man who makes persistent and unwelcome advances to women.

38. "The Miseducation of ___ Hill" (1998 Grammy-winning album) : LAURYN
Lauryn Hill is a singer-songwriter from South Orange, New Jersey who is best known as a member of the band called the Fugees (from 1994 to 1996). Off stage, Hill is known for having five children with Rohan Marley, the son of reggae icon Bob Marley. She was also in the public eye in 2010 when she served 3 months in jail for tax evasion.

39. Allen of Hollywood : KAREN
The actress Karen Allen is best known for playing Marion Ravenwood in the “Indiana Jones” series of films, opposite Harrison Ford in the title role. Some might remember her film debut, in the madcap 1978 comedy “National Lampoon’s Animal House”. Off screen, she loves knitting and has her own textile company called Karen Allen Fiber Arts. And, she also teaches yoga!

40. Moscato bianco grape product : ASTI
Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. It is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine. Moscato d'Asti is produced from the same grape (Moscato Bianco) but is a much sweeter wine with a lower alcohol content. It is usually served as a dessert wine.

43. City across the border from Eilat : AQABA
The coastal city of Aqaba is the only seaport in the country of Jordan. The city lies at the very northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba, which is off the Red Sea.

47. Max. 3,333,360, in Pac-Man : PTS
Points (pts.)

The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero "Paku", known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

48. Game also called Five in a Row : GOBANG
Gomoku (also called “Gobang” and “Five in a Row”) is a strategy game played on a board or with pencil and paper. The game originated in Japan, and the name “Gomoku” translates as “five pieces”. It sounds like tic-tac-toe but with the goal to get five of one player’s marks/pieces in a row.

50. What three of California's four largest cities share : SAN
California’s largest cities, by population, are:
1. Los Angeles
2. San Diego
3. San Jose
4. San Francisco

51. Common name for a chimp : JOCKO
“Jocko” is a West African name for a chimpanzee.

61. Upset : DYSPEPSIA
The prefix “dys-” comes from the Greek for “bad”. Example of the use of the prefix would be: dyslexia (bad + word), dyspepsia (bad + digested).

Down
1. Key that's oxymoronic at school? : F-SHARP
The word "oxymoron" is in itself an oxymoron, as it is derived from the Greek words "Oxys" and "moros" meaning "sharp" and "stupid".

2. At the original speed, musically : A TEMPO
“A tempo” is a Italian for “in time”. The phrase is used on a musical score to instruct a performer to return to the main tempo of the piece, perhaps after slowing down or speeding up.

4. "A Yank at ___" (Mickey Rooney film) : ETON
"A Yank at Eton" was released in 1942, and is a sequel to the 1938 comedy "A Yank at Oxford". The film had some use as "propaganda" as the movie's message was that "Yanks" and "Limeys" could get along. This was helpful as American forces were pouring into the UK in preparation for the invasion of Europe during WWII.

8. Fearsome foes : NEMESES
Nemesis was a Greek goddess, the goddess of retribution. Her role was to make pay those individuals who were either haughty or arrogant. In modern parlance, one's nemesis (plural “nemeses”) is one's sworn enemy, often someone who is the exact opposite in character but someone who still shares some important characteristics. A nemesis is often someone one cannot seem to beat in competition.

9. Bone-boring tool : TREPAN
A trepan is a boring tool used to sink mineshafts.

13. Grammy-winning LL Cool J song that starts "I've been watching you from afar for as long as I can remember" : HEY LOVER
Rap star LL Cool J was born James Todd Smith. Smith’s stage name stands for "Ladies Love Cool James".

23. Longtime Indiana senator defeated in 2012 : LUGAR
Richard "Dick" Lugar served as Republican Senator representing Indiana in the US Congress from 1977 to 2013. He was the ranking member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and is noted for his work to dismantle existing weapons of mass destruction all around the world.

26. Mediterranean vacation spot : CAPRI
The island of Capri off the coast of Southern Italy has been a tourist resort since the days of ancient Rome. Capri is home to the famous Blue Grotto, a sea cave that is illuminated with sunlight that's colored blue as it passes through the seawater into the cave. Natives of Capri are known as Capriotes.

27. "Men always hate most what they ___ most": H. L. Mencken : ENVY
H. L. Mencken was a journalist and essayist from Baltimore. Mencken reported on the Scopes trial of 1925 and was the writer who dubbed it the “Monkey Trial”.

29. Public figure? : JOHN Q
We sometimes use the term “John Q. Public” for the man in the street, the common man. The original John Q. Public was a cartoon character created by Vaughn Shoemaker for the “Chicago Daily News”.

31. "Whatever Lola Wants," e.g. : TANGO
"Whatever Lola Wants" is a song from the musical "Damn Yankees". "Damn Yankees" is actually yet another version of the classic German legend of "Faust", set in Washington, D.C. in the fifties. The show was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, a production that turned out to be a very successful follow-up to their prior hit, "The Pajama Game". The future was looking really rosy for Adler and Ross but, sadly, Jerry Ross died of an obstructive lung disease only a few weeks after "Damn Yankees" opened on Broadway in 1955. He was just 29 years old.

34. Raucous card game : SLAPJACK
Slapjack is a children’s card game. Players alternately turn up cards on a pile until a jack is seen, at which point all players rush to slap a hand over the pile.

37. Alternators in some internal-combustion engines : MAGNETOS
A magneto is an electric generator that produces an alternating current, and as such can be classified as an alternator. Hand-cranked magnetos were used in old telephone systems to create a ringing signal at the other end of the line. Magnetos are also used in some gas engines to produce current for the spark plug, for example in lawnmowers and chainsaws.

39. Acts of a scalawag : KNAVERY
We've been using "knave" to mean a cad since about 1200, and as an alternative name for the jack in a deck of cards since the mid-1500s. "Knave" comes from the Old English word "cnafa", a "boy, male servant".

The American word "scalawag" meaning “rogue” was originally borrowed as a nickname for southern white people who supported reconstruction after the Civil War.

44. The Golden Horde, e.g. : ASIANS
The Golden Horde was a group of Mongols who ruled over what is now Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Moldova and the Caucasus, from the 1240s until 1502. It has been suggested that the name of the group derives from the yellow tents used by the rulers of the Golden Horde. And, the Golden Horde’s influence and rule led to the term “horde” entering the English language, via many languages spoken in Slavic Eastern Europe.

45. War cry : BANZAI!
During WWII the Japanese infantry when making mass assaults would often yell out "Banzai!", a shout of courage, and encouragement, as they ran into enemy fire. These mass assaults became known by the Allied soldiers as "banzai attacks". The term "banzai" is not limited to use in times of war, but is used like a toast wishing long life, as "banzai" translates into "ten thousand years".

46. First name in European politics : ANGELA
The formidable politician Angela Merkel is the current Chancellor of Germany, the country's head of state. Merkel is the first female German Chancellor and when she chaired the G8 in 2007 she became only the second woman to do so, after the UK’s Margaret Thatcher. Merkel grew up in East Germany under Communist rule.

52. Herbal stress reliever from Polynesia : KAVA
Kava is a plant found in the western Pacific. Its roots are used to make an intoxicating drink also called kava, which acts as a sedative.

54. "___ Baby" (song from "Hair") : ABIE
The full name of the famed stage show from the sixties is "Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical". This controversial work outraged many when it was first performed in the sixties as it attacked many aspects of life at the time. For example, the song "Air" is a satirical look at pollution, sung by a character who comes onto the stage wearing a gas mask. The opening lines are "Welcome, sulfur dioxide. Hello carbon monoxide. The air ... is everywhere". I’ve never had the chance to see “Hair” in a live production, but it’s on “the bucket list” ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Result of a bad trip : FACE PLANT
10. Signs of life : ANKHS
15. Paper pusher? : STATIONER
16. What some people do to vows : RENEW
17. 1998 Spike Lee film : HE GOT GAME
18. Sunflowerlike flower : OXEYE
19. Royal name in ancient Egypt : AMENHOTEP
20. The Rosetta Stone, for one : STELE
21. Engineer's home, for short : RPI
22. "I'm not buying it" : NO SALE
24. Small vault : HOP
25. Caribbean port : PONCE
28. Choices, choices : MENU
29. Pantheon member : JOVE
30. They cast no votes : ANTIS
32. Key employer in England? : GAOLER
34. Woodworker's device, informally : SHOP VAC
37. Advance men? : MASHERS
38. "The Miseducation of ___ Hill" (1998 Grammy-winning album) : LAURYN
39. Allen of Hollywood : KAREN
40. Moscato bianco grape product : ASTI
41. Ring : GANG
43. City across the border from Eilat : AQABA
47. Max. 3,333,360, in Pac-Man : PTS
48. Game also called Five in a Row : GOBANG
50. What three of California's four largest cities share : SAN
51. Common name for a chimp : JOCKO
53. Doing mean work? : AVERAGING
56. Very loud : AROAR
57. Light : SET ABLAZE
58. Teacher's implementation : CURVE
59. Affected by wind or water, say : EROSIONAL
60. Massage : KNEAD
61. Upset : DYSPEPSIA

Down
1. Key that's oxymoronic at school? : F-SHARP
2. At the original speed, musically : A TEMPO
3. Entrap : CAGE IN
4. "A Yank at ___" (Mickey Rooney film) : ETON
5. Substance : PITH
6. Gain access, in a way : LOG ON
7. Body-related : ANATOMIC
8. Fearsome foes : NEMESES
9. Bone-boring tool : TREPAN
10. Stopped lying : AROSE
11. Almost up : NEXT
12. Desk feature : KNEEHOLE
13. Grammy-winning LL Cool J song that starts "I've been watching you from afar for as long as I can remember" : HEY LOVER
14. They clean up well : SWEEPERS
23. Longtime Indiana senator defeated in 2012 : LUGAR
26. Mediterranean vacation spot : CAPRI
27. "Men always hate most what they ___ most": H. L. Mencken : ENVY
29. Public figure? : JOHN Q
31. "Whatever Lola Wants," e.g. : TANGO
33. No longer tied up, say : ASEA
34. Raucous card game : SLAPJACK
35. Really must go : HAS TO RUN
36. Best at play : OUTSCORE
37. Alternators in some internal-combustion engines : MAGNETOS
39. Acts of a scalawag : KNAVERY
42. Put down : ABASED
44. The Golden Horde, e.g. : ASIANS
45. War cry : BANZAI!
46. First name in European politics : ANGELA
48. Ran through : GORED
49. Get a handle on : GRASP
52. Herbal stress reliever from Polynesia : KAVA
54. "___ Baby" (song from "Hair") : ABIE
55. Unappealing bowlful : GLOP


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0429-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew Kingsley
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Graveyard hour : FIVE AM
Work days are routinely three shifts:
- Day/1st shift
- Swing/2nd shift
- Night/graveyard/3rd shift

7. Dark as dark can be : JET-BLACK
The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

15. Nova Scotia, once : ACADIA
The great explorer Verrazzano gave the name "Arcadia" to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The "Arcadia" name quickly evolved into the word "Acadia" that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word "Acadian" was "Cajun", giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

19. Haggis ingredient : SUET
Fat, when extracted from the carcass of an animal, is called "suet". Untreated suet decomposes at room temperature quite easily so it has to be "rendered" or purified to make it stable. Rendered fat from pigs is what we call "lard". Rendered beef or mutton fat is known as "tallow".

Haggis is the national dish of Scotland. It is savory pudding made from the heart, liver and lungs of a sheep, mixed with onion, oatmeal, suet and spices. The pudding was originally cooked in the sheep’s stomach but these days is usually prepared in a sausage casing.

20. "What's hangin'?" : SUP
I think “sup” is slang for “what’s up?”

22. Ursule, e.g.: Abbr. : STE
“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a female.

Saint Ursula is a saint in the Christian Church. What is known about Ursula’s life comes from legend, which describes her as a virgin martyr who was executed in Cologne sometime before the 5th century CE.

26. Old radio dummy : SNERD
Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen's most famous character was Charlie McCarthy, but Bergen also worked with Mortimer Snerd.

27. Squeaker in a cage : HAMSTER WHEEL
The rodents known as hamsters are commonly kept as house pets. Male hamsters are called bucks, females are called does, and baby hamsters are known as pups.

30. City on the Oka River : OREL
Orel (also Oryol) is a city lying on the Oka River, just over 200 miles SSW of Moscow. Orel was one of the cities occupied by Germany during WWII. It was liberated in 1943, but had been almost completely destroyed.

31. Arles article : LES
The definite article in French can be “le” (with masculine nouns), “la” (with feminine nouns), and “les” (with plurals of either gender).

Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city's design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous "Cafe Terrace at Night", as well as "Bedroom in Arles".

32. Lucky strike : TROVE
The term “treasure trove” comes from the Anglo-French “tresor trové “ meaning “found treasure”.

35. Result of holding or hooking : PENALTY
Both hooking and holding are penalties in ice hockey.

37. Shot-putter's activity : HEAVING
Shot put, or events like shot put, have been around for millennia, but the first events that truly resemble today's track and field event had to come with the invention of the cannonball. Soldiers would "putt" (throw) cannonballs as far as possible in attempts to outperform each other. Shot put has been in the modern Olympic Games since day-one, with an American winning the gold in the first games in 1896, one Robert Garrett.

39. Latin word on a diploma : SUMMA
When an academic degree is awarded, a level of distinction can be noted depending on the degree of success achieved by the student. There are three types of honor, each with a Latin name:
- cum laude: meaning "with honor" (literally "with praise")
- magna cum laude: meaning "with great honor"
- summa cum laude: meaning "with highest honor"

41. Conclusion lead-in : ERGO
"Ergo" is the Latin word for "hence, therefore".

42. Tropical smoothie flavor : PASSION FRUIT
Passion fruit is a vine species of passion flower. It is grown mainly for juice, although the fruit can be eaten is if is allowed to dehydrate a little to enhance the sweetness.

45. Double-dipping, e.g. : TABOO
Double-dipping a chip into salsa, say, is considered taboo in polite circles.

49. ___ Balls : SNO
The Hostess cakes called Sno Balls are usually pink in color, although in its original form each packet of two cakes contained one white and one pink. Around Halloween you can buy Sno Balls in the form of Scary Cakes and Glo Balls that are colored orange and green. and on St. Paddy's Day there's a green one available. Yoo hoo!

50. Healing helper : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

51. Show that's earned more than 40 Emmys, in brief : SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

56. Sonnet-ending unit : TERCET
A tercet is a group of three connected lines of poetry.

A sonnet is a short poem with varying rhyming schemes but always with 14 lines. The sonnet form has been around at least since the 13th century. The Shakespearean sonnet is composed of three quatrains (4 lines) and a final couplet (2 lines). The Petrarchan sonnet comprises two quatrains (4 lines) followed by two tercets (3 lines).

58. 72 of its 108 lines end in "-ore" sounds : THE RAVEN
"The Raven" is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student's bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven's shadow and shall be lifted "nevermore" …

59. "The Evangelist" of Christianity : ST MARK
Mark the Evangelist was the author of the Gospel of Mark and the founder of the Church of Alexandria in Egypt.

Down
4. "Desperate Housewives" housewife : EDIE
Edie Williams is a character on television’s “Desperate Housewives” played by Nicollette Sheridan. Edie has had a few marriages as the “Desperate Housewives” storyline progressed. Edie Williams was formerly Edie Britt, Edie McLain and Edie Rothwell.

6. Questel who voiced Olive Oyl : MAE
Mae Questel was an actress and voice artist who was most famous for voicing the cartoon characters Betty Boop and Olive Oyl.

7. Fitting gifts for puzzle enthusiasts? : JIGSAWS
The original jigsaw puzzles were created by painting a picture on a sheet of wood and then cutting the picture into small pieces using a jigsaw, hence the name. Today, almost all jigsaw puzzles are pictures glued onto cardboard. The puzzle pieces are then die-cut, and there’s no jigsaw involved at all.

8. "Uncle!" : ENOUGH!
To "say uncle" is an American expression meaning to submit or yield. Its usage dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how "uncle!" came to mean "stop!"

9. Too much, to Marcel : TROP
"Trop" is the French word for "too", in the sense of "too much" for example (i.e. not in the sense of "also").

11. Valentino type : LATIN LOVER
Rudolph Valentino was an Italian actor who emigrated to the US when he was 18 years old. He developed a Hollywood career in silent movies that propelled him to the status of sex symbol in the twenties. Valentino died very young, having being admitted to hospital with appendicitis and gastric ulcers. He underwent surgery and developed peritonitis, and passed away when he was only 31 years old.

12. Fourth-wall breaker : ASIDE
In the theater world, the fourth wall is the imaginary was at the front of the stage through which the audience experiences the action. When a character acknowledges the existence of the audience, perhaps by addressing them, he or she is said to have broken the fourth wall.

13. Star on the horizon? : COMER
A “comer” is a rising star, someone with a promising career.

24. Symbols of change, in math : DELTAS
Delta is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet. We are most familiar with an upper-case delta and its distinctive triangular shape. The letter’s shape has influenced terms such as “deltoid muscle” and “river delta”. The upper-case delta is also used in mathematics and science to indicate a change in value. The lower-case delta looks a bit like our lower-case D, and indeed the Greek letter delta gave us our Latin letter D.

25. Shot from behind the arc, informally : TREY
In basketball, a shot from “behind the arc” is taken from outside the three-point line.

26. Shot putter's supply? : SERA
A nurse might be “putting” a shot into one’s arm containing serum (plural “sera”).

28. Grist for a war of words? : SLAM POETRY
A poetry slam is a competition in which poets read their own work (usually), with winners being chosen by members of audience. Apparently the first poetry slam took place in Chicago in 1984. Now there is a Nation Poetry Slam that takes place each year, with representatives from the US, Canada and France.

When grain has been separated from its chaff, to prepare it for grinding, it is called "grist". Indeed, the word "grist" is derived from the word "grind". Grist can be ground into a relatively coarse meal, or into a fine flour. The names can be confusing though. For example, the grist from maize when ground to a coarse consistency is called "grits", and when ground to a fine consistency is called "corn meal". There is an idiomatic phrase “grist for one’s mill”, meaning something used to one’s advantage.

33. It often catches an infection : VIRUS SCAN
A computer virus has characteristics very similar to a virus found in nature. It is a small computer program that can copy itself and can infect another host (computer).

36. "OMG, I'm cracking up!" : LMAO
Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

40. First country in the world with universal suffrage (1906) : FINLAND
“Universal suffrage” today is said to exist when all citizens have the right to vote, regardless of race, sex, belief, wealth or social status. That said, the term has been used differently in times past, and in particular in the context of universal suffrage for me. There is some debate about which nation was the first to achieve universal suffrage. New Zealand opened up voting to all citizens regardless of sex in 1893, however, women did not have the right to stand for election at that time. Finland is another contender for the “first universal suffrage” moniker, having achieved that status in 1906.

43. Product of natural outdoor steeping : SUN TEA
Sun tea is tea that is made simply by dropping tea into water and letting it “brew” in the sun for a few hours, then adding ice. A blog reader has kindly pointed out that he was told by a doctor that sun tea has the potential to be dangerous. The sun-warmed brew is warm enough and sits long enough to incubate any bacterial contamination that may be present. I think I'll stick to my regular iced tea that is speedily brewed at high temperature ...

46. Warm welcome? : ALOHA
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

53. Pistolet ou canon : ARME
In French, a “pistolet ou canon” (pistol or gun) is an “arme” (weapon).

55. "God, home and country" org. : DAR
In order to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), an applicant has to prove that she is a descendant of someone closely associated with, and supportive of, the American Revolution. The DAR maintains an online database of Revolutionary War patriots. The database is searchable, and is known as the Patriot Index.

56. Literary monogram : TSE
The author T. S. Eliot was the son of Henry Ware Eliot and Charlotte Champe Stearns, so his full name was Thomas Stearns Eliot (TSE).

57. Fight call, for short : TKO
Technical knockout (TKO)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Graveyard hour : FIVE AM
7. Dark as dark can be : JET-BLACK
15. Nova Scotia, once : ACADIA
16. Not excessively : IN REASON
17. A ghostwriter isn't given one : BYLINE
18. Ball : GOOD TIME
19. Haggis ingredient : SUET
20. "What's hangin'?" : SUP
21. It comes to a head : IDEA
22. Ursule, e.g.: Abbr. : STE
23. Means of tracking wildlife : ID TAG
26. Old radio dummy : SNERD
27. Squeaker in a cage : HAMSTER WHEEL
30. City on the Oka River : OREL
31. Arles article : LES
32. Lucky strike : TROVE
35. Result of holding or hooking : PENALTY
37. Shot-putter's activity : HEAVING
39. Latin word on a diploma : SUMMA
40. Dedicated to : FOR
41. Conclusion lead-in : ERGO
42. Tropical smoothie flavor : PASSION FRUIT
45. Double-dipping, e.g. : TABOO
48. Answering to : UNDER
49. ___ Balls : SNO
50. Healing helper : ALOE
51. Show that's earned more than 40 Emmys, in brief : SNL
52. Lack of anxiety : EASE
54. Spreadsheet function : SORT DATA
56. Sonnet-ending unit : TERCET
58. 72 of its 108 lines end in "-ore" sounds : THE RAVEN
59. "The Evangelist" of Christianity : ST MARK
60. Book that doesn't require much time or thought : EASY READ
61. "But still ..." : EVEN SO …

Down
1. Dynamite : FAB
2. Hostile looks : ICY STARES
3. A 99¢ burger may be on it : VALUE MENU
4. "Desperate Housewives" housewife : EDIE
5. Slangy "True, no?" : AIN'T IT?
6. Questel who voiced Olive Oyl : MAE
7. Fitting gifts for puzzle enthusiasts? : JIGSAWS
8. "Uncle!" : ENOUGH!
9. Too much, to Marcel : TROP
10. See 38-Down : … BED
11. Valentino type : LATIN LOVER
12. Fourth-wall breaker : ASIDE
13. Star on the horizon? : COMER
14. Work digitally? : KNEAD
22. Fill time at an airport, say : SHOP
24. Symbols of change, in math : DELTAS
25. Shot from behind the arc, informally : TREY
26. Shot putter's supply? : SERA
28. Grist for a war of words? : SLAM POETRY
29. Ageless, ages ago : ETERNE
33. It often catches an infection : VIRUS SCAN
34. Rail heads : ENGINEERS
36. "OMG, I'm cracking up!" : LMAO
37. Place for a stove light : HOOD
38. With 10-Down, turn in : GO TO ...
40. First country in the world with universal suffrage (1906) : FINLAND
43. Product of natural outdoor steeping : SUN TEA
44. Onetime motel come-on : FREE TV
45. Refinement : TASTE
46. Warm welcome? : ALOHA
47. Snoozers : BORES
51. Relief pitcher's success : SAVE
53. Pistolet ou canon : ARME
55. "God, home and country" org. : DAR
56. Literary monogram : TSE
57. Fight call, for short : TKO


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0428-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 16, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Kurt Krauss
THEME: Compass Rose … the center square in today’s grid is filled with a compass rose. This is a hint that there’s some directional trickery required to solve. The answers in the WEST of the grid are written in a westerly direction, from right to left. The answers in the NORTH of the grid are written in a northerly direction, from bottom to top. The answers in the EAST and SOUTH of the grid are written normally, as the easterly and southerly directions correspond to the normal way of entering across- and down-answers. Additionally, we have four answers starting with WEST, EAST, NORTH AND SOUTH in the appropriate positions in the grid:
34A. London theater district : WEST END
38A. Inventor of roll film : EASTMAN
6D. Arctic gale : NORTHER
43D. Contemporary of Wordsworth and Coleridge : SOUTHEY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. 50s president : GRANT
Ulysses S. Grant had been a career soldier when he was elected as the 18th president of the US, and had risen to commander of all the Union armies by the end of the Civil War. Grant served two terms as president, and also made a failed bid for a third term. Grant’s reputation was tarnished by his apparent tolerance of corruption in his administration. On the other hand, Grant worked hard to protect African Americans during Reconstruction after the Civil War, and pursued peaceful relations with Native Americans.

President Ulysses S. Grant appears on the obverse of the US fifty-dollar bill. There have been two unsuccessful attempts in recent years in Congress to have President Grant’s image replaced with that of President Ronald Reagan.

6. Rappeller's need : ROPE
What we call “rappelling” in this country is known as “abseiling” in the rest of the world (from the German “abseilen” meaning “to rope down”).

10. Foot, to Flavius : PES
“Pes” is Latin for “foot”.

13. Goldfinger's first name : AURIC
“Goldfinger” is the Ian Fleming’s seventh James Bond novel, first published in 1959. Fleming was in the habit of naming his characters after people in the real world. The novel’s colorful antagonist Auric Goldfinger was named after Hungarian-born British architect Ernő Goldfinger.

14. French assembly : SENAT
In French, the “Parlement français” (French parliament) is divided into the “Sénat” (Senate) and the “Assemblée nationale” (National Assembly).

16. "Return of the Jedi" villain : JABBA
Jabba the Hutt is the big blob of an alien that appears in the "Star Wars" movie "The Return of the Jedi". Jabba's claim to fame is that he enslaved Princess Leia and kitted her out in that celebrated metal bikini.

19. Big brass : TUBAS
The tuba is the lowest pitched of all the brass instruments, and one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra (usually there is just one tuba included in an orchestral line-up). "Tuba" is the Latin word for "trumpet, horn". Oom-pah-pah ...

21. Online identity : AVATAR
The Sanskrit word "avatar" describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It's easy to see how in the world of "online presences" one might use the word avatar to describe one's online identity.

26. Writer Calvino : ITALO
As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn't very popular in the US nor in Britain.

27. With 17-Across, reference book for a writer : ROGET’S
(17A. See 27-Across : THESAURUS)
Peter Mark Roget was an English lexicographer. Roget was an avid maker of lists, apparently using the routine of list-making to combat depression, a condition he endured for most of his life. He published his famous thesaurus in 1852, with revisions and expansions being made years later by his son, and then in turn by his grandson.

30. Duke, e.g.: Abbr. : SCH
Duke University was founded in 1838 as Brown’s Schoolhouse. The school was renamed to Trinity College in 1859, and to this day the town where the college was located back then is known as Trinity, in honor of the school. The school was moved in 1892 to Durham, North Carolina in part due to generous donations from the wealthy tobacco industrialist Washington Duke. Duke’s donation required that the school open its doors to women, placing them on an equal footing with men. Trinity’s name was changed to Duke in 1924 in recognition of the generosity of the Duke family.

31. Morlock victims, in science fiction : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called "The Time Machine", there are two races that the hero encounter in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet's surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

34. London theater district : WEST END
The West End of London is part of the central area of the city that contains many tourist attractions and in particular a large number of theaters. The West End of London is also home to the most expensive office space in the world.

38. Inventor of roll film : EASTMAN
George Eastman founded the Eastman Kodak Company, named after the Kodak camera that he had invented four years earlier. He came up with the name of Kodak after careful consideration. Firstly he was a big fan of the letter "K", calling it "strong, incisive". He also wanted a word that was short, easy to pronounce and difficult to mispronounce, and a word that was clearly unique with no prior associations. "Kodak" fit the bill.

48. Cleveland Browns great Graham : OTTO
Otto Graham was not only a professional football player for the Cleveland Browns, but he also played professional basketball for the Rochester Royals (now the Sacramento Kings).

49. Manhattan eatery since 1927 : SARDI’S
Sardi’s is a renowned restaurant in the Theater District of Manhattan that was opened in 1927 by Italian immigrant Vincent Sardi, Sr. Sardi’s is famous for attracting celebrities who pose for caricatures that are then displayed on the restaurant’s walls. After the death of actress and director Antoinette Perry in 1946, her friend and partner Brock Pemberton was having lunch at Sardi’s and came up with idea of a theater award that could be presented in Perry’s honor. The award was to be called the Tony Award.

51. Resentment : PIQUE
Our term "pique" meaning a "fit of ill feeling" is a French word meaning a "prick, sting, irritation".

53. Subway entrance : TURNSTILE
A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping. The derivative term “turnstile” describes a revolving structure in a wall or fence that allows the controlled passage of people.

58. Annual department store event : WHITE SALE
The first white sale took place in January of 1878 in a Philadelphia department store. It was called a white sale because it was only bed linens (which were all white) that were discounted. Over time, white sales have evolved to include almost any household items.

64. Asian holiday : TET
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning "Feast of the First Morning", with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

66. Ones in cocoons : PUPAE
The pupa is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are: embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

68. Topiary trees : YEWS
Topiary is the practice of training and clipping perennial plants into clearly defined shapes.

69. Word on an old gas pump : ETHYL
The Ethyl Corporation produced the controversial anti-knock fuel additive known as Ethyl, actually tetra-ethyl lead (and we are still living with the consequences).

Down
3. Hidden means of support? : BRA
The word "brassière" is French in origin, but it isn't the word the French use for a "bra". In France what we call a bra is known as a "soutien-gorge", translating to "held under the neck". The word "brassière" is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby's undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. "Brassière" comes from the Old French word for an "arm protector" in a military uniform ("bras" is the French for "arm"). Later "brassière" came to mean "breastplate" and from there the word was used for a type of woman's corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

4. Extinct creature with armored spikes on its back : STEGOSAUR
The stegosaur was a very large, plant-eating dinosaur that grew to a length of up to 40 feet. Stegosaurs relied on spikes and plates of “armor” on the back and tail for defense.

5. Bingeing : ON A JAG
The word "jag" is used to describe periods of unrestrained activity, particularly involving alcohol, and has been in use since the 1800s.

6. Arctic gale : NORTHER
A “norther” is a strong cold wind that suddenly blows in from the north.

7. Brian of ambient music : ENO
Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the “ambient” genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks somewhat inventively: 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

10. Persian ruler : SATRAP
"Satrap" is an old Persian word for a provincial governor. In modern usage in English, a satrap is a world leader who is heavily influenced by a superior power.

11. Artist Monet : CLAUDE
Claude Monet painted the harbor of Le Havre in the north of France in 1872, giving it the title "Impression, Sunrise". The painting is not a "realistic" representation of the scene in front of him, hence the name "impression". It was this very painting that gave rise to the name of the Impressionist movement, and earned Monet the title of Father of Impressionism.

12. Power measures, informally : HORSES
The unit of horsepower was introduced along with the steam engine, where the output of the engine was compared with the power of draft horses. Largely, this comparison with the horse was a marketing ploy, as the intent was to demonstrate that one steam engine could negate the need for a number of draft horses used for work.

18. Sigma follower : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

22. Frisbee, e.g. : DISC
The Frisbee phenomenon started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

24. He, for one: Abbr. : ELEM
Helium is the chemical element with the atomic number 2 and the element symbol “He”. Helium is a gas, and lighter than air. It is the second-most abundant element in the universe (after hydrogen). Helium was first detected in 1868 as an unknown yellow spectral line during a solar eclipse. As such, the gas was named for “Helios”, the Greek god of the Sun.

29. Santa ___ : ANA
Santa Ana is the county seat of Orange County, California and takes its name from the Santa Ana River that runs through the city.

36. Pond young 'un : EFT
Newts wouldn't be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

37. Katarina ___, two-time Olympic gold-medalist skater : WITT
Katarina Witt is a retired figure skater who represented her homeland of East Germany, winning Olympic golds in 1984 and 1988. After the reunification of Germany, Witt gained access to the files held on her by the East German secret police. Her file contained 3,000 pages of information about her life since she was eight years old.

40. Seed covering : ARIL
The casing surrounding many seeds is called the aril, and it may be quite fleshy. This fruit-like characteristic makes it desirable as a food and aids in the dispersion of the seeds.

41. Inits. at 11 Wall Street : NYSE
The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement. Today, the NYSE is located in National Historic Landmark building with the address 11 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

43. Contemporary of Wordsworth and Coleridge : SOUTHEY
Robert Southey was perhaps the least well-known of the three main Lake Poets, the others being William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The Lake Poets were a group of Romantic poets who lived in the Lake District of northern England in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Southey was also a prolific biographer, publishing books about the lives of John Bunyan, Oliver Cromwell, Horatio Nelson and other. He was England’s Poet Laureate for three decades, until his death in 1843.

46. Gable part : BUTLER
The actor Clark Gable was the leading man in so many great movies, the most famous of which is probably 1939’s “Gone with the Wind” portraying Rhett Butler. My personal favorite of his films is 1934’s “It Happened One Night”, for which he won the Best Actor Oscar. Gable enlisted in the US Army Air Corps in 1942 and flew five combat missions from England, for which he was awarded the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross.

49. TV home of "Weekend Update," in brief : SNL
“Weekend Update” is the longest-running of any recurring sketch on “Saturday Night Live”. In fact, the segment made its debut on the very first show, back in 1975. The first “anchor” at the “Weekend Update” was Chevy Chase.

52. Runner of many Apple devices : IOS
iOS is what Apple now call their mobile operating system, previously known as iPhone OS.

61. Nascar stat, for short : MPH
Miles per hour (mph)

The acronym NASCAR stands for the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing. NASCAR is very, very popular and commands the second largest television audience of any professional sport in America, second only to football.

63. Daughter of Loki : HEL
Hel is a being from Norse Mythology who presides over a realm that is also called Hel. The underworld of Hel receives many of the dead, and the term “go to Hel” is used in Norse accounts to mean “to die”.

Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki is bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then his wife must empty the venom onto Loki when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing results in what we poor mortals experience as earthquakes.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 50s president : GRANT
6. Rappeller's need : ROPE
10. Foot, to Flavius : PES
13. Goldfinger's first name : AURIC
14. French assembly : SENAT
15. Stand buy : ADE
16. "Return of the Jedi" villain : JABBA
17. See 27-Across : THESAURUS
19. Big brass : TUBAS
21. Online identity : AVATAR
22. Like some office furniture : ERGONOMIC
26. Writer Calvino : ITALO
27. With 17-Across, reference book for a writer : ROGET’S
28. Like the heads of many hairbrushes : OVAL
30. Duke, e.g.: Abbr. : SCH
31. Morlock victims, in science fiction : ELOI
32. Spoilers? : NANAS
34. London theater district : WEST END
38. Inventor of roll film : EASTMAN
42. Sorts (through) : SIFTS
44. Very light : AIRY
45. Go out : EBB
48. Cleveland Browns great Graham : OTTO
49. Manhattan eatery since 1927 : SARDI’S
51. Resentment : PIQUE
53. Subway entrance : TURNSTILE
55. Teakettle parts : SPOUTS
57. Peals : TOLLS
58. Annual department store event : WHITE SALE
60. Zip : OOMPH
64. Asian holiday : TET
65. Cut off : SEVER
66. Ones in cocoons : PUPAE
67. Oral hesitations : ERS
68. Topiary trees : YEWS
69. Word on an old gas pump : ETHYL

Down
1. Perform : ACT
2. Laundry container : BIN
3. Hidden means of support? : BRA
4. Extinct creature with armored spikes on its back : STEGOSAUR
5. Bingeing : ON A JAG
6. Arctic gale : NORTHER
7. Brian of ambient music : ENO
8. "Now!" : ASAP!
9. Show real eagerness : SALIVATE
10. Persian ruler : SATRAP
11. Artist Monet : CLAUDE
12. Power measures, informally : HORSES
14. Fortitude : GUTS
18. Sigma follower : TAU
20. Rip off : ROB
22. Frisbee, e.g. : DISC
23. Cry of innocence : NOT I!
24. He, for one: Abbr. : ELEM
25. Overhang : EAVE
29. Santa ___ : ANA
33. Commences : STARTS OUT
35. Plugs : STOPPERS
36. Pond young 'un : EFT
37. Katarina ___, two-time Olympic gold-medalist skater : WITT
39. Skirt style : MIDI
40. Seed covering : ARIL
41. Inits. at 11 Wall Street : NYSE
43. Contemporary of Wordsworth and Coleridge : SOUTHEY
45. Attacks from all sides : BESETS
46. Gable part : BUTLER
47. Think of as the same : EQUATE
49. TV home of "Weekend Update," in brief : SNL
50. Slanting : ASLOPE
52. Runner of many Apple devices : IOS
54. Spats : ROWS
56. Worry : STEW
59. "___ got it" : I’VE
61. Nascar stat, for short : MPH
62. Remit : PAY
63. Daughter of Loki : HEL


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0427-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Apr 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Stillman
THEME: (Fe)Male Authors … today’s themed answers are male pen names used by female authors:
17A. Pen name of the female author of "Wuthering Heights" : ELLIS BELL
23A. Pen name of the female author of "Out of Africa" : ISAK DINESEN
39A. Pen name of the female author of "The Cuckoo's Calling" : ROBERT GALBRAITH
49A. Pen name of the female author of "Silas Marner" : GEORGE ELIOT
61A. Pen name of the female author of True Detective stories : ANDY STACK
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 9m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Grand Canyon, notably : CHASM
The Grand Canyon is in Arizona. The canyon continues to be carved out of layers of rock by the Colorado River. The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and over a mile deep.

6. Muesli morsel : OAT
"Muesli" is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. “Muesli” is a diminutive of the German word “Mues” meaning “puree”. Delicious ...

14. Three-line work : HAIKU
A haiku is a very elegant form of Japanese verse. When writing a haiku in English we tend to impose the rule that the verse must contain 17 syllables. This restriction comes from the rule in Japanese that the verse must contain 17 sound units called "moras", but moras and syllables aren't the same thing. What the difference is though, is not so clear to me. Here’s a rather humorous example of a Haiku:
Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don't make sense
Refrigerator

15. Mid-11th century year : MLI
The year 1051 is written “MLI” in Roman numerals.

17. Pen name of the female author of "Wuthering Heights" : ELLIS BELL
“Wuthering Heights” is the only novel written by Emily Brontë, one that she published using the pen name Ellis Bell. “Wuthering Heights” was published in December of 1847, a date chosen to take advantage of the wave of success enjoyed by Charlotte Brontë’s “Jane Eyre” that had been published just two months earlier.

19. Tiniest bit : MINIM
“Minim” and “jot” are terms used to describe a small portion.

21. Body of agua : LAGO
In Spanish, “un lago” (a lake) contains “agua” (water).

22. Rome's Via ___ : VENETO
Via Veneto is (actually “Via Vittorio Veneto”) is an upmarket street in Rome, the site of many of the pricier hotels. It was made famous in Federico Fellini's "La Dolce Vita", and is still the home to Harry's Bar and Café de Paris, both featured in the movie.

23. Pen name of the female author of "Out of Africa" : ISAK DINESEN
Isak Dinesen was the pen name of the Danish author Baroness Karen Blixen. Blixen's most famous title by far is “Out of Africa”, her account of the time she spent living in Kenya.

34. Has a yen (for) : ACHES
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

39. Pen name of the female author of "The Cuckoo's Calling" : ROBERT GALBRAITH
Joanne Rowling changed her name to J. K. Rowling at the request of her publisher, who believed that young boys might have shied away from reading the first "Harry Potter" book if they believed the story was written by a woman (this was 1997!). "Jo" Rowling chose J for Joanne, and K for Kathleen after her grandmother (Jo has no middle name to use). Rowling also writes books for adults, using the pen name Robert Galbraith.

“The Cuckoo's Calling” is the first in a series of crime novels written by J. K. Rowling using the pen name Robert Galbraith. The author’s name was kept secret on initial release, and sales were unremarkable. After Galbraith was “unmasked”, sales surged and within weeks “The Cuckoo’s Calling” was the top seller on Amazon.com. I haven’t yet read the book, but the critics have been generally enthusiastic.

43. Terrier of old whodunits : ASTA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb "The Thin Man" series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called "Skippy". Skippy was also the dog in "Bringing up Baby" with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of "The Thin Man" films.

44. Attorney general parodied by Ferrell : RENO
Janet Reno was Attorney General of the US from 1993 to 2001. Reno was the person to hold the office second longest, and was our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Thereafter she retired from public life.

While appearing on “Saturday Night Live”, comedian Will Ferrell was noted for several impersonations, including President George W. Bush, Neil Diamond, James Lipton, Ted Kennedy and Janet Reno.

45. It's a "gift" : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

47. Coarse-toothed tool : RIPSAW
In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special ripsaw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

49. Pen name of the female author of "Silas Marner" : GEORGE ELIOT
George Eliot was the pen name of English novelist Mary Anne Evans. As one might think, Evans chose a male pen name in order that her work might be best appreciated in the Victorian era. Eliot wrote seven novels including “Adam Bede” (1859), “The Mill on the Floss” (1860), “Silas Marner” (1861) and “Middlemarch” (1871-72).

"Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe" is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There's an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

56. Fashion editor Wintour : ANNA
Anna Wintour is fashion editor in Britain, and is also the editor-in-chief of American "Vogue". Lauren Weisberger wrote the book "The Devil Wears Prada" with the tyrannical main character apparently based on Wintour.

60. Inner self, to Jung : ANIMA
The concepts of anima and animus is found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male there resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

61. Pen name of the female author of True Detective stories : ANDY STACK
Ann Rule is a true-crime writer, who comes from a crime-fighting family with sheriffs, a medical examiner and a prosecutor around her as she grew up. She started off writing with a male pen name (Andy Stack) as it was perceived that she would have more success in the genre, after a virtual "sex change".

65. Wispy clouds : CIRRI
Cirrus (plural “cirri”) clouds are those lovely wispy, white strands that are often called "mare's tails".

66. Cash in Baja : PESOS
The coin called a “peso” is used in many Spanish-speaking countries around the world. The coin originated in Spain where the word “peso” means “weight”. The original peso was what we know in English as a “piece of eight”, a silver coin of a specific weight that had a nominal value of eight “reales”.

Baja California is both the most northern and the most western of the Mexican states. The name translates from Spanish as “Lower California”.

67. Traditional dog name : REX
“Rex” is Latin for king.

68. 15-Across, e.g. : ANNUM
(15A. Mid-11th century year : MLI)
The Latin word for year is “annus”. We often see it used in Latin phrases, but usually with a different spelling. For example in “anno Domini”, the “anno” is the ablative case of “annus” as the phrase means “in the year of the Lord”. Another example is “per annum”, in which “annum” is the accusative case as the literal translation of the phrase is “during the year”.

Down
1. "Big Brother" host Julie : CHEN
As well as co-anchoring "The Early Show", Julie Chen has been host of the American version of "Big Brother" since it graced our screens in the year 2000.

The “Big Brother” television franchise started out in 1999 in the Netherlands. The term “Big Brother” comes from George Orwell’s novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four”.

2. Prop at a Christmas play : HALO
The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo”, used for a radiant light depicted above the head of a saintly person.

5. Five Pillars adherent : MUSLIM
Followers of the Muslim tradition believe in the Five Pillars of Islam, five obligatory acts that underpin Muslim life. The Five Pillars are:
- The Islamic creed
- Daily prayer
- Almsgiving
- Fasting during the month of Ramadan
- The pilgrimage to Mecca (haj) once during a lifetime

6. Last in a series : OMEGA
Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet, and is the one that looks like a horseshoe. The word "omega" literally means "great O" (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron meaning "little O" (O-micron).

10. Dior dress style : A-LINE
Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

18. Hound variety : BASSET
The Basset Hound wouldn’t be my favorite breed of dog, to be honest. Basset Hounds have a great sense of smell with an ability to track a scent that is second only to that of the Bloodhound. The name “Basset” comes from the French word for “rather low”, a reference to the dog’s short legs.

26. God with a bow : EROS
Eros, the Greek god of love, was also known as Amor.

27. "Mine!," in a schoolyard : DIBS
The phrase “to have dibs on” expresses a claim on something. Apparently, the term “dibs” is a contraction of “dibstone”, which was a knucklebone or jack used in a children’s game.

33. Carrier with a Copenhagen hub : SAS
SAS was formerly known as Scandinavian Airlines System and is the flag carrier of three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. SAS is based at Stockholm Arlanda Airport located just north of the Swedish capital.

Copenhagen is the largest city and the capital of Denmark. I have never visited Copenhagen, but I hear it is a wonderful metropolis with a marvelous quality of life. The city is also very environmentally friendly, with over a third of its population commuting to work by bicycle.

35. Be a kvetch : CARP
The word "carp" used to mean simply "talk" back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian "karpa" meaning "to brag". A century later the Latin word "carpere" meaning "to slander" influenced the use of "carp" so that it came to mean "find fault with".

The word "kvetch" comes to us from Yiddish, with "kvetshn" meaning "to complain" or "squeeze".

37. Volcano in Catania : ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-guage railway, and two ski resorts.

Catania is the second largest city on the island of Sicily (after Palermo). Catania has a long and rich cultural history, and today is best known as a center for technology industries earning it the nickname of the "European Silicon Valley".

40. Wimbledon court surface : RYEGRASS
Wimbledon is a suburb of London located in the southwest of the metropolis. Wimbledon translates from Old English as “Wynnman’s Hill”, with “dun” being an archaic word for “hill”. And, the district is home to the All England Club where the Wimbledon tennis championships are played each year.

46. Hill V.I.P.: Abbr. : SEN
Senator (sen.)

48. Lake that's the source of the Mississippi : ITASCA
The Mississippi River runs right through the Midwest. It originates in Lake Itasca, Minnesota and flows into the Gulf of Mexico about a hundred miles below New Orleans. The name Mississippi is a corruption of a Native American name "misi-ziibi", meaning "Great River".

50. Counting-off word : EENIE
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

51. Articles that are sometimes prewritten : OBITS
"Obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

53. Tilter's tool : LANCE
Tilting is the most recognized form of jousting. Jousting can involve the use of a number of different weapons, but when lances are used the competition is called "tilting". Jousting took place in a roped-off enclosure that was called the lists, or list field. In later medieval times, some castles and palaces had purpose-built "tiltyards" that were used for jousting. Do you remember where the Beach Volleyball events were held in the 2012 London Olympics? Well that was Horse Guards Parade, the former tiltyard for the Palace of Whitehall that was used in the time of King Henry VIII.

58. Shade of raw linen : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word "ecru" comes from French and means "raw, unbleached". "Ecru" has the same roots as our word "crude".

62. Pewter, mostly : TIN
Pewter is a relatively soft alloy that is made up mostly of tin, with some copper, antimony, bismuth and lead.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Grand Canyon, notably : CHASM
6. Muesli morsel : OAT
9. Acceded, informally : CAVED
14. Three-line work : HAIKU
15. Mid-11th century year : MLI
16. Still in the running : ALIVE
17. Pen name of the female author of "Wuthering Heights" : ELLIS BELL
19. Tiniest bit : MINIM
20. Denials : NOS
21. Body of agua : LAGO
22. Rome's Via ___ : VENETO
23. Pen name of the female author of "Out of Africa" : ISAK DINESEN
25. Makes hazy : BEDIMS
29. Tiny : WEE
30. Not getting much rain : ARID
31. Bed of roses, so to speak : EASE
34. Has a yen (for) : ACHES
39. Pen name of the female author of "The Cuckoo's Calling" : ROBERT GALBRAITH
42. Written contest entry, say : ESSAY
43. Terrier of old whodunits : ASTA
44. Attorney general parodied by Ferrell : RENO
45. It's a "gift" : ESP
47. Coarse-toothed tool : RIPSAW
49. Pen name of the female author of "Silas Marner" : GEORGE ELIOT
55. Having new energy : REBORN
56. Fashion editor Wintour : ANNA
57. Affirmative : YES
60. Inner self, to Jung : ANIMA
61. Pen name of the female author of True Detective stories : ANDY STACK
63. Travel guide listings : SITES
64. Cryophobe's fear : ICE
65. Wispy clouds : CIRRI
66. Cash in Baja : PESOS
67. Traditional dog name : REX
68. 15-Across, e.g. : ANNUM

Down
1. "Big Brother" host Julie : CHEN
2. Prop at a Christmas play : HALO
3. Has a bug : AILS
4. Boot attachment : SKI
5. Five Pillars adherent : MUSLIM
6. Last in a series : OMEGA
7. "No problem here" : ALL OK
8. Up to, informally : ‘TIL
9. Approached : CAME NEAR
10. Dior dress style : A-LINE
11. Trellis climbers : VINES
12. Party notice that lands in your inbox : E-VITE
13. Possessive spirit : DEMON
18. Hound variety : BASSET
22. Go head-to-head : VIE
24. Spoke at length about, with "on" : DWELT
25. Unpainted, say : BARE
26. God with a bow : EROS
27. "Mine!," in a schoolyard : DIBS
28. What comes to mind : IDEA
32. Visibly awed : AGAPE
33. Carrier with a Copenhagen hub : SAS
35. Be a kvetch : CARP
36. Hotfoots it, old-style : HIES
37. Volcano in Catania : ETNA
38. Gallery event : SHOW
40. Wimbledon court surface : RYEGRASS
41. Noble's domain : BARONY
46. Hill V.I.P.: Abbr. : SEN
48. Lake that's the source of the Mississippi : ITASCA
49. Get, as a point : GRASP
50. Counting-off word : EENIE
51. Articles that are sometimes prewritten : OBITS
52. Womanizer : ROMEO
53. Tilter's tool : LANCE
54. Reference book feature : INDEX
57. Story you can hardly believe : YARN
58. Shade of raw linen : ECRU
59. Take off the top : SKIM
61. Word before gun or guitar : AIR
62. Pewter, mostly : TIN


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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